Rs 0.790 Treaty Of 27 January 1967 On The Principles Governing The Activities Of States In Exploration And Use Of Outer Space, Including The Moon And Other Celestial Bodies

Original Language Title: RS 0.790 Traité du 27 janvier 1967 sur les principes régissant les activités des Etats en matière d’exploration et d’utilisation de l’espace extra-atmosphérique, y compris la lune et les autres corps célestes

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0.790 text original Treaty on principles governing the activities of States in the exploration and use of the outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies concluded on January 27, 1967, signed by Switzerland on January 27, 1967, approved by the Federal Assembly on October 2, 1969 in Washington, Moscow and London Instrument of ratification deposited by the Switzerland on December 18, 1969, entered into force for the Switzerland on 18 December 1969 (State on 27 January 2010) for States parties to this Treaty, if inspiring vast prospects offered to humanity because of the discovery of outer man-made space, recognizing the interest that shows to all mankind the progress of exploration and utilization of outer peaceful space, believing that the exploration and utilization of outer space should be carried out for the good of all peoples regardless of the stage of their economic or scientific development to contribute to the development of broad international cooperation regarding the scientific aspects, also although legal exploration and utilization of outer peaceful space, believing that such cooperation will help develop mutual understanding and consolidate the friendship between States and between peoples , Recalling resolution 1962 (XVIII), entitled "Declaration of legal principles governing the activities of States in exploration and use of outer space", that the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted unanimously on 13 December 1963, recalling resolution 1884 (XVIII), which calls upon States to refrain from putting into orbit around the Earth objects carrying nuclear weapons or any other kinds of weapons of mass destruction and to install such weapons on celestial bodies , resolution of the UN General Assembly adopted unanimously on October 17, 1963, holding account of the resolution 110 (II) of the General Assembly of the United Nations as of November 3, 1947, resolution which condemns propaganda designed or likely to provoke or encourage any threat to peace, any breach of the peace or any act of aggression , and whereas this resolution is applicable to outer space, convinced that the Treaty on principles governing the activities of States in the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, will contribute to the realization of the purposes and principles of the Charter of the United Nations, have agreed to the following: art. I the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, must be for the benefit and in the interest of all countries, regardless of their economic or scientific development stage; they are the prerogative of the whole of humanity.
Outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, may be explored and used freely by all States without any discrimination, in conditions of equality and in accordance with international law, all areas of celestial bodies to be freely available.
Scientific research are free in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and States must facilitate and encourage international cooperation in this research.

Art. II outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, may be the subject of national ownership by proclamation of sovereignty or by means of use or occupation, or by any other means.

Art. III activities of States parties to the Treaty related to the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, must be carried out in accordance with international law, including the Charter of the United Nations to maintain peace and security international and foster cooperation and understanding international.

Art. IV the States parties to the Treaty undertake to put into orbit around the Earth any object carrying nuclear or any other kind of weapons of mass destruction, not to install such weapons on celestial bodies and do not place such weapons, in any other manner, in the outer space.
All States parties to the Treaty will use the Moon and other celestial bodies exclusively for peaceful purposes. Are not allowed on the heavenly bodies military planning of bases and military installations and fortifications, the testing of weapons of all types and execution of maneuvers. Is not prohibited the use of military personnel for purposes of scientific research or for any other peaceful purpose. Is not prohibited either the use of any equipment or facility necessary for peaceful exploration of the Moon and other celestial bodies.

Art. V States parties to the Treaty will regard astronauts as envoys of mankind in outer space and will lend them all possible assistance in case of accident, distress or emergency landing on the territory of another State party to the Treaty or landing on the high seas. If such a landing or ditching, the return of astronauts to the State of registry of their space vehicle must be made promptly and safely.
When they will continue activities in outer space and on the celestial bodies, astronauts from a State party to the Treaty will lend all possible assistance to astronauts from other States parties to the Treaty.
States parties to the Treaty will bring immediately to the attention of other States parties to the Treaty or the Secretary-General of the Organization of the United Nations any phenomenon discovered by them in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, which could pose a danger to the life or health of the astronauts.

Art. VI. the States parties to the Treaty have international responsibility for national activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, that they be undertaken by government agencies or by non-governmental entities, and ensure that national activities are continued in accordance with the provisions set out in this Treaty. The activities of non-governmental entities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, must be authorized and ongoing monitoring on the part of the appropriate State party to the Treaty. In the case of activities carried out by an international organization in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, responsibility for compliance with the provisions of this Treaty will be up to this international organization and the States parties to the Treaty that are part of the organization.

Art. VII any State party to the Treaty which proceeds or proceeded to the launching of an object into outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and any State party whose territory or facilities are used in the launch of an object, is responsible for the international perspective of the damage caused by such object or its component parts, on the Earth in the atmosphere or in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, to another State party to the Treaty or the natural or legal persons that fall within that other State.

Art. VIII. the State party to the Treaty on the registry an object launched into outer space is registered will keep under its jurisdiction and control the object and all the staff of said object, while they are in outer space or on a celestial body. Property rights on objects launched in outer space, including objects brought or built on a heavenly body, as well as their components remain whole when these objects or elements are in the OST or on a celestial body, and when they come back on Earth. Objects or elements of objects found beyond the limits of the State party to the Treaty on the registry of which they are registered must be returned to that State party to the Treaty, it is required to provide on request identification before restoring data.

Art. IX


With respect to the exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, States parties to the Treaty should be based on the principles of cooperation and mutual assistance and will continue all their activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, with due regard for the corresponding interests of all other States parties to the Treaty. States parties to the Treaty will carry out the study of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, and will proceed to their exploration so as to avoid the harmful effects of their contamination as well as harmful to terrestrial changes resulting from the introduction of alien substances and, if necessary, they will take the appropriate measures to this end. If a State party to the Treaty has reason to believe that an activity or experience considered by itself or by its nationals in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, would cause a gene that is potentially harmful to the activities of other States parties to the Treaty for exploration and use peaceful outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies It should enter into appropriate international consultations before undertaking such activity or experience. Any State party to the Treaty has reason to believe that an activity or experience being considered by another State party to the Treaty in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, would cause a gene that is potentially harmful to the peaceful activities continued exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, may request that consultations be opened about such activity or experience.

Art. X to promote international cooperation in exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, according to the purposes of this Treaty, the States parties to the Treaty will review in equal applications of other States party to the treated to obtain facilities for observing the flight of space objects launched by those States.
The nature of such facilities to observation and the conditions in which they could be granted will be determined by mutual agreement by the States concerned.

Art. XI to promote international cooperation in exploration and peaceful use of outer space, States parties to the Treaty conducting activities in outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, agree, to the extent where it is possible and feasible, to inform the Secretary-General of the United Nations, as well as the public and the international scientific community the nature and the conduct of these activities, the places where they are pursued and their results. The Secretary-General of the United Nations must be ready to provide, immediately after receiving, the effective dissemination of such information.

Art. XII all stations and facilities, all material and all space vehicles on the Moon or on other celestial bodies will be available, in conditions of reciprocity, to representatives of other States parties to the Treaty. These representatives shall notify in advance any tour planned, so that necessary consultations could be held and that maximum precautions may be taken to ensure safety and avoid disturbing the normal operations on site at the facility to visit.

Art. XIII the provisions of this Treaty shall apply to the activities carried out by the States parties to the Treaty for exploration and use of the extra-atmos-pressure space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, that these activities are conducted by a State party to the Treaty alone or together with other States, including through international intergovernmental organizations.
All practical questions arising on the occasion of the activities carried out by intergovernmental international organizations exploration and use of outer space, including the Moon and other celestial bodies, will be resolved by the States parties to the Treaty either with the competent international organization or with one or more of the Member States of that organization that are parties to the Treaty.

Art. XIV 1. This Treaty is open for signature by all States. Any State which has not signed this Treaty before its entry into force in accordance with the by. 3 of this article may accede at any time.
2. the present Treaty will be submitted to ratification by the signatory States. The instruments of ratification and instruments of accession will be deposited with the Governments of the United States of America, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, which are, in the present Treaty, designated as the depository Governments.
3. this Treaty shall enter into force when five Governments, including those designated as the depository Governments under the terms of this Treaty, have deposited their instruments of ratification.
4. for States whose instruments of ratification or accession deposited after the entry into force of the present Treaty, it will enter into force on the date of the deposit of their instruments of ratification or accession.
5. the depository Governments inform without delay all States which have signed the present Treaty or acceded are the date of each signature, the date of the deposit of each instrument of ratification of the present Treaty or accession to this Treaty, from the date of entry into force of the Treaty as well as to any other communication.
6. the present Treaty will be registered by the depository in accordance with art Governments. 102 of the Charter of the United Nations.

Art. XV. any State party to this Treaty may propose amendments to the Treaty. The amendments take effect for each State party to the Treaty accepting the amendments once they have been accepted by the majority of States parties to the Treaty and thereafter, for each of the other States parties to the Treaty, on the date of acceptance of such amendments.

Art. XVI. any State party to this Treaty may, one year after the entry into force of the Treaty, communicate its intention to cease to be a party by means of a written notification to the depository Governments. This notification will take effect one year after the date on which it was received.

Art. XVII scope on January 27, 2010, reservations and declarations this Treaty, of which the English, Russian, Spanish, french and Chinese texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited in the archives of the depository Governments. Duly certified copies of this Treaty will be sent by the depository Governments to the Governments of States that have signed the Treaty or which will have acceded.
In faith of what, the undersigned, duly empowered to this effect, have signed this Treaty.
Done in triplicate at Washington, London and Moscow, January twenty-seven thousand nine hundred and sixty-seven.

Scope on January 27, 2010 States parties Ratification, accession (A) Declaration of estate (S) entry into force Afghanistan 17 March 1988 17 March 1988 South Africa September 30, 1968 September 30, 1968 European Space Agency (ESA) June 25, 1975 25 June 1975 Germany February 10, 1971 February 10, 1971 Antigua - and - Barbuda December 26, 1988 of November 1, 1981 Saudi Arabia December 17, 1976 to December 17, 1976 Argentina March 26, 1969 March 26, 1969 Australia 10 10 October 1967 October 1967 Austria February 26, 1968 February 26, 1968 Bahamas 11 August 1976 S 10 July 1973 Bangladesh 14 January 1986 A 14 January 1986 Barbados 12 September 1968 12 September 1968 Belarus October 31, 1967 October 31, 1967 Belgium March 30, 1973 March 30, 1973 Benin 19 June 1986 has 19 June 1986 Brazil * March 5, 1969 March 5, 1969 Bulgaria March 28, 1967 October 10, 1967 Burkina Faso 18 June 1968 18 June 1968 Canada October 10

1967 10 October 1967 Chile October 8, 1981 October 8, 1981 China December 30, 1983 to December 30, 1983 Hong Kong June 3, 1997 1 July 1997 Macau 20 December 1999 December 20, 1999 Cyprus 5 July 1972 July 5, 1972 (North) Korea 5 March 2009 was March 5, 2009 (South) Korea October 13, 1967 October 13, 1967 Denmark 10 October 1967 October 10, 1967 Egypt October 10, 1967 October 10, 1967 El El Salvador 15 January 1969 January 15, 1969

United Arab Emirates 4 October 2000 October 4, 2000 Ecuador March 7, 1969 A March 7, 1969 States parties Ratification, accession (A) Declaration of estate (S) entry into force Spain 27 November 1968 was November 27, 1968 United States October 10, 1967 October 10, 1967 EUMETSAT 19 December 2005 19 December Fiji 18 July 2005 S 1972 10 October 1970 Finland 12 July 1967 10 October 1967 France 5 August 1970 5 August Gambia 2 June 1970 1968 2 June 1968

Greece January 19, 1971 January 19, 1971 Guinea Equatorial 16 January 1989 has 16 January 1989 Hungary 26 June 1967 October 10


1967 India 18 January 1982 18 January 1982 Indonesia June 27, 1999 June 27, 1999 Iran April 22, 1968 21 December 1970 Iraq December 4, 1968 4 December 1968 Ireland July 17, 1968 17 July 1968 Iceland February 5, 1968 5 February 1968 Israel February 18, 1977 18 February 1977 Italy may 4, 1972 4 May 1972 Jamaica August 6, 1970 August 6, 1970 Japan October 10, 1967 October 10, 1967 Kazakhstan 11 July 1998 has 11 July 1998 Kenya

January 19, 1984 January 19, 1984 Kuwait 7 June 1972 was June 7, 1972 Laos 27 November 1972 27 November 1972 Lebanon March 31, 1969 March 31, 1969 Libya 3 July 1968 has 3 July 1968 Luxembourg 17 January 2006 17 January 2006 Madagascar * 22 August 1968 22 August 1968 Mali June 11, 1968 was June 11, 1968 Morocco December 21, 1967 was December 21, 1967 Maurice April 7, 1969 S March 12, 1968 Mexico January 31, 1968

January 31, 1968 Mongolia October 10, 1967 October 10, 1967 Myanmar March 18, 1970 March 18, 1970 Nepal October 10, 1967 October 10, 1967 Niger April 17, 1967 October 10, 1967 Nigeria 14 November 1967 A 14 November 1967 Norway 1 July 1969 July 1, 1969 New Zealand 31 May 1968 31 May 1968 Uganda 24 April 1968 A 24 April 1968 Pakistan April 8, 1968 April 8, 1968 Papua New Guinea 27 October 1980 S 16 September 1975 Netherlands October 10, 1969

October 10, 1969 Netherlands Antilles October 10, 1969 October 10, 1969 Aruba December 20, 1985 1 January 1986 Peru 28 February 1979 February 28, 1979 Poland January 30, 1968 January 30, 1968 Portugal 29 May 1996 was May 29, 1996 Dominican Republic 21 November 1968 21 November 1968 Czech Republic September 15, 1993 S January 1, 1993 Romania 9 April 1968 9 April 1968 United Kingdom October 10, 1967 October 10, 1967 Anguilla 10 October 1967 10 October 1967 territories under territorial sovereignty 10 October 1967 10 October 1967 Russia 10 October 1967 October 10, 1967 Saint - Marin October 29, 1968 October 29, 1968 Saint - Vincent and the Grenadines, on May 13, 1999 of October 10, 1967 Seychelles 5 January 1978 to January 5, 1978 Sierra Leone July 13, 1967 October 10, 1967 Singapore September 10, 1976 A September 10, 1976 Slovakia 17 May 1993 S January 1, 1993 Slovenia 27 May 1992 S 27 May 1992 Sri Lanka November 18, 1986 18 November 1986 Sweden

October 11, 1967 October 11, 1967 Switzerland 18 December 1969 18 December 1969 Swaziland June 10, 1969 A June 10, 1969 Syria November 19, 1968 has 19 November 1968 Thailand September 5, 1968 September 5, 1968 Tonga 22 June 1971 S June 4, 1970 Tunisia March 28, 1968 March 28, 1968 Turkey March 27, 1968 March 27, 1968 Ukraine 31 October 1967 October 31, 1967 Uruguay 31 August 1970 August 31, 1970 Venezuela March 3, 1970 March 3, 1970 Viet Nam

20 June 1980 20 June 1980 Yemen 1 June 1979 was June 1, 1979 Zambia 20 August 1973 A August 20, 1973 * reservations and declarations, see below.

From 10 oct. 1967 to June 30, 1997, the Treaty was applicable to Hong Kong on the basis of a declaration of territorial expansion of the United Kingdom. Starting from July 1, 1997, Hong Kong became a special administrative Region (SAR) of the People's Republic of China. Under the Chinese declaration of 3 June 1997, the Treaty is also applicable to the RAS Hong Kong from July 1, 1997.

Under a declaration of the People's Republic of China on Dec. 9. 1999, the Treaty shall apply to the Macao Special administrative Region (SAR) from 20 dec. 1999 reservations and declarations Brazil the Brazilian Government interprets the art. 10 of the Treaty as an express finding that the concession of "observation facilities" by the parties to the Treaty will be agreed between the States concerned.
Madagascar Government of the Malagasy Republic understands that the provisions of art. 10 cannot, in any way, undermine the principle of the national sovereignty of the State, which remains free of its decision on the possible installation of bases of foreign comments on its soil, and retains the right to determine, case by case, the conditions of such facilities.

1970 90 RO; FF 1969 I 865 RO 1970 89 RS 0.120 a version of the update scope is published on the web site of the FDFA (http://www.dfae.admin.ch/traites).
Instruments of ratification or accession or succession statements are filed with the U.S. Government, the United Kingdom and the Russia Federation, either simultaneously or at different times, or only to one or more of the above-mentioned Governments. The dates in this list are those that are related to the first ratification, accession or declaration of succession occurred.

January 27, 2010 State

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