On The Convention On Certain Conventional Weapons Of Any Kind To Prevent Or Limit The Use That Can Be Considered Weapons, Which Cause Enormous Damage Or Having A Non-Selective Operation Of Protocol 5.

Original Language Title: Par Konvencijas par tādu konkrētu parasto ieroču veidu lietošanas aizliegšanu vai ierobežošanu, kurus var uzskatīt par ieročiem, kas nodara ārkārtīgus postījumus vai kam ir neselektīva darbība, 5.protokolu

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Read the untranslated law here: https://www.vestnesis.lv/ta/id/195483

The Saeima has adopted and the President promulgated the following laws: On the Convention on certain conventional weapons of any kind to prevent or limit the use that can be considered weapons, which cause enormous damage or having a non-selective action, 5. Article 1 of the Protocol. 10 October 1980, of the Convention on certain conventional weapons, such a way to prevent or limit the use of which can be considered as weapons that inflicts the most damage or having a non-selective action (hereinafter referred to as the Convention), 28 November 2003 report on the explosion hazardous war remnants (Protocol) (Protocol) with this law is adopted and approved. 2. article. Protocol 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and article 11 fulfilment of the obligations provided for in the coordinated by the Ministry of Defense, the rest of the fulfilment of the obligations provided for in the Protocol are coordinated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. 3. article. The Protocol shall enter into force in article 5 of the Convention within the time and in order, and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs shall notify the newspaper "journal". 4. article. The law shall enter into force on the date of its promulgation. With the law put the Protocol in English, and its translation into Latvian language. The Parliament adopted the law of 16 July 2009. President Valdis Zatlers in Riga V 2009 July 30 PROTOCOL ON explosive REMNANT OF WAR (PROTOCOL V) the High Contracting Parties, Recognising the serious post-conflict humanitarian problems caused by explosive remnant of war, conscious of the need to conclud a Protocol on post-conflict remedial measure of a generic nature in order to the minimis risks and effects of explosive remnant of war , And willing to address generic preventive measure is, through voluntary best practices specified in a Technical Annex for improving the reliability of munition, and therefore minimising the occurrence of an explosive remnant of war, have agreed as follows: article 1 General provision and scope of application 1. In conformity with the Charter of the United Nations and of the rules of the international law of armed conflict applicable to them, the High Contracting Parties agree to comply with the obligation of specified in this Protocol, both individually and in co-operation with other High Contracting Parties, to minimize the risks and effects of explosive remnant of war in post-conflict situation. 2. This Protocol shall apply to explosive remnant of war on the land territory including internal waters of High Contracting Parties. 3. This Protocol shall apply to the situation resulting from conflicts referred to in article 1, paragraphs 1 to 6, of the Convention, as amended on 21 December 2001.4. Articles 3, 4, 5 and 8 of this Protocol apply to explosive remnant of war other than existing explosive remnant of war as defined in article 2, paragraph 5 of this Protocol. Article 2 Definition For the purpose of this Protocol, 1. Explosive ordnance means conventional munition containing explosives is, with the exception of mines, booby trap and other devices as defined in Protocol II of this Convention as amended on 3 May 1996.2. Unexploded ordnance means explosive ordnance that has been primed, fused, armed, or otherwise prepared for use and used in an armed conflict It may have been fired , dropped, launched or projected and should have exploded but failed to do so. 3. Abandoned explosive ordnance means explosive ordnance that has not been used during an armed conflict, that has been left behind or dumped by a party to an armed conflict, and which is no longer under control of the party that left it behind or dumped it. Abandoned explosive ordnance may or may not have been primed, fused, armed or otherwise prepared for use. 4. Explosive remnant of war means unexploded ordnance and abandoned explosive ordnance. 5. Existing explosive remnant of war means unexploded ordnance and abandoned explosive ordnance that existed prior to the entry into force of this Protocol for the High Contracting Party on whose territory it exists. Article 3 clearance, removal or destruction of explosive remnant of war Each High Contracting Party 1 and party to an armed conflict shall bear the responsibilities set out in this article with respect to all explosive remnant of war in territory under its control. In cases where a user of explosive ordnance which has become explosive remnant of war, does not exercise control of the territory, the user shall, after the cessation of active hostilit, where feasibl, provide inter alia technical, financial, material or human resources assistance, bilaterally or through a mutually agreed third party, including inter alia through the United Nations system or other relevant organizations the marking, facilitat and clearance, removal or destruction of such explosive remnant of war. 2. After the cessation of active hostilit and as soon as each High Contracting Party feasibl, and party to an armed conflict shall mark and clear, remove or destroy explosive remnant of war in affected territories under its control. Areas affected by explosive remnant of war which are assessed to the paragraph 3 of pursuan this article as posing a serious humanitarian risk shall be accorded priority status for clearance, removal or destruction. 3. After the cessation of active hostilit and as soon as each High Contracting Party feasibl, and party to an armed conflict shall take the following measure in affected territories under its control, to reduce the risks posed by explosive remnant of war: (a) survey and assess the threat posed by explosive remnant of war; (b) assess and prioritise needs and practicability in terms of marking and clearance, removal or destruction; (c) mark and clear, remove or destroy explosive remnant of war; (d) take steps to mobilise resources to carry out these activities. 4. In conducting the above activities High Contracting Parties and parties to an armed conflict shall take into account international standards, including the International Mine Action standards. 5. the High Contracting Parties shall co-operate, where appropriate, both among themselves and with other States, relevant regional and international organizations and non-governmental organizations on the provision of inter alia technical, financial, material and human resources assistance including, in appropriate circumstanc, the undertaking of joint operations to fulfil the cessary no provision of this article. Article 4 Recording, retaining and transmission of information, High Contracting Parties 1 and parties to an armed conflict shall to the maximum possible and as far the exten s practicabl record and retain information on the use of explosive ordnance or abandonmen of explosive ordnance, it is facilitat the rapids marking and clearance, removal or destruction of explosive remnant of war, risk education and the provision of relevant information to the party in control of the territory and to civilian population in that territory. 2. the High Contracting Parties and parties to an armed conflict which have used or abandoned explosive ordnance which may have become explosive remnant of war shall, without delay after the cessation of active hostilit and as far as practicabl, subject to these parties ' security interests legitimat, make available such information to the party or parties in control of the affected area bilaterally or through a mutually agreed that third party including inter alia the United Nations or, upon request, to other relevant organizations which the party providing the information is or will be satisfied with the undertaking risk education and the marking and clearance, removal or destruction of explosive remnant of war in the affected area. 3. In recording, retaining and transmitting such information, the High Contracting Parties should have regard to part 1 of the Technical Annex. Article 5 Other precaution for the protection of the civilian population, individual civilian and civilian objects from the risks and effects of explosive remnant of war 1. High Contracting Parties and parties to an armed conflict shall take all feasibl of precaution in the territory under their control affected by explosive remnant of war to protect the civilian population, individual civilian and civilian objects from the risks and effects of explosive remnant of war. Feasibl is a precaution precaution with those in which the practicabl or practicably possible, taking into account all of the ruling at the circumstanc time, including humanitarian and military considerations. These precaution may include warning, risk education to the civilian population, marking, fencing and monitoring of territory affected by explosive remnant of war, as set out in part 2 of the Technical Annex. Article 6 Provision for the protection of humanitarian missions and organizations from the effects of explosive remnant of war Each High Contracting Party 1 and party to an armed conflict shall: (a) protect, as far as feasibl, from the effects of explosive remnant of war, humanitarian missions and organizations that are or will be operating in the area under the control of the High Contracting Party or party to an armed conflict and with that party's consent. (b) Upon request by such a humanitarian mission or organization, provide, as far as feasibl, information on the location of all explosive remnant of war that it is aware of in territory where the requesting humanitarian mission or organization will operate or is operating. 2. The provision of this article with with out prejudice to existing International Humanitarian Law or other international instruments as applicable or decisions by the Security Council of the United Nations which provide for a higher level of protection. Article 7 assistance with respect to existing explosive remnant of war Each High Contracting Party 1 has the right to seek and receive assistance, where appropriate, from other High Contracting Parties, from States non-party and relevant international organizations and institutions in dealing with the problems posed by existing explosive remnant of war. 2. Each High Contracting Party in a position to do so shall provide assistance in dealing with the problems posed by existing explosive remnant of war, not sharp and feasibl cessary. In so doing, High Contracting Parties shall also take into account the humanitarian objective of this Protocol, as well as international standards including the International Mine Action standards. Article 8 Co-operation and assistance Each High Contracting Party 1 in a position to do so shall provide assistance for the marking and clearance, removal or destruction of explosive remnant of war, and for risk education to civilian population and related activities inter alia through the United Nations system, other relevant international, regional or national organizations or institutions, the International Committee of the Red Cross , national Red Cross and Red Crescent societies and their International Federation, non-governmental organizations, or on a bilateral basis. 2. Each High Contracting Party in a position to do so shall provide assistance for the care and rehabilitation and social and economic reintegration of victim of explosive remnant of war. Such assistance may be provided, inter alia, through the United Nations system, relevant international, regional or national organizations or institutions, the International Committee of the Red Cross, national Red Cross and Red Crescent societies and their International Federation, non-governmental organizations, or on a bilateral basis. 3. Each High Contracting Party in a position to do so shall contribute to trust funds within the United Nations system, as well as other relevant trust funds, to the provision of facilitat assistance under this Protocol. 4. the High Contracting Party shall Each have the right to participat in the fulles a possible exchange of equipment, material and scientific and technological information other than weapon related technology, not for the implementation of the cessary a Protocol. The High Contracting Parties to the undertak facilitat such exchanges in accordanc with national legislation and shall note the impost of the undu restriction on the provision of clearance equipment and related technological information for humanitarian purpose. 5. Each High Contracting Party to provide information of the undertak to the relevant databases on mine action established within the United Nations system, especially information concerning various means and technologies of clearance of explosive remnant of war, lists of experts, expert agencies or national points of contact on clearance of explosive remnant of war and, on a voluntary basis, technical information on relevant types of explosive ordnance. 6. the High Contracting Parties may submit requests for assistance substantiated by relevant information to the United Nations, to other appropriate bodies or to other States. These requests may be submitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations, who shall transmit them to all High Contracting Parties and to relevant international organizations and non-governmental organizations. 7. In the case of requests to the United Nations, the Secretary-General of the United Nations, within the resources available to the Secretary-General of the United Nations, may take appropriate steps to assess the situation and in co-operation with the requesting High Contracting Party and other High Contracting Parties with responsibility as set out in article 3 above, recommend the appropriate provision of assistance. The Secretary-General may also report to High Contracting Parties on any such assessment as well as on the type and scope of assistance required, including possible contributions from the trust funds established within the United Nations system. Article 9 Generic preventive measure of 1. Bearing in mind the different sites, each ation and capacities High Contracting Party is encouraged to take generic preventive measure is aimed at minimizing the occurrence of of explosive remnant of war, including, but not limited to, those referred to in part 3 of the Technical Annex. 2. Each High Contracting Party may, on a voluntary basis, Exchange information related to efforts to promote and establish best practices in respect of paragraph 1 of this article. Article 10 Consultation of High Contracting Parties 1. The High Contracting Parties to consult undertak and co-operate with each other on all issues related to the operation of this Protocol. For this purpose, a Conference of the High Contracting Parties shall be held as agreed to by a majority, but less than eighteen High Contracting from Parties. 2. The work of the Conference of the High Contracting Parties shall include: (a) review of the status and operation of this Protocol; (b) considerations pertaining to national implementation of matters of this Protocol, including national reporting or updating on an annual basis. (c) preparation for review conferences. 3. The costs of the Conference of the High Contracting Parties shall be borne by the High Contracting Parties and States not parties participating in the Conference, in accordanc with the United Nations scale of assessment basis appropriately. Article 11 compliance 1. Each High Contracting Party shall require that its armed forces and relevant agencies or departments issue appropriate instructions and operating procedures and that its personnel receive training consistent with the relevant provision of this Protocol. 2. The High Contracting Parties to consult each other undertak and to co-operate with each other bilaterally, through the Secretary-General of the United Nations or through other appropriate international procedures, to resolve any problems that may «arise with regards to the interpretation and application of the provision of this Protocol.  Technical Annex this Technical Annex contains suggested best practice for achieving the objective of led in articles 4, 5 and 9 of this Protocol. This Technical Annex will be implemented by High Contracting Parties on a voluntary basis. 1. the Recording, storage and release of information for Unexploded ordnance (UXO) and Abandoned explosive ordnance (AX) (a) Recording of information: Regarding explosive ordnance which may have become UXO a State should endeavour to record the following information as accurately as possible: (i) the location of areas targeted using explosive ordnance; (ii) the number of approximat explosive ordnance used in the areas under (i); (iii) the type and nature of explosive ordnance used in areas under (i); (iv) the general location of known and probabl a UXO; Where a State has been obliged to abandonment explosive ordnance in the course of operations, it should endeavour to leave in a safe AX and secure manner and record information on this ordnance as follows: (v) the location of the AX; (vi) the amount of the approximat AX at each specific site; (VII) the types of AX at each specific site. (b) storage of information: where a State has recorded information in accordanc with paragraph (a), it should be stored in such a manner as to allow for its retrieval and subsequent release in accordanc with paragraph (c). (c) release of information: Information recorded and stored by a State in accordanc with paragraphs (a) and (b) should, taking into account the security interests and other obligations of the State providing the information, be released in accordanc with the following provision: (i) content: On UXO the released information should contain details on: (1) the general location of known and probabl a UXO; (2) the type and number of approximat explosive ordnance used in the targeted areas; (3) the method of identifying the ex-plosiv ordnance including colour, size and shape and other relevant marking; (4) the method for safe disposal of the explosive ordnance. ONA AX the released information should contain details on: (5) the location of the AX; (6) the number of the approximat AX at each specific site; (7) the type of AX at each specific site; (8) the method of identifying the AX, including colour, size and shape; (9) information on type and methods of packing for AX; (10) State of readiness; (11) the location and nature of any booby trap is known to be present in the area of AX. II) recipient: the information should be released to the party or parties in control of the affected territory and to those persons or institutions that the State is satisfied with releasings, or will be, involved in UXO or AX the clearance in the affected area, in the education of the civilian population on the risks of UXO or AX. (iii)): (A) the State Mechanism should, where feasibl, make use of those mechanisms established internationally or locally for the release of information, such as through the UNM, IMSM, and others expert agencies, as considered appropriate by the releasings State. IV) Timing: the information should be released as soon as possible, taking into account such matters as any ongoing military and humanitarian operations in the affected areas, the availability and reliability of information and relevant security issues. 2. Warning, risk education, marking, fencing and monitoring Key terms (a) Warning with the provision of punctual cautionary information to the civilian population, intended the minimis risks caused by explosive remnant of war in affected territories. (b) Risk education to the civilian population should be consis of risk education programmes to facilitat information exchange between affected communities, government authorities and humanitarian organisations so that affected communities are informed about the threat from explosive remnant of war. Risk education program with a usually a long term activity. Best practice elements of warnings and risk education (c) All programmes of warnings and risk education should, where possible, take into account the prevailing national and international standards, including the International Mine Action standards. (d) warnings and risk education should be provided to the affected civilian population which is living in the civilian or compris around areas containing explosive remnant of war and civilian who transit such areas. (e) the Warning should be given, as soon as possible, depending on the context and the information available. A risk education programme should replace a warnings programme as soon as possible. Warning and risk education always should be provided to the affected communities at the earlies to a possible time. (f) parties to a conflict should employ third parties such as international organisations and non-governmental organisations when they do not have the resources and skills to deliver efficient risk education. (g) parties to a conflict should, if possible, provide additional resources for warnings and risk education. Such items might include: provision of logistical support, production of risk education materials, financial support and general cartographic information. Marking, fencing, and monitoring of an explosive remnant of war affected area (h) When possible, at any time during the course of a conflict and thereafter, where explosive remnant of war exist the parties to a conflict should, at the earlies to possible time and to the maximum possible, exten to ensur that areas containing explosive remnant of war are marked, fenced and monitored so as to ensur the effective exclusion of civilian in , in accordanc with the following provision. (i) Warning signs based on methods of marking recognised by the affected community should be used in the marking of suspected hazardous areas. Signs and other hazardous area boundary marker should as far as possible be visible, legibl, durable and resistant to environmental effects and should clearly identify which side of the marked boundary is considered to be within the explosive remnant of war affected area and which side is considered to be safe. (j) An appropriate structure should be put in place with responsibility for the monitoring and maintenance of permanent and temporary marking systems, integrated with national and local risk education programmes. 3. Generic preventive measure of the States producing or procuring explosive ordnance should to the exten the possible and as appropriate endeavour to ensur that the following measure is implemented and respected during a the life-cycle of explosive ordnance. (a) a Munition manufacturing management (i) Production processes should be designed to achieve the greatest reliability of munition. (ii) Production processes should be subject to certified quality control measure. (iii) During the production of explosive ordnance, certified quality assurance standards that are internationally recognised should be applied. (iv) acceptance testing should be conducted through live-fire testing over a range of conditions or through other validated procedures. (v) High reliability standards should be required in the course of explosive ordnance transactions and transfers. (b) a Munition Management In order to ensur the best possible long-term reliability of explosive ordnance, States are encouraged to apply best practice norms and operating procedures with respect to its storage, transport, field storage, and handling in accordanc with the following guidance. (i) explosive ordnance, where not cessary, should be stored in secure facilities or appropriate containers that protect the explosive ordnance and its components in a controlled atmosphere, if not cessary. (ii) A State should transport explosive ordnance to and from production facilities, storage facilities and the field in a manner that the damage to the minimis explosive ordnance. (iii) appropriate containers and controlled environments, where no cessary, should be used by a State when stockpiling and transporting explosive ordnance. (iv) the risk of explosion in the should be minimised by stockpil the use of the priat of the subject stockpil appr. (g) States should apply appropriate explosive ordnance logging, tracking and testing procedures, which should include information on the date of manufacture of each number, lot or batch of ex-plosiv ordnance, and information on where the explosive ordnance has been, under what conditions it has been stored, and to what environmental factors it has been exposed. (vi) Periodically, stockpiled explosive ordnance should, where the underg appr priat, live-firing testing to ensur that munition will function as desired. (VII) the Sub-assemblies of ex-plosiv ordnance stockpiled should, where appropriate, the laboratory testing the underg ensur that munition will function as desired. (VIII) where appropriate action not cessary,, including adjustment to the expected shelf-life of ordnance, should be taken as a result of information acquired by logging, tracking and testing procedures, in order to maintain the reliability of stockpiled ex-plosiv ordnance. (c) Training the proper training of all personnel involved in the handling, transporting and use of explosive ordnance is an important factor in seeking to ensur it for reliable operation as intended. States should therefore maintain the adop and training program of the suitabl ensur that properly trained with regards to personnel to the munition with which they will be required to deal. (d) Transfer A State planning to transfer explosive ordnance to another State that did not previously posses that type of explosive ordnance should endeavour to ensur that the receiving State has the capability to store, maintain and use that explosive ordnance correctly. (e) future production (A) the State should examin ways and means of improving the reliability of explosive ordnance that it intends to produce or Procura, with a view to achieving the highest possible reliability.

Of the Convention on certain conventional weapons in a WAY to prevent or limit the use of which can be considered as weapons that INFLICTS the most damage or HAVING a non-selective action, the Protocol on explosive remnants of war (Protocol V) the High Contracting Parties, recognizing the serious humanitarian problems by military conflicts, which have led to explosive remnants of war, conscious of the need to conclude a Protocol on measures of general nature of post-conflict remedial to mitigate the potentially explosive remains of war risks and impacts And ready to take the preventive measures of a general nature, on a voluntary basis as listed in the annex to the technical good practice models for improving the reliability of munitions, so reducing the explosive remnants of war quantities, have agreed as follows: article 1 General provisions and scope 1. in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and the rules of international law applicable in armed conflicts, for which the parties refer, the High Contracting Parties, both individually and in cooperation with other High Contracting Parties in this Protocol, shall assume obligations to mitigate the potentially explosive remains of war risks and impacts in post-conflict situations. 2. this Protocol apply to explosive remnants of war to the High Contracting Parties ' land areas, including internal waters. 3. This Protocol shall apply to situations resulting from conflicts, as described in article 1 of the Convention from 1 to 6, following the 2001 December 21 amendments. 4. this Protocol 3., 4., 5., and article 8 shall apply to explosive remnants of war other than existing explosive remnants of war set out in article 2 of this Protocol, point 5. Article 2 definitions for the purposes of this Protocol: 1. Explosive ordnance means conventional munitions containing explosives, with the exception of mines, lamatmīn mines and masked/other devices as defined in Protocol II of this Convention as amended on May 3, 1996. 2. Unexploded munitions means explosive ammunition that is loaded, which has activated the detonator, which has hauled the shutter or which has any belzen in otherwise prepared for use in armed conflict. It can be passed round, dropped, launched or otherwise transmitted and it should have been to explode, but it is not a guess. 3. Abandoned explosive ordnance means explosive ordnance that has not been used in armed conflict, and that a military conflict involving the party gave up or thrown in a landfill, which is no longer on the supervision of the party to which it gave up or thrown in a landfill. Abandoned explosive ordnance may or may not be charged, it may or may not be activated detonators to belzen, hauled the shutter, or otherwise prepared for use. 4. Explosive remnants of war means unexploded ordnance and abandoned explosive ordnance. 5. existing explosive remnants of war means unexploded ordnance and abandoned explosive ordnance that existed before this Protocol enters into force for High Contracting Parties in whose territory it is located. 3. Article potentially explosive war remnants of neutralisation, removal or destruction 1. each High Contracting Party and the armed conflict in the party to take on the obligations set out in this article with respect to all explosive remnants of war in its controlled areas. In cases where the explosive ordnance become explosive remnants of war, but the user does not control the territory, after the end of hostilities the user provides, inter alia, where possible, technical, financial, material or human resources assistance, bilaterally or through a third party, which reached a common agreement, including the joint Nations system or with other relevant organizations, to facilitate such explosive remnants of war and the neutralization of the marking, disposal or destruction. 2. After the end of hostilities and as soon as possible, each High Contracting Party and the armed conflict a party affected areas highlights, neutralize, removed and destroyed by explosive remnants of war, which is in its control. Explosive remnants of war in affected territories which, in accordance with paragraph 3 of this article, recognized as such, which is causing serious humanitarian risk, can be allocated to priority mine clearance, removal and destruction of the remains. 3. After the end of hostilities, and as quickly as possible, each High Contracting Party and the armed conflict in the party to take the following measures in their control affected areas to reduce the explosive remnants of war risks: (a) inspect and assess the war threat generated remains; (b) assess and prioritise the markup, neutralization, of removal and destruction needs and practical options; (c) highlight and neutralize, removed or destroyed by explosive remnants of war; (d) take action to attract resources for this activity. 4. the measures referred to above, the High Contracting Parties and the armed parties to the conflict to comply with international norms, including the international strategy for mine action (International Mine Action standards). 5. where appropriate, the High Contracting Parties shall cooperate both among themselves and with other States, relevant regional and international organisations, and non-governmental organizations, inter alia, to provide technical, financial, material and human resources assistance, including, whenever circumstances permit, joint operations necessary for the execution of the provisions of this article. Article 4 Information recording, storage and transmission/delivery 1. The High Contracting Parties and the armed parties to the conflict, as widely as possible and as far as filled, recorded and stored information on explosive ordnance or abandonment of explosive atmospheres in order to contribute to the war remain quick tagging, neutralization and destruction, removal, education of risk mitigation, and provision of relevant information to the party, which controls the territory, and the territory's civilian population. 2. The High Contracting Parties and parties to armed conflict that are used the abandoned explosive ordnance that might have become explosive remnants of war, to the end of the hostilities immediately and to the extent feasible, in accordance with their legitimate security interests, provide the following information in such bilateral or with third parties that help achieve a common understanding, including through the United Nations assistance to the party or parties that control the affected area or on request, other relevant organisations, which satisfied the party providing the information, or will be education about risk and explosive remnants of war, the removal or neutralization of the destruction of the affected areas. 3. By registering, storing and transferring/providing such information, the High Contracting Parties comply with part 1 of the technical annex. Article 5 Other precautions for civil society, individual civilians and civilian objects from the war of explosive protection remain in risk and consequences 1. The High Contracting Parties and the armed parties to the conflict under its control and explosive remnants of war in affected territories take all possible precautions to protect civilian society individual civilians and civilian objects from explosive remnants of war-induced risks and consequences. Possible precautions are the precautionary measures that may practice to realize and apply, having regard to the specific circumstances, including humanitarian and military considerations. These precautions may include warnings, risk education to the civilian populations, explosive remnants of war affected area, the impoundment and monitoring, as specified in the technical annex, part 2. Article 6 conditions for the humanitarian mission and the Organization for the protection of the explosive remnants of war would create consequences 1. each High Contracting Party and the armed conflict a party: (a) to the extent possible, from the explosive remnants of war would create consequences in humanitarian missions and protect organizations with high contracting parties or the armed parties to the conflict consent works or will work in the territory of that party's control; (b) after such a humanitarian mission and organization of the request and to the extent possible, provide information on all the known explosive remains of war locations in the territory in which the work or works for the humanitarian mission or organisation that requested the information. 2. the provisions of this article are without prejudice to existing international humanitarian law or other international governing these documents, or the United Nations Security Council decisions, which require more protection. Article 7 assistance with respect to existing explosive remnants of war 1. Each High Contracting Party shall have the right, where appropriate, to ask for and receive help from other High Contracting Parties, from States not party to the Convention and of the relevant international organisations and institutions to deal with explosive remnants of war. 2. each High Contracting Party, if possible, provide assistance to deal with explosive remnants of war issues as necessary and possible. In so doing, High Contracting Parties shall also take into account the humanitarian objectives of this Protocol, as well as international norms, including the international strategy for mine action. Article 8 cooperation and assistance 1. each High Contracting Party, if possible, provide assistance for the marking of the explosive remnants of war and landmines, neutralization or destruction, civilian education and other related activities, inter alia, the United Nations system, relevant international, regional or national organizations or institutions, as well as through the International Committee of the Red Cross, national Red Cross and Red Crescent societies and their International Federation , non-governmental organizations, or on the basis of a bilateral agreement. 2. each High Contracting Party, if possible, a potentially explosive remains of war victims provide treatment, rehabilitation and social and economic reintegration. Such assistance shall, inter alia, can be provided by the United Nations system, international, regional or national organizations or institutions, as well as through the International Committee of the Red Cross, national Red Cross and Red Crescent societies and their International Federation, non-governmental organizations, or on the basis of a bilateral agreement. 3. each High Contracting Party, if possible, participate in the trust funds of the United Nations system, as well as other relevant trust funds, to facilitate the provision of assistance, as provided for in this Protocol. 4. Each High Contracting Party has the right to participate in the fullest possible exchange of equipment, materials, scientific and technological information necessary for the execution of the present Protocol, except for weapons-related technology. The High Contracting Parties undertake to facilitate such exchanges in accordance with national legislation and shall not introduce excessive restrictions on mine clearance equipment and related technological information, if necessary for humanitarian purposes. 5. each High Contracting Party undertakes to provide information to the relevant United Nations databases created on pretmmīn activities, in particular information about the various means and technologies of explosive remnants of war, for the neutralization of the specialist register, professional bodies and national focal points of the explosive remnants of war, and voluntary for neutralization, technical information on relevant types of explosive ordnance. 6. The High Contracting Parties may submit with the information a reasonable requests for assistance by the United Nations, other appropriate bodies or to other States. These requests may be submitted to the Secretary-General of the United Nations that it reroutes all High Contracting Parties and relevant international organizations and non-governmental organizations. 7. in the case sought the assistance of the United Nations, the Secretary-General of the United Nations and the United Nations can make possible the necessary measures to assess the situation and, in co-operation with the requesting High Contracting Party and other High Contracting Parties, that a certain article 3 responsibility, recommend to provide adequate assistance. The Secretary-General may also report to High Contracting Parties on any such assessment as also on request, the nature and extent of assistance, including possible assistance from the United Nations to set up trust funds. Article 9 General safeguard measures 1. taking into account the different circumstances and opportunities, each High Contracting Party is encouraged to take the General protective measures to reduce the quantity of explosive remnants of war, including, but not limited to measures referred to in the technical annex, part 3. 2. each High Contracting Party may, on a voluntary basis, Exchange information on the measures taken to promote better establishment of samples for this article, part 1. Article 10 the High Contracting Parties, consulting 1. The High Contracting Parties undertake to provide advice and collaborate with each other on all matters relating to this Protocol. For this purpose, the High Contracting Parties shall hold conference in agreement on most, but not less than eighteen High Contracting Parties. 2. The High Contracting Parties in the work of the Conference shall include: (a) the status of the Protocol and the review of the action; (b) the issues relating to the implementation of this Protocol, the Member States, including on the national annual reports and the updating of the information; (c) preparation of review conferences. 3. The high cost of the Conference of the Parties shall be borne by the High Contracting Parties and the Member States not participating in the Conference, according to adapt United Nations assessment scale. Article 11 compliance 1. each High Contracting Party shall require that its armed forces and relevant agencies or departments develop appropriate instructions and operating procedures and that its personnel would be drawn up in accordance with the provisions of this Protocol. 2. The High Contracting Parties undertake to provide each other with advice and mutual cooperation with the Secretary-General of the United Nations and other appropriate international procedures, to resolve any problems that may arise in relation to the interpretation of the provisions of this Protocol and application.
 Technical annex This technical annex contains best practices for action, focused on this Protocol 4, 5 and 9. the achievement of the objectives laid down in article. The High Contracting Parties implement the technical annex on a voluntary basis. 1. With unexploded munitions (NM) and abandoned explosive ordnance (PSM) information recording, storage and provision of: (a) track information: Member States must endeavour to register the following more precise information about the potentially explosive munitions that can be become a PSM: (i) the location of the territory, which have been the target as the explosive munitions use; (ii) the approximate number of explosive ordnance used in the unit, (i) in areas; (iii) in subparagraph (i) those areas used explosive ordnance type and nature; (iv) the known and possible NM general location; If a Member State in the course of the military operations had been forced to abandon a potentially explosive munitions, seek leave, done necessary APL security measures and on this ammunition to record the following: (v) PSM location; (vi) the approximate quantity of each PSM specific object: (VII) PSM types on each specific object. (b) storage of information: where a Member State has registered the information under (a) above, this information is stored so that it can obtain and provide, in accordance with the provisions of subparagraph (c); (c) provision of information: information recorded and stored, as provided for in (a) and (b) subparagraphs, to be provided in accordance with the following conditions and taking into account the Member State supplying the security interests and other obligations: (i) content: the information provided on the NM must include details on: (1) the known and possible NM general location; (2) the target of the explosive ordnance used and approximate number of units; (3) explosive munitions recognition techniques, including colour, size and shape, and other relevant characteristics; (4) methods for the safe disposal of explosive ordnance. The information provided on the PSM jāie kļauj details: (5) the PSM location; (6) the approximate number of units in each PSM specific object: (7) the PSM types on each specific object. (8) recognition techniques, including PSM colour, size and shape; (9) and PSM type of packaging methods; (10) the degree of ripeness; (11) all the PSM area known lamatmīn/veiled mine location and character; (ii) the recipient: the information to be provided) the party or parties in control of the affected area, and the persons or institutions which, as it satisfied the Member State providing the information in the affected area are engaged or will engage in NM or PSM and neutralization of civilians in educating about NM or PSM risk; III) mechanism: the limits of a Member State to use the reporting mechanisms established internationally or locally, such as UNM (United Nations mine action service), IMSM-(information management system for mine action), or other professional organisations which, in the Member State providing the information shall be considered relevant; IV) timing: the information to be provided as soon as possible, considering factors such as the ongoing military or humanitarian operations in the affected areas, the availability and reliability of information and relevant security issues; 2. Warnings, risk education, marking, and monitoring of impoundment; The main concepts (a) warnings are accurate information warning civilians to mitigate the threat affected areas causing explosive remnants of war; (b) civilian education risk include educational programs about risk, to facilitate information exchange between affected communities, government authorities and humanitarian organizations by informing the affected community on explosive remnants of war threats. Educational programs about risk are often long-term in nature; The best samples of the alert action going and education about risk (c) All alert programs and education programs, where possible, be taken into account in determining the national and international standards, including the international strategy for mine action. (d) warnings and awareness programmes to be affected civilian populations, which include civilians and around areas where explosive remnants of war, and the civilian population, which moves through such zones. (e) Notice to be given as soon as possible depending on the circumstances and available information. Warnings and risk education should always ensure affected communities as soon as possible. (f) the parties to the Conflict, if they lack the resources and skills to effectively carry out education on risk, you must use third parties such as international organisations and non-governmental organizations. (g) the parties involved in the Conflict, if possible, provide additional resources for warnings and risk education. Such support could include logistical support, development of training materials for education about the risks, financial support and General cartographic information. Explosive remnants of war affected area marking, and monitoring of impoundment (h) places where explosive remnants of war, the parties to the conflict during the conflict and after it as soon and as widely as possible to ensure that explosive remnants of war affected area are marked, fenced and monitored in accordance with the conditions mentioned below, it prevents access to the civilian population: (i) the marking of hazardous areas to use warning signs marked with the techniques that the population of the area easily recognizable. Signs and other hazardous area must be best visible, legible, durable and resistant to environmental effects and should clearly identify which side of the marked boundary line behind considered unexploded remnants of war affected area and which side is considered safe. (j) to create the authority, which is obliged to monitor and maintain the permanent and temporary marking systems, integrated with national and local risk education programmes. 3. General precautionary measures as far as possible, and if necessary the Member States producing or acquiring explosive ammunition, must endeavour to ensure that the exploding munitions during operation are implemented and complied with the following measures: (a) munitions manufacturing management (i) production process to be established so as to achieve the highest possible reliability of munitions. (ii) the production process to the certified quality control measures. (iii) explosive munitions production during the applicable quality system certified in accordance with recognised international standards. (iv) acceptance trials carried out as a pilot with battle shooting under certain circumstances, or other approved methods. (g) explosive munitions transfer/moving and service high security standards. (b) munitions management in order to ensure the ammunition explosive as possible long-term reliability, Member States are encouraged to apply good practices and operating procedures with respect to such munitions storage, transport, field storage, and handling it in accordance with the following instructions. (i) if necessary, the explosive munitions safe storage facilities or appropriate containers that protect the necessary explosive ordnance and its components in artificial atmospheric conditions. (ii) the Member State should transport explosive munitions to and from factories, warehouses and fields in such a way as to minimize the potentially explosive munitions. (iii) where appropriate, collecting and transporting the explosive ammunition, the Member State must use proper containers and artificial atmospheric conditions. (iv) the threat of explosions of stockpiled stocks shrink, their placing. (v) the Member States should apply appropriate explosive munitions inventory, tracking and testing procedures, which include details of each explosive munitions number, batch, series, and information on where explosive munitions found stored under any circumstances, and what environmental impact has been exposed. (vi) where appropriate, to carry out regular accumulated explosive munitions trials, shooting battle conditions, in order to ensure the desired functioning of munitions. (VII) the accumulated explosive munitions node parts, if necessary, to laboratory studies to ensure the desired functioning of munitions. (VIII) in order to maintain the reliability of explosive munitions stocks, in response to the information on record keeping, tracking and testing procedures, where necessary, to take appropriate measures including the adjustment estimates about expected duration of storage of munitions. (c) the training of explosive munitions to ensure reliable operation of its purpose, an important factor is the proper training of personnel handling explosive munitions and is involved in the transport and use. Therefore, Member States should approve and maintain adequate training programs to deliver that personnel are adequately trained on the ammunition with which it will be necessary to deal with. (d) a transfer to the Member State which intends to transfer explosive ordnance to another Member State which does not so far belonged to the type of explosive ordnance should endeavour to ensure that the requested Member State should be able to properly store, maintain and use that explosive munitions. (e) future production To achieve the highest possible reliability of munitions, the Member State must identify ways and means to enhance the reliability of explosive ordnance that it intends to produce or buy.