Order On Education For Two-Year Hf (Hf-Order)

Original Language Title: Bekendtgørelse om uddannelsen til toårigt hf (hf-bekendtgørelsen)

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Read the untranslated law here: https://www.retsinformation.dk/Forms/R0710.aspx?id=132649

Overview (table of contents)
Chapter 1 Aim, duration and scope
Chapter 2 Structure and content
Chapter 3 Manual and retention
Chapter 4 Programme management
Chapter 5 teaching planning and implementation
Chapter 6 Internal evaluation
Chapter 7 Education descriptions and certificates for completed training
Chapter 8 Special education and other special educational assistance
Chapter 9 Health Education
Chapter 10 Miscellaneous provisions
Chapter 11 Appeal
Chapter 12 Exemptions from the Order
Chapter 13 Commencement and transitional rules
Appendix 1
Appendix 2
Appendix 3
Appendix 4
Appendix 5
Appendix 6
Appendix 7
Appendix 8
Appendix 9
Annex 10
Annex 11
Annex 12
Annex 13
Annex 14
Annex 15
Annex 16
Annex 17
Annex 18
The full text
Order on education for two-year hf (hf-Order)
Pursuant to § 10 paragraph. 4, § 11 paragraph. 2, § 14 paragraph. 3, § 15 paragraph. 2, § 16 paragraph. 4, § 17, § 25, § 35 paragraph. 1, § 36 paragraph. 3, § 37 paragraph. 3, § 38 paragraph. 2 and § 41 paragraph. 3 of the Law on Higher Preparatory Exam (hf-Act). Act no. 445 of May 8, 2007, as amended by Act no. 641 of 14 June 2010, and § 8 paragraph. 3, § 14 paragraph. 4 and § 55 of the Law on Institutions of general secondary education and general adult education, etc., see. Legislative Decree no. 937 of 22 September 2008:
Chapter 1
The program's purpose, duration and extent
§ 1. The program for the higher preparatory examination organized as a two-year secondary education targeted to young people with an interest in knowledge, depth, perspective and abstraction, and the main objective of higher education. The program represents a whole and concludes with an examination after the national standard.
PCS. 2. The purpose of the program is to prepare students for higher education, including that they acquire a general education, knowledge and skills through training combination of breadth and depth, and through interaction between the subjects.
PCS. 3. The participants shall, through the academic and educational progression develop insight and study competence. They should become familiar with the use of various forms of work and ability to function in a study where the requirements for independence, cooperation and sense to seek out knowledge is key.
PCS. 4. Training must have an educational perspective with emphasis on the students' development of personal authority. Students must learn to relate reflection and responsibility for their environment: fellow human beings, nature and society, and to their own development. The training shall also develop students' creative and innovative skills and critical thinking.
PCS. 5. The education and school culture as a whole to prepare students for participation, joint responsibility, rights and duties in a society based on freedom and democracy. Tuition and course its daily life must therefore build on intellectual freedom, equality and democracy. The participants will thus achieve the conditions for active participation in a democratic society and awareness of the possibilities for individually and collectively, to contribute to the development and change, and understanding of both the near and the European and global perspective.
§ 2. The two-year hf implemented with emphasis on both the theoretical and the applied subjects, see. § 37 paragraph. 2. The program will develop students' ability to in-depth study and their understanding of the relationship between the subjects and the promotion of the individual student accountability for individual and joint achievements. The participants will gain analytical and critical skills as well as gain insight into natural science, social science and humanities contexts. They must also develop their language skills.
§ 3. The total training time, see. § 4, for students in the two-year hf includes at least 1,625 hours of 60 minutes.
PCS. 2. For students who have been approved merit, respectively substitution, according to the rules, the course can organize individual sessions with a training time of less than 1,625 hours.
PCS. 3. Course leader may, upon application, to a student who has received credit in the program under the rules of merit notice and therefore be exempted from parts of the teaching may use the vacant time to conduct additional electives that can be included in hf -uddannelsen, including raising the level of compulsory subjects.

§ 4. Training time includes the total teacher-led student activity, ie the time students take part in various forms of teacher-led instruction and other activities organized by the course of realization of the aims of the program, including professional and methodological guidance, see. § 28 para. 1.
PCS. 2. Student The preparation for teaching, the written work, the official samples for examination, guidance for the implementation of the program, cf.. § 28 para. 2, volunteer teaching, see. § 23, study groups, see. § 24, and open workshop, see. § 25, are not covered by the training period.
Chapter 2
Structure and content
§ 5. A second-level education consists of courses at the secondary C, B and A level, where A is the highest level.
PCS. 2. The two-year hf include for all students compulsory subjects, see. § 6, mandatory professions see. § 7 and elective subjects, cf.. §§ 8 and 9. In addition, a large project, see. § 16, project periods, see. § 17, an introductory course, see. § 18, and scheduled workshop teaching, see. § 19.
PCS. 3. The course will offer students optional courses; see. § 23, the guide, see. § 28 para. 1 and 2, and offers a range of other activities, see. §§ 20-22, §§ 24 and 25.
Compulsory subjects
§ 6. Training time include:
1) Danish A: 240 hours.
2) English B: 210 hours.
3) Mathematics C 125 hours.
4) Sport C: 75 hours.
5) Practical / musical subjects C: 75 hours.
PCS. 2. EUR 75 hours for other subjects at C level, 125 hours of lifting from C to B-level and 125 hours to lift from B- to A-level.
PCS. 3. The teaching of English and Danish placed in 1st and 2nd hf. Course leader decides on the distribution of hours between the two years.
PCS. 4. The teaching of mathematics, physical education and the practical / artistic subjects can be the course leader's decision placed in the 1st or 2nd hf, however, that at the individual hf course always offered Mathematics C in at least one class in the 1st hf.
PCS. 5. Students need to shoot express desire of one of the following practical / arts: Art, dance, design, drama, media studies and music, see. § 33.
Mandatory professionals
§ 7. Training time include:
1) A scientific trade group that includes biology C, C geography and chemistry C, with a total of 225 hours.
2) A cultural and social studies group, which includes history B, Social C and religion C, with a total of 300 hours.
PCS. 2. The teaching of the science profession finishes in 1st hf, while teaching in the cultural and social studies group placed in the 1st and 2nd hf. Course leader decides on the distribution of hours between the two years.
PCS. 3. The course leader decides how the training time, professional groups are assigned, distributed among the individual subjects, so the subject group særfaglige goal the greatest possible extent.
electives
§ 8. As elective course can offer practical / aesthetic subjects from this order, subjects from the notice of the electives common for secondary schools and subjects from other upper secondary education, see. Higher preparatory single notice stx-notice hhx Executive Order and HTX-Order referred. however, § 9.
PCS. 2. The course informs while an elective course offered by the Order profession planned reading if it planned to read for stx-notice hhx-notice or HTX-Order. The teaching is done according to the rules for the relevant subject.
PCS. 3. When students choose electives, they could choose between electives were offered when students applied for admission to the course.
PCS. 4. The course can offer other electives than referred to in paragraph. 1, see. § 34 paragraph. 2.
PCS. 5. The course could decide to offer a number of electives in a group (core module) with a global theme.
PCS. 6. Students must for the recording on the course express desire selection of a core module offered respectively choice of electives, if the course provider electives 1st hf.
§ 9. Only one of the following subjects may be included as electives:
1) Computer Science C,
2) Information Technology C
3) Information Technology B,
4) IT B,
5) IT A
6) communications / IT C
7) communications / IT A, and
8) programming C.
PCS. 2. A student can either choose History of Ideas B or cultural understanding C or B as electives.
§ 10. The practical / arts, see. § 6 paragraph. 5, can be included in a module, see. § 8 paragraph. 5.
PCS. 2. The course can decide that one electives such. 2nd foreign language, to be chosen by all students.

§ 11. Course leader may, upon application, to a student in training time attend courses in a electives that can be included in the sixth-form education at another institution.
PCS. 2. For institutions with both STX and HF can course looking for application in special cases, allow a student who wants an elective that form specific admission requirements to higher education, the training time of attendance at the institution of a compulsory subject or study subjects sTX. This assumes, however, that the relevant subject or level is not created as an elective course at the institution, or to schedule technical constraints prevent a student can be admitted to a desired choice team. In such cases, the student must follow the plan drawn up for the teaching profession.
PCS. 3. An elective course taken at another secondary education, always ends with the test.
PCS. 4. A student may not be as electives receive instruction in a subject at the same or lower level than the level included in compulsory education.
§ 12. For each student, the training time in elective total at least 250 hours and include 2-4 electives in C, B or A-level. The minimum requirement is:
1) Two subjects at B level
2) a course at the B and two subjects at C level,
3) a course at B level and a subject at C-level if the student chooses one language at least B-level physics or at least B-level, or
4) a subject at A-level and a subject at C-level. If the A-level course is English or history requires at least two subjects at C level or a course at B level.
PCS. 2. Each participant may, after approval by the course leader follow the teaching of additional electives.
§ 13. Each student must have followed or follow classes at the nearest underlying level before they can start teaching at a higher level in the subject.
PCS. 2. Course leader may depart from paragraph. 1, where the student's real academic qualifications are deemed sufficient.
§ 14. Election of Biology A, Physics A and Chemistry A is conditional on the student follows the teaching of mathematics B or academic qualifications equivalent to mathematics B.
PCS. 2. Election of German or French as a continuation language is conditional upon the student has followed the graduation test preparatory teaching of the subject in 2-4 years or otherwise have achieved equivalent qualifications.
PCS. 3. Course leader may depart from paragraph. 1 and 2, where the student's real academic qualifications are deemed sufficient.
Merger of choice team
§ 15. If the course leader decides to merge two existing election team to one team, aggregation alerted to the affected students and teachers in time that it is possible to provide an adequate match between the teams' academic content and achievement of the professional targets and to conduct a re-planning of teaching in the combined team.
Larger written assignment
§ 16. 3rd or 4th semester students individually a major written assignment, see. Annex 4. The assignment is part of the training time by 25 hours.
Project periods
§ 17. In the training period included project periods, with about 50 hours. It sold at the end of the fourth semester about 25 hours for an exam in the cultural and social studies group. Students prepare project individually or in groups, see. Annex 14
Other educational activities in training time
§ 18. As part of the subjects and subject group's training period organized for each class an introductory course as a coordinated introduction period lasting a total of about four weeks meaning. Annex 3.
PCS. 2. Introduction The course is organized and planned coordination between the class teacher in the professional / multi-disciplinary teaching and workshop teaching.
PCS. 3. The course leader decides how the training period for the introductory course divided on trades and professions.
§ 19. Throughout the scheduled 50 hours of workshop training attached to each class listed. Annex 6
§ 20. Parts of the training time can be the course leader's decision is organized and planned as field trips, etc..
PCS. 2. All field trips must be approved by the course leader and must be included in the fulfillment of professional goals to the same extent as the education they supersede.
§ 21. Course leader may decide that the teaching is held joint events and theme days and can allow for internships.

PCS. 2. Joint Arrangements must involve more than one class or one team can be made from different years and organized under the freer forms than the usual teaching.
PCS. 3. Theme days can be used for activities across ages, grades and teams must be such that there can be worked professionally and pedagogically relevant in secondary schools.
PCS. 4. The internship is staying at a company, institution or the like for one or more participants. Practical training is included in a course in all subjects, their interactions or in connection with the written projects.
PCS. 5. All joint events, seminars and internships to be approved by the course leader and part of the fulfillment of the program's goals.
§ 22. Parts of the program can be completed at a foreign educational institution for students who have registered for a specific system, where previously planned.
Activities outside the training time
§ 23. The course will offer students volunteer training. Course leader decides in which subjects and topics the course is offered. The teaching that can be offered participants across generations, classes and teams may not include trial-related technical training.
PCS. 2. Participation in voluntary training can not be made a condition for the individual student's opportunities for choice of subjects or other activities offered by the course as part of the training.
PCS. 3. The course shall establish special programs for students with special needs, in accordance. Hereby § 56 a. These can be on trial-related technical training.
§ 24. The course offers students study groups. Study groups can be offered to groups of students from different years, classes and teams. Study groups can not include trial-related technical training.
PCS. 2. Participation in voluntary study groups can not be made a condition for the individual student the opportunity to choose courses or other activities offered by the course as part of the training.
PCS. 3. The course shall establish special programs for students with special talents, see. Hereby § 56 a.
§ 25. Course leader can offer students the opportunity to apply the facilities open workshop, homework or the like in order to enhance the learning environment and the basis for that all participants achieve a good academic achievement.
Læreplaner
§ 26. The objectives and content of the teaching contained in the respective curricula, see. Annex 2-18.
PCS. 2. In Annex 7-18 defines the technical content of the section. 2.2. Basic courses and sections. 2.3. Additional fabric. The core fabric covers the academic content, which is mandatory for all students who have the subject at that level. The additional substance is a freer framework within which to select course content, which elaborates and puts into perspective the core substance and expands the student's professional horizons. Both the core material and supplementary material is required to achieve the professional goals. In the selection of core material and supplementary material should students be involved.
§ 27. The language is Danish unless the teaching takes place at a foreign institution. § 22. The Ministry of Education may in other cases approve the language of instruction is English, German or French.
PCS. 2. In teaching, a common grammatical terminology. Foreign language texts can be used in the teaching of all subjects and in their interactions.
PCS. 3. The teaching must regularly include training in studiemetodik.
Chapter 3
Instructions and retention
§ 28. Course leader must ensure that there be professional and methodological guidance in the individual subjects and professional groups, etc.. as part of the training period.
PCS. 2. The educational and vocational guidance that students receive in accordance with the Order for guidance on choosing higher education and careers, are beyond the training time.
PCS. 3. Students are required to participate in the guidance given under paragraph. 1-2.
PCS. 4. The manager must ensure that guidelines for the work to keep students in education, including on reducing dropout rates and procedures in connection with switches or apostasy, see. § 14 of the Law on Higher Preparatory Exam (hf Act).
§ 29. Course leader appoint one of their teachers a number of tutors, each must follow and advise usually 6-8 students throughout their courses, see. Appendix 5.
Chapter 4
The program's management
Classes and hold
§ 30. The course provides a framework for creating classes and teams see. However, § 35th

PCS. 2. The course leader decides on the distribution of students in each class and team. In the distribution of students in classes should be the course leader as far as possible take into account students' prior statements on the choice of practical / musical subjects, see. § 6 paragraph. 5, and elective subjects, cf.. §§ 8 and 9
§ 31. The course leader decides that the teaching of practical or educational reasons in some cases can be organized in groups within the individual class and across generations and classes, and decide on the participants' distribution of the teams.
§ 32. Course leader may approve that single students and students from another upper secondary education who have chosen a profession in hf program, included in an existing class or on an existing team.
Supply and establishing disciplines
§ 33. The course should offer two or more of the in § 6 paragraph. 5, mentioned the practical / musical subjects.
§ 34. The course in cooperation with the other courses in the committed cooperation that the course involved, ensure that within the geographical area in which cooperation covers, offered a wide range of electives covering the three main areas of humanities, science and social sciences.
PCS. 2. The course can offer other elective subjects, cf.. § 8 paragraph. 4, after the Ministry of Education's approval of objectives, content, level and test requirements.
PCS. 3. Course range of subjects, including practical / arts, see. § 6 paragraph. 5, core modules and electives must be published no later than 1 December prior to the deadline for application for admission. The announcement takes place on the course's website and possibly at a briefing for coming first hf-learners.
§ 35. Offer election team created when the courses with more than 400 trainees / students have joined at least 10 students / pupils to the subject, and when the courses with a maximum of 400 students / pupils are at least seven entries. At schools with both general gymnasium and hf count of the total number of students in the two programs when it comes to subjects that can be selected by both high school students and sixth-form students. For subjects that can only be elected by hf-participants, calculated from the total number hf-learners.
PCS. 2. The course leader decides on the creation of specific electives. The decision may mean that not all participants' wishes are respected. The manager must ensure that all students can meet the requirements of the program, cf.. § 12.
Kursusår and holiday
§ 36. The course decides on the course beginning of the year.
PCS. 2. The course decides on the number of school days and the placement of holidays and days off.
Chapter 5
Teaching planning and implementation
§ 37. Teaching planned and implemented so that the objectives of both the program as a whole and for the individual subjects and professional groups met.
PCS. 2. The teaching is organized practices related and applied in contexts where it is relevant for the fulfillment of professional goals in each subject area and professional groups. This involves the inclusion of authentic problems from social life, work and everyday life, which can form the basis for work on subjects objectives and content in order to explore and develop the use of professionalism in practice.
§ 38. The training should be organized taking into account students' different abilities and assumptions.
§ 39. The course supervisor may decide atundervisningen in a subject in professional groups and introductory course, workshop teaching and project periods in a class or on a team can be handled by several teachers.
PCS. 2. When teaching by several teachers, the leader must establish a sharing of responsibility for the overall teaching, evaluation and test (s).
§ 40. Course leader puts together a team of teachers for each class. In addition, the head teacher team put together by other criteria. A team of teachers may be needed function for shorter or longer.
PCS. 2. The manager decides which tasks are added to each team of teachers with regard to teaching, planning, implementation, evaluation and development.
§ 41. Course manager shall, after discussion with the individual class teaching team an overall concise and clear plan (curriculum) for teaching. The curriculum must ensure consistency and continuity in the individual student's education, and the curriculum is the starting point for the teaching staff's joint planning.
PCS. 2. The curriculum must provide a clear division of responsibilities between the class teachers and ensure consistency between its professional and interdisciplinary teaching.

§ 42. The curriculum must include all courses and professional groups and their interactions in order to ensure progression and variation in the use of various forms of work, including written work, virtual programs, project work and field trips.
§ 43. The curriculum is continuously adjusted and should be communicated on the course's website in accordance with the provisions of the law on transparency and openness in education, etc.
§ 44. Course leader must ensure that there is clarity of objectives for the students' professional, general and personal skills as a prerequisite for academic concentration, study skills and personal development, see. Educational objectives in Chapter 1.
PCS. 2. In addition to the særfaglige goal leader must ensure students'
1) oral and written expression skills and communication skills,
2) basic IT skills, including ensuring that students master IT-based communication forums, and
3) awareness and ability to manage their own learning and mastery of different forms of work.
PCS. 3. The course leader must ensure that the written work in subjects interaction and in the individual subjects, including subjects with pre-assigned time for written work, see. § 56, included with this preassigned kursisttid in a binding common plan for the written work for the realization of both the subject-specific goals as targets set out in paragraph. 1 and 2.
PCS. 4. Course leader must ensure that students' work load is evenly distributed over the entire course of study.
§ 45. Outside the project periods, see. § 17, the mono-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary project periods in individual subjects and professional groups or across disciplines and professions organized in shorter continuous course or built into the table and run over a longer period.
PCS. 2. 2. hf suspended the scheduled classes in the week in which students draw the major written assignment, see. § 16.
§ 46. When training starts in a new profession or a new level, the students had submitted a plan for teaching or assisting in the preparation of such. For the later stages of planning students and teachers jointly work.
§ 47. Course leader must ensure that there is a coordination of teaching and writings. Coordination must make it possible to combine simultaneous teaching to different levels in the same subjects in accordance with the course goals and academic content requirements.
§ 48. Up to 20 per cent. of training time can take place as teaching that does not require the simultaneous presence of teacher and student (virtual teaching).
§ 49. The course leader decides that a maximum of seven per cent. of the students' overall training time is used for internal audits, internal joint arrangements or other interdisciplinary teaching activities in accordance with the program's objectives.
PCS. 2. The course leader decides in terms of learning objectives, how the portion allotted shall be distributed on individual subjects, disciplines and courses.
Written work
§ 50. Course leader ensures distribution of the resources available to submit written assignments and to evaluate the students' written work. The manager can as part of this meet establishing knowledge banks for tasks and task formulations and the development and application of collective (including IT-based) correct methods that can be applied to groups of students.
PCS. 2. Written work may take the form of texts, reports, IT presentations, multimedia productions mm.
§ 51. The written work must be used to ensure the quality of the individual student's education in relation to the objectives of both the program as a whole and for the individual subjects.
PCS. 2. There must be progression in the requirements for the students' written work.
PCS. 3. The written work must be included in the ongoing internal evaluation.
§ 52. Written work, both within individual disciplines and across disciplines contribute to the students' skills by
1) develop and document students' skills and knowledge in the subject area,
2) practicing students in communicating scientific material in linguistically correct written form
3) ensure the possibility of having students conduct independent processing issues
4) practicing students in performing systematic writing, including getting the opportunity to demonstrate overview of the subject material,
5) contribute to students' immersion into particular issues and
6) provide the basis for learner and teacher evaluation of student's standpoint.

PCS. 2. Course leader prioritises the use of written work in both the individual subjects as in subjects' interaction and ensures coordination and cooperation between the subjects of its objectives.
§ 53. The course operator decides which tasks are added to each teacher and each team of teachers with regard to students' written work.
PCS. 2. The extent of the students' written work must be approximately the same for all students.
PCS. 3. The chair may accommodate students with special needs.
§ 54. The extent of the written work compiled in kursisttid. Student time is the expected time, an average student at that level need to draw up a response to a specific task.
§ 55. Course manager shall, after discussion with the teachers involved principles for determining student time for each task is done. Course leader distributes student time for the written work, see. §§ 56 and 57.
PCS. 2. Students should be made aware in advance of course ice age for each task.
§ 56. Allocated a kursisttid at 360 to 460 hours over the course of study for each student's written work.
PCS. 2. Course leader beforehand assigns the following hours:
1) at least 75 hours Danish A
2) at least 50 hours to English B
3) at least 50 hours to mathematics C
4) at least 45 hours to the scientific profession
5) at least 100 hours to mathematics B
6) at least 160 hours of mathematics A
7) at least 125 hours for each of the subjects Biology A, Physics A and Chemistry A
8) at least 110 hours to other subjects at A-level with written test
9) at least 40 hours for the second foreign language at the B level, but 50 hours in continuation language B-level
10) at least 25 hours to subjects from the scientific profession being lifted from C- to B-level
PCS. 3. The course ensures progression in the development of students' academic preparatory writing skills, see. Annex 2.
PCS. 4. To ensure the achievements of the individual subjects should be the course leader at the decision as to whether a subject should be awarded more hours than the preassigned least kursisttid, take into account how the subject is part of other written work.
PCS. 5. Course manager can require the students' presence on settlement of kursisttid for written work.
§ 56 a. On each course, in addition to the students time to each student, see. § 56 and § 57 paragraph. 2, set aside a pool of kursisttid that after the course resolution distributed to students with special needs, see. § 23 paragraph. 3 for students with special talents, see. § 24 paragraph. 3, and for students who need enhanced and evaluated by the exam training. In connection with these activities ensure the course professional guidance as necessary.
PCS. 2. The pool is at. school year of at least three hours kursisttid times the number of students on the course per. October 1st.
§ 57. The course operator decides after discussion with the teachers involved, how the remaining kursisttid distributed. In addition to the tasks listed in Annex 2, para. 2.2., The written work met in the following areas:
1) trade groups and other multi-disciplinary collaboration for written products
2) introductory course
3) reporting experimental work
4) internally reviewed the projects, including written assignments, see. § 64 paragraph. 2
5) written work in other subjects, including electives, and
6) written work in subjects at B level as the participants have indicated that would choose as optional subjects at A level.
PCS. 2. Course leader can devote several hours to the written work for students who have selected one or more subjects at A level with written test.
§ 58. The students have in connection with the written work requirements on a regular basis to get feedback on their position, including getting a deepened evaluation of opgavebesvarelsernes strengths and weaknesses.
PCS. 2. Course leader must regularly ensure knowledge of each class strengths, weaknesses and its professional level of the written work. The manager uses this knowledge to after discussion with the teachers involved to ensure progression and distribution of the written work.
§ 59. The evaluation of the students' written work must be in the subject at A-level with pre-assigned time for written work, see. § 56 paragraph. 2, no. 1 and 6-8, and in other subjects and in disciplinary interactions using different forms of evaluation, including:
1) towards the participants' individual responses of tasks and tests
2) direction and comments on individual or group-based written work,

3) comments on the partially finished written work in a process writing,
4) talks with students or student groups, and
5) The combinations of the above.
PCS. 2. The course leader decides how the evaluation of the written work must be performed in each subject and in disciplinary interactions.
Chapter 6
Internal evaluation
The school's evaluation strategy
§ 60. The course prepares an evaluation strategy. Course leader decides after discussion with teachers and students how the strategy translated into an evaluation process that includes concrete, ongoing evaluation of teaching and of each student, both from the objectives set for the program as a whole and by the targets and assessment criteria set out for the courses, etc., see. the curricula so that
1) participants continuously informed of their proficiency in the development process they are in, and how the future can improve, see. § 63 paragraph. 1 and 2
2) the individual teacher is informed about the class or team students' academic level and how students develop in the teacher and the class other subjects and courses,
3) teaching regularly evaluated in order to assess the chosen methods and plan future courses, and
4) The school principal will keep abreast of the results of the evaluations.
PCS. 2. Students must be actively involved in the evaluation, including through the establishment of a study journal, see. Appendix 5.
PCS. 3. The strategy must be on the course website.
PCS. 4. Course leader determines the division of responsibility between students, teachers, teaching staff and management of the course's practical, ongoing evaluation of teaching and learning of each student. Course leader sets including when and how to use common evaluation themes and approaches on the course.
§ 61. The course decide how the evaluation strategy and evaluation of specific professional and educational areas included in the course's quality system.
PCS. 2. The course decide in accordance with the law on transparency and openness, which parts of the assessments made, see. Paragraph. 1 published.
Evaluation of each student
§ 62. All major projects that students are involved in preparing, should be evaluated separately and the results of the evaluation submitted to the course leader.
§ 63. Information is not final term marks (årskarakterer), but teachers give at least twice a year students an assessment of their position in each subject, see. Paragraph. 2. The assessment will form the basis for the guidance of each student on how the student develops his academic progress, its working methods, etc.
PCS. 2. The course decide how the assessment of the student's academic level, see. Paragraph. 1, must be made. The course can choose to give the student proficiency mark in the subject to give the participant written assignments, graded with a character, or to use other evaluation methods based on concrete evidence.
PCS. 3. Students in the stx, hhx- and HTX program taught in courses or courses for this be-Order, entitled proficiency marks and final term marks (årskarakte acids) under the rules for the programs in question.
§ 64. Course leader must ensure that students receive training in the various forms of testing that are part of the program.
PCS. 2. During the last semester before the final written exam to exam, students will be offered to prepare a written assignment under exam-like conditions. The task can be judged with a character.
§ 65. Course leader ensures that at least once per. semester takes place a discussion of each student in order to assess the student's ability to complete the program.
Chapter 7
Education descriptions and certificates for completed training
§ 66. Each team of teachers, respectively, each teacher must at the end of a kursistår prepare an educational description.
PCS. 2. Teaching Descriptions, prepared at the end of instruction in a subject, is included as background information for the oral tests. Students who have previously completed a course or courses at a lower level or have received credit for a portion of the subject or course, may, by agreement with the teacher who expected to act as examiner at a possible oral exam, use instruction description / is from here.

PCS. 3. The teaching staff respectively teacher must in the preparation of teaching the description using the Ministry of Education drew up a template in the Ministry of prescribed format. The Ministry may require instruction descriptions submitted and may request that this be done in a specific electronic format. Education description must be available for the course examiners.
§ 67. For students who change education or training during a kursusår, each team of teachers, respectively, each teacher to help develop an educational description. Education description shall be prepared in accordance with § 66.
§ 68. A student who participated in the teaching of a subject or a course without completing this, on request, obtain a certificate from the course leader for completed courses; see. However paragraph. 2, and the results obtained.
PCS. 2. It is a condition to get a certificate for completed training that the student has met the requirements of the course tuition and regulations for active participation.
Chapter 8
Special education and other special educational assistance
§ 69. Students who, because of disability or other difficulties that may be treated, need special support must have special education or other special educational assistance that meets their needs.
PCS. 2. Education or other assistance initiated after the course leader's specific assessment of the student's needs based on expert opinions. Education or special educational assistance shall be undertaken in cooperation with the student and his teacher or team of teachers. If the participant is subject to custody, the implementation done in agreement with the custodial parent.
PCS. 3. Course leader may exempt a student for teaching sports C. The manager decides which elective participant must complete instead.
§ 70. For students who, because of disability are not able to follow an ordinary two-year course, the course leader allow the two-year course stretched over three years. Training time is the same as for an ordinary course of 2 years, see. § 3, paragraph. 1.
Chapter 9
Sick Education
§ 71. Students who temporarily due to illness can not follow mainstream education for longer, must be offered health education.
§ 72. In case of absence due to illness, which is expected to last for a long time, the course leader soon as possible and no later than 2 weeks (10 school days) after the student last attended class, contact the student. If the participant is subject to parental directed also contact the custodial parent on the introduction of health education.
PCS. 2. The leader makes sure that the necessary lessons are implemented in agreement with participant and as necessary with the student's teacher or team of teachers.
PCS. 3. Staying participant in a hospital or other institution, acting head further agreement with the institution of teaching settlement.
§ 73. Duration of the course, at any time must be adjusted student's health condition, may not exceed five hours a week and can not normally extend beyond 8 weeks (40 school days). The completed course replaces the training period, as the participant in that period have not completed.
§ 74. If a student due to illness frequently have had short-term absence or expected to have frequent short absences, the student get additional training related to the student's participation in mainstream education.
PCS. 2. The course leader decides on teaching after paragraph. 1.
§ 75. For students who because of prolonged illness are not able to follow the ordinary teaching, the course leader allow the two-year course stretched over three years. It is a precondition that the participant has no prospect of immediate recovery and that the student needs that teaching limited daily or periodically. Training time is the same as for an ordinary course of 2 years, see. § 3, paragraph. 1.
PCS. 2. The student must document his illness and his need of a medical certificate.
Chapter 10
Various provisions
§ 76. For students who are busy during the TEAM Denmark, and for students who are admitted to the Musical Basic Course or equivalent course in visual arts, can the course leader organize the training over three years. Training time for hf portion is the same as for an ordinary course of 2 years, see. § 3, paragraph. First

§ 77. A course can by the Ministry of Education approval providing a higher preparatory education in combination with an agricultural or maritime education with a total duration of three years. Training time for hf portion is the same as for an ordinary course of 2 years, see. § 3, paragraph. 1.
Chapter 11
Complaints
§ 78. A student can appeal to the course's director of educational decisions taken at the course in accordance with this Order.
PCS. 2. If the student is subject to custody, the complaint also made by the custodial parent.
§ 79. If the course leader does not give the student rejected a complaint in accordance with § 78, the student or the custodial parent complaint to the Ministry of Education over the course leader's decision. The complaint must be submitted to the course leader within two weeks of the course leader has informed the participant of its decision.
PCS. 2. Course leader must issue an opinion in the matter and give the complainant the opportunity to comment on the statement. Course leader must give the complainant a one-week deadline for this. Complaints must submit any comments to the course, which forwards the matter, including opinion and the complainant's comments, if any, to the Ministry.
PCS. 3. The Ministry shall decide on the retention of the course leader's decision or amending this in favor of the complainant.
§ 80. A student in need of special educational assistance can appeal to the Appeals Board for the education grant of decisions which the Authority for State Education has taken the award for the extra costs for the participant under the Law on Institutions of general secondary education and general adult education, etc. | || Chapter 12
Deviations from the Order
§ 81. The Ministry of Education may in special cases permit deviations from the Order to promote experimentation and educational development.
PCS. 2. Ministry of Education may approve deviations from the Order where a course offering lessons aimed at a similar international exam which gives access to higher education in Denmark.
PCS. 3. Ministry of Education may approve deviations from the Order for a single student, where exceptional circumstances apply.
Chapter 13
Commencement and transitional rules
§ 82. This Order shall enter into force on 1 August 2010. The Order is effective for students who have started the two-year hf program on 1 August 2010 or later.
PCS. 2. Order no. 745 of 1 July 2008 on the program for two-year (hf-Order) is repealed. The Order is still effective for students who have started the two-year higher preparatory training before 1 August 2010. Notice Annex 14 also impact on higher preparatory single students who pass a comprehensive test of cultural and social studies group before the summer examination 2012, cf. . § 4 pcs. 3 of Law no. 1526 of 27 December 2009 amending the law on education to secondary school (stx) (secondary law), law on education to higher commercial examination (HHX) and the higher technical examination (HTX) and the Law on Higher Preparatory Exam (hf).
PCS. 3. The course leader can decide to hold the students covered by paragraph. 2, point 2., Taught according to the curriculum set out in the Annexes to this Order. This does not apply in the cultural and social studies group, see. Annex 14

Ministry of Education, June 22, 2010
Department Head
Jarl Damgaard
/ Helle Kristensen

Annex 1
Summary of the Order contents and list of annexes - two-year hf, June 2010










Notice content






Chapter 1


The program's purpose, duration and scope (§§ 1-4)



Chapter 2


Structure and content (§§ 5-27)



Chapter 3


Instructions and retention (§§ 28-29)



Chapter 4


The program's management (§§ 30-36)



Chapter 5



Teaching planning and implementation (§§ 37-59)



Chapter 6


Internal evaluation (§§ 60-65)



Chapter 7


Education descriptions and certificates for completed training (§§ 66-68)



Chapter 8


Special education and other special educational assistance (§§ 69-70)



Chapter 9


Sick Teaching (§§ 71-75)



Chapter 10


Various provisions (§§ 76-77)



Chapter 11


Complaints (§§ 78-80)



Chapter 12


Deviations from the Order (§ 81)



Chapter 13


Commencement and transitional regulations (§ 82)













Notice Annex






Appendix 1


Summary of the Order contents and list of Annex



Appendix 2


Student The university preparatory writing skills



Appendix 3


Introductory course



Appendix 4


Larger written assignment



Appendix 5


Tutor Scheme and study journal



Appendix 6


Workshop Teaching



Appendix 7


Visual C



Appendix 8


Dance C



Appendix 9


Danish A



Annex 10


Design C



Annex 11


Drama C



Annex 12


English B



Annex 13


Sport C



Annex 14


Culture and social studies group



Annex 15


Mathematics C



Annex 16


Medienberufe C



Annex 17


Music C




Annex 18


Scientific profession





Appendix 2
Student The university preparatory writing skills - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Measure
1.1. Students are required to find and select relevant material, and process and writing key single and multiple academic subjects.
Students must using professional knowledge, basic methods in the subject / subjects and the relevant documentation could provide a clear, coherent and nuanced writing, based on the following study preparatory writing skills:


- Genre consciousness
- Linguistic accuracy
- Conceptual
- Reasoning
- The use of quotations, figures, illustrations, etc..
- Presentation
- Relevant references, of notes and bibliography.

The university preparatory skills to be applied in the major written assignment.
2. Implementation
2.1. Course leader ensures that the extension of the written base course within the framework of the introductory course, see. Annex 3, throughout the school's progression and coherence in the development of the individual student writing skills. The course decide how the systematic work on the development of students' writing skills organized.
2.2. As part of the development of students' academic preparatory writing skills should students:


- Work on a unit of writing in the first half of the course in the art Danish, see. Annexes 9 and
- Answer a task in history in the context of cultural and social studies group, see. Annex 14

Course leader decides which other single and multiple professional tasks that have a particular focus on achieving the goals. Course leader decides how the students' other written work included in the overall capacity building.
2.3. Course leader decides for all major assignments beyond the major written assignment, see. Annex 4, the procedure of choice of subjects or disciplinary interactions professional field and assignment.
2.4. The course provides guidance resources etc. available for each student / student group.
3. Evaluation
3.1. The evaluation of the section. 2.2. mentioned tasks included both professional communications qualities and shortcomings, and to what extent the student mastered the study-related writing skills listed in section. 1.1. The evaluation shall be applied prospectively with a view to continuous progression in students' mastery of writing skills. The evaluation is performed using evaluation forms listed in § 59 paragraph. 1.
3.2. The course will decide whether to grant character for each task. The course decide how the evaluation of the individual written assignment included in the definition of proficiency marks.
Appendix 3
Introductory course - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Purpose
The introductory course is designed to qualify the transition to higher preparatory education and provide students a safe professional and multidisciplinary study methodical platform. Furthermore, the introductory course ensure that each student is offered and organized the professional and methodological training, the need for a gateway to the total program.
The introductory course will contribute to a strengthening of the general study skills in the 2-year hf.
Overall be introductory course, also help to establish a common educational platform for teaching.
2. Contents
Each course defines itself of the introductory content. The following items are normally included:


- Initial screening
- Introduction to general study methods, including to study the book, see. Annex 5
- Introduction to tutor tasks
- Introduction to the different working methods, including group work and project-oriented teaching
- Introduction to virtual study and work methods
- Introduction to oral and written presentation, including writing basic course
- Differentiated courses in math, grammar, reading techniques, IT, etc.

By course's end draw trainee draft study profile that describes the student's current study status. The student aligns study profile with tutor and introduces the study book in order to forward the application, including in conversations with a tutor, see. Appendix 5.

The content and weighting of the different elements of the introductory course varies according to the individual student's requirements.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The introduction program is a special organization of teaching in professional, multidisciplinary and differentiated organized lessons.
In connection with the introductory course typically includes screenings of student's study background in key subject areas Danish, English and mathematics. The screenings are made for the organization and implementation of differentiated teaching.
Of the introductory elements followed up and be involved in all the professional, multi-disciplinary and pedagogical considerations related. planning, implementation and evaluation of teaching in the further course.
Parts of the teaching can usefully be organized differentiated and virtual, while other parts are organized in class or team basis.
3.2. organizing
Each hf course sets an overall target and action plan for the introduction program and its various elements.
The introductory course is organized in relation to the individual student circumstances and opportunities where each student in addition to engaging in a particular class can be part of several teams contexts.
The introductory course is organized as a combination of teaching, supervision and evaluation.
At the start of the course students presented a comprehensive plan of the introductory content and phases.
Appendix 4
Larger written assignment - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Assignment objective
The purpose of the major written assignment is that students work independently to explore and communicate an academic issue within a chosen area. Students must demonstrate that they are able to independently select, integrate and use relevant material and that they are able to conduct a critical assessment on a scientific basis. In working with the major written task forces students so their study skills know that through written presentation must demonstrate that they are able to grasp, manipulate, dispose, summarize and communicate an academic issue.
2. Measure
The goal of the major written assignment is that students should be able to:


- Demonstrate the ability to in-depth study and to familiarize themselves with new skills areas
- Demonstrate the ability to select, use and combine different academic approaches and thereby enhance the professional immersion
- Master relevant professional goals in the (t) incoming subjects
-, Process and structure the relevant material
- Demonstrate the ability in teaching,
- Answer the assigned task, including that there is consistency between the project description and assignment as well
- Master the manufacturing mold in a professional task (eg. Quote technique, notes, sources and bibliography).

3. Task hits
The major written assignment is individual and developed within one to three subjects. Written task in one subject, the student must either attending classes or have passed examination in at least B-level. Written task in several subjects, the trainee must follow or have passed the test in the subjects, of whom at least one must be at least B-level. The student must prepare task at the highest academic level and qualifications or have followed courses.
4. Task area
4.1. Each student chooses - under the section. 3.1. - The subject (s) which the project is written in.
4.2. Course leader appoint one of the teachers one or possibly more than one supervisor for each student in the subject (s) involved. For guidance purposes tips and hints for the student's future work on the task. The course organizes instructions in such a way as to ensure a clear separation between the role of the teacher as a supervisor and assessor, and the guidance must not include a review of significant parts of the student's response.
4.3. The student chooses in consultation with the supervisor field for the task. The area must be within both master the core substance as supplementary material enclosed in such a way that the possibility of developing a thesis statement, which ensures that there can be no recycling of sections from responses that have been previously submitted and corrected.
4.4. The student must be six weeks before the assignment of the week start writing state (s) chosen subjects and area. The course establishes a procedure for this.
5. Task formulation

5.1. Task formulation is developed by the student's supervisor (s). It must embrace discipline-specific, respectively multidisciplinary requirements of the constituent subjects, and there must be demand for immersion, involving important beyond the work of the (t) subject in question. The task must be specific, limited and shall specify in detail what is required of the participant and must involve some aspect or be accompanied by documents that have not been discussed during the instructions. The task must have such a form that the participant can not be automatically produce detailed parts of the final answer, but at the same time be so designed as to take into account the considerations that the student has taken on the task of guidance period. Students who have chosen the same area must have different task formulations.
5.2. The task can not rely directly on the part of the subject matter that has already been entered in the individual student teaching in the higher preparatory courses. However, there is nothing to prevent that answer drawn in continuation of the work of the (t) incoming subjects or relating thereto.
5.3. Written assignment in a subject with a practical touch, be it the assignment clearly state that in the case of a written assignment.
6. Task week
6.1. The assignment is written during one of the course's head down week for the period 1 November to 15 March.
6.2. The task week trainee must ensure appropriate access to facilities that are appropriate for the preparation of the task.
7. The assignment
7.1. The assignment is written in Danish. The course may approve that a fully or partially written in English, German or French. If one or more foreign languages ​​are included, the course can also approve the assignment fully or partially prepared on the foreign language.
7.2. The answer must contain a summary in English.
8. Delivery of the answer
8.1. The answers submitted no later than seven days after the task start the week in an original and the number of copies. The course establishes a procedure for this.
8.2. Course leader may allow students who demonstrate that they are full-time employees, answering task over a period of 10 days.
9. Marking
9.1. The assessment of the assignment is a professional overall assessment in relation to the academic goals of the subjects included in the task.
9.2. In evaluating the addition importance to the following conditions:


- Whether the task is answered from the formulated requirements
- The consistency between the time-frame for the job and the reply scope and quality
- There used relevant background material for answers
- The substance is conveyed satisfactorily and are sufficiently profound
- Whether the material used is included in the reasonable
- Whether there are specific references and complete documentation
- On all sources is illuminated, and notes and bibliography are accurate and complete
- The production is manageable predisposed, and that there is consistency in the response
- Whether the language used is clear, precise and consistent throughout the job.

9.3. If the assignment fully or partially prepared in a foreign language, the requirements for their language the same as if the task were written in Danish.
9.4. One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
10. Even Students
10.1. Even students can develop a large project in accordance with clause. 1.1. - 7.4., Except for the section. 2.2. The independent student must, if no tests have been taken in the subject / subjects, having signed up for the test in that / those subjects at the first examination period.
10.2. Course leader may allow even students who demonstrate that they are full-time employees, answering task over a period of 10 days.
Annex 5
Tutor Scheme and study journal - two-year hf, June 2010
The tutor
1. Purpose
Mentoring, which should help to develop the individual student autonomy and self-management in relation to teaching and supporting the student's retention in the program.
Tutor program must contribute to:


- Strengthen the individual student's study skills
- Maintain focus on the individual student's learning process
- Strengthen the individual student academic motivation, total student motivation and thus retention in education
- Support the participant in the effort to develop the ability to make the study status to himself regarding:
- Ambition

- The study terms the strengths and weaknesses
- Progression in teaching
- Adjustment of the learning process
- Self-evaluation.

2. Contents
The tutor is responsible for:


- Participate in the planning and implementation of the introductory course, see. Annex 3, including providing introduction to tutor tasks
- Plan and conduct individual interviews with the associated participants, the talks focused on the student's study-related and -faglige development, and summary of the talks entered in the study book
- Advise each student on how the student can work towards its goals, including by working with and update the study book
- As needed disseminate information about students' study-related progression to the other teachers.

3. Establishment and organization
Course leader appoints tutors so that each student has one of his teachers who tutor.
The tutor must be through an appropriate number of conversations have close contact with each student and follow the student's learning progression in collaboration with other class teachers for professional and methodical guidance of the student.
Central to the tutor's work is partly interviews with the participant and an improved collaboration with the student on study book focusing on progression in learning and acquisition of study skills.
The tutor must - to an extent determined by the course leader - be available for individual study purposes related inquiries from students.
'Research
1. Purpose
The work with the student's personal study journal aims to sharpen student's awareness of why and how to work with the professional and personal learning progression.
Study the book will serve as a tool for that student, in collaboration with the tutor sets realistic goals and success criteria for further development of its academic and study-related skills and continually evaluate the process and progression.
Thus, study the book will help to maintain the student's focus throughout the school and serve as documentation of the work of the established academic goals.
2. Contents
Study the book serves as a unifying tool in the student's education and includes the following elements:


1) relevant information on the student's previous education and qualifications on the current sixth-form courses (subjects and levels, credit etc.), as well as the specific features relevant to the program, such as. purpose of the program, or any reading difficulties.
2) information on the student's academic and study-related skills and the goals that the participant has set itself.
3) information and assessments of the extent to which the goals have been reached.
4) agreements on how the student can work with its academic progression and skills development.
5) interview schedules and short summaries and conclusions from tutor talks.

In addition, study the book contain special pages for appointments, meetings, daily notes etc.
The participant's entry of the information in the section. 1 in connection with the preparation of the study profile, see. Section. 2 of Annex 3 on the introductory course.
Para. 2-4 filled in by the students, teachers and tutors.
Para. 5 completed by the student.
3. Establishment and organization
Study book is part of the professional and methodological guidance and maintained by each student and his teacher and tutor.
Study book is electronic.
Template to study the book's various sections designed in the individual course and made available online.
Access to the individual student study journal the student, the student's tutor and other teachers and the course leader.
It is assumed to study the book does not contain sensitive personal information.
Appendix 6
Workshop Education - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Purpose
Workshop Teaching aims to support students in developing good study and work habits, and increase their awareness of learning processes, methods and goals.
Workshop Teaching must thus help develop students' metacognitive thinking and allow time for structured preparation and independent study-related contemplation.
Work in the workshop will create a connection between teaching and students' homework in order that students will gain knowledge of how to prepare for the individual subjects and disciplines.
2. Content

The student work habits and study skills developed through presentation and integration of different concepts for the acquisition of academic content and professional contexts. This must be done in order to ensure the progression of the development of the course participant to the students.
In connection with the acquisition of the subject material usually includes the following elements of progression in the workshop hours:


- Working with taxonomy and methodology
- Study techniques, including various forms of note-taking, reading techniques and strategies
- Teaching various forms of work, including project
- Continued development of the study-related IT skills
- Training in sample presentation.

3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
There is allocated 50 hours of training time for workshop training, see. § 19.
Workshop instruction scheduled and assigned to each class.
Workshop teaching is organized on the progression of work and consistency with other lessons.
The workshop teaching the course participants will work individually as needed in some periods, but so that they can both help and time for processing and contemplation. The workshop can also provide a good framework for differentiated instruction, which can take place both by physical presence as virtual.
3.2. organizing
Workshop The hours change character during the process and thus divided into different phases:
At the beginning of the course includes some of the workshop hours in the introductory course.
Then follows workshop teaching up on the study methods are introduced in order to study the methods anchored in the students' work habits.
Later in the process can focus on homework in the workshop hours possibly with differentiated offers with a focus on the individual student's need for support.
Workshop Teaching is organized in close cooperation between the class teacher and with the involvement of the participants, where appropriate. A class teaching team must collaborate closely on the planning and conduct of activities in the workshop hours.
The mandatory workshop lessons can be supplemented by an open, voluntary lesson workshop, see. § 25.
Annex 7
Visual C - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
The subject's primary target field are phenomena from across the visual field, including art and architecture.
The subject studied visual expression as being dependent on time, culture and individual. Today examines challenges and changing art and architecture our view of the world through perception and cognition. Furthermore, various notions of how art and architecture designed, analyzed and interpreted.
Visual course based on application-oriented themes that integrate theoretical and practical dimensions.
1.2. purpose
The subject aims that students acquire an understanding of visual expression forms and manifestations, both on individual work level and in larger contexts.
Students acquire visual skills to orient themselves in visual cultures and to work with the visual impact, even without the subject's borders.
The powers trained through relevant aesthetic work, practical as well as theoretical.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:


- Distinguish between personal experience of visual expression and analytical approach to the visual phenomena
- Solve elementary visualization tasks with an emphasis on visual communication
- Select and analyze a relevant picture material on the basis of a clear academic issue. Student's own work to be included in the imagery.
- Collect analytical results in a conclusion
- Understand art science texts in the media and in educational material at an elementary level
- Distinguish between three selected art historical periods and describe these periods main features
- Communicate about and using visual expression.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Theoretical and practical work with images on surfaces, sculptures and installations and architecture
- Selected works and texts accordingly with the following spread: 1. before about 1750, after about 2 1750 and 3 art from the past five years, including global contemporary art. Within these periods selected works from three categories: a. Images on surfaces, b. Sculptures and installations and c. Architecture

- Theoretical and practical work with at least two of three following types of professional issues: formalanalytiske, important analytical and social analytical
- Theoretical and practical work with at least two different rendering strategies, for example. various methods which can be imaged or visualized something, as well as some considerations behind these methods.
- Theoretical and practical work with creative processes.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. In the supplementary material included other works, application-related tasks or exhibition visits, that elaborates the core fabric so be cited multiple dimensions and perspectives. Visual material and visual problems that are parts of other subjects included as supplementary material in the visual arts in relation to disciplinary interactions.
Students can only meet the academic goals by including works that students choose or designer. Phenomena from across the visual field which stands participants closely, involved.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Students experiencing art and architecture at first hand and through reproductions. These encounters with art and architecture are actively involved in teaching as a starting point and further processing of visual and image communication issues.
Teaching must be organized as a development from teacher-led courses to more independent work. Teaching should encourage students to ask its questions to different ways of looking at phenomena from the visual field on. Teaching must be organized in a way that practical and theoretical work is linked and complement each other in relation to defined thematic issues. The practical and theoretical work always appears as a means of achieving the overall professional goals and is not an end in itself.
In the planning of the practical and theoretical work, the trainee must always be made aware of what specifically is expected. This applies to both the theoretical and practical work.
3.2. Work methods
The subject of work alternates between classroom training, short courses and project periods where students work individually or in groups. There must be consistency between courses and projects. Lectures and courses provide theoretical and practical tools that students can use in projects.
At the end of the period of education implements students an independent, individual examination where students work from a problem formulation that teacher formulates. The teacher acts as a tutor.
Work is consistent with practical and theoretical elements. Work is handy with simple image communication and visualize the theoretical elements, like the theoretical reflections in connection with the practical work always maintained in note form.
Common to all forms of work is that the process and solutions to problems, that is, research, options, opting out and results, collected in a portfolio. Written assignments, imagery and literature gathered also in the portfolio.
The results of teaching presented outside the art premises in the form of exhibitions or presentations that show students' competence to communicate about and by means of visual expression.
3.3. it
It is used in education as a means of communication, as a means of expression, as billedreproduktivt media as information retrieval and as artistic visual media.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Visual covered by the general requirement for subject interaction.
In the visual arts trained visual skills and image communications, which qualifies the students' use of images in other subjects.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Student's work progression and self-evaluation is held in the portfolio.
Based on the portfolio assessed learner work ongoing in relation to the tasks assigned. The student edits his portfolio, so theoretical and practical problem formulations, research material and assignments clearly communicated.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral examination, which consists of two parts:


1) a sample of the examinee's exam
2) a sample of the theoretical analytical substance on the basis of an assignment which is based on the student's portfolio, see. Section. 3.2.

The candidate chooses the order or can choose to merge the two parts together.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Preparation time is about Per 60 minutes. examinee.

Sample portion of the examinee's exam
The basis for this part of the exam is the student's thesis. This part of the examination consists of an introductory presentation where the student explains and discusses key elements of the project and a detailed conversation between the candidate and the examiner about the student project.
The examination time is maks.10 minutes for this part of the test.
Sample part in the theoretical analytical substance on the basis of the student's portfolio
The task formulated by the examiner within a topic that is chosen so that the student may withdraw examples across the portfolio (see. Section. 3.2.). The examples are partly made by the student, partly photographs or reproductions of examples produced by others.
The student answers the task based on the portfolio content. The answer is elaborated in a subsequent conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
Even Students
For exam has examinees made a portfolio which is in line with the curriculum requirements. The portfolio contains a collection of self-made works, reproductions or works made by others as well as relevant literature. The portfolio should contain material so that examinees can demonstrate that they have achieved the necessary academic goals (para. 2.1.), And the portfolio must have the latitude mentioned in the curriculum section on the core substance (para. 2.2.), As well as additional substance ( section. 2.3.).
The exam is otherwise as described in the curriculum (para. 4.2.).
The examiner puts one examination paper based on the portfolio content.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the academic goals set forth in the section. 2.1.
In the assessment of the oral examination of the student's exam Emphasis is also placed on the exam project idea and execution with respect to the identified problem formulation.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 8
Dance C - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
The course deals with dance as bodily and cultural phenomenon and thus includes artistic, popular as well as popular dance forms. The course has both a theoretical as a practical dimension, based on a European cultural heritage and its global relationships. The course builds on the current dance science, which opens for interaction with other disciplines.
1.2. purpose
The course contributes to the program's overall objective of the students to acquire basic skills in dancing and improvising, choreograph and analyze dance. The emphasis is on the students to acquire the ability to combine theory and dance practice in a reflective manner.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:


- Create, execute and analyze different forms of dance
- Perform dance steps and movements and analyze them formally
- Explain important dance forms in Europe and see them in a cultural perspective
- Apply concepts from dance theory
- Use and understand dance genres and dance cultures in the context of the story
- To reflect on the sensory learned.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Practical and analytical work with theatrical and social dance forms
- Dance improvisation and composition
- Basic concepts of dance technique and dance theory
- Two dance historical periods: one before and one after 1950
- Dance in a cultural context.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance in the course dance should be put into perspective and deepen the core substance and in general expand professional horizons, so that students can meet the academic goals.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on the disciplines experienced as a whole. The theoretical work is done with still view the practical and the practical work with the continued involvement of the theoretical in the quest for expansion of students' awareness of dance as cultural skills. In this way the students' level of reflection.
Because of the essential role of sensuous orientation plays in the subject, the bodily expression and reflection of this will be in focus. For the purpose of the subject's purpose organized teaching, so there are good opportunities to develop relevant skills based on this sensory information.
3.2. Work methods

The teaching themes and projects where several elements of the course are included. Project and subject teaching alternate with training periods where work systematically with the necessary basic knowledge in the individual disciplines. The participants shall be for about 50 per cent. of the subject of education work physically with the performance of dance: solo, couples and group dances as well as basic improvisation and choreography.
Students must for project work to provide written reports to document the results of the work and the work process. The written reports function is primarily to deepen the students' academic skills in key parts of the subject.
Company visits and visits by guest teachers should be part of the subject's activity forms.
3.3. it
It must be included in the subject's theoretical and practical dimensions which students get acquainted with the modern dansenotationsprogrammer, computer technology as part of the performance, video as a tool etc.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
The teaching of elective dance organized so that students get the opportunity to use the skills and relevant knowledge that they achieve in other subjects or groups. This must be done in such a way as to contribute to the perspective of the substance and lighting of dance educative pages.
With its project-oriented and practice-based learning can dance relatively easily integrated into multidisciplinary design process with all other subjects.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The academic goals are the basis for the ongoing evaluation of the students' standpoint in particular and education in general. These goals must always be the foundation for the ongoing oral and written evaluation. The fundamental and recurring question is: How are the students' position in relation to the academic objectives and targets? For the evaluation can be sufficiently differentiated, the research group at the educational institution based on the academic preparation milestones and present them to students at semester start.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral examination consisting of two parts with a total duration of about 24 minutes per. examinee.
The first part of the exam is a presentation of the group dance project. The presentation should last at least one minute per. examinee, and the whole presentation may not exceed 10 minutes. The group has a size of between two and eight trainees. There is no examination during this part of the test. In presenting the group can use a limited number of helpers, whose efforts must be clear to examiners.
The second part of the exam is individual. It is based not reviewed material and put in relation to the candidate's own dance project synopsis and undergone substance. This part of the test has a duration of approximately 20 minutes and give a preparation time of about 20 minutes. The test consists of a short presentation by the candidate and a subsequent interview with the examiner. The sample material can be up to several parts and can be pictures, small text and / or up to one minute video quotes. The material chosen by the examiner and should - to the extent that the information is known - is supplied with data such. construction place and year as well as title and possibly author. By fragments may be accompanied by a brief summary.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the academic goals set forth in the section. 2.1.
In the first part of the test is emphasized:


- Dance technical execution of the choreography
- The candidate's ability to work choreography.

In the second part of the test is emphasized:


- The student's ability to independently dispose his presentation
- Examinee detailed description and analysis of the material
- The candidate's ability to draw lines undergone drug
- The candidate's ability to engage in dialogue with examiners
- The candidate's ability to communicate precise, balanced and detailed
- The candidate's insight and awareness of the project idea and execution

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 9
Danish A - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. Identity

The subject's core is the Danish language, literature and communication. In working with the Danish language and language texts in a variety of genres and media connected language, culture, history, aesthetics and communication. It is characteristic that the literary, linguistic and communicative activities are part of a close interaction in both the receptive and productive dimension of the subject.
1.2. purpose
Danish course serves at once an educationally and academically purposes.
In a practice- and application-oriented work with fictional and non-fictional texts in all media, sharpened student's critical and analytical skills to uncover the meaning of texts. Thus contributing profession both to expand the students' formation horizons and to strengthen their ability to handle information, go behind the words and understand their content and shades. Critical-analytical skills and mastery of a safe linguistic expression promotes student's opportunities to orient themselves and act in a modern, democratic, globally oriented society.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:


- With accuracy, nuanced and communication conscious both orally and in writing
- Master the written language standards for accuracy and apply grammar and stilistikkens basic concepts
- Demonstrate insight into the language function and variation, including its interaction with culture and society
- Apply key oral presentation forms (including presentations and argue a point of view) with disseminating awareness
- Apply key written presentation forms (including presentation, discussion, analysis and interpretation) with communication consciousness.
- Demonstrate knowledge of the subject's identity and methods
- Analyze and evaluate primary non-fictional texts in all media
- Analyze, interpret and relate primarily fictional texts in all media
- Demonstrate knowledge of the features of the Danish literary history with examples of the interaction between text, culture and society
- Demonstrate knowledge of and relate to the modern media landscape, including analyze and assess texts communicative significance and the media's role in communicating
- Navigate and select information in screen-based texts with an academic focus.

2.2. Basic courses
To the core substance falls within the linguistic, literary and media-related subject matter, estimated weighted as 2: 2: 1. The three subject areas included in the close interaction in the classroom.
The core fabric is the following:
The linguistic subject matter
The linguistic fabric area has as its object a genre varied selection of texts, spoke as well as printed on which to built a language-analytical approach.
He works among other things:


- Language observation, including grammar and style
- Argumentationsanalyse
- Rhetorical analysis
- Communication analysis.

The literary subject matter
The literary subject matter has as its object a historically wide and genre varied selection of mainly literary texts from the last 1000 years. The text consists of Danish-language text supplemented with Norwegian and Swedish texts in the original languages ​​and world literature in translation.
The texts are read with emphasis on their importance and function of the present time and in the future.
In substance the area included:


- Ballad, adventure, hymn and comedy
- Texts from the Enlightenment and Romanticism
- A historically wide and genre varied selection of texts from 1870 to today, including realistic and modernist texts
- At least five works in the categories of novel, drama, short stories, poetry collections and discursive prose. The works must have a historical and genre diversification. Two of the works are read individually in relation to a disciplinary components. Students documenting orally or in writing their work with each of these works.
- At least one text from each author Ludvig Holberg, Adam Oehlenschläger, NFS Grundtvig, Steen St. Blicher, Hans Christian Andersen, Herman Bang, Henrik Pontoppidan, Johannes V. Jensen, Martin Andersen Nexo, Tom Kristensen, Karen Blixen, Martin A. Hansen, Peter Seeberg and Klaus Rifbjerg.

He works among other things:


- Genre concepts
- Literary theory and literary method
- Literary, cultural and historical awareness presentations.

The media-related subject matter

The media-related subject matter has as its object media texts in both printed and electronic media, including newspapers, radio, television, films, websites and interactive media.
In substance the area included:


- News texts
- Documentary texts
- Fiction texts
- Visual forms of expression
- A work in the form of a larger rounded media product.

He works among other things:


- Nyhedskriterier
- Fiction and facts codes in fabric area text types.

Oral and written expression
In this part of the core substance included:


- A course of orality
- A course on writing
- Oral presentations and text production.

Work on oral and written expression must put students in a position to express themselves clearly and to the dissemination conscious. We work with a range of oral and written communication forms, some of which go into other subjects.
2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance into perspective and deepen the core substance. The teaching in the supplementary material occupies about 15 per cent. of the subject of education.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The instruction includes the professional skills of interaction within and across the three subject areas, the linguistic, literary and media-related subject matter. Specifically included the linguistic work as an integrated part of the text reading, with particularly emphasis on the utility and media context in which the lyrics belong.
In teaching texts into perspective historically and systematically look for their function in both simultaneously as a contemporary context.
3.2. Work methods
It involved a wide range of work.
The written work ranging from small writing exercises, as coach partial competences and limited write operations, to the larger genre defined tasks where participants in a coherent and communication deliberate manufacture relate analyzing, debating or investigative to a text or a topic. The emphasis on vocational guidance in the writing phase. In the organization of the written work included a course on writing in the first half of the course (see section. 2.2.), Where students work with basic concepts and methods of importance to the writing process and the finished product.
The written work is planned so that there is progression and coherence of written work in other subjects. The connection to other subjects can be established in a substantive as well as a formally plan.
The oral work focuses on the student's oral language skills in various communication situations. The organization included a course of orality in the first half of the course (see section. 2.2.), Where students work with different oral genres. Students are presented here for appropriate techniques and tools related to the preparation, execution and evaluation of oral presentations.
3.3. it
The emphasis is on integration of ICT in education in relation to:


- Writing teaching and working with presentation supported the oral presentations
- Information retrieval
- Work with texts that are not available in printed form.

3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Parts of nuclear material and supplementary material selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional between the subjects.
At two-year hf strengthened the Danish professional goals through a professional interaction, since the subject is put into perspective the core fabric or additional material in other subjects from hf's range of subjects.
On single fags-hf met the academic interaction to the extent that the organization allows.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The completed units are evaluated regularly in order to provide teacher and student knowledge about the academic level and to define the subsequent work. Use is made of various forms of evaluation, including:


- Portfolio evaluation, possibly with electronic portfolios, which includes the responses of greater and lesser writing tasks
- Oral presentations
- Less written tests.

4.2. Sample Forms
There will be a written and an oral examination.
The written test

The test has a duration of six hours, the first hour and a half takes place in groups. The candidate chooses between a number of assignments given on the basis of a text / image material. The assignments made in continuation of the subject's three subject areas.
The oral examination
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. student, and given some 60 minutes preparation time. The sample material is chosen by the examiner.
The examination questions are distributed discretion of the linguistic, literary and media-related subject matter in the order of 2: 2: 1.
The exam question has a focus in one of the subject areas and consists of one or more texts and instructions on how the student must work with the texts. Subtitle total volume should not exceed eight pages or 12 minutes played text. A standard page consists of 1300 characters. Known and unknown texts may be included, but at least one text must be unknown.
Texts are allowed to be reused if the associated instructions are not identical.
Candidate begins with an oral presentation of about 10 minutes. The examination forms itself forward as a professional conversation about the drawn exam questions. In the interview into perspective for the other reading material.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the academic goals set forth in the section. 2.1.
The written examination emphasis is on the student's proficiency in:


- Written presentation
- To answer the assignment
- Appropriate use of Danish professional knowledge and method
- Genre and communication awareness.

At the oral exam the emphasis is on the student's proficiency in:


- Oral presentation
- To answer the assignment
- Appropriate use of Danish professional knowledge and method.

For both tests receives a mark on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 10
Design C - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Designs subject area is product design, communication design and design of the physical environment, which is seen as an interaction between form, function and communication.
The subject is defined as a process-oriented, deliberate problem solving, seen in historical and social context.
Design Analysis is the element that establish a connection between the subject's practical and theoretical side. With analysis during the practical design process qualify an understanding of the professional design process and result, as analysis of professional design sharpens an awareness of the design process in practice.
In secondary schools based design education projects that integrate theoretical and practical dimensions.
1.2. purpose
Students must acquire the basic design skills that are essential for the practical implementation of a design process and enables them to analyze and evaluate the designed environment.
The subject must with its structuring of a problem-solving workflow provide students a way that they can use for solving tasks in other subjects in secondary education and in higher education.
Education shall provide awareness of the role of design in a globalized world, as part of an international communication and as a method for solving locally related issues.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:
General


- Analyze and evaluate the design process and result
- Visually and verbally communicate the design process, design solutions and design analysis.

Design Process


- Identify a design problem and implement a design process
- Generate design ideas
- Perform, document and justify the choice of a design process
- Examine a design problem and design solutions based on different parameters, and using various methods as mentioned in the core substance
- Combine the results of idea generation and some studies in a specific design project
- Detail how a few aspects of a design project or an element of a design project
- Present a design project
- Be able to move between practice and theory, the abstract and the concrete, between whole and detail, between the known and the yet unknown.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is the following:
Subject Field


- Product design
- Communication design

- Design of the physical environment.

Design Theory


- Design elements of the process on a descriptive level
- Design history, historical focus on design produced in the period from modernism to the present.

Visualization Methods of elemental intermediary level


- 2D and 3D sketching
- Model building
- Desktop publishing.

Research Methods at the elementary level in the context of specific processes


- The study of literature or websites
- At least one method of investigation of various stakeholders including the user
- Product analysis.

Design parameters


- Form, function and communication are the subject's overall key parameters included in all courses
- The parameters space, materials, aesthetics, audience, production, construction, technology, environment, society, economy, ethics and culture are part of the teaching at an elementary level; these parameters are nuances and additions to the overall parameters and involved in the process where they are relevant.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. Students can only meet the academic goals by supplementing core fabric with design examples that students choose.
The selected projects and interaction with other disciplines makes some design parameters b) listed in the core substance involved in education at a higher level.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The primary teaching method is inductive, so that students acquire the academic practical and theoretical skills in project work, course participants gain skills through their experience with their own projects and through employment with professionally executed design.
Projects must be organized so that students are increasingly able to show independent initiative in the identification of a design problem and in formulating and solving it. The teacher acts increasingly as a sparring partner and advisor in this process.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching consists of project periods and short courses that creates tool capability to implement a design process.
Student The work progression and self-evaluation held in a portfolio.
Trainee edit this, so theoretical and practical research materials and completed tasks clearly apparent.
Students work individually and in groups. For group work, each student must provide an individual documentation in its portofolio of his work in the project.
It includes external activities in the form of visits to design studios, companies, exhibitions or equivalent.
3.3. it
It is a fundamental tool in the design process phases. Students use ICT in connection with research, testing of ideas, visualization and communication.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Design is subject to the general requirement for subject interaction.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
In design projects include ongoing evaluation as a natural part of the process. It takes the evaluations in the form of conversations underway, involving the whole team, part of the team or the individual student, and taking an evaluation during the final presentation of each project.
Based on the portfolio assessed students' work ongoing in relation to the tasks assigned.
4.2. Sample Forms
There will be an oral exam. The course choose for each team one of the following two methods of evaluation:
Examination form a)
Oral examination on the basis of a presentation task set by the examiner.
The assignment is based on the student's portfolio, see. Point 3.2. The task is made on a topic selected by the student and approved by the examiner. The subject must be chosen so that the student may withdraw examples across the portfolio and across at least two disciplines of subject fields product design, communication design and design of the physical environment.
The examination time is about 30 minutes. Is given about 48 hours of preparation time, but not less than 48 hours. During the preparation time selecting the candidate materials from the portfolio and prepare on that basis a presentation on the basis of the assignment.
Exam is based on the student's presentation. The examination is shaped to fit an in-depth interview. The student presentation accounts for up to half of the exam.
Sample Form b)

Oral examination on the basis of an assignment which is based on the student's portfolio. The assignment formulated by the examiner. The assignment formulated so that the student may withdraw examples across the portfolio and across the disciplines of product design, communication design and design of the physical environment.
At a graduation team may tasks used three times.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Is given about 60 minutes preparation time.
Each examination paper answered using examples from the student's portfolio (see. Section. 3.2.). The examples are partly made by the student, partly photographs or reproductions of examples produced by others.
The student answers the task based on the portfolio content. The answer is elaborated in a subsequent conversation.
The entire portfolio can be involved in the examination.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the academic goals set forth in the section. 2.1.
If the examination form a) is selected, evaluated also the presentation quality in communication terms.
An overall character based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance
Annex 11
Drama C - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Drama is a subject that connects the creative processes in drama and theater with a discussion of the aesthetic results. This means that we are dealing with to create, understand and reflect on the various forms of performing arts in a current or historical context.
The substance is human actions and relationships that are often marked by conflicts. Term Funds are the drama and the performing arts: body, voice, language and technical tools.
Reflection on the aesthetic results are from a description and understanding of the creative processes of analysis, interpretation and perspective of theatrical performance and other performative expression.
1.2. purpose
Faget drama contributes to the program's overall objective know that students acquire both basic skills in creating, realizing and analyzing scenic expression which act to develop and realize their own ideas - including entering into binding partnerships for the realization of the ideas for a defined target group.
Emphasis is placed partly on students' ability to analyze and evaluate both the process and the result, in part on their ability to combine theory and dramatic practice in a reflective manner. Students acquire skills and knowledge of selected forms of drama and theater and these kunstformers importance to human understanding and development.
In working with the drama and theater and by involving expertise from other disciplines develop students understanding of relations between the European and global art and culture.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:


- Create and understand real scenic expression and games
- Understand and apply key concepts from drama and theater
- Use of drama and theater techniques in problem solving and idea generation
- Reflect on the creative process and product
- Understand and apply theories of European drama and theater and see them in a cultural context
- Work creatively, innovatively and independently in interaction with others.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Basic principles for the development and realization of an idea
- Basic principles to create a game or with others, with or without a text
- Basic concepts, techniques and methods of work with physical expressions, dialogues, improvisation and role-playing
- Two theater historical periods - one before and one after 1900.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance in the subject drama should be put into perspective and deepen the core substance and in general open to new knowledge and interaction with other disciplines, so students can meet the academic goals.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The teaching is organized so that every course is an integration between the practical-experimental and theoretical and analytical work and taking into account that the course is to give students a sense of drama and theater as ways of experiencing, thinking, exploring and producing reality.

The student academic learning is built up from two different observation positions, one when as participants in an exercise or realization will have specific experience with a drug, the other when as spectators observe, responds, analyze and reflect. In this way based teaching bridge between the creative and scientific.
The module interfaces with and all other humanities subjects like social science curricula and some of the natural sciences. It is therefore essential that teaching is organized so that students will have the opportunity to engage the professional knowledge and skills they achieve in other subjects.
To strengthen students' understanding of quality must include course where students meet the professional environment either as spectators or in collaboration.
3.2. Work methods
The progression in the teaching goes from working with simple exercises and realizations of ideas or texts of smaller projects and short courses for independent project.
The initial phase will be characterized by teacher direction and that the whole team working on joint issues, while in the smaller projects exchanged between teacher management and students' independent work in small groups.
In the project the students individually or in groups of up to five people make a small production, including formulating an idea and realize it or with a defined audience. In this phase, the teacher's role constructively critical adviser and commentator.
The production continuously documented in a log book to explain and argue for the group idea, describe and reflect on the process of realization, the target group reactions and evaluate the process and product.
Each trainee must hand select materials (eg. Photos, sketches, quotes and short reviews) and give some professional, personal process of reflection on key elements from each of the approximately five major teaching and combining them in a portfolio that can illuminate the student's professional development. The time spent on portfolio work must be adapted to the case of a tool to support the academic objectives.
If the course has been conferred kursisttid be the written work is planned so that there is progression and coherence of written work in other subjects.
3.3. it
Participants will use electronic communication and knowledge, and they must collect, process and evaluate information from various sources, including the Internet.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Drama covered by the general requirement for subject interaction.
As a practical-musical subjects in the 1st hf teaching should be organized so that interaction with other subjects included.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Student 'ability to work with the practical-experimental parts of the profession and understand and convey the theoretical and analytical elements, together with the students' portfolios basis for ongoing evaluation.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral examination, which consists of two parts. It takes about Per 30 minutes. examinee.
The first practical part is a test of the ability to develop and realize an idea, based on the final project. The test consists of a collective or individual presentation of (parts of) the final project. The group may consist of up to five examinees. The exam lasts four to six minutes times the number of group members. It carried no rating under this part of the test. At the presentation, the examinees using various helpers, whose efforts must be clear to examiners. Helpers do not participate in the conversation and will not be evaluated in the test.
The second part is an individual test without preparation in the ability to understand the project and see it in a larger perspective. The starting point is a short presentation of the examinee followed by one of the examiner led perspective academic discourse where other parts of the core substance and the examinee's portfolio involved.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the academic goals set forth in the section. 2.1.
In the first practical part of the exam includes the following elements in the assessment:


- The project's complexity and difficulty
- The degree of elaboration
- The candidate's ability to communicate to the target audience.

In the second part of the exam includes the following elements in the assessment:


- Examinee overview and detailed understanding of the project
- The candidate's ability to reflect and relate to relevant theories and history

- The candidate's ability during the conversation to unfold new aspects of the project.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 12
English B - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
English is a færdighedsfag, a vidensfag and cultural skills. The course deals with English language, English-language cultures and global issues. The course includes the use of English in writing and speaking and a knowledge of the subject material.
1.2. purpose
It is the purpose of teaching that students in the subject English acquire the ability to understand and use the English language, so that they can orient themselves and act in a globalized world. It is also the objective that students acquire knowledge about British, American and other English-speaking countries' social conditions and cultures and their understanding of their own cultural background thus developed. The course provides an opportunity for the students to communicate across cultural boundaries. The teaching of the subject's different disciplines helps develop students' linguistic, cultural and aesthetic knowledge and awareness and thus their general study skills.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:


- Understand spoken and written English for general and professional topics
- Mastering a varied vocabulary that allows you to participate in a conversation and discussion in English
- Provide a balanced, coherent oral and written presentation of a known topic in fluent and mostly correct English
- Could explain the content and views in different types of English language and English language media material, including film
- Analyze and interpret literary texts, non-literary texts and media material, including film
- Put into perspective the given material culturally, socially and historically
- Apply a basic knowledge of historical, cultural and social conditions in Britain and the United States for analysis and perspective of current conditions
- Formulate their own views in English with the use of appropriate communication strategies
- Use professional reference books and other aids.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- The English language grammar, spelling and punctuation
- Pronunciation, vocabulary and idiom
- Communication strategies, standard language and variation
- The English language as a global language of communication
- Different types of newer literary texts, non-literary texts and media material, including film
- Text analytical concepts
- Significant historical, cultural and social conditions in the UK and USA
- Historical and current conditions in other parts of the English-speaking world.

Literary texts, non-literary texts and media substance present in the core substance, must be primary and authentic English.
2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The supplementary material elaborates and puts into perspective the core substance and expands students' professional horizons.
In the supplementary material includes texts and other expressions from recent times. It also includes material from other fields and other parts of the world than the English language.
The additional substance must be written in or translated into English.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Tuition must be based on an academic level equivalent to students' level of primary school. The teaching is organized so that alternate between inductive and deductive organized courses.
Work on language, text and culture are integrated so that students experience a clear correlation between the expression, substance and communication situation.
We must work on listening, reading and communication strategies and strategies for foreign language acquisition. The student's own language production in speech and writing is a priority. Education in text analysis and foreign language acquisition must be adapted to the academic progression. The working language is primarily English.

The program's application-oriented profile implies that the teaching of the subject's linguistic dimension organized with emphasis on the use of language, and to work with the language structure as a means to promote communication skills and communication skills. The substantive part of the teaching is geared towards the action-by: the use of parts of the course in other subjects, to consider art as a tool for solving problems and to involve current issues relevant to the student group's general education and life practice.
3.2. Work methods
Work on the subject organized preferably in subjects. The report must include at least six subjects, which must have based on the subject's core substance and in the adjunctive agent.
Education and work that preferably is teacher-led, should gradually be replaced by teaching and study methods that give students greater independence and responsibility. Work methods and techniques must be adapted to the professional goals, and the written and oral work should be varied, so students develop a nuanced and flexible fluency in both spoken and written. Furthermore, working with the various disciplines support the students' general skills, including their ability to cooperate and to work in autonomous groups.
Working with the written side must be organized, so it includes support for text and topic work and support for language learning. The written report must also be included as self-discipline and organized so that students will develop the ability to master the English language system in a free writing and writing to express themselves clearly and precisely on mainly correct English.
The teaching of written expression is organized so that students will be trained in working with a broad spectrum of genres in both printed texts and digital media. In the teaching of both the writing process, including various appropriate writing strategies, and the finished product and its qualities.
The written work is scheduled to progression, and so as far as possible be coherent written work in other subjects and other written test types. The brief written summary in English, which is mandatory in the major written assignment, is one of the written genres that are trained in the subject.
3.3. IT and electronic media
IT and electronic media used with the overall aim to promote students' learning process and learning results. Integration of electronic media in education gives students the opportunity to experience the language of varied, authentic and current contexts. It is used as one of several tools in the work with texts and working with the skill-related side of language acquisition. The practical application of IT must also strengthen students' ability to search, select and disseminate relevant learning material, and students should acquire knowledge about different electronic media relevant for communication.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
The subject is covered by the general requirement for subject interaction. The oral and written proficiency to be in this interaction is strengthened by the students to acquire and convey parts of the subject material in English.
English should be based on the subject's core substance and the supplementary material serve to strengthen and clarify the technical content of and perspective on the subject areas addressed in the interaction.
On hf-enkeltfagtilgodeses the professional interaction to an extent which allows the organization.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
At the beginning of the course and during the year shall be carried out evaluation in the form of screening or other individual tests to determine the individual student level and progression. For that students can get a tool to assess their own knowledge growth, must also be made self-value rendering test. The evaluation of the written work exchanged between different forms of evaluation of the finished product and a process-oriented evaluation.
4.2. Sample Forms
There will be a written and an oral examination.
The written test
The basis of the written exam is a two-part key made assignments. The entire examination paper handed out at the start.
The exam lasts five hours. During the first hour, computer and technical devices is not used.
After an hour collected all the responses to the first part of the set, and then the student is using all aids to answer the second part of the problem set. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet is not allowed.
The oral exam

Based on an unknown, raw material thematically associated with a studied topic tested in presentation, conversation, text understanding and perspective. The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance. The sample material shall consist of one or more texts to a total of five to eight pages. The scope should take into account the material difficulty and ensure that the academic objectives can be evaluated. Media Material in electronic form can be involved and replacing printed text material to an extent corresponding to a maximum of 25 per cent. the five to eight pages which make up a sample material.
The examination time is about 30 minutes. The text material associated with one of the subjects studied handed out the day before the test, and provides about 24 hours of preparation time, but not less than 24 hours.
The same unknown sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team.
A page of prose 1,300 letters for poetry and drama 30 lines. Using electronic media sources is three to six minutes of play for one standard page.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the academic goals set forth in the section. 2.1.
The written examination emphasis is on the student's mastery of the English language, understanding of the model and skills in written presentation in English.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the overall response.
The oral exam is emphasized that the candidate, in fluent and mostly correct English can present, analyze, interpret / assess and put into perspective the unknown sample material and apply the knowledge gained in working with the studied subject. Furthermore, the emphasis is on the ability to communicate their own views and arguments.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 13
Sport C - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
The centerpiece of physical education, physical activity, supported by knowledge from science, health and social sciences and the humanities. Through the acquisition of sporting skills obtained motion joy, knowledge and experience of the body and its movement possibilities. Through physical activity, training of sporting skills and their involvement theory course provides hand insight into the physical activity influence health, partly understanding of sport cultural values.
1.2. purpose
Through versatile sports education achieves students and good physical capacity as basic sporting skills and experience of the body's movement possibilities. They gain an understanding of combining practical experience with theoretical knowledge in relation to training and health, thus achieving an understanding of the importance of being in good physical training mode. The training contributes to the development of students' personal identity and social skills, and through the experience of the joy of moving motivates subject to a physically active lifestyle.
2. Academic objectives and content areas.
2.1. Academic goals
Students must:
Focus area physical activity and exercise


- Through versatile sports education achieve good physical capacity and in doing so know the key concepts in sport disciplines and training
- Apply the basic sporting skills and functional movements
- Take part in selected sports disciplines and activities that accommodate skill areas:





a)


ballgame



b)


music and movement



c)


classic and new boules








- Draw up and implement a heating program, a physical test and an own physical training, and in doing so understand the -fysiske activity and the impact of lifestyles on health
- Develop body awareness
- Enter into various kinds of cooperation and gain understanding of both its own and others' roles and ethics
- Know the opportunities for physical activity outside the school setting.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:



- Activities that promote the physical capacity
- Versatile sports disciplines and activities that accommodate body control and ball mastery
- Basic principles of training and basic physical science concepts about training, lifestyle and exercise habits
- Boules focusing on cooperation and ethics and promotes self-esteem.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. In addition to the core substance included additional substance which, in interaction with the other subjects in the foundation program into perspective the core substance. That way expanded students' professional horizons, and they are made aware of the subject's possibilities.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Tuition must be based on an academic level equivalent to students' level of primary school.
Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on the subject's practical subjects involve the necessary theory on the relationship between physical activity, fitness and health. The versatility of discipline elections accommodated by skill areas a, b and c (see. Section. 2.1.) Each account for at least 20 per cent. of teaching time. The key of course is the physical activity. Theory and training integrated into the physical activity so that the training aspect is included in the teaching together with the appropriate coupling to the theories areas.
By virtue of the role played by the player placement of the individual student's academic and personal yield and consequently the motivation for continuing to do sports, education must take into account the progression variation, safety as well as to the physiological gender. Each student participates in both gender-differentiated and gender-integrated training.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching in the process which has such a length that the professional immersion into account. Each course must be based on practice integrate theory and training in individual lessons.
The students must at times work with courses that start linking theory and practice and results in a product as documentation of a process of professional achievement. Education shall be by selection of courses provide students a comprehensive experience of the subject options and pathways must
ensure that both genders are motivated to continue physical activity.
Each timer organized so that in the majority of the hours are a minimum of 20 minutes where each student experience to be physically loaded.
3.3. it
Students make use of it to gain knowledge about health, lifestyle and exercise habits. It can be associated with different test forms and Its treatment, and also as a source of hedge opportunities to play sports in their free time.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
In the two-year hf included subject in close cooperation with the other subject taught in the introductory course. The course allows for interaction with all subjects in the foundation program. This interaction ensures that students gain the necessary understanding of the sport in professional elements at the same time that they are made aware of the wider implications of physical activity and exercise in relation to lifestyle, body ideals and general education.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The academic goals are the basis for the ongoing evaluation of the subject. Based on a comprehensive gender integrated and gender-differentiated instruction is given an overall assessment of the student's point of view, where both sporting and social skills and theoretical knowledge included. Student The awareness to link theoretical knowledge to a personalized training program to be included in
assessment.
4.2. Sample Form
There will not try in the subject.
4.3. Assessment criteria
In connection with the ongoing evaluation, including the assessment of students' activity, promotion to the 2nd hf as well as the scientific basis for selection of B-level, the following evaluation criteria:


- Physical capacity
- Mastery of basic sporting skills
- Mastery of the technical and tactical elements of a versatile range of sports disciplines and activities within the three skill areas (see. Section. 2.1.)
- Ability to work independently and engage in cooperative
- The ability to combine theory with practice and training in connection with heating, training and teaching.
Annex 14
Culture and social studies group - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. Identity

The research group consists of subjects of history, religion and social studies. The Section provides basic understanding of the interaction between the historical, social and cultural development locally, nationally and internationally, both in terms of lives interpretation, the basic conditions of life and individuals' backs The and discretion.
1.2. purpose
Education shall develop the students' self and environment awareness and thereby contribute to creating a professional foundation for independent decision and active participation in a modern, multicultural and democratic society.
The participants will gain knowledge and understanding of the essential elements of the historical development of modern society's complexity and dynamics of different religions, cultural values ​​and philosophies of life.
The coherent insights and comprehensive understanding that students achieve in working with common professional issues and the application of concepts, theories and methods from the subjects of the research group, the understanding of the relationship between the subjects of the research group and contribute to strengthen students' study skills.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Contents
Students are required to:


- Using and combining knowledge and methods from research group to gain insight into the historical, social and cultural contexts of understanding of each subject's distinctive
- Account for different creeds, religions and political standpoints and their importance in a historical and current context
- Reflect on the man as history made and history-making
- Discuss their own and others' cultural values ​​in relation to present and past values ​​
- Apply knowledge of key epochs to obtain an understanding of contexts of cultural and social nature in the history of Denmark
- Put the religions and their historical impact in relation to selected aspects of European culture and thinking
- Examine the relationships between relevant background variables and social and cultural patterns.

method
Students are required to:


- Collect, analyze and critically utilize various types of material, including texts, statistics and pictures
- Distinguish between description and evaluation and identify the values ​​that underlie their own and others' statements
- Conduct an empirical study
- Provide professional contexts, both orally and in writing, using terminology
- Argue a point of view on a professional basis and be able to discuss and assess the impact of the position.

2.2. Academic content
Tuition is based on common scientific issues. It encompasses both master the core substance as additional substance into perspective and deepens the core substance.
Work with common subjects within or across the following areas:


- Globalization and cultural meeting
- Area Studies
- Identity of traditional, modern and post-modern society
- Religious and political fractures in the Danish or European perspective
- The good society.

Other areas may be involved to put into perspective the common professional issues.
2.2.1. History
The core fabric is:


- Danish history and identity
- The thrust of European history from antiquity to the present day
- Nature, technology and production in historical and contemporary perspective
- Governance historical and contemporary perspective
- Ideologies struggle in the 20th century
- The relationship between Western culture and the world.

2.2.2. religion
The core fabric is:


- Christianity, particularly in view of its European and Danish manifestations. The work includes both contemporary as biblical texts.
- Islam, including both contemporary texts as texts from the Koran, with the involvement of a European and Danish context
- Selected pages of one more religion and religions key phenomena
- Ethical or philosophical issues
- Religions, social, political and cultural importance in the past and present.

2.2.3. Social
The core fabric is:


- Political ideologies
- Democracy, participation opportunities, political decisions and human rights
- Identity formation and socialization
- Social and cultural differences, including welfare and distribution
- Economic contexts.


The core fabric of social science can be applied to social conditions in Denmark and in other countries.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The teaching of the research group carried out at least four common academic processes. In common professional courses include all three subjects. The teaching is based on concrete and realistic common scientific issues. It includes særfaglige activities of shorter duration.
Teaching must be versatile in the choice of methods and issues, theories and perspectives. Students must be involved in the choice of work. There should be emphasis firmly on the individual student opportunities on a professional basis to put forward their own views, arguments and assessments. In særfaglige periods the emphasis will be on working with basic knowledge, concepts and methods that qualify the common professional activities.
In history, the following aspects should be represented: the use and abuse of history and myth and reality in history.
Teaching must be organized so that there is a progression in:


- Choice of issues (from simple to complex)
- Methodological requirements (requirements for use of different types of material to document academic contexts)
- Requirements for application of academic concepts and
- Requirements for the students' ability for precise and nuanced written and oral communication.

In the planning of the whole process should be taken into account that religion and social studies can be selected as an elective (B-level) in the 2nd year.
Training time is scheduled flexible so as to allow for varied training time in each subject area of ​​their participation in the common professional course, see. The professional goals.
3.2. Work methods
The instruction must be used varied and learner activating work so that students will have good opportunities to document, communicate and discuss academic contexts and views. External activities, including less empirical studies should be integrated into the teaching.
Common Technical subjects are the focal point for technical cooperation, the issues to be dealt with using methods from subjects with thorough professional and methodological guidance.
The written work must be organized so that students try various written work to support professional learning and communication, including the preparation of synopses based on a larger material.
The production of the first hf a story assignment. History The task aims to train students to work with and immerse themselves in historical issues, to include professional goals. See Annex 2.
3.3. it
Information used for:


- Information search
- Training in critical use of the Internet's resources
- Processing and dissemination
- Knowledge sharing.

3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
The instruction can load up to interaction with subjects outside the professional group with the aim to further deepen and put into perspective the core substance and application aspects of the three subjects.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Through individual professional guidance, the use of testing and feedback on written work must be the participant in the course of the entire process is given a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level, including strengths and weaknesses. Furthermore, there once every semester necessary to evaluate the student's performance, active participation in and responsibility for teaching. In doing so teaching and fagsamarbejde evaluated by students and teachers.
4.2. Sample Form
The test is oral, based on a writing project.
The project is made of an examinee or more examinees together. The oral exam is individual.
The project is conducted in approximately 25 hours spread over at least two weeks at the end of the semester, after the training period in the professional group is completed. Teachers supervisor examinees.
The project charter is a sample within one of the common professional issues, see. Section. 3.1. The sample material contains a header that indicates the subject, and an unknown, diverse appendices of 10-15 normal pages at 1,300 characters. Using electronic media material as part of the documents corresponding four to seven minutes playback for one standard page.
There must be sample material in all common professional issues. The same sample material can be included in the draw twice.

When the training period is completed, pulling examinees a specimen. Examinees who want to develop jointly a project, draws a sample material together.
The student or group of examinees prepare a synopsis of two to three pages. The synopsis should include:


- The subject of the drawn specimens (headline)
- A common problem statement
- Overview of the issues that are worked on in the synopsis
- Addresses the issues from:





a)


the drawn annexes



b)


substance from all three phage



c)


relevant and significant additional material which the examinee must find.








- A clarification of the project's conclusions
- A summary of the material used.

The synopsis handed in last training. The synopsis is sent to the subject along with the sample material.
The examination time is about 45 minutes. The candidate presents the synopsis (10-15 minutes). Then, the examiner (s) and censor-depth questions and included a professional dialogue with the student on the basis of the synopsis.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the academic goals set forth in the section. 2.1.
In the assessment emphasis on the candidate's ability to:


- Examine the issue from the common technical problem formulation
- Independently identify and critically apply relevant and important supplementary material
- Using and combining concepts, theories and methods from the group's subjects in relation to the problem formulation and material
- Characterize and analyze material
- Perspective to other common professional course where appropriate
- Use and combine relevant knowledge from the subjects' core substance
- Engage in professional dialogue
- Express themselves independently and critically about professional issues
- Produce a facts in a clear and understandable manner
- Organize and structure its presentation.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the student's oral presentation.
Annex 15
Mathematics C - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Mathematics is based on abstraction and logical thinking and include a variety of methods of modeling and problem solving. Mathematics is indispensable in many occupations in science and technology, medicine and ecology, economics and social sciences, and as a basis for political decision-making. Mathematics is also important in daily life. The widespread use of mathematics is rooted in the abstract nature and reflects the experience that many different phenomena behave uniformly. When hypotheses and theories formulated in the language of mathematics, won often hereby new insight. Mathematics has accompanied the development of culture from the earliest civilizations and mankind's first consideration of the number and shape. Science Mathematics as a subject has evolved in a continuous interaction between applications and building theory.
1.2. purpose
The purpose of teaching mathematics is that students are able to understand, use and communicate about mathematics in contexts that relate to everyday life, social life and nature, and that they acquire sufficient skills to implement an education in which mathematics is used on a basic level. In addition, they know about important aspects of mathematics interaction with culture, science and technology.
2. Academic content and professional goals
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:


- Handle simple formulas and equations, including the ability to translate from symbolholdigt language to natural language and vice versa
- Provide a statistical processing of numerical data and communicate findings in clear language
- Handle simple models to describe the relationships between variables and to discuss the scope of such models
- Explain this geometric models and solve geometric problems
- Carry out simple mathematical reasoning

- Seek information and communicate knowledge of mathematics applications in daily life and society
- IT tools for solving given math problems.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Expense species hierarchy, equation solving by graphical methods and simple algebraic manipulation, percentage and Rentesregning, absolute and relative change
- Formal expression to describe straight forward and inverse proportionality, linear relationships, exponential contexts and power relationships between variables
- Xy plot of the data material and characteristics of linear relationships, exponential contexts and power relationships
- Descriptive statistics with graphical presentation and provision of simple empirical statistical descriptors
- Ratio calculations of similar triangles and trigonometric calculations in arbitrary triangles

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance in the subject of mathematics fills about 25 hours of training time. It must be put into perspective and deepen the core substance and in general expand professional horizons, so students can meet all academic goals.
Therefore, the adjunctive agent include include:


- Issues that put into perspective the work percentage and Rentesregning and other economic relationships
- Reasoning and evidence on selected subjects
- Machining of authentic figures.

3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Program is organized so that each student when the academic objectives. Student The independent handling of mathematical problems and tasks should be the focus of teaching.
Student The mathematical understanding to be developed through experimental approach to problems and tasks, as well as through work with oral communication.
Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on mathematics applications, and students need to see how the same mathematical methods can be applied to different phenomena.
The teaching is organized with progression in working methods and subject content, while basic skills and general knowledge is retained by being regularly reviewed.
3.2. Work methods
A significant part of the teaching of core material and the additional material is organized as project progress or larger theme tasks. For each major process formulated professional goals, and deciding on the workflow, including a possible differentiated teaching. For each major project or topic course, the students should prepare a written product who possess the academic results. After each course of or in connection with a repetition demonstrates how the subject content can be translated into exam questions.
Part of the course is organized as a group in order that students will develop their mathematical concepts through their mutual professional discussion.
In teaching, considerable emphasis on problem solving as an essential support for the appropriation of concepts, methods and skills. Solving tasks done both in class and as homework. A number of project processes and tasks theme concludes with the students to prepare a report.
3.3. it
The teaching is organized so Calculators / it included as essential aids in the students 'work with' learning and problem solving. The organization includes training in the use of calculators and computer to perform calculations for handling statistical data material and to gain an overview of graphs. Furthermore exploited it in the experimental approach to issues and problem solving.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the stage is set for the subject is part of interaction with other disciplines, with the aim to organize professional courses, which contains applications of mathematics in other subject areas, students are aware.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Both teaching and students' academic achievement which is continuously evaluated, including prospective evaluation conversations.
For each major project or topic process must clearly show how participants' benefits from training will be evaluated.
After each major project or topic course implement teacher and students an evaluation of the teaching work and progress towards the fulfillment of professional goals.

Students submit regular written assignments and reports. The responses are corrected and commented on by the teacher.
4.2. Sample Forms
There will be a written and an oral examination.
The written test
For the written test will be three hours. The centrally asked written examination assignment consists of assignments given within the core substance and to evaluate the corresponding professional goals. During the second part of the test the examinee use all aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet is not allowed.
The oral examination
The oral examination must include completed project sequence and theme tasks. The final questions for the oral examination should be published well in advance of the test and shall collectively cover the academic and professional content. A significant part of the examination questions must be designed so that it is possible to include the completed project sequence and theme tasks with associated student reports. The questions and a list of reports and teaching sent to the censor.
Each question must be designed with a headline indicating the overall topic for examination and specific sub-questions.
The examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. Is given about 24 minutes of preparation time.
The sample is two-fold.
The first part of the test consists of the candidate's presentation of its response to the extracted matter supplemented with detailed questions.
The second part takes the form of a conversation based on the overall subject.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an overall assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the relevant professional goals specified in section. 2.1.
The emphasis is on whether the examinee:


- Have basic math skills, including:
- Have knowledge of mathematical symbol language and mathematical concepts
- Have knowledge of mathematical methods and can apply them correctly
- Skill in using IT tools appropriate.
- Have an overview and to use mathematics at existing problems, including:
- Can choose appropriate methods to solve problems submitted
- Can present a mathematical topic or a method of solving a mathematical problem in a clear and understandable manner
- Can explain the simple mathematical reasoning
- Have knowledge of mathematics application in another field
- Can reflect on and discuss the range of available mathematical models.

In an exam situation involved the categories that are relevant to the exam questions.
The oral exam includes any report not in the assessment. Taking into account only the oral presentation.
In both the written and the oral test will be one character from an overall assessment.
Annex 16
Medienberufe C - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Media The subject field is moving images in an aesthetic, cultural and communicative context. The course combines a theoretical-analytical and practical-productive approach to moving images.
The course will give students the necessary tools to analyze live images. This is crucial to their ability to experience and evaluate the information and influences they encounter as users of media. The course also provides students with knowledge on films and TV's expressions in connection with practical production so that they become active, creative and reflective media users.
1.2. purpose
The instruction develops students' ability to analyze, perspective and assess Danish and international media productions of fiction and fact and mixtures of these forms. At the same time develops teaching the students' ability to express themselves independently and nuanced in moving images, so that they become active, creative and reflective users of film and television - and allows them to test their skills in specific practice situations.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Theory and analysis
Students are required to:


- Use film language terminology in analysis of film and television productions
- Explain basic dramaturgical principles and tell relation
- Characterize the basic features of fact and fiction
- Identify key genres and program types
- Make a perspective of film and television productions.

Practice

Students are required to:


- Operate recording and editing equipment
- Plan and implement a media production in groups
- Determine the phases of working with a media production
- Use film language terminology associated with a media production phases
- Adapt expression to content and audience
- Develop synopsis and storyboard
- Use dramaturgical principles
- Adopt an analytical approach to the production process and their own production.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Film language terminology
- Basic dramaturgical principles and tell relation
- Basic features of fact and fiction
- Key genres and program types
- Production planning, including preparation of synopsis and storyboard
- Incorporate the principles and shooting technique
- Editing principles and editing technique.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance in the media profession should be put into perspective and deepen the core substance and in general expand professional horizons, so students meet the academic goals. Historical, cultural, social and genre perspectives must be involved in teaching.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
It is an essential educational principle in the media profession to integrate the theoretical and analytical training in the practical-productive and vice versa. The emphasis on the disciplines experienced as a whole: In connection with the theoretical and analytical training incorporated the terminology and other concepts that are applied in the production process. In connection with the production made a number of practical experience that can be transferred for analysis.
It lies in the subject didactics, that there will be an interaction between inductive and deductive learning so that teaching is organized as a balance between theoretical and analytical work and the practical-productive.
3.2. Work methods
To develop analytical, creative, communicative and social skills of students, teaching methods from project work in groups to the classroom.
The theoretical and analytical work based on the viewing of movies and television productions. Initially, work is under the teacher's instruction and guidance with short quotes and shot-to-shot analysis to make students familiar with the terminology and working methods. Work then with close investigation of selected scenes / sequences, where participants become increasingly active part in the analysis. Later the whole of the works using more complex analytical methods and working practices, which emphasizes students' independent contributions.
The practical work carried out as a group and project and begin with simple, short exercises in production under the teacher's instruction and guidance. Work then with a little longer exercises where students will gradually be made responsible for major parts of the process. Gradually made independent productions, with the teacher acting as supervisor and consultant.
3.3. it
It has a central location in the subject, both in theoretical and practical dimension.
In the theoretical and analytical work used it for information, presentation and dissemination of academic material. In the production process used it for word processing and information retrieval in preproduction and digital editing in post production.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the stage is set for the subject is part of interaction with other disciplines and professions. Parts of nuclear material and supplementary material in the subject chosen and treated so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction. This strengthens the students' perception of the media profession as a multifaceted profession that involves historical, cultural, social and aesthetic perspectives.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The academic goals are the basis for the ongoing evaluation of the students' standpoint and teaching.
The theoretical and analytical processes, as well as teaching and work evaluated using questionnaires, tests and / or interviews tailored to each course; thereby contributing the ongoing evaluation that the student brought to reflect on their professional development.

All practical production process is concluded with a single view of production for the entire team / class. After an evaluation of the outputs, so that each group and the teacher jointly participate in the evaluation of all productions. Moreover evaluate each group its own production processes in interaction with the teacher.
By interdisciplinary unit indgårvalg of evaluation methods in the joint organization.
4.2. Sample Form
There is an oral examination in a preparation time of about 30 minutes. During the preparation time, the student use any aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet is not allowed.
The basis for the first part of the examination is a non-undergone quote from a movie or a television program. The quotation must not exceed five minutes and must be related to film and television course that has been worked on theoretical-analytical part of teaching. The quotation shall be accompanied by a sheet containing the necessary credits and any guiding questions. Examination quote should only be used three times. The candidate is tested in its ability to point out important aspects of the quote.
The basis for the second part of the examination is the candidate's exam production. In this part of the examination verified the student in its ability to explain the key elements of production.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the academic goals set forth in the section. 2.1.
In assessing eksaminandensgennemgang of the quote is emphasized:


- The analysis of the cinematic language, instrument deployed using
- Statement for elementary dramaturgical and genre conditions
- Perspectives none of the quote to the taught material.

In the assessment of media production emphasis is on:


- Designing images and sounds
- Consistency between objectives, content, design and audience.

In assessing eksaminandensredegørelse for production emphasis is on:


- The ability to justify the choice of films linguistic tools
- The ability to relate analytically-reflectively to own production.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of production and the examinee's performance in sample two parts.
Annex 17
Music C - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Music The course combines a theoretical-scientific, artistic and performative approach to music as a global and multi-cultural, universal human expression. Music subject combines elements from the humanities, the natural sciences and the social sciences.
Throughout the creative process and musical expression plays music profession has an important role in the educational environment.
1.2. purpose
Teaching must challenge and develop students' musical universe and provide them with professional tools to express themselves about and music as well as enhance their ability to deal with music as listeners and performers.
Through employment of music and music-related issues and by working with musical parameters, music theory, ear training and music theory in practice, teaching should provide students musical ability and awareness. Tuition includes historical, social and cultural perspectives, providing students increased understanding of the world.
Musical activity develops students' interpersonal skills and allows them to experience the musical community.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Music knowledge (theory and history)
Students are required to:


- Identify musical parameters in different styles and genres of Western art and popular music and non-Western music
- Demonstrate an understanding of music in a historical, social and cultural context of the application of basic concepts and methods of music theory, ear training and music theory
- To use the terminology in a discussion of music from domestic and foreign cultures
- Orient themselves in a simple, graphical representation of sounding music
- Locate and apply topic of relevance to source material from printed and virtual media.

Music Exercise (singing and ensemble)
Students are required to:


- Sing and play one- and polyphonic songs and rates in a Danish and international repertoire

- Cooperation in the rehearsal and performance of musical arrangement for an audience
- Play simple shapes on a chord, a rhythm and a Bass Instrument
- Apply basic ear training in connection with singing and games.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is the following:
Music knowledge (theory and history)


- Basic music theory and ear training
- Musical parameters via classical music, rhythmic music, Danish music, folk and non-Western music
- Music history and music cultural conditions in classical and popular music
- A special studied music topic
- Simple, short texts related to the selected music

Music Exercise (singing and ensemble)


- A varied selection of unanimous songs from home and abroad
- A varied selection of polyphonic vocal and / or instrumental rates from home and abroad
- Basic voice training and basic techniques of rhythm, bass and chord instruments
- The rehearsal and performance of a musical piece.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. In addition to the musical core substance to students deal with aspects of inter alia music's past and present, cultural and social, and communication and media-related issues.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The emphasis is on the students to be presented to the disciplines as a whole, so that they experience a relationship and interaction between the executive and it's academic. Both in music performance and music knowledge, it should be sung and played and listened be the subject of conversation, analysis and discussion. In this combined practical and theoretical learning process qualified music experience through employment with the terminology and methodologies.
Music Teaching addresses the following levels in the learning process: perception (listening, experience), reproduction (performing existing compositions), imitation (counterfeiting), production (composition, improvisation), interpretation (interpretation) and reflection (perspective) which form a taxonomic learning process in which both inductive and deductive principles included.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching, so the subject's practical, instrumental / vocal and theoretical methods and skills are presented and incorporated by listening and performing. Working methods alternates between classroom teaching, group work, presentations and performances in class or for a larger audience. Instruction is divided equally between musical knowledge and musical performances.
In order to sensitize students about the musical parameters, work is in music knowledge and in music performance analyzes, intensive listening, presentations and discussions in relation to the core substance. It carried a shorter music history course in classical music and popular music.
This total employment form the basis for the students and teachers in cooperation requires special attention during at least one music item that represents basis for the exam.
In music performance, work is from the instructive, imitative, teacher-led instruction against musical empowerment and cooperation. The aim is that in the individual music lesson alternate between theoretical and practical work and between different forms of work.
As part of the teaching, in music performance towards a concert event on the course. The following reflection is the basis for continued musical development.
Music Education shall establish contact with the rest of the music scene.
3.3. it
To support the professional learning in music knowledge (music history, music theory, music theory, ear training) and music performance used it.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
The course provides consistency in the student's understanding of the world and, where possible, to create links between the course's other subjects as music to be understood in the context of its historical, social, cultural, psychological, philosophical and technological conditions.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
To ensure that students achieve the described professional goals for the teaching of music knowledge, does the teacher use of smaller test along the way.
Music Fagets executive side implies an ongoing assessment and improvement of the musical performance, and evaluation is a natural and necessary part of the process. This evaluation takes into account the subject's artistic elements.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be a test of music knowledge and music performance.

Music knowledge (theory and history)
The test is primarily based on the known substance from the selected music topic in teaching and secondarily in parallel unknown substance. The test material consists of a recording of one or more pieces of music of no more than 10 minutes duration, a graphical representation of the sounding music, or parts thereof, and any other material.
The examination time is about Per 20 minutes. examinee. Is given about 40 minutes preparation time.
Preparation chamber must be equipped with play equipment and a Keyboard. Students may bring instrument of their choice.
The sample material approved by the examiner prior to the examination.
Music Exercise (singing and ensemble)
In music performance included an ingenious number in groups of at least two examinees. Each candidate appears only once. The examination time is about five minutes per. examinee. It allowed the teacher discreetly to support the performance, for example. piano.
In the time between the last lesson and exam meet the teacher with students two to three times to maintain the musical skills for group performance.
Even students tested in music knowledge in a particular subject studied music, the content approved by the teacher.
Although students do not participate in group interaction, but judged in music performance in a solo song selected by the examiner from a wide and varied repertoire of unanimous songs composed by the student and approved by the teacher.
At the trial in the make-up examination due date examination in music knowledge and a solo number chosen by the student as group interaction lapse.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance meets the academic requirements specified in section. 2.1. Emphasis is placed on the following:
Music knowledge (theory and history)


- Elementary knowledge of musical parameters, music theory and ear training and ability to use this in the analysis of music
- Basic knowledge of music's historical, social and cultural context

Music Exercise (singing and ensemble)


- Responsiveness and musicality, ie feel for own function in the group in balance with the group's other members
- Vocal and / or instrumental skills

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 18
Scientific profession - two-year hf, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
The research group comprises the subjects biology, geography and chemistry.
The research group uses scientific methods where knowledge and conceptual understanding developed through interaction between on the one hand observations and experiments on the other hand, theories and models. This forms the basis for recognition and understanding of the phenomena of nature and the understanding of the interaction between man and his surroundings.
The research group has a practical dimension and involves biological, geographical and chemical knowledge to create a coherent insight into the problems with science content.
The Section provides technical background for positions in the context of current social problems of science content.
1.2. purpose
The science profession contributes to higher preparatory program's overall objective of the students to gain insight into scientific methods and disciplines.
Through working with scientific tools and methods, the students should develop both general education preparatory skills. They must be below have experience with how to systematically collect, process and disseminate scientific information, and they must develop the ability to critically and constructively to the use of science.
The teaching gives students knowledge in biology, geography and chemistry through work with the core substance and through the elaboration and perspective of this. Through work on common academic subjects, the students should be able to see wholes and relationships between the subjects and get an understanding of the relationships between science, technology and society. Students get hereby background for a nuanced and complex understanding of the world so that they can understand the importance of sustainable development as a principle and can participate in the democratic debate on the basis of achieved scientific skills.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to analyze common professional issues and identify and relate to scientific problems from the outside world and from the current debate.

Students must also


- Use science jargon
- Relate observations, model representations and symbolic representations to each other
- Distinguish between a theoretical model and the observed reality and understand simple connections between theory and practice
- Perform experimental work, taking into account general laboratory safety and dealing with chemicals in a responsible manner
- Make systematic observations and data collection during field work and laboratory
- Set up simple hypotheses and explain the importance of the control experiment
- Collect data and analyze the results of qualitative and quantitative experiments and studies
- Identify and discuss sources of error in the assessment of results from experimental work
- Express themselves with professional precision of scientific topics both orally and in writing
- Obtain and evaluate scientific information from different sources
- Analyze the figures and data and relate them to the relevant explanatory models
- Work with simple problem formulations based on a scientific approach
- Put local natural and social conditions into a regional or global context and understand global processes local consequences.

2.2. Academic content
The training includes both master the core substance as supplementary material. Work with at least two common academic subjects, chosen within or across the following areas:


- Science in everyday life
- Health
- Living Conditions
- Environment
- Resource exploitation, production and technology
- Substances, materials and products.

Other areas, including the history of science and development, can be involved.
biology
The core fabric is selected areas of the following:


- Organic substances and their biological significance including DNA's structure and function
- Cell structure and function of cellular processes
- General genetic concepts and contexts, including the interaction between heredity and environment
- The biological basis for biotechnology
- Organ systems structure and function seen in health
- Ecological processes and their importance

Geography
The core fabric is selected areas of the following:


- Weather and climate
- Energy flows and cycles in nature
- Natural resources, production and technology
- Demographic and business conditions

chemistry
The core fabric is selected areas of the following:


- Use of the elements period system
- Organic and inorganic substances structure, naming, state and mixability
- Chemical reactions
- Quantity calculations in relation to the reaction schemes, including the amount of substance concentration

Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. There, supplementary material as required, to the common professional issues and core substance gives students the opportunity to achieve the professional goals. Parts of the adjunctive agent can be selected in cooperation with the students.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on the academic goals are reached as a result of the common professional work.
The organization of the single-disciplinary teaching and choice of tools and methods is for the treatment of common professional issues.
Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on practical work, which is linked to fieldwork and other
experimental work, linked to the theoretical substance for the purpose of maximum integration.
The teaching is organized so that the students' curiosity, activity and creativity is stimulated, among others by the applied aspects have high priority.
3.2. Work methods
The instruction includes a common introductory course and at least two scenarios where there is a joint academic subjects. These common academic subjects organized subject and / or project-oriented. The other training is organized single subject and / or common professional as needed. An equal distribution of the time pattern of the three subjects.

During the year, there must be a progression both in working as professional demands and requirements of the students' independence. Use aspect must be a focus throughout the course.
The experimental work, field work and empiribaseret work forms an integral part of the teaching of scientific profession, and it has a total amount corresponding to approximately 20% of teaching time. Students will perform laboratory work in the subjects of biology and chemistry in total of at least 30 hours. At the end of the total teaching teachers prepare a list of participants with the titles of the experimental work, field work and other empiribaseret work that may be involved in the B part in the oral test (see 4.2. Test form). The list is published for students by the completion of the teaching.
At the end of the total teaching of science profession prepares the trainee an evaluation task which is the starting point for the A part in the oral test. Evaluation assignment is based on one of the most common professional issues. In the assessment activity, the trainee must illuminate a common academic issue from the three subjects. The problem, from which the student prepares the assessment activity, chosen by teachers or by teachers in collaboration with the student. Teachers determine how many issues each class must be exposed to. Student response of the assessment activity can be equated with an extended reasoned available for use in the oral test. Apart from the problem prepares the student an outline for how he or she will look at the problems with the inclusion of knowledge from all three subjects. In the response, makes the student explain how he / she will respond to each item in the outline. In reply contained documents that can be used in the test. Annex example. be figures, graphs, tables, maps, equations, results from experimental work, field work or other work empiribaseret mm. Evaluation assignment is written individually or in groups and must fill max. Five pages, including appendices corresponding to five hours kursisttid whether done individually or in groups. Teachers comment on the student's evaluation task for the purpose of student's preparation for the oral examination. Evaluation paper can be submitted so that teachers have time to comment on the task before the teaching end.
Writing in the Section includes work with the group's various written genres and is part of the learning process. The written work includes following:


- Records of experimental work and field work
- Reports prepared on the basis of records
- Different types of tasks including for the purpose of training of professional elements
- Other products, including the assessment activity

The written work in the research group to give students the opportunity to concentrate on specific scientific problems and strengthen the acquisition of scientific knowledge and methods. The written work is organized so that there is progression in the profession of writing and context for written work in other subjects in the development of the individual student writing skills.
3.3. it
It involvement in education by using, for example .:


- IT-based teaching materials, natural scientific material and data
- Science education programs, data collection, data processing and data analysis
- Programs for modeling, visualization and simulation.

3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
The instruction can load up to interaction with subjects outside the professional group with the aim to further deepen and put into perspective the core substance and application aspects of science profession.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The Student 'learning outcomes evaluated regularly, so there will be a basis for future guidance of each student in the work to achieve the professional goals and adjustment of teaching.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an individual oral exam consisting of two parts, A and B, with a total duration of about 40 minutes. The two parts are each occupy approximately half of the probationary period.
During the preparation time, which is approximately 40 minutes, the examinee to the extent practicable, access equipment, chemicals and other equipment, as applicable.
A
The student presents brief evaluation task and deepens selected areas in the task. Then follows a conversation about both the assessment activity and the academic content of the associated common professional topic.
B
This task assigned by lot.

The task is the title of an experimental work, field work or other empiribaseret work concluded in the teaching. The candidate presents the actual experiment, fieldwork or other empiribaseret work. During the test, the relevant equipment, chemicals and other equipment be present to the extent possible.
If the institution put examiners in all three subjects can censor ask clarifying questions during the test. If the institution put examiners in the two subjects, examiners do not represent part examiner on an equal footing with the examiners during the oral examination.
The three subjects should be equally represented in the team's overall assignment.
Each academic experimentation, fieldwork or other empiribaseret work may be used twice. Joint Academic experiments, field work or other empiribaserede work may be used three times. The test material, i.e., students' assessment tasks and the list of the titles of the experimental work, field work and other empiribaseret work that may be involved in the B part in the oral test, sent to the censor.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student meets the academic goals set forth in the section. 2.1., And can illuminate common professional issues from the three subjects. In addition, the emphasis is on whether the examinee:


- Express themselves clearly, precisely and understandably in a proper academic language
- Can analyze the figures and data and relate them to the relevant explanatory models
- May shed light on a common technical problem involving the relevant professional knowledge
- Describe experimental work, field work and other empiribaseret work and present data and evaluate results
- Can explain simple relationships between theory and practice.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the student's oral presentation.