Order On Curriculum For Driver Training For Category B (Standard Car)

Original Language Title: Bekendtgørelse om undervisningsplan for køreuddannelsen til kategori B (almindelig bil)

Subscribe to a Global-Regulation Premium Membership Today!

Key Benefits:

Subscribe Now

Read the untranslated law here: https://www.retsinformation.dk/Forms/R0710.aspx?id=123766

Overview (table of contents)

Appendix 1
Appendix 2
Appendix 3
Appendix 4
Appendix 5
Appendix 6
Appendix 7
Appendix 8
Appendix 9
Annex 10
Annex 11
Annex 12
The full text
Order on the curriculum for driver training for category B (standard car) 1)
Pursuant to § 56 paragraph. 5, § 64 paragraph. 5, and by order pursuant to § 134 b of the Road Traffic Act, see. Act no. 1058 of 4 November 2008:
§ 1. Education of students with a view to obtaining a driving license for category B should be in accordance with the curriculum for driver training for category B (standard car), which is annexed to this notice.
§ 2. This Order shall enter into force on 16 March 2009.
PCS. 2. At the same time, Order of 30 November 1995 on the curriculum for driver training for regular car (category B) and Executive Order no. 1030 of 15 December 1995 on the curriculum for driver training for regular car (category B).
PCS. 3. Students who have begun running training before 16 March 2009 may complete training and presentation driving test under the current rules until the end of August 2009.
National Police, 13 February 2009
Hojbjerg | || / Michael Højer
Annex 1









CONTENTS









0


Introduction











1.


CAR INTERIOR, EQUIPMENT AND DOCUMENTS




1.1





Service equipment and instruments




1.1.1


Service equipment




1.1.2


Instruments and warning




1.1.3


Engine, ignition and throttle




1.1.4


Coupling




1.1.5


gear




1.1.6


Steering




1.1.7


Brakes







1.2


Regulations regarding vehicle design and equipment









1.2.1


The driver and the owner's responsibility




1.2.2


Steering




1.2.3


Brakes




1.2.4



Lights, reflectors and horn




1.2.5


The engine and exhaust system etc.




1.2.6


Energy and environmental friendly driving




1.2.7


Bearing parts




1.2.8


Body




1.2.9


Special equipment




1.2.10


Special vehicles







1.3





Vehicle documents




1.3.1


Registration Certificate












2.


MANOEUVRES ON CLOSED EXERCISE ROOM




2.1


Preparing for driving






2.1.1


Control, control, adjustment and use of equipment




2.2


Starting and stopping









2.2.1


Start, gear operation, repair and braking




2.2.2


Starting on the sloping road







2.3


Driving in figure 8






2.3.1


Hand position and steering wheel




2.4


Forward and reverse drive with målbremsning






2.4.1


Evaluation of the car's length




2.5


Reversing the oscillation






2.5.1


Vibration, alignment and orientation




2.6


Forward and backward slalom






2.6.1


Coordination of speed and control





2.7


Parking at the roadside






2.7.1


Evaluation of the car's width and location




2.8


Driving in 2nd gear, turn right and possible hard landing without wheels blockade






2.8.1


Gear changes, speed and braking




2.9


Vending






2.9.1


U-turn and trepunktsvending




2:10


Parking bays






2.10.1


Forward and reverse parking










3.


VEHICLE HANDLING PROPERTIES




3.1





General information on handling properties




3.1.1


Fart Properties




3.1.2


Control Properties




3.1.3


The driver orientation conditions







3.2





Different vehicles maneuvering characteristics




3.2.1


Cars and vans




3.2.2


Trucks, including buses




3.2.3


Cars with trailers




3.2.4


Tractors, including motor gear




3.2.5


motorcycles




3.2.6


mopeds




3.2.7


bicycles













4.


TRAFFIC CONDUCT




4.1






Perception and reaction




4.1.1


Motorist's main tasks




4.1.2


The reaction time




4.1.3


Perception and reaktionsevnens restriction




4.1.4


Improving the perception and ability to react




4.1.5


Mobile phones influence on perception and ability to react




4.1.6


Various activities influence on perception and ability to react.







4.2





Vision and motion




4.2.1


Visual orientation and motion direction







4.3





Rated speed and distance




4.3.1


Evaluation of distance




4.3.2


Evaluation of own speed




4.3.3


Evaluation of others' speed







4.4





Regulations regarding driving ability and health




4.4.1


alcohol




4.4.2


Illness, medications, fatigue, and the like







4.5





Other road users' behavior




4.5.1


Accidents, age and trafikantart




4.5.2


Age-related difficulties







4.6





Assessment of other road users




4.6.1



Characteristics of age, attention and intention




4.6.2


Particularly vulnerable road users typical errors







4.7





Individual attitudes and behavior




4.7.1


attitudes




4.7.2


Behaviour




4.7.3


Risk Blindness













5.


ROAD CONDITIONS




5.1





Road safety design




5.1.1


Limits to weigh security




5.1.2


Use of roads







5.2





Risks to the roads




5.2.1


Characteristics of risk factors




5.2.2


The road's surroundings




5.2.3


The road equipment or standard




5.2.4


The road course




5.2.5


The road use




5.2.6


The road type or class













6


BASIC RULES FOR DRIVING




6.1





Advice to traffic




6.1.1


Traffic Law validity




6.1.2


Advice for driving








6.2





Safe and unhindered settlement of traffic flow




6.2.1


Basic rules to traffic




6.2.2


Danger, disadvantage and unfairly disadvantage




6.2.3


Signaling and use of light without daytime




6.2.4


Free passage to certain traffic




6.2.5


People and goods etc.




6.2.6


Motor Stop and towing etc.




6.2.7


Traffic Accident




6.2.8


Insurance requirement




6.2.9


Entrusting the vehicle to other












7.


MANOEUVRES ON ROAD




7.1





Starting and stopping at the traffic lane edge




7.1.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.1.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.1.3


Orienteering skills




7.1.4


Maneuver skills







7.2





Placed under the straight running




7.2.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.2.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.2.3


Orienteering skills




7.2.4



Maneuver skills







7.3





Speed ​​during straight running




7.3.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.3.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.3.3


Orienteering skills




7.3.4


Maneuver skills




7.3.5


Legal provisions also







7.4





Lane departure and Merge




7.4.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.4.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.4.3


Orienteering skills




7.4.4


Maneuver skills




7.4.5


Legal provisions also







7.5





Vending




7.5.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.5.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.5.3


Orienteering skills




7.5.4


Maneuver skills




7.5.5


Legal provisions also







7.6





Driving past stationary vehicles and pedestrians, etc.




7.6.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.6.2



Knowledge of risk factors




7.6.3


Orienteering skills




7.6.4


Maneuver skills







7.7





meeting




7.7.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.7.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.7.3


Orienteering skills




7.7.4


Maneuver skills




7.7.5


Legal provisions also







7.8





Driving before or after other




7.8.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.8.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.8.3


Orienteering skills




7.8.4


Maneuver skills




7.8.5


Regulatory and other factors







7.9





overtaking




7.9.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.9.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.9.3


Orienteering skills




7.9.4


Maneuver skills




7.9.5


Legal provisions also







7:10






Driving in trafiksanerede areas




7.10.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.10.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.10.3


Orienteering skills




7.10.4


Maneuver skills




7.10.5


Legal provisions also







7:11





The forward against cross




7.11.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.11.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.11.3


Orienteering skills




7.11.4


Maneuver skills







7:12





Forward movement in the cross




7.12.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.12.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.12.3


Orienteering skills




7.12.4


Maneuver skills







7:13





Right turn at intersections




7.13.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.13.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.13.3


Orienteering skills




7.13.4


Maneuver skills








7:14





Left turn at intersections




7.14.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.14.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.14.3


Orienteering skills




7.14.4


Maneuver skills







7:15





Driving in roundabout




7.15.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.15.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.15.3


Orienteering skills




7.15.4


Maneuver skills







7:16





Driving on the highway




7.16.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.16.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.16.3


Orienteering skills




7.16.4


Maneuver skills




7.16.5


Legal provisions also




7.16.6


Driving on the expressway







7:17





Running alongside other




7.17.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.17.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.17.3


Orienteering skills





7.17.4


Maneuver skills







7:18





Stopping and parking




7.18.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.18.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.18.3


Orienteering skills




7.18.4


Maneuver skills




7.18.5


Legal provisions also







7:19





Driving in the dark and in the daytime also




7.19.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.19.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.19.3


Orienteering skills




7.19.4


Maneuver skills




7.19.5


Legal provisions also







7:20





Driving in tunnel




7.20.1


Knowledge of accidents




7.20.2


Knowledge of risk factors




7.20.3


Orienteering skills




7.20.4


Maneuver skills













8.


SPECIAL RISK FACTORS IN TRAFFIC




8.1


Specific risk factors









8.1.1



Alcohol as accident and injury factor




8.1.2


Speed ​​as accident and injury factor




8.1.3


Not wearing seat belts as an injury factor












9.


MANOEUVRES ON DRIVING TECHNICAL SERVICES




9.1





Road holding and loading condition




9.1.1


Vejgrebets importance




9.1.2


Loading condition, tire pressure and tread pattern







9.2





Speed, centrifugal force, braking distances and vejgrebets utilization




9.2.1


Kinetic energy and speed




9.2.2


centrifugal force




9.2.3


Stopping distances




9.2.4


Vejgrebets utilization







9.3





Obstacles on the road and slalom




9.3.1


Slalom




9.3.2


Double evasive action without braking




9.3.3


Combined braking and evasive action







9.4





Recovered to traction after slipping




9.4.1


Driving in curve




9.4.2


Rear wheel skid




9.4.3


Front wheel-skidding.







9.5






Maintain control after running off the high road edge




9.5.1


Returning the car after running off the high road edge












10.


PREPARING FOR DRIVING LICENCE




10.1





Conditions for obtaining driving license




10.1.1


Driving lessons etc.




10.1.2


Setting the driving test




10.1.3


Driving license categories and entitlements







10.2





Driving test run




10.2.1


Requirements of the driving test




10.2.2


Theory exam




10.2.3


The practical test







10.3





Regulations regarding the license




10.3.1


Driving license validity




10.3.2


Recovery and restoration / reproduction of license







Appendix 2
0. INTRODUCTION
The overall goal of driver training for vehicle category B are:


1) to give students insight into and understanding of the dangers and difficulties they as motorists meetings in circulation, as well as providing them with knowledge of the traffic laws and other legal provisions that are important in this context
2) to give students sufficient knowledge of the vehicle and its operation that can detect emerging defects affecting security,
3) to give students an understanding of the basic human conditions that affect driving skill so that they can fully utilize their skills and where necessary discourage ordinary human limitations
4) to give students the ability to judge traffic flow critical and drive the vehicle without danger to themselves and others
5) to help the students become considerate and responsible drivers and
6) to give students knowledge and understanding of the weak road situation, particularly in relation to the motorized traffic.

This curriculum contains a detailed specification of training objectives divided into main sections and subsections.

Each main section begins with a brief description of teaching purposes. Then follows a breakdown in subsection stating the objectives and detailed targets. Milestones represent the actual guidelines as well as teaching assessment of the driving test since they more closely clarify what the student should know and be able, after the course.
Specifying performance requirements for student used the following expression in milestones descriptions:
Eleven must


7) have knowledge, means that the student must be respect informed about a topic, it is not unknown for the student, or that it can support and facilitate the understanding of a subsequent more targeted and thorough training, || | 8) designate, means that the student must in practice be able to locate specific parts of the vehicle, including operating equipment,
9) read and understand the meaning of words, the student must in practice be able to use instruments and control light in the vehicle, understand the importance of these and react as necessary,
10) check means that the student without tools in practice be able to investigate and decide whether in the control section stated requirements for the vehicle are met, including explain how the checks are made
11) indicate the reasons for the content or meaning of words, the student should be able to find the correct answer among several possible questions about road markings, the content of a legal provision and the like, as well as other issues of significant importance
12) control orientation and maneuvering skills and other skills means that the student in practice able to familiarize themselves critically, manage vehicle operating equipment properly perform maneuvers flawlessly and perform other skills properly
13) perceive and judge means that the student must be able to observe certain conditions in a traffic situation or images that understand the relationship significance and how to respond on this, or find the correct answer among several possible questions about the relationship
14) recognize, is that the student in practice must recognize the importance of notes to traffic, and live the meaning of these,
15) respond appropriately, means that the student in practice must be able to drive the vehicle and change the speed, location and direction of travel in accordance with traffic rules, safety considerations and traffic flow
16) by exercise gain experience on to say that the student while driving alone in the vehicle on the road safety center have the opportunity to observe behavior of the vehicle when performing certain maneuvers
17) gain any skill in, ie the student while driving alone in the vehicle on the road safety center must be able to operate the vehicle correctly, WITHOUT THE maneuver as a whole required flawlessly executed and
18) by exercise achieve proficiency in, to say that the student while driving alone in the vehicle in closed training ground and road safety center must be able to perform maneuvers correctly.

The milestones descriptions can performance requirements combined and / or performance requirements can be used partially. Fx's performance requirement "recognize and define the meaning of 'used descriptions from two performance requirements.
Performance requirement "indicate reasons for the content or meaning of 'is used in the theory test.
Performance requirement 'recognize' is used in the practical test.
In theory test the pupil from situations on the pictures could "indicate the importance of 'road markings, for example, by finding the correct answer among several possible.
In the practical test, the student must in any traffic situation could 'recognize' such road markings and live the meaning of these.
There is the target descriptions not distinguished clearly between theoretical and practical training. This is due to the need to fulfill theoretical and practical training must be integrated to the greatest extent possible, and to run the teacher therefore greater freedom in the choice of teaching methods and teaching situation.
A sharp distinction between theory and practice is also less appropriate as much practical training, ie training in practical skills may well be learned in a classroom with the right tools and some theory lessons, ie teaching academic subjects could exploit the practical exercises in the traffic flow.
About the detailed planning and implementation of teaching, including the auxiliaries refer to the teacher's guide for the curriculum.

Practice driving (ie maneuvers on a closed training ground, maneuvers on the road and exercises on road safety center) and driving test for category B shall be carried in a passenger car that meets the requirements for a passenger car, category B, as indicated in the license Order and its Annex.
About the detailed guidelines for the driving test, refer to license the notice with appendices.
Appendix 3
1. CAR INTERIOR, EQUIPMENT AND DOCUMENTS
The purpose of education is to give the student a sufficient knowledge of the car's design and equipment and such an understanding of the car's functions, it facilitates the learning of a correct and careful handling of the car and safe execution of the various maneuvers.
The training also aims to make the student familiar with the main legal provisions on vehicle equipment, so that the student can identify and decide defects or errors that have a bearing on road safety.
Teaching has finally aims to make the student familiar with the laws on the main administrative documents related to the car's use.
1.1 Operating equipment and instruments
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to identify service equipment in the car to be used while driving on the closed training ground and on the way, and learn to understand the importance of standard instruments and pilot lights on the car's instrument panel.
The student must also have knowledge of how the motor, ignition, throttle, clutch, gearbox, steering and brakes work, so that it helps the learner to deal with controls safely.
The instruction in section 1.1.1 can be combined with the teaching in section 2.1.1 "Control, control, adjustment and use of equipment."
Subobjective
1.1.1 Service equipment
The student must be able to identify the following control equipment:


1) Switch for steering lock, ignition, electric starter, wiper and washer, horn, lights, fan, heated rear window.
2) Switch for lights, high beam, low beam, flashing lights and hazard warning.
3) Pedal to the clutch, accelerator and brake.
4) Gear lever and gear including the placement and parking brake grip and steering wheel.
5) The safety belt attachment points and lock.

1.1.2 Instruments and warning
The student must be able to read and understand the meaning of the following instruments and warning:


1) Speedometer and temperature meter.
2) Check for oil pressure, electrical power, door closing, lights in the lights, including turn signals, parking brake, ABS brakes and possibly tale for airbags and brake system malfunctions.

1.1.3 Motor, ignition and throttle
The student must be familiar with the following features:


1) The engine works in principle in the manner that the pistons are set in motion when a fuel mixture is ignited.
2) pistons movement is transformed into a rotary movement of the crankshaft, and this motion be passed through the clutch and gear to the car's wheels.
3) The engine rpm is adjusted using the accelerator.
4) The engine helped started by an electric starter motor that gets power from the battery when the ignition key is operated.
5) The ignition key or start button must immediately be released when the engine starts, the starter motor otherwise destroyed.

1.1.4 Coupling
The student must be familiar with the following features:


1) The clutch function is to connect and disconnect the connection between the engine and gearbox.
2) The coupling functions in principle in the manner that a plate is pressed against a rotating wheel on the crankshaft, whereby the movement is carried on to the gearbox.
3) The connection to the gearbox interrupted when the clutch pedal is depressed.
4) The clutch pedal to pedal depressed when starting the engine to spare starter motor and it must be pressed into the bottom during gear changes not to damage the gearbox.
5) The clutch pedal must be lifted slowly in first gear so that the rotational movement from the engine is transmitted softly to the car's wheels.
6) For passenger cars, which include hydraulics clutch, the liquid level must be sufficient.

1.1.5 Gear
The student must be familiar with the following features:


1) The gear box controls the transmission of the rotary motion from the engine to the vehicle wheels.
2) The gear box operates in principle in the manner that the gear wheels of different sizes are caused to interfere with each other. This is done by the shift lever is operated or in some cars automatically (automatic transmission).

3) The lower gears are used where you want great traction, which when starting, acceleration or driving up a steep hill and when driving at low speed.
4) The gear is used when driving at high speed. This protects the engine and reduces fuel consumption.
5) A reverse gear is necessary to get the car to drive backwards.

1.1.6 Steering
The student must be familiar with the following features:


1) The control apparatus functions in principle in the manner that a rotation of the steering wheel is transmitted to the front wheels through the various links and joints.
2) The steering is usually self-righting, so that the front wheels and hence the steering wheel itself turns back toward the straight-ahead when the grip on the steering wheel loosened while driving.
3) The steering on newer cars are usually provided with an auxiliary steering (power steering), which facilitates control. The vehicle must be controlled, even if a possible help control failure, but its continued operation would be reckless and often illegal.
4) Newer cars may be equipped with an Electronic Stability Program (ESP), which can prevent overturning and skidding by braking one or more wheels.

1.1.7 Brakes
The student must be familiar with the following features:


1) The wheel brakes operate in principle in the manner that a brake lining at a liquid pressure is pressed against a drum or disc wheel on the vehicle, so that rotation of the wheel is reduced.
2) The fluid pressure occurs when you step on the brake pedal and the pressure is transmitted from the master cylinder through the brake lines to hjulcylinderne in the brakes. The service brake is usually supplemented by a brake booster, which amplifies the hydraulic pressure when the driver steps on the brake pedal. If the amplifier fails, will continue to drive could be irresponsible and illegal.
3) Two-circuit brake consists of two separate brake circuits and are arranged so that the one brake circuit can operate for emergency braking if there are leaks in the other brake circuit. If one circuit fails, will continue to drive be irresponsible and illegal.
4) Anti-lock brakes (ABS) are arranged so as to prevent the wheels from locking during braking, and enable a certain extent, steering and braking at the same time. When the wheels of a car with ABS brakes sits sensors that monitor wheel speed and sends pulses to an electronic control box. If one or more wheels during braking tends to block, the electronic control unit regulating the pressure to the brakes such that the blocking of the wheel (s) is avoided. This regulation provides vibration in the brake pedal. If the ABS braking system does not work, will slow the properties changed and only drive to the nearest repair shop is allowed.
5) The parking brake acts on the wheel brakes through special connections and shall be designed so that it can remain tight.

1.2 Regulations regarding vehicle design and equipment
Overall dimensions
The student must learn the main legal provisions on vehicle design and equipment and have knowledge of various risk factors and signs of bugs that are particularly important for road safety.
The student must also without tools learn to control equipment legality of a car and detect possible mistakes.
Teaching in control of the car's equipment can be combined with the teaching in section 2.1.1 "Control, control, adjustment and use of equipment."
Subobjective
1.2.1 The driver and the owner's responsibility
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) The owner or the registered user is responsible for ensuring that the car is in lawful condition, and the driver is responsible for ensuring that the car is in a secure state.
2) The driver must always be aware that the car is in order, and especially the steering, brakes, lights and audible warning device (horn) operate safely and in accordance with legal requirements. (When driving with a trailer, ensure that the interface is sound).

1.2.2 Steering
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) The steering system shall be such that the car can be steered easily, safely and quickly.
2) There must not be due to wear or the like occur significant slack in the steering system as a whole or in its parts.
3) When driving at low speeds the steering wheel could easily be turned from side to side without encountering uneven resistance or elicit murmurs.

The student must be able to check if the following conditions at the steering mechanism are met:



4) should normally not be backlash gearing. This is controlled by the wheels immediately follows the steering wheel movement (in cars with power steering checks shall be made with the engine).
5) The fluid level in any servobeholder should follow the vehicle manufacturer's instructions. This is controlled either by the fluid level is between the minimum and maximum mark or by control indicator for this is not on.

The student must have knowledge of the following signs of defects in the steering system:


6) Heavy or difficult management, may be due to lack of liquid on servobeholderen or worn or broken drive belt for the power steering.
7) If the wheels do not immediately follow the steering wheel movements, it may be signs of slack in the steering links.

The student must be able to express the content of the following aspects of the steering system:


8) Heavy or difficult management is a sign of failure.
9) If the wheels do not immediately follow the steering wheel movement, it is an indication errors.
10) The steering must be checked if there is too little fluid in the servo system, or if there is significant backlash gearing.

1.2.3 Brakes
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) The service brake shall act on all wheels and could slow the car safe, fast and effective at all speeds and loads.
2) The parking brake must be able to keep the car stationary on sloping path.

The student must have knowledge of the following legislation:


3) The emergency (which may be the parking brake or one circle in a two-circuit brake system) must be able to stop the car safely if the service braking.

The student must be able to confirm that the following aspects of the service brake are met:


4) The brake pedal must not be violated in the bottom when pedaling hard on the pedal. Pedal migration is also dependent on bilfabrikatet.
5) The brake pedal must not sag while it must be depressed at constant pressure.
6) brakes with vacuum amplifier, the brake pedal (for pressure compensation) however sink a little while it must be depressed and the engine is then started.
7) The fluid level in the brake fluid reservoir should be between minimum and maximum mark, or by the control indicator for this is not on.

The student must have knowledge of the following signs of defects in the brakes:


8) skew drawing of the car during light braking on a level road suggests brake system malfunctions or moisture or dirt on the brake pads. Moisture can penetrate the brakes during eg car wash, but disappear after a brief braking.
9) Uneven braking or sudden hugninger from one or more wheels indicate faults in brake drums, brake discs and brake linings.
10) The brake pedal can suddenly depressed further than usual are signs that the one brake circuit is faulty.

The student must be able to express the content of the following aspects of the brakes:


11) skew drawing of the car during light braking on a level road is a sign of failure.
12) Uneven braking or sudden hugninger from one or more wheels is the sign of failure.
13) The brake pedal can suddenly depressed further than usual are signs that the one brake circuit is faulty.

The student must be able to indicate the importance of the following:


14) Brakes should be immediately checked if there is insufficient brake fluid in the brake fluid reservoir, if the light stays on while driving, the brake pedal can be depressed further than normal, or if braking is uneven or the car during braking pulls to the side.
15) If the indicator light for the ABS brake system is not switched off shortly after starting, this indicates fault in the ABS brake system, and only drive to the nearest repair shop is allowed.

1.2.4 Lights, reflectors and horn
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) The car may only be provided with prescribed or permitted lights and reflectors.
2) The obligatory lamps and reflectors include:



a) two lamps with high beam,
b) two lamps with asymmetrical passing,
c) two lamps with position,
d) two lamps to backlight,
e) three lamps with stoplights, (older cars only need 2 stop lights)
f) at least one license plate lamp
g) two lamps at the front and rear of the car and one on each side of the car and
h) two red approved and labeled rearward reflectors (not to be triangular).



3) The headlight beam (high beam) to be able to illuminate at least 100 m in front of the car, low beam must be able to light up the road at least 30 meters ahead of the vehicle without dazzling, and position lights must be clearly visible for at least 300 m distance without dazzling.
4) The headlight light must be white or yellowish.
5) Tail light lights shall be red and shall be clearly visible for at least 300 m distance without dazzling.
6) Cars that are longer than six meters shall be provided with approved and labeled yellow side reflectors and side marker lamps to be distributed on the car's sides. Side marker lamps shall be clearly visible for at least 300 m distance without dazzling.
7) Number plate lights to illuminate the rear license plate so that it can clearly be read in at least 20 m distance.

The student must have knowledge of the following provisions and conditions:


8) The lighting and reflectors include:



a) Additional main-beam headlamps, daytime running lights, additional stop lights, additional tail lights, fog lamps, reversing lamps, rear fog lamps, search and work lights work, buoy and marker lights, parking lights and headlight flash, for which special rules apply. Furthermore, the car must be equipped with white reflectors front, yellow reflectors on the sides and additional red reflectors at the back.


9) Pears must be properly set in the headlight sockets (possibly rated the outside of the light / dark boundary location).
10) On vehicles that are more than 2.10 m, there must be two front-facing and two rear-facing marker lamps must be visible for at least 300 m distance without dazzling.

The student must be able to check if the following requirements for lights, reflectors and horn are met:


11) All lights and reflectors must be whole and clean, and all lights should be bright.
12) passing beam shall not dazzle (rated at the top of lysgrænsen falls 1 cm per. M).
13) Stop lamps must provide significantly brighter than the rear lamps.
14) Flashing lights should be flashing yellow lights, clearly visible in sunlight.
15) The signal shall be able to turn on all the lamps at the same time.
16) License plate lights should be white light that can illuminate the rear license plate.
17) Lights matched pair must have the same color and brightness.
18) The horn must have a clear, steady tone.

The student must be able to indicate reasons for the following signs of error lights, reflectors and horn:


19) If the lamps flash substantially faster than usual, it is usually indications that one or more lamps do not work.
20) All lights and reflectors must be whole and clean, and all lights should be bright.
21) The horn must have a clear, steady tone.

1.2.5 The engine and exhaust system etc.
The student must be able to check if the following requirements for the engine and exhaust system are met:


1) The engine must not develop unnecessary smoke or noise.
2) The engine must not be soiled by leaking oil.
3) The exhaust system must be tight and stuck.
4) The engine oil must be filled in sufficient quantity, read on dipstick max. and mine. brands or by instructions in the manual.
5) Coolant must be filled in sufficient quantity assessed according to instructions in the manual.

The student must have knowledge of the following risk factors relating to the engine and exhaust system:


6) Leaks in exhaust system or drive with the tailgate open can cause carbon monoxide, which is odorless and dangerous even in small amounts, enters the car.
7) Too little oil on the engine or too little water in the cooling system can cause the engine to be destroyed.
8) Is the exhaust system with a catalytic converter, will attempt to push or tow the car in time could lead to catalytic converter being destroyed.
9) The parking of a car with a catalytic converter in dry grass, dry leaves, and the like should be avoided because of the fire risk.

The student must have knowledge of the following signs of defects in the engine and exhaust system etc.:


10) Black exhaust smoke indicates poor combustion due to a fault in the engine or the air filter.
11) The student shall be able to specify the content of the following conditions of the engine and exhaust system etc.:
12) Black exhaust smoke indicates poor combustion and a malfunction.
13) Noise in the abnormal extent to acceleration indicates a fault in the exhaust system.

14) Motoropspeedning without speed while driving is increased, indicates a fault in the coupling.
15) The difficulty gear shifting with strong murmurs suggest errors in gear or clutch.
16) Slow movement of the car in first gear, even if the clutch pedal is depressed, indicating errors in the clutch.

1.2.6 Energy and environmental friendly driving
The student must be able to express the content of the following conditions:


1) The engine should only be started immediately prior to drive.
2) To reduce air pollution and noise should not let the engine idle for a long time.
3) Run mode of great importance to energy consumption.
4) energy-efficient driving techniques mean that one generally fail unnecessary and repetitive speed changes.
5) The deceleration fuel consumption can be reduced by releasing the accelerator all the way to release.

The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


6) High speed and aggressive driving with high accelerations, for example when overtaking, resulting in increased fuel consumption, while the energy-efficient driving techniques in general can give 5-10% savings in fuel and in many cases up to 25% savings.
7) Subject to stop at signalized intersections should anticipate about stopping for yellow or red becomes necessary, and where necessary to adapt the speed the last stretch towards the intersection, rather than continuing at high speed and then brake sharply at the end.

Statutory law and matters concerning environmentally friendly driving
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


8) The vehicle must be operated so that it is not noisy unnecessary and cause smoke and gases unnecessarily.
9) Unnecessary and disturbing driving should not take place at the settlement, and if driving is necessary the driver run in such a way that other disturbed as little as possible.
10) Any local ban to let the engine idle longer than a certain time.

1.2.7 Bearing parts
The student must be able to express the content of the following provisions and conditions:


1) Tyres, wheel rims and wheel bearings must be undamaged.
2) Tires must be of the same type on all wheels (except nødreservehjul) and be inflated to a pressure by the vehicle manufacturer's instructions. Adjusting the tire with an air pump and checked with a tire gauge.
3) Studded tires may only be used in the period November 1 to April 15 and must then be fitted to all wheels on the car.
4) The car must be equipped with shock absorbers on all wheels.
5) Abnormal noise or vibration from the wheel bearing or suspension may indicate errors.

The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


6) Any directional tires should be fitted in the correct direction of rotation.

The student must be able to check if the following requirements for tires and shock absorbers are met:


7) Tires must have at least 1.6 mm depth in the main pattern on all wheels, possibly rated at wear indicators.
8) Shock absorbers must be active on all wheels, judged by the car immediately resolves after a strong influence of the shock absorbers.

The student must have knowledge of the following signs of defects in the structural parts:


9) Uneven / crooked tire wear indicates a fault in the tire pressure, wheel or wheel alignment, brakes, shock absorbers.
10) Creaking noises while driving can indicate errors in the springs or shock absorbers.

The student must be able to express the content of the following aspects of the structural parts:


11) Uneven / crooked tire wear indicates a fault.
12) Abnormal tendency to oversteer or understeer of the car - that is, the car turns into a sharper respectively. softer arc, than what would correspond to ratdrejningen - or increased sensitivity to crosswinds suggests incorrect tire pressure.

The student must be able to indicate the importance of the following:


13) Uneven / crooked tire wear may indicate various errors in the vehicle. These errors must be immediately remedied.
14) Incorrect tire pressure can occur with the uneven / crooked tire wear, skew during light braking or abnormal understeer and oversteer and must be immediately remedied.

1.2.8 Body
The student must have knowledge of the following requirements for bodywork, which includes roof and sides with screens, hood and trunk lid, doors and floor pan:



1) The body must be no sharp edges or protruding parts that can cause undue risk to other road users.
2) The body must not be damaged or corroded by rust to the point that it is a danger to road safety.
3) Doors, hood and trunk lid must be fitted with a lock, so they can be kept closed while driving.

1.2.9 Special equipment
The student must be able to express the content of the following provisions and conditions:


1) The vehicle must normally be equipped with safety belts at all seating positions.
2) Safety belts must be approved and undamaged.
3) The car must be equipped with headrests.
4) The windscreen must be kept clean with wipers and washer. The windscreen must generally be whole and undamaged.
5) The car must be equipped with an interior rear-view mirror and an exterior rear-view mirror on the left side. If there is not sufficient visibility to the rear, there must also be outside rear-view mirror on the right side.
6) Mirrors must be clean, whole and correctly adjusted.
7) When driving you should carry an approved warning triangle, so you have it handy in situations where you are required to set it up. (See section 6.2.6).

The student must be able to indicate reasons for the following signs of errors by special equipment:


8) Can the windshield is not kept clean, it indicates errors in wiper or washer.

The student must be able to verify the following:


9) Washer fluid must be filled in sufficient quantity.

1.2.10 Special vehicles
The student must have knowledge of the following statute:


1) For van and trailer for passenger and commercial vehicle, 3-wheel motorcycle, great moped, tractor and motorized equipment are all subject to license for regular car (category B) Special rules apply to vehicle design and equipment. These rules relate in particular to the vehicle length and width markings on the permissible load and gross vehicle weight, brakes, lights, tires, mirrors, and connecting to the trailer.

1.3 Vehicle documents
Overall dimensions
The student must have knowledge of what information is shown on the vehicle documents, as well as learn when these documents must be brought.
Sub-objectives.
1.3.1 Registration Certificate
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) To a car can be used, it must be registered and there shall be issued a registration certificate.
2) Registration Certificate, showing the vehicle's curb weight / curb weight, the permissible total weight and the weight of any trailer that may be linked to it.
3) On the basis of registration certificates, the driver can determine whether the car and trailer may be connected.
4) When driving with a trailer must vehicle and trailer registration certificates allowed. When traveling abroad, the original certificates, or one of a motor office issued copy, allowed.
5) When driving in Denmark can be brought copies.

The student must have knowledge of the following:


6) Many countries require that you bring original registration certificate when driving in the countries concerned.
Appendix 4
2. MANOEUVRES ON CLOSED EXERCISE ROOM.
The purpose of education in closed training ground is to give the student the skills to master the car at low speeds while performing maneuvers that occur in ordinary traffic, ie starting, stopping, forward and reverse drive, swinging, turning, parking at the roadside and parking space.
The individual maneuvers should be learned with as much certainty and precision that students in subsequent exercises on the way, mainly concentrate on adapting driving to road and traffic conditions and the traffic rules.
On an enclosed exercise space may only be at the number of exercise cars that space be used for.
The exercises carried out to one student in each car and run teacher must not teach and be responsible for 3 students at the same time. The exercises will normally be carried out in 4 to 5 hours, of which at least 4 lessons of 45 minutes duration must be exercises as a driver of the car.

Each exercise should be learned with a satisfactory result, which means that the student must perform the exercise flawlessly least 2 times in succession. The exercises must be implemented in order to ensure that the student continually fed from a lighter to a more difficult maneuver. It will correspond to the order listed in the training objectives. Apart from a brief instruction from the driving instructor, the student must find itself alone in the car while training. Driving teacher must during the exercises monitor students properly.
At the closed training ground must be kept lists of students who have received driving lessons in the described in paragraph 2 exercises. The list shall contain information on:


1) The teaching driving instructor's name and address.
2) The student's name and address.
3) Date and time (from and to) for teaching.

Lists must be kept for at least three years and must be presented to the police on request.
Closed training grounds must be authorized. About device refers to license the notice with appendices.
With regard to teaching organization and implementation, refer to the teacher's guide for the curriculum.
2.1 Preparation for driving
Overall dimensions
The student must make the necessary security preparations for the journey and become familiar with service equipment names and location.
Teaching in section 2.1.1 can be combined with the teaching in section 1.1 "Operating Equipment and instruments ', and the milestones which the performance requirement is to' control 'in section 1.2" Regulations regarding vehicle design and equipment'.
Subobjective
2.1.1 Control, operation, setting and use of equipment
The student must master the following skills:


1) Clean possibly misted or dirty windows, mirrors and lenses.
2) Remove any loose objects on the dashboard, sun visors, rear window shelf and under and in front of the driver's seat.
3) Operate the doors closing and Locking mechanisms.
4) Set the driver's seat to achieve comfortable driving position and to operate the car's equipment, including reading instruments.
5) Buckle and adjust the seatbelt and headrest.
6) Setting the mirrors so that the best possible visibility is achieved without the need to change the driving position.
7) Could disengage quickly from the safety belt.
8) Operate the clutch, accelerator and brake pedal.
9) Operating gear and parking brake.
10) Serve contacts to light, character and signaling, window wiper and washer, fan, heated rear window and sun visor, etc..

These skills the student must be able to use in the coming maneuvers on the road.
The student must have knowledge of the following:


11) Operating the clutch, accelerator and brake pedal with inappropriate footwear can result in a risk of user error.

2.2 Starting and stopping
Overall dimensions
The student must learn how to operate the electric start motor properly and operate the clutch, accelerator and brake, so that the starting and stopping takes place without violent jerk, and so that the speed is kept fairly regularly in first gear on the short driving distances.
There should not be special emphasis on steering wheel and steering.
Subobjective
2.2.1 Start, gear operation, repair and braking
The student must know exercise achieve proficiency in the following proportions:


1) Buckle your seat belt.
2) Start the engine by operating the steering wheel lock, ignition and electric start engine and keep the engine idling.
3) Restart the engine if the stall.
4) Shift from neutral to first gear with the engine running.
5) Look for possible obstacles ahead, to the sides and rear.
6) Be aware of blind spots and check them at the head turning.
7) Releasing the parking brake.
8) Put soft going and drive forward slowly a short while.
9) Brake softened to a halt with simultaneous tripping and then shift into neutral.

2.2.2 Commissioning the sloping road
Circumstances permitting, the pupil of exercise achieve proficiency in the following proportions:


1) Start the engine and engage 1st gear on rising / sloping road.
2) Put soaked in time during operation of the accelerator, clutch pedal and brake pedal or parking brake.

2.3 Driving in figure 8
Overall dimensions

The student must learn how to operate the steering wheel with correct hand position and so that the control is performed smoothly and accurately during swinging left and right in figure 8.
Subobjective
2.3.1 Hand position and steering wheel
The student must know exercise achieve proficiency in the following proportions:


1) Keep hands on the wheel with your thumbs on the inside of the rim and hands in a position corresponding to urviserstillingen about "a quarter to three."
2) Run forward in 1st gear in large figure-8 curve and perform ratdrejninger by crossing the arms during change of hand position on the steering wheel rim.

2.4 Forward and reverse drive with målbremsning
Overall dimensions
The student must learn improved accuracy and safety in operating the pedals, and in particular by the combined use of clutch and accelerator and clutch and brake.
The student must also learn how to run backwards and to judge the car's length.
Forward and reverse driving is performed between two marker cones, ca. 10 m in front of and behind the car. Cones top to be visible from the driver's seat, perhaps marked by a cane.
Subobjective
2.4.1 evaluation of the vehicle's length
The student must know exercise achieve proficiency in the following proportions:


1) Brake accurately by marking the forward run, ie so that the bumper just touching the cone without passing it.
2) Shift into reverse, modify driving position for reversing the orientation through the rear window and the left hand on top of the steering wheel rim.
3) Brake exactly when marked in reverse.

2.5 Backwards driving oscillation
Overall dimensions
The student must learn how to run backwards in straight course and during swinging left and right in soft curves.
Subobjective
2.5.1 Vibration, alignment and orientation
The student must know exercise achieve proficiency in the following proportions:


1) Driving backwards in straight course and even rate an extended period (about 20-30 m), including orienting themselves through the rear window.
2) Swing backward to the left around the selected corners with any precision, including orienting themselves through the left side window.
3) swing backwards to the right around the selected corners with any precision, including orienting themselves through the right side window.
4) Right up fast enough after the turn of the corner, then head again becomes straight.
5) During the exercises should also be used mirrors.

2.6 Forward and backward slalom
Overall dimensions
The student must learn greater accuracy and security to coordinate speed and control.
Subobjective
2.6.1 Coordination of speed and control
The student must know exercise achieve proficiency in the following proportions:


1) Forward slalom driving in first gear between 5-6 marker cones with about 10 m intervals.
2) Backward slalom driving as above.
3) The exercise must be carried out without stopping and without falling over cones.
4) Backward slalom driving should be implemented by both orientation through the rear and side windows alone and using mirrors in combination with head turning.

2.7 Parking at the roadside
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to park at the forward driveway marked road edge or curb on the right, including obtaining reliable appraisal of the car's width, wheel position and the vehicle's longitudinal direction relative to the wayside.
Subobjective
2.7.1 evaluation of the vehicle's width and location
The student must know exercise achieve proficiency in the following proportions:


1) Forwards parking at the marked road edge on the right side with ample room for maneuver and thus good option for steering correction.
2) Forwards parking at the marked road edge on the right side with limited maneuvering space and so that the right set of wheels is not more than 20 cm from the curb and the car is parallel to the wayside.
3) Maneuver site's limit can be marked with cones as "parking pocket" of about 15 x 2 m.
4) exercises should be implemented by both orientation through the front and side windows alone and using mirrors in combination with head turning.

2.8 Driving in 2nd gear, turn right and possible hard landing without wheels blockade
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to switch quickly to 2nd gear and even speed swing right near the marked road edge on sharp corners. If the exercise of the square size permits, the student should also learn to brake hard without the wheels locking.
Subobjective
2.8.1 Shifting, speed and braking
The student must know exercise achieve proficiency in the following proportions:



1) After the stopped position accelerate quickly up to 20- 25 km / h with the shift from 1st to 2nd gear.
2) Keep the targeted rate and steady rate.
3) swing to the right in 2nd gear selected, sharp street corners, until fairly close to the roadside and later with the rear wheel 20-30 cm from the roadside throughout the oscillation.
4) In the circumstances slow up without wheels blockade and in the shortest possible distance at the highest possible and reasonable speed on the training ground.

2.9 Vending
Overall dimensions
The student must perform a U-turn and turn in forward and reverse directions.
Subobjective
2.9.1 U-turn and trepunktsvending
The student must know exercise achieve proficiency in the following proportions:


1) Perform U-turn on sufficiently wide, marked lane, adapted to the used school wagon (car's turning circle + 1 m).
2) Turn on forward and reverse directions on the wide, marked lane, (about 10 m) and narrow, marked lane, (about 7 meters), and later a width adapted to the specific vehicle (car length + 2 m) (trepunktsvending, possibly using the parking brake).

2.10 Parking in bays
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to park in different parking bays and the reversing driveway to the road edge.
Subobjective
2.10.1Forlæns and reverse parking
The student must know exercise achieve proficiency in the following proportions:


1) Park by forward and backward driveway in marked parking space (about 7 x 2.5 m), perpendicular to the direction of travel. The car must be located roughly in the middle of the bay.
2) Park by back driveway to the road edge in marked "parking pocket" (about 8 x 2 m). Right pair of wheels must be less than 30 cm from the roadside.
3) exercises should be implemented by both orientation through the front / rear and side windows alone and using mirrors in combination with head turning.
Appendix 5
3. VEHICLE HANDLING PROPERTIES
The purpose of education is to give the student sufficient knowledge of the different vehicles maneuvering characteristics and drivers of different orientation conditions that it helps the student to learn to anticipate the difficulties drivers might in certain situations and thus assess the risk student exposing themselves yourself and others from getting too close to another vehicle.
The student's knowledge of the theoretical contents to be exploited in practice, where there is opportunity for it during the exercises in road use.
3.1 General maneuvering characteristics
Overall dimensions
The student must be familiar with the terminology of the vehicles maneuvering capabilities and to some general issues regarding the handling properties and orientation conditions.
Subobjective
3.1.1 Speed ​​Properties
The student must have knowledge of the following designations:


1) Speed ​​Features include:



a) The acceleration ability, ie how fast the vehicle can get up to speed,
b) top speed, i.e., how fast the vehicle can run in high gear, and
c) braking performance, ie how fast the vehicle can come down to speed.



3.1.2 Control Properties
The student must have knowledge of the following designations:


1) Control Features include:



a) Control Willingness, ie how fast the vehicle responds when the steering wheel or handlebars are turned,
b) directional stability, that is, which supports the vehicle stay the course during straight driving, and
c) cross wind sensitivity, i.e., how much the vehicle is affected by crosswinds.



The student must be able to express the content of the following general conditions:


2) The vehicle's steering performance depends mainly on the scale distribution on the front and rear wheels.
3) Vehicles with the greatest weight on the rear wheels are usually very willing control (oversteer tendency) and cross wind sensitive and thus less stable direction.
4) Vehicles with the greatest weight on the front wheels is smaller steering willing (understeer tendency) and less cross wind sensitive and thus more stable direction.

By loading condition, these trends intensified.
3.1.3 The driver orientation conditions
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Orientation terms determined by vehicle window frames, mirrors, bodywork, driver's helmet, motor goggles or visor, which forms the 'blind spots' in different directions.
2) Information Conditions aggravated by poorly cleaned windows and mirrors or lenses.

3) Crash helmet, engine noise and possible radio reduces the driver's ability to orient to sound.

3.2 Various vehicles maneuvering characteristics
Overall dimensions
The student must have knowledge of the main maneuvering characteristics of cars, vans, trucks, cars with trailers, tractors, motorcycles and mopeds and bicycles.
The student must also learn to judge the vehicles maneuvering capabilities in situations where it is important for road safety or for an unobstructed settlement of traffic flow.
Subobjective
3.2.1 Cars and vans
Passenger and commercial vehicles' speed range
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Cars and vans are among the fastest vehicles in terms of both acceleration and top speed, and they also have the best braking performance.
2) Special fast car types can be identified by large width, wide track and low ride height compared to the width.
3) Differences in top speed between the cars themselves, is less important with the applicable general speed limits, while differences in acceleration continued importance.

The student must be able to perceive and judge the following conditions and respond appropriately to them:


4) Own acceleration relative to the rear Coming One speed, for example, by starting and overtaking.
5) Self-accelerating power over other kørendes acceleration, for example, by choosing lane before the intersection where you must stop for a red light.

Passenger and commercial vehicles' steering
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


6) Passenger and cargo cars steering has gradually developed so well that there is no essential difference in their control appetite. Directional stability and cross wind speed may vary depending on the bodywork construction and loading of the tractor.

Orientation Terms of passenger and commercial vehicles
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


7) All vehicles have blind spots due to window frames, mirrors and body.
8) The front window pillars form in several types of vehicles blind spot that is large enough to approximately 100 m distance to hide a cross-country vehicle, for example, approaching an intersection.
9) The rear window frames forming on all vehicles blind spots that completely hides a trailing close to the left and right side.
10) The exterior mirrors can not reveal everything that is in the blind spots behind.
11) Panel vans without rear window or blinded windows giving bad information conditions.
12) Glazing which is more or less covered in dirt, dew, ice, snow or posters reduces the driver's view seriously.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


13) Other motorists orientation conditions following the blind between angles location on different vehicle models, eg when driving in columns or rows before changing lanes, overtaking, crossing and vibration.

At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must in practice be able to respond appropriately to the danger opportunities that arise, as indicated in section 3.2.1.
3.2.2 Trucks, including buses
Lorries' speed range
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Most trucks have compared to cars less acceleration.
2) All trucks have lower maximum speed and inferior braking performance.
3) In built-up area shall trucks at most drive 50 km / h, irrespective of any higher fixed rate. This does not apply to buses.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


4) Lorries' usually inferior acceleration, for example, when from behind approaching a truck that will merge or change lanes.
5) Lorries' tend to congregate in clusters on the road a short distance because of their inferior acceleration, for example, before overtaking.
6) Lorries' inferior braking performance, eg when driving in front of the truck that is close.

Lorries' steering
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


7) Trucks is usually pronounced towards stable and less crosswind sensitive due to the great weight and long wheelbase.
8) High trucks with special light loads and empty trucks with high box can be cross wind sensitive.

9) Medium and large trucks demands special space for vibration and other maneuvers, and this space requirement is increased by projecting loads.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


10) Lorries' possible crosswind sensitivity of the load for art, for example by meeting or overtaking in strong crosswinds.
11) Lorries' special space requirements, eg before passing / overtaking fluctuating truck.

Orientation Terms of trucks
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


12) Trucks have more and larger blind spots than passenger cars.
13) The large exterior mirrors can increase the blind spots onwards.
14) Read or product box, covering the cab's rear window, obstruct the view to the rear.
15) Close along the vehicle's sides created blind spots that may be large enough to completely hide smaller vehicles.
16) Lorries' soundproof cabs can make it difficult for the driver to hear sound signals.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


17) Lastbilføreres orientation conditions following the blind between angles location and size, for example, while driving in columns or rows before changing lanes, overtaking, crossing and vibration.
18) Lastbilføreres little opportunity to hear the beep.

At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must in practice be able to respond appropriately to the danger opportunities that arise, as indicated in section 3.2.2.
3.2.3 Cars with trailers
Speed ​​Properties of cars with trailers
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Cars with trailers often have less acceleration, lower top speed and considerably poorer braking performance than cars without a trailer.

The student must be able to perceive and assess risk opportunities by speed characteristics of cars with trailers and respond appropriately to them in the same way as for trucks.
Control Characteristics of cars with trailers
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


2) Cars with trailers tend wobbling drive.
3) Lorries' great directional stability may be impaired when towing a trailer.
4) Trailers may under exceptional circumstances (slippery or heavy braking downhill) easily slide and swing completely across the roadway.
5) Cars with trailers have at least as much space needed for maneuvers as large trucks.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


6) wobble Tendency of cars with trailers, for example when overtaking.
7) The risk of the trailer skid, for example, by meeting or overtaking.
8) The space requirements for maneuvers as for large trucks.

Orientation Terms of cars with trailers
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


9) Orientation terms are very limited, especially for cars with caravans, and many are not accustomed to use only mirrors the orientation behind.

The student must be able to perceive and assess risk options by orientation terms of cars with trailers and respond appropriately to them as for trucks.
At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must in practice be able to respond appropriately to the danger opportunities that arise, as indicated in section 3.2.3.
3.2.4 Tractors, including motor gear
Tractors speed range
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Tractors has good acceleration, but low top speed, with the maximum drive 30 km / h. They must therefore back be marked with a red triangle for slow-moving vehicles.
2) Tractors and tractor combinations often have less stopping power than other vehicles because some tractors only brakes on two wheels, and because not all trailers to tractors must be provided with brakes.
3) Hard braking of a tractor-trailer combination during oscillation may cause the tractor to overturn.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:



4) of tractors low top speed, eg by tractor transients from the side road or crossing and driving on country roads and village streets.
5) of tractors poor braking performance, eg by crossing or the like where the tractor has the right of way.
6) Tractors and especially tractors with trailers confused easily with trucks. From a distance the difference solely on the triangle and the speed, which is already difficult to judge.

Tractors steering
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


7) Tractors with different tool equipment is pretty unstable and may wobble while driving.
8) Tractors with trailers have the same less fortunate steering performance as cars with trailers.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


9) of tractors unstable control, for example, by meeting in sharp turns.
10) wobble trending and risk of skidding by tractors with trailers as in cars with trailers.
11) The space requirements for maneuvers with the trailer as in cars with trailers.

Orientation Terms of tractors
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


12) Trailer implement or trailer with heavy load can reduce the tractor driver's rear visibility considerably.
13) The tractor engine noise makes it difficult for the driver to hear sound signals.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


14) Traktorføreres reduced or lack of rear visibility, for example, by driving after a tractor laden trailer.
15) Traktorføreres little opportunity to hear the beep.

Other features of the tractors
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


16) older tractors do not have to be equipped with direction indicators, but must then bear lightboard and the driver must give the signal with his arm.
17) Outboard gear is often wider than other vehicles and can therefore be difficult to overtake.
18) Tractors with protruding læssegrabbe or similar front and possibly rear can tilt as much while driving the front wheels leave the road, and the steering is reduced thereby seriously.
19) Tractors can have up to two attached trailers.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


20) Older tractors without forward facing direction indicator lamps, for example, by meeting at junctions.
21) Broad outboard gear possibly marked by yellow flashing light on the tractor, eg when overtaking or meeting.
22) Tractors with protruding læssegrabbe, for example, by meeting or overtaking.
23) Tractors with two trailers, for instance when overtaking.

At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must in practice be able to respond appropriately to the danger opportunities that arise, as indicated in section 3.2.4.
3.2.5 Motorcycles
Motorcycle speed range
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Motorcycles has an acceleration that is often significantly higher than passenger cars.
2) motorcycle top speed is on par with passenger cars.
3) Motorcycles must normally be given inferior braking performance, because very few motorcyclists completely mastered the proper braking technique.
4) Motorcycles will during braking in slippery or greasy lead often skidding or tipping over.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


5) motorcycle great acceleration and often high top speed, for example, by the driveway from the side road and left turn in front of oncoming motorcyclist.
6) motorcycles poor braking performance (especially when towing a trailer or in inclement weather), for example when driving in front of or after a motorcyclist.
7) Motorcycles are often confused with the significant slowing mopeds. Visible characteristics of motorcycles compared to mopeds is wider tires and stronger frames and license plate.
8) Some motorcycles is not larger than the cycle, and it may therefore be difficult to distinguish between them.
9) motorcycle acceleration compared to other kørendes acceleration, for example, by choosing lane before the intersection where you must stop for a red light.

Motorcycle steering

The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


10) Large and heavy motorcycles is more towards stable than small and light motorcycles, particularly scooters.
11) All motorcycles are regardless of the size distinctly crosswind sensitive.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


12) Large motorcycle directional stability, for example when cornering.
13) All motorcycles large crosswind sensitivity, for example, by meeting or overtaking under strong crosswind.

Control Features for motorcycles with sidecars
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


14) Motorcycle with sidecar is less directional stability than solo motorcycle.
15) acceleration pull the motorcycle to the right.
16) If braking pulls the motorcycle on the left.
17) By pivoting to the right, there is a risk that the side-car rises.
18) By tilting to the left, there is a risk that the motorcycle rear wheel rises.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


19) The less directional stability by motorcycle with sidecar, for example, by meeting in curves and when driving in the intersection.

Motorcycle with trailer
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


20) Motorcycle with / without sidecar towing a trailer, especially when the coupling device is a single ball coupling, the wobble trend of cars with trailers.

Orientation Terms of motorcycles
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


21) Crash helmet, visor, motorbrillers frame and possible windshield can reduce motorcyclist orientation options.
22) Dirt, rain or dew on Goggles, visors, etc. can quickly reduce motorcyclist's visibility.
23) Motorcyclists running without googles, tend to squint or turn his face partially away from the road, whereby the orientation easily become deficient.
24) Motorcyclists who ride a motorcycle without a mirror, will often not properly briefed backward because it requires an inconvenient turn of the head and body.
25) Motorcyclists are due helmet hard to hear sounds.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


26) Motorcyclist reduced opportunities for orientation, eg when driving in front of the motorcyclist or the crossing.
27) Motorcyclist sometimes deficient orientation behind, for example, by driving after motorcyclist.
28) Motorcyclist difficulty hearing audible.
29) Motorcyclist tend sudden lane changes, for example when driving in rows.

Passenger on motorcycle
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


30) A pillion passenger, who are not used to riding a motorcycle, may be deterred from lean to the same side as the driver during cornering, and can therefore make it difficult for the driver to turn the motorcycle.

3.2.6 Mopeds
Mopeds speed range
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Mopeds can have an acceleration that is level with the small motorcycles, but the speed limit is much smaller.
2) Mopeds can easily be mistaken for small motorcycles and can be distinguished from those at the license plate.
3) Although mopeds belong to the slow vehicles, there is usually clear differ by them, as large mopeds are allowed to drive 45 km / h and small mopeds may only drive 30 km / h.
4) Some mopeds are illegally modified so that they can run significantly faster than the permitted speed.
5) Mopeds usually have an inferior braking performance, because very few moped riders completely mastered the proper braking technique.
6) Any sudden braking of a moped is a high risk of skidding or overturning.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


7) mopeds poor top speed compared to cars and motorcycles.
8) mopeds higher top speed compared to most bikes in city traffic, for example by crossing and before swinging in front of oncoming or from behind moped rider.

9) mopeds poor braking performance, eg when driving in front of or after a moped driver.

Mopeds steering
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


10) Mopeds is no stable and is also strong cross wind sensitive.
11) Directional stability is at least in starting and at low speed, but is increased at higher speed.
12) Moped driver's head and body movements affect immediately the vehicle and gives inconsistent driving.
13) Crosswind sensitivity and wobble trend increased significantly on mopeds who carry large or heavy luggage.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


14) mopeds wobble trend, for example, by passing during their start-up and while overtaking of moped driving uphill.
15) mopeds directional stability at higher speeds, for example, by meeting with fluctuating moped rider.
16) mopeds crosswind sensitivity as for motorcycles.

Orientation Terms of moped
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


17) Moped drivers' briefing conditions similar to bikers.
18) Moped riders without Goggles are like bikers tend to squint or turn his face partially away from the road, especially in rain and snow, whereby the orientation easily become deficient.

The student must be able to perceive and assess risk opportunities by moped orientation conditions as for motorcyclists.
At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must in practice be able to respond appropriately to the danger opportunities that arise, as stated in section 3.2.6
3.2.7 Bicycles
Cycles voyages properties
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Bicycles belong to the slow vehicles, but there is often a big difference between them. Racing bikes can often run faster than mopeds.
2) Bicycles have poor braking performance, because very few cyclists completely mastered the proper braking technique.
3) Any sudden braking of a bike, there is a high risk of skidding or overturning.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


4) Quick cycles top speed in city traffic, for example by crossing and before swinging in front of oncoming or from behind a cyclist.
5) cycles of poor braking performance, eg when driving in front of or after a cyclist.

Cycles steering
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


6) Bicycles are not direction stable and is also strong cross wind sensitive.
7) Directional stability is at least in starting and at low speed, but is increased at higher speed.
8) The bicyclist head and body movements affect immediately the bike and gives inconsistent driving.
9) Crosswind sensitivity and wobble trend increased significantly on bikes that carry large or heavy luggage or children.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


10) cycles wobble trend, for example, by passing during their start-up and while overtaking of cyclists or moped driving uphill.
11) cycles directional stability at higher speeds, for example, by meeting with fluctuating cyclist or moped rider.
12) cycles big crosswind sensitivity.

Orientation Terms bike
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


13) Cyclist orientation conditions are the best possible, but their orientation backward, like with moped riders and motorcyclists require an inconvenient turn of the head and body, which often omitted, including because it also affects the control significantly.
14) Cyclists orientation backward may be reduced significantly by inappropriate attire, such as wind jacket with big hood.
15) Cyclists are like motorcyclists and moped riders tend to squint or turn his face partially away from the road, especially in rain and snow, whereby the orientation easily become deficient.

The student must be able to perceive and assess risk opportunities by cyclists orientation conditions as for motorcyclists and moped riders.
At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must in practice be able to respond appropriately to the danger opportunities that arise, as specified in section 3.2.6.
Appendix 6

4. TRAFFIC CONDUCT
The purpose of education is to give the student sufficient knowledge of some basic psychological aspects of driving, so that it helps the student to become familiar with his own perception and responsiveness and to develop a road safety, attitude and behavior.
The training also aims to provide the student with such an understanding of other road users' behavior, it helps the student to learn to anticipate their possible errors or thoughtless entirety in traffic flow and in a timely manner to respond appropriately to them.
Moreover, teaching make the student aware of the applicable laws on drivers' driving ability and health and to the obligation to give particular attention to specific drivers.
The student's knowledge of the theoretical contents to be exploited in practice, where there is opportunity for it during the exercises in road use.
4.1 Perception and reaction
Overall dimensions
The student must learn that it is the motorist's main task to be aware of, understand, assess and respond to the danger signs and signals from the road, traffic flow and one's own vehicle, which are important for driving.
The student must also have knowledge about reaction time and its importance while driving, and that perception and response capabilities are limited, but also depends on the driver's knowledge of traffic, experience and attitude to traffic flow and thus can be improved by the motorist's own efforts.
Subobjective
4.1.1 motorist's main tasks
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Road safety depends not only on the purely technical driving mastery of the car, but at least as much of the way in which the driver perceives and evaluates traffic conditions.
2) Inadequate attention misconception and misjudgment plays a significant role in most road accidents.
3) The perception of traffic conditions relies primarily on visual impressions, and the driver must therefore pay special attention to possible eye defects or impairment of vision.

4.1.2 The reaction time
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Response time is the time that elapses from a hazard signs or the like is possible to conceive until the driver starts to react to the sign (ie the brakes, turn the steering wheel, etc.).
2) The reaction time is not constant, but can last from fractions of a second to many seconds, depending on the traffic situation and the driver's attention, foresight, driving skill, etc.
3) The correct and safe response is more important than the lightning and perhaps wrong reaction.

4.1.3 perception and reaktionsevnens limitation
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Although its entirety in any traffic situation depicted in the eye (or affect another sense organ), only a small portion being consciously perceived or trigger a reaction depending on what the driver is particularly aware of.
2) You can usually no more than perceive and react to 2-3 its entirety, danger signs or signals per. second, and the speed must be adapted to the limited perception and responsiveness.
3) visual acuity is only a small part of the visual field big enough that you can clearly perceive its entirety, and you must avoid to keep your eyes in a particular direction for a long time.

4.1.4 Improving the perception and ability to react
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) things or events that are particularly eye-catching and unusual, or the driver is particularly interested in attracting immediate attention, thus more important detail easily overlooked.
2) The driver can even suppress the tendency to let the attention captured by extraneous things by expanding its knowledge of traffic conditions, especially the causes of accidents and thus stimulate interest in its entirety, danger signs and signals that are critical to safety, helping to predict what may happen the next moment.
3) A traffic confident attitude are best developed through knowledge of own limitations and a healthy skepticism about the reliability of what we perceive in the traffic flow.
4) A road safe position strengthened by that as a counterweight to own limitations acquire driving ability, providing ample margin of safety during the various maneuvers.

4.1.5 Mobile phones influence on perception and ability to react
The student must be able to express the content of the following conditions:


1) When driving, do not use hand-held phone.

2) The use of the mobile phone (eg telephone call or using SMS) will always deflect some of the driver's attention to the road, so the response time is extended.
3) Telephone calls can seem stressful if the conversation goes bad through, or if the message is complicated or uncomfortable.
4) A phone call can divert attention so that the driver unconsciously change speed and vehicle position on the road is inaccurate.
5) The driver can prevent stress situations by paying attention to the traffic situation and not to use the phone in heavy traffic and other demanding situations.
6) The driver can also prevent stress situations by interrupting the conversation if it goes bad through and return under better conditions.

4.1.6 Different activities influence on perception and ability to react
The student must be able to express the content of the following conditions:


1) Distraction occurs when the driver is doing something that takes attention away from driving. Typical everyday activities like finding things in the glove compartment, read maps, changing CDs, eating an apple or talking with a passenger can divert some of the driver's attention from traffic.
2) Use of electronic equipment such as GPS or laptop could also distract the driver's attention from traffic.

4.2 vision and motion
Overall dimensions
The student should learn that the vision not only serves for information on road and traffic conditions, but to some extent also influence the management and the proper use of the eyes helps to stabilize the exchange rate and to perform maneuvers safely and accurately.
Subobjective
4.2.1 visual orientation and motion direction
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) There is a link between visual impressions and muscle reactions that immediately tends to control the car in exactly the direction you look.
2) This propensity can on the one hand be used to help maintain the exchange rate in a certain direction by maintaining the gaze in the same direction, but must be on the other side countered by that we shift our gaze away from things that are likely to run into.
3) In the longer free roads stabilizes to control by looking as far ahead as possible.
4) When driving through curves without centerline facilitates you control by moving the gaze into the innermost (and diverging) roadside and moving Looking ahead throughout the entire swing. Is provided with the road center line, leaving one eye follows the center line of turn of the road to the left.
5) By tilting the intersection should not hold the gaze for long in the direction of other road users, but after the necessary orientation let your eyes look in the direction to drive.

4.3 Evaluation of speed and distance
Overall dimensions
The student must learn that the immediate perception of distances and of one's own and others' speed is rather inaccurate, but can be improved when you know the most important event of error assessment and take account of this by the various maneuvers.
Subobjective
4.3.1 Evaluation of distance
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Distances below approximately 50 m judged usually fairly correct, while distances of 50 m often overstated, ie perceived longer than they really are.
2) The perception of distance relying especially on the immediate visual impression of affairs size ahead and perspective, (the fact that verges mm seems to run along the horizon).
3) The risk to misjudge the distance is present, for example for small vehicles because they appear to be farther away than they really are, and of all things in all weather conditions, including because the perspective lines are blurring.

4.3.2 Evaluation of own speed
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) The perception of one's own speed relies partly on noise and vibration in the car, and partly to visible light evidence by road (houses, trees, lane stripes, etc.).
2) There is a risk of underestimating his speed when driving on a road with few basis points of reference, or when driving in a car with low noise and good suspension.
3) There is a widespread tendency to underestimate his speed when after some time driving, where you have become accustomed to high speed, coming into an area where the speed should be reduced (speed blindness).

4.3.3 Evaluation of others' speed
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:



1) velocities below approximately 50 km / h judged usually fairly correct, while speeds above 50 km / h is often underestimated, ie perceived lower than they really are.
2) Most people can not judge speeds only approximately correct on cars that are more than 200 meters away.

4.4 Regulations regarding driving ability and health
Overall dimensions
The student must learn the main legal provisions on driving and use of alcohol, drugs, exhilarating or anesthetic, narcotic substances and of fatigue, illness and the like.
Subobjective
4.4.1 Alcohol
The student must be able to express the content of the following conditions:


1) perception and response capability weakened by even small amounts of alcohol (beer, wine or spirits), and even at low blood alcohol levels can have difficulty responding correctly and quickly enough in difficult or surprising situations.
2) You should leave the car if you go to the company, which serves liquor, or predetermine determine, how little to drink, if you even want to run both out and home.

The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


3) Notwithstanding alkoholpromillens size can be punished if you can not drive safely.
4) Is alcohol levels of 0.5 and a maximum of 2.0 punished to the first time with a large fine, and at higher thousandths sentenced to imprisonment.
5) Is alcohol levels of 0.5 and a maximum of 1.2 deprived you the first time driving condition, and at higher thousandths deprived normally driving unconditional. Førstegangserhververe of license (ie license holders for either Category A or Category B) will get a driving ban. This applies to anyone who has not yet had the first license for 3 years.
6) The penalties for drink-driving state tightened in recidivism.

The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


7) It is forbidden to leave the car to someone who has drunk so much alcohol that he can not drive the car in a safe manner.
8) Police may at any time require breath test by a motorist.

4.4.2 Disease, medications, fatigue and the like
The student must be able to express the content of the following provisions and conditions:


1) Do not drive or just try it if you can not do it is safely because you are sick, tired, have any medicine or drugs.
2) perception and ability to react weakens if you are sick or have been given tranquilizers, sleeping pills, strong cough or painkillers or medicine for hay fever, motion sickness or similar.
3) Medicine sedative effect is greatly enhanced if you also drink alcohol.
4) Medications that may reduce attention and reaction capability are marked with red triangle, but you should also consult with their doctor or pharmacist about the medication influence on driving ability.
5) perception and ability to react is affected by both physical and mental fatigue (stress), and one should therefore give serious consideration to leave the car if you have not slept enough the night or going home after a long day of particularly strenuous work. Likewise, if you are affected by an emotion (eg traumatic experiences).
6) Many drivers tend to overestimate their own strength by running longer distances at times when you tend to relax, rest or sleep.
7) It is forbidden to leave the car to a person who, because of illness, fatigue or ingestion of drugs or narcotic substances are not able to keep the car is safely.

4.5 Other road users' behavior
Overall dimensions
The student must learn that conditions on reaction time and perception and reaktionsevnens limitation principle applies to all road users, both vehicular and pedestrian. The number of accidents, however, is particularly large among road users of certain ages. This accumulation of accidents include sign that the drivers have special difficulties that one must take into account.
Subobjective
4.5.1 Accidents, age and trafikantart
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) There are very many accidents



a) going in the 5-10 year age
b) cyclists in the 10-15 year age
c) moped riders in the 15-19 year age
d) motorcyclists in 18-22 years of age,
e) drivers 18-24 years of age and

f) elderly pedestrians and cyclists from around age 70.


2) The many mishaps can not be explained solely by the fact that there are very many road users of the species in those ages, but is also linked with typical teething problems where users have little experience, and some of them development-related difficulties coping in traffic.

4.5.2 Age-related difficulties
The student must be able to express the content of the following conditions:
Foot children


1) Infants (under 5-6 years) do not have the necessary physical and mental conditions to move safely in traffic.
2) Toddlers who apparently behave carefully, is still unreliable, because they can not master the sudden impulses for example, to run above the ground, because they can not judge the danger in traffic, and because they still are uncertain in their movements could easily be tripping or falling when walking or running.
3) Toddlers who move on their own, should always be seen as a clear danger signs that require vigilance, reduced speed and brake response.
4) Use of bovine Childhood should be done carefully, because it can easily provoke panic reactions.
5) Small school children (6-10 years of age) usually know the main traffic rules, but find it difficult to understand that they should be careful, even when others are obliged to hold back (eg in pedestrian crossing and at the traffic light).
6) Less schoolchildren have difficulty sustaining attention on traffic and can act upon sudden impulses and urges.
7) Small school children a long time to look for and therefore sees the situation slowly, and they are unsure of the speed and distance judgment.
8) Less schoolchildren can probably see a hazard that is clearly present, but can not predict that a dangerous situation is developing.

Cyclists children


9) Although most bicycle accidents affecting children in the 10-15 years of age, there many accidents already from 5-6 years of age, with the same physical and mental difficulties arise as when they move on foot.
10) Very few children receive sufficient practical training in cycling correctly and safely in traffic, including because the transition between toy bicycles and regular bicycles are liquid.
11) Many children have trouble just to master the bike, ie Keep balance, steering and braking.
12) Every child has a strong need to test their own abilities and skills and often use just the bicycle as a means to experiment and play with.
13) Even older schoolchildren (10-15 years of age) find it difficult to control the bike, if they should look in a different direction than the direction of travel, and orient themselves often inadequate, particularly in arrears.

Young motorists


14) Although young people have the best-developed perception and responsiveness, they are still the most vulnerable to accidents of all road users because of inexperience and possible attitude problems.
15) Young people's lack of experience proves particularly as difficulties in adapting speed to the conditions, assess his own maneuver correctly and judge other road users sufficiently critical.
16) Some young people are tempted to use the vehicle to test their own abilities, experience the excitement, let off steam disappointments or assert itself, thereby causing themselves and others in dangerous situations.
17) Most young people have a positive basic attitude to traffic and driving rules and the need for consideration, but may find it difficult to translate this into your driving style because of insufficient awareness of the many hazards.
18) The young people's positive basic attitude are often in conflict with other road users' lack of consideration and understanding.

older


19) Older road users often have impaired vision and hearing, and perceive and react slowly.
20) Many older people are physically disabled and afraid of falling and are therefore less attentive to the occupants when they step down from the curb or on the way of the road.
21) Many older people perceive pedestrian crossings as particularly safe places and fail often completely to look for before they pass.
22) Many elderly cross the road at traffic lights in full confidence the green light and without looking for.
23) Many older people are afraid of traffic and frightened easily by cars rapidly approaching, runs close by or braking abruptly, which may cause a dangerous panic situations.

4.6 Evaluation of other road users
Overall dimensions

The student must learn to judge other road users by looking for characteristics of their age, attention and intention in traffic situations, which often leads to accidents, and thus anticipate other road users possible errors and react appropriately to them.
Subobjective
4.6.1 Characteristics of age, attention and intention
The student must be able to perceive and judge the following features:


1) Other road users and age, among other things, may appear on their height, hair growth and hair color, posture, any gait, dress, and possibly characteristic objects (toys, cane, etc.).
2) Other road users' attention, which equals their head turning or visual direction and possibly striking things or conditions that their attention apparently targeted.
3) Other road users' lack of attention to other traffic, set out in their actions, eg using mobile phone.
4) Other road users intent, usually evidenced by their actions, movements or movement direction in conjunction with their age and attention and the current traffic situation as a whole.

4.6.2 Particularly vulnerable road users typical errors
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


1) young children totally unpredictable behavior requires that you consistently reduce speed to a minimum and is ready for immediate braking.
2) Foot's possible crossing of the roadway, especially on residential roads outside the intersection, in front of or between parked vehicles along the curb at intersections with or without traffic lights too, despite seemingly thorough orientation, and where several children play or go together in packs.
3) Bicycling's possible mistakes especially when driving straight ahead, where they often fail to adhere to give way at intersections, and at left at intersections and at entrances, where they often fail to orient themselves or hold back.
4) Young motorkørendes possible errors, especially at the crossing and turn left.
5) Older pedestrians possible errors, especially when crossing the road on straight sections and intersections with and without pedestrian crossings and traffic lights.

At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must in practice be able to respond appropriately to the danger opportunities that arise, as stated in the section.
4.7 Individual attitudes and behavior
Overall dimensions
The student must know the meaning of their own attitudes and behavior. The student must demonstrate considerate behavior towards other road users in order to contribute to an appropriate and unsafe traffic flow.
The student must also learn to show a defensive driving behavior, thereby minimizing the risk of accidents.
The student must have knowledge that in certain traffic situations can occur risk blindness.
Subobjective
4.7.1 Attitudes
The student must be able to indicate the importance of the following:


1) You have to be positive and helpful, even when other drivers make mistakes in traffic.
2) One should be particularly helpful and considerate when crossing the road works.
3) One should be particularly helpful and considerate of vehicles during emergency.
4) You have to be sympathetic to other road problems in traffic (eg lack of familiarity).
5) You have to be sympathetic to other road users' lack of experience as a driver.
6) You have to be sympathetic to other road users desire to go faster or slower traffic than yourself.
7) One should be sympathetic to others - especially the elderly - road users exercise caution in traffic.
8) Never be influenced / excite the mistakes or frivolous entirety.
9) Never feel tempted or be provoked to commit reckless acts.
10) Always be prudent and risk-conscious.

4.7.2 Behaviour
The student must master the following skills:


1) Be cautious and help other road users, even if they have made mistakes.
2) Help other road users seem to have difficulties in finding their way, for example by allowing them to change lanes or change the location in / at intersections, even if it is those who have duties.
3) Provide ample space for large vehicles, which will perform certain maneuvers such as cornering, reversing and the like, even if it is those who have duties.

4) Keep extra good distance to the front, there seems insecure / inexperienced.
5) Run with special low speed at roadworks, particularly where road workers on the carriageway or in its immediate vicinity and keep a distance from these.
6) Keep the road open to vehicles during emergency (eg on roads with two lanes in the same direction of pull drivers in lane 1 to the right and drivers in lane 2 pulls to the left and at intersections where stop at a red light, run such little towards left / right to make room).
7) Failing to provide signal (light / sound) to a running, there is a little slow for example, to put into action by a light signal.
8) Failing to give signals or signal (light / sound) to a running, pulling in front and decreases the safety distance.
9) Refrain from using profanity / -Express or gestures to other drivers.
10) Always be prepared (for example by moving the foot / hand brake) if the situation is confusing or uncertain.
11) At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', a pupil practice mastering these behavioral skills.

4.7.3 Risk Blindness
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Once you gain some driving experience can be inclined to underestimate risk in specific situations, because it tends to go well. One is blind to the risks.
2) Risk blindness shown by the following:



a) Speed ​​Selection of reduced visibility or inclement weather, where you do not put speed sufficiently far down that it is possible to stop before any obstacle. It may therefore involve risks blindly following the other road speed level under such driving conditions.
b) You drive too close to the vehicle in front so you can not avoid a collision if the vehicle in front brakes suddenly up.
c) As the driver does one go about doing things in the car that does not have the driving task to do, which means that one in for long periods of time without adequate attention to driving.
d) Man overlook other risks, for example, that you are too tired to drive safely.


Appendix 7
5. ROAD CONDITIONS
The purpose of education is to give the student sufficient knowledge of risks on the road, depending on the particular weather, etc. and lead. and other road-way to move on, it helps the student to learn to anticipate dangerous situations that can often occur in specific locations on a road or on designated roads, and in time react appropriately to them.
The student's knowledge of the theoretical contents to be exploited in practice, where there is opportunity for it during the exercises in road use.
5.1 roads safety design
Overall dimensions
The student must learn that there almost always are economic and technical limits to how safe a road can be built, but that a road safety in any case depends on the behavior of road users using it.
Subobjective
5.1.1 Limits to weigh security
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) The two main requirements for the roads on both accessibility and security can not always be met because a fast and convenient flow of traffic is often in itself implies danger.
2) Traffic development is usually faster than the roads can be expanded or changed, and society can not provide unlimited funds available for road construction and road maintenance.
3) Knowledge of the causes of the accidents that can be combated with road construction funds are limited and there will always be some risk by traveling on the roads.

5.1.2 Use of roads
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) One must as a driver be critical of the incentive to run at the maximum speed allowed on roads with good safety standard without taking into account the current traffic conditions and other road users often make unexpected or surprising errors.
2) One should not overestimate the importance of road construction security because their effect include depends on weather conditions and other road users' behavior and because technical devices can fail.

5.2 Risks of roads
Overall dimensions

The student must learn that the risk conditions of the roads are related to road environment, process equipment, process, use and special type. The student must also learn to judge the road conditions after the said characters, and respond appropriately to them in traffic situations, which often leads to accidents.
The student must also learn about vejgrebets importance for vehicle maneuverability.
Subobjective
5.2.1 Characteristics of risk factors
The student must be able to indicate the importance of the following designations:


1) The road's surroundings, i.e. settlement and the settlement density, vegetation, forests, open fields, etc. along the way.
2) The road equipment or standard, such as narrow or wide lane, lane pavement type and condition, lane stripes, speed bumps, sidewalks, bike path, pedestrian crossing and street lighting.
3) The road courses, ie intersections, roundabouts, swings, tunnels, hills, railway crossings and road narrowing.
4) the use of the road, that is, density and nature, any specific local objectives (school, station, shopping center, sports ground, etc.).
5) The road type or class, eg highway, expressway, more or less significant road or Traffic calming way.

5.2.2 road's surroundings
Urban areas
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Approximately 2/3 of road accidents occur in urban areas, and accident figures are also relative to the volume of traffic highest on roads in urban areas.
2) The risk of accidents in urban areas is highest in shopping streets and residential roads with high or low buildings. This high accident risk is mainly present in the intersection.
3) Most accidents involving children as pedestrians will take place on residential roads on lines between intersections.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


4) Shopping streets and residential roads, especially when driving past the timid, walking, etc., By driving in front or after the other or next to the other, by failing to stop at intersections and straight driving and oscillation.

Special risk outside the cities
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


5) In the transition between autumn and winter, and between winter and spring there is particular risk of patchy slippery road surface where the road goes through or adjacent wetlands, ie forest, marsh, depressions, lake and beach. The same risk is present along the embankments and on and under bridges.
6) Spring and autumn will be many places on the roads occur greasy lead because of land from the tractor while driving to and from field work.
7) In the autumn will on many roads along the forests and the like occur greasy lead because of falling leaves.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them, especially in the choice of speed:


8) Humid areas along the road as well as embankments and bridges during periods when the temperature hovering around freezing.
9) Weighing during periods of frequent tractor driving and thus vejforurening.
10) Forest roads or major vegetation along the road during periods of leaf fall.

At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must in practice be able to respond appropriately to the danger opportunities that arise, as specified in section 5.2.2.
5.2.3 The road equipment or standard
Sidewalk and bike path
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Roads without sidewalks entails a risk of collision of pedestrian in the roadway on the right side. The risk is especially great in the dark, because many reaching fail to use reflex.
2) roads without cycle track (both rural and urban) entails twice the risk of collision with cyclists and increased risk of collision with moped riders as roads with bicycle path.
3) The bike path and cycle crossing at intersections to be used by both cyclists and drivers of small mopeds, unless otherwise indicated on road signs.
4) Cyclists and moped riders, ranging from a bicycle lane on the roadway (except the bike lane mouth of the cross), has unconditional right of way, but do not always give way.
5) The bike path signposted with traffic sign "bike path" (D 21), unless road construction clearly shows that it is a bike path, or with white painted bicycle symbol (V 21) in a path defined by continuous edge line (Q 46).
6) Bicycle Field of intersection (S 21) marked by a broad broken line or with normal blue color.

7) Bi-directional cycle track signposted with traffic sign "bike path" (D 21) and the board (UD 21.1), indicating that the cycle path has traffic in both directions. During board (UD 21.2) indicates that the bike path no more traffic in both directions.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


8) The road outside sidewalk or bicycle path especially by position on the road and meeting on confusing places and while driving in the dark.

Zebra crossings, walkway, etc.
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


9) Pedestrian crossings on road sections between junctions used only a few pedestrians if their detour to the field is larger than the width of the road - even if the pedestrian crossing is signalised.
10) The risk of collisions with pedestrians crossing is greater in areas just before and after a pedestrian crossing than on stretches without pedestrian crossings.
11) Bridges and tunnels used only by reaching a greater extent, if they can save significant time, which is rarely the case.
12) The terrain will often traverse the roadway, although there is the walkway or tunnel.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


13) stretches just before and after a pedestrian crossing outside intersection, especially when driving transient.
14) Walkway and visible sign of the pedestrian tunnel ahead, especially when driving transient.

Magnetic Stripes
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


15) Striping of the length of the carriageway (lane lines block lines, edge lines) helps the occupants to proper positioning and maneuvering, and this help is particularly great in low light and in the dark.
16) Outside urban areas there are road without striping increased risk of accidents.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


17) Roads without striping, especially at the position on the road, meeting, overtaking and failing to stop at crossings and curves at intersections.

Driving The width
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


18) Wide 4-lane roads are generally not significantly safer than two-lane roads.
19) On the narrow roads there is an increased risk of solo accidents, for meeting accidents and collisions moped riders, cyclists and pedestrians.
20) The risk of accidents on narrow roads is also greatest where smaller side roads opens, and at entry and exit from plots etc.
21) The risk of especially crossing pedestrians are most at both the 4-lane and two-lane roads in urban areas.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


22) Narrow roads, especially in the choice of speed and position on the road and at the meeting and driving towards the side roads and lending and driveways.

carriageway
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


23) General 4-lane roads with carriageway is not significantly safer than roads without a median strip.
24) The divider reduces the risk of any meeting accidents and also prevents left turns to and from the smaller side roads.
25) Central Reservations without guardrails or fencing does not reduce significantly the risk of accidents involving crossing cyclists, moped riders and pedestrians.

Magnetic Coating type and mode
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


26) surface of the track is very important for grip.
27) Earth and gravel roads provide poor grip and therefore require reduced speed to avoid slipping during rotation and braking.
28) Paving for better grip than gravel and earth roads, but quickly becomes slippery in the wet.
29) The best grip is achieved on a rough asphalt surface with rough pebbles. Driving on a freshly laid coating of rough pebbles at speeds over 40 km / h can give risk of stone chips because of pebbles thrown up.
30) In the spring, will surface of the track is often the hole and uneven due to winter frost and eventual salting.
31) A shower after a drought period could make the fat coating, because of the mixture of water, dust and oil spillage.
32) Heat waves can melt the asphalt surface, so the road will be smooth.

33) The grip arises from frictional resistance (friction) between the tire and road surface and partly by the tires grabs down and get impetus towards the road surface irregularities.
34) Acceleration, braking and steering can only be exercised through the grip, which is therefore a necessary condition for any maneuver.
35) The grip is considerably reduced in wet and greasy lead (especially in snow, sand and slippery road). Therefore, accelerator, clutch, brake and steering wheel operated with great caution, and the speed is kept suitably low.

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential and react appropriately to them:


36) Soil or gravel and cobbles in the wet, especially in the choice of speed.
37) Driving Surface of thawing after a long period of frost, especially in the choice of speed.
38) Run track surface by light summer shower after a long drought and asphalt pavement during the heat wave, especially in the choice of speed.

Speed ​​Bump
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


39) If a car passes a bump too fast, it is uncomfortable for the driver and passengers - and the worse the higher the rate.
40) When the high speed can in some cases cause back injury to the driver and passengers and damage to the vehicle.
41) The bump should be no more than passed the on-site existing or specified speed.
42) If buses and large trucks to pass without too much discomfort, they can not pass the bumps at the same speed as cars, but to run at much lower speeds.

At the latest after teaching in section 7.3 'speed during straight ahead' and 7/10 'Driving in trafiksanerede areas', the student must be able to perceive and assess risk possibilities when driving over bumps.
Street lighting
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


43) The risk of accident in the dark is about double that on roads without lighting as on roads with lighting.
44) Accident risk on dark roads is particularly great at meeting with vehicles that dazzles, and by crossing pedestrians.
45) street lighting safety significance should not be overstated in dark and rainy weather, where the many reflections can complicate orientation.

At the latest after teaching in section 19.7 "Driving in the dark and in the daytime also," the student must be able to perceive and assess risk possibilities when driving in the dark.
At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must in practice be able to respond appropriately to the danger opportunities that arise, as stated in Section 5.2.3.
5.2.4 The road course
Intersections and roundabouts
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Intersection both rural and urban areas are the places on a road where most accidents because traffic flow here together from several directions, and both vehicular and pedestrian come across each other's lanes.
2) 4-legged intersection on the country (ie cross with four side roads) without signaling has the largest number of accidents in relation to traffic volume.
3) Intersection with narrow roads are generally as dangerous as intersections with wide roads.
4) Intersections without afstribede lanes (especially left turn lanes), traffic islands or blocking faces dangerous than intersections with these markers that help the occupants to better perceive the intersection.
5) Intersections without street lighting is more dangerous in the daytime than intersections with lighting.
6) Intersections with traffic lights reduces the risk of accidentally driving straight ahead on different roads, but increases in turn the risk of accidents between left-turning, no holding back for driving straight ahead.
7) Roundabouts reduce the accident risk for drivers significantly compared to the risk in the general priority junctions. Roundabouts improve not the situation for cyclists who often hit by motorists who are moving into or out of the roundabout.

At the latest after teaching in section 7.11 'The Running against the cross "and section 7.15" Driving in roundabout ", the student must be able to perceive and assess risk possibilities when driving in the intersection and roundabout.
curves
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


8) Curves must generally considered to be dangerous places on a road, and the risk of accidents increases at least the sharper the bend is.
9) A single sharp curves is especially dangerous if it occurs on a road where you would normally only soft voice and a good overview.

10) Curves on narrow roads, where there is only overview 100 meters forwards or less dangerous than swing with a better overview.
11) Sharp bends in the countryside outside marking of roadside dangerous than sharp curves with edge lines edge poles or directional arrows.
12) Curves, where the roadway is inclined outward toward the crank outside, is particular dangerous because they make control through the turn difficult even at normal speed.

Bakker
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


13) Backed Up must generally considered to be dangerous places on the road because of the limited inventory.
14) The risk of accidents is particularly high on the steep hills above 4% slope, where rear impact is typical accident just before the hilltop and just before the foot of the hill, especially where heavy and light vehicles run consecutively.

tunnels
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


15) The risk of accidents is particularly high when driving into a tunnel from full daylight, with visual acuity reduced.
16) Tunnels may in particular be dangerous, because some drivers forgetting to ensure that there is enough fuel on the vehicle.

Level crossing
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


17) The risk of accidents is particularly high at level crossings without barriers.
18) level crossing with barriers are safer than crossings with light and sound signal alone, but you must always be aware that the technical measures may fail.

Vejindsnævring
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


19) road narrowing a risk of collision with a ride that pushes or are pressing the left or right side.

At the latest after teaching in section 7.3 'speed during straight ahead', section 7.7 'Meeting' and section 17.7 "Running alongside other ', the student must be able to perceive and assess risk possibilities when driving around curves, hills, railway crossings and road narrowing.
At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must in practice be able to respond appropriately to the danger opportunities that arise, as indicated in section 5.2.4.
5.2.5 The road use
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) There is the most accidents on roads with heavy traffic, and the risk also in relation to the volume of traffic increases, the more mixed traffic.
2) Certain roads in a local area often attracts certain groups of road users, thereby reducing the risk of accidents increases, such as schools, roads used by ferry or heavy truck traffic, entry and exit roads to urban centers, 'loopholes', shopping streets, parking blocks, etc..
3) Some local targets on a road often cause inattentive behavior of road users, for example at bus stops and train stations, large workplaces, schools, playgrounds, retirement homes, sports grounds, cinemas and other places of entertainment.

The student must be able to perceive and evaluate specific current and clear danger options for road use in the area where the exercise run takes place.
At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must in practice be able to respond appropriately to the danger opportunities that arise.
5.2.6 The road type or class
The student must be able to indicate the importance of road markings for the following road types:


1) Motorway.
2) Expressway.
3) Main road.
4) Areas with speed reduction.
5) Pedestrian street.
6) Residence and play area.
7) Tunnel.

No later than the teaching of section 7.10 "Driving in trafiksanerede areas' 7.11 'the driving toward intersection' and 7.16 'Driving on the motorway' and, the student must have obtained knowledge of the risks and able to comprehend and assess the hazard potential of the various types of roads.
At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must in practice be able to respond appropriately to the danger opportunities that arise.
Annex 8
6. BASIC RULES FOR DRIVING
The purpose of education is to give the student knowledge of some general laws for driving immediately before the student must undergo exercises in road use.
The student must also be made aware of some terms used in the Highway Code, which specifies requirements to run the way at every turn.
The student's knowledge of the theoretical contents to be exploited in practice, where there is opportunity for it during the exercises in road use.
6.1 Instructions to traffic
Overall dimensions

The student must learn where legal requirements for driving applies, and that it might also have to comply with police instructions and road markings in the form of road signs, lane stripes, etc. and traffic signals.
Subobjective
6.1.1 Traffic Law validity
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) Traffic rules apply on all roads, bike paths and sidewalks, squares, bridges and tunnels, passages, paths and similar places where there is general traffic, whether these places are public or private.
2) Cars can usually only run on the part of the road intended for cars and motorcycles (motor vehicles) and large mopeds.

6.1.2 Advice for driving
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) You must follow the directions for driving, which is given at road signs, lane stripes, etc. and traffic signals.
2) Yellow lane stripes, etc. used to temporarily regulate such road works and must be respected instead of any white stripes, etc.
3) You must also comply with police instructions, even when road signs, lane stripes and traffic signals indicate otherwise, or where it is contrary to an otherwise applicable traffic rule. (Information can also be given by others who are authorized to do so).

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of police instructions / tegngivninger to traffic.
The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following traffic signs:


4) »Entrance forbidden" (C 19).
5) "Running in both directions forbidden" (C 21).
6) "One-way traffic" (E 19).
7) "Motor vehicle, tractor, power equipment and large moped forbidden" (C 22.1).
8) 'Under The boards' (U 4-6), indicating that the main board only applies for certain traffic types and adjacent road.
9) "Driving with dangerous goods" (C 23.3)

The student must be able to recognize and express the content of the following legislation:


10) Traffic signs can be indicated on the information boards.

At the latest after teaching in section 7 'maneuvers on the Move', the student must be able to recognize the importance of the instructions set out in section 6.1.2, including being able to live the meaning of these.
6.2 Safe and unobstructed settlement of traffic flow
Overall dimensions
The student must learn the Highway Code, basic rules for safe and unhindered settlement of traffic flow and for special consideration to certain road users, including the meaning of the terms 'hazard' and 'disadvantage' and 'undue inconvenience'.
Subobjective
6.2.1 Basic rules to traffic
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) Always run a considerate and attentive, so there is no danger or injury or inconvenience to others, and so that traffic is not unnecessarily hindered or disturbed.
2) One must also show consideration for those living or staying off the road.
3) One should give particular attention to children, school patrols, the elderly and the disabled.

6.2.2 danger, inconvenience and undue disadvantage
The student must have knowledge of the importance of the following terms:


1) Man is the 'danger' of a driving style that gives obvious possibility of collision or other accident.
2) It is "disadvantageous" at a driving mode where one without the danger comes in the way of another road user and thereby forcing it to give way, give way or hold back.
3) For certain maneuvers, such as starting from the roadside, lane changes and when stopping or fast deceleration can not always avoid getting in the way of others, and you should then simply ensure that the maneuver is not undue disadvantage ( ' undue inconvenience ').

The student must be able to express the content of the following statute:


4) One should before reversing ensure that the maneuver can be performed without danger or inconvenience to others.

6.2.3 Signaling and use of light without daytime
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) When it is necessary to warn of a danger, you should make other aware of the dangers of short-term use of the horn or flashing headlights.
2) Use of the horn in other cases is prohibited.
3) When operating without daytime, use low beam. Instead of passing beam can be used special daytime running lights and front fog lights.


6.2.4 Free passage to certain traffic
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) You have to hold back or give room for groups of children under the supervision of a leader, defense and emergency services columns funeral procession and others joined processions.
2) It shall, in due time keeping the road open and if necessary stop for vehicles during emergency.
3) Do not run so close to the accident site that is in the way of rescue efforts.

6.2.5 Individuals and goods etc.
The student must be able to express the content of the following provisions and conditions:


1) A car may be with or without load should not be wider than 2.55 m, longer than 12 meters higher than 4 m. The car's weight may be with people, luggage or other read not exceed the maximum weight listed in the registration certificate for the car.
2) Passengers and cargo shall be arranged in the vehicle, the driver has a clear view and sufficient opportunity to maneuver the car.
3) Passengers may not be included in such numbers or be positioned in such a way that there is a danger to themselves or others.
4) Driver and passengers must wear a seat belt when one is available. There may in combination with seatbelt use booster seat.
5) Children from 3-6 years instead of seat belt use seat or other approved safety equipment appropriate to the child's height and weight.
6) Children under 3 years and under 135 cm should instead for seat belt use seat or other approved safety equipment, appropriate to the child's height and weight. This does not apply if they are placed in the back seat and rear seats are equipped with seat belts. It also does not apply if they are placed in the back seat and rear seats with seat belts are made by children under 3 years with custom safety. Children under 3 must use seat equipped with seat belts (in combination with customized safety) over others. There may not be transported more passengers than there are seats with their seat belts.
7) New cars must be equipped with warning labels against rear-facing child seat in the seats except the driver's seat, which is mounted airbag unless the airbag automatically comes out of function when rear-facing child seat fitted.
8) The driver is responsible for passengers under 15 wear seat belts or other safety equipment.
9) The setting of the head restraint must be proportionate to the individual user.
10) Goods shall be placed so that it does not cover indicators, lights and license plate, and so it is not making unnecessary noise, you can drag or fall on the road or otherwise be obstacle or danger to traffic.
11) In cases where the transport of luggage / cargo back of the car covers for one or more obligatory lamps and reflectors must be appropriately lightboard back of the cargo / luggage.
12) If the vehicle license plate cover, use a 3rd license plate, which must be arranged so that this can easily be read. If the third number plate used in the daytime, it must be illuminated with registration plate lamp (s). When a lightboard, the third plate is placed on the main boom.
13) Gods projecting more than 1 m beyond the car's front or rear point or more than 15 cm over the sides, must be marked by a cloth or other clear way. For commercial transport these goods shall be marked with a white cylinder that is 30 cm high, with a diameter of 10 cm. The cylinder must be equipped with 2 red reflective tape. In the daytime, goods, whether private or commercial transportation, marked with said cylinder and red light backwards and white light forward.
14) Transport of dangerous goods must be implemented according to specific rules.
15) If anything is dropped or spilled on the road, and it is a risk to traffic, it should be removed immediately. It can not be done, should be done with traffic signs or by other similar means to warn others about the risks.
16) Do not hang sled, handcart or similar for a car, and you should not while driving pull a person on skis, skates, roller or the like.
17) For a car may be connected at most a trailer and only if the vehicle is authorized.

6.2.6 Motor Stop and towing etc.
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:



1) breakdown, accident or the like in a place where stopping or parking is prohibited, as soon as possible to move the car away from the site and the highway as far as possible completely off the roadway. If the car is a danger or inconvenience to traffic, immediately set up an approved warning triangle at least 50 meters before the car on normal roads and at least 100 meters before the car on highways. In addition to the warning triangle can be used hazard warning.
2) In connection with unexpected traffic jams or other direct danger on highways and roads outside built-up area can (on motorways) hazard warning is used to alert other road users to the dangers.
3) Use of hazard warning lights in other cases is prohibited.
4) When the motor stops or the like on a level crossing or another crossing over the track must be as best you can, warn the driver of the danger.
5) It is allowed to use the car to lug a wrecked car, tractor or motorized equipment under certain conditions. Hauling must be by means of a strong rope, a rod connection or the like, so that the distance between the vehicles is not more than 4 m. If the distance of 2 m, the rope is clearly indicated. It dragged the vehicle must be driven by a person who has a driving license for the vehicle. The speed must not exceed 30 km / ⁠t.
6) Towing is prohibited if the towed vehicle brakes or steering are not in proper condition, and one must then leave hauling to an authorized tow truck or the like.

6.2.7 Traffic Accident
The student must have knowledge that you can do to prevent an accident from developing:


1) If necessary, remove damaged cars that are hazardous to circulation.
2) You must turn off the engine damaged cars and avoid open flames when leaking fuel.
3) One should refrain from approaching the damaged cars, with a potential release of dangerous goods. Vehicles carrying dangerous goods are marked with orange sign.

The student must also be aware of the following regarding their own performance in road accidents:


4) The injured inspected, for that you can get an impression of their lesions and condition.
5) Injured provided the help they can.
6) Withstands not see blood or injured, you have to involve others on the road to inspect the injured, in granting the aid and in alerting.

The student must have knowledge that after participation in a first aid can help save injured road users or that may contribute to their injuries after traffic accident reduced significantly.
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislative and other matters:


7) severe injury made calls to emergency services where it stated how the accident happened, if there are special hazards (eg fire hazard, jammed, dangerous goods), how many people have been injured, whether they are in mortal danger (eg no breathing, no heartbeat, or major bleeding), and from which the call is.
8) accident location is signposted, so subsequent road users are not impacting damaged cars, injured people, spectators, etc., And if necessary stopped traffic or diverted around.
9), with or without fault on damage road signs, markings on the carriageway or cycle track, signaling and other traffic devices must immediately bring markings in order again, if possible. If this can not happen, the soon to inform the police and also undertake what is necessary to warn other road.
10) One should immediately stop and help injured if with or without fault being involved in a traffic accident, and you have to request the name and address to others who are involved in the accident.
11) If one has caused more than negligible damage to people, you must report it to the police. If you are seriously injured or killed people, do not change the situation or remove traces at the scene. However, you must move the vehicle away if they are a danger to traffic.
12) If there has been damage to another's property or things to be the one who caused the damage, notify the victims or police accordingly.

6.2.8 Insurance requirement
The student must be able to express the content of the following statute:


1) The owner of a motor vehicle or the person (user) who has permanent disposal of the vehicle to cover possible claims by compulsory insurance.

6.2.9 Entrusting the vehicle to other

The student must be able to express the content of the following statute:


1) It is forbidden to leave the lead of a vehicle for people who are not in possession of a valid driving license for this.
Appendix 9
7. MANOEUVRES ON ROAD
The purpose of education is to give the student skills in safe and respectful to adapt driving to changing road conditions and the traffic rules in different types of roads and time (in and outside the rush hour in daylight and darkness) during the execution of all normal maneuvers.
Each excercisecap precise content set out in the milestones. The duration is determined by the individual student's needs. The individual exercises / maneuvers considered learned successfully when they can be performed with the degree of precision, as shown in milestones descriptions.
The exercises must be implemented in order to ensure that the student continually fed from a lighter to a more difficult maneuver. It will correspond to the order listed in the training objectives.
A maneuvered severity depends not only on the requirements for the driver orientation and vehicle handling, but also on the current road and traffic conditions.
By planning and execution of the exercises in maneuvers on the way and to ensure a good learning should run the teacher use the guidelines in the teacher's guide on driver training for category B on requirements for exercise stretches. These requirements describe in detail what exercise stretches that are suitable to meet the requirements of the teaching plan milestones descriptions. It involves, among other things, that immediately before driving in the dark implemented driving on a long stretch of road (urban) in daylight.
It is a further condition that the teaching of orientation skills for any maneuver carried in theory room prior to and in close connection with the practical exercise.
7.1 Starting and stopping at the traffic lane edge
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to make starting and stopping, including being aware of other road users, maneuverability and vejgrebets size.
Subobjective
7.1.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances by launching accidents:


1) The counterparties are almost exclusively from behind, especially motorists, but also some two-wheeled road users.

7.1.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risk factors for commissioning:


1) Error evaluation of rear Coming One speed and the distance to them.
2) Impatience because there are constantly moving traffic from behind.
3) Possibility of stalling, such as immediately after starting a cold engine.

7.1.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential by initiating and responding appropriately to them:


1) Rear coming, hidden in blind spots.
2) Tight control position that requires special attention to several things.
3) Reduced grip.

The student must master the following orientation skills before starting or stopping:


4) Look forward and backward by traffic or other obstacles.
5) Inform backwards using mirrors and check the blind spots by head turning.
6) Evaluate whether a stay in the traffic flow behind is sufficient for starting or stopping, so as not to endanger or undue disadvantage.
7) Evaluate own acceleration relative to the rear Coming One speed.

7.1.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuver skills for commissioning:


1) Take the seat belt.
2) Turn on the light.
3) Provide evidence well before starting.
4) Put soaked started as taught at the closed training ground, including being able to start off on rising / sloping road.
5) Accelerate so fast that the running approaching from behind, usually not need to slow down.
6) Cease all signals at the latest when the maneuver is completed.

The student must master the following maneuver skills at stopping:


7) Give evidence in time for stopping the brake lights and possibly turn signals.
8) Brake softened to a halt at the traffic lane edge.
9) Turn off the light.

7.2 Location in straight running
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to stand properly on the roadway, including learning how to use your eyes properly.

The student must also learn about the markings on the carriageway and traffic signs that are important in positioning.
Subobjective
7.2.1 Knowledge of accidents
Treat during recent maneuvers in which location included.
7.2.2 Knowledge of risk factors
Treat during recent maneuvers in which location included.
7.2.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings inherent in the location during straight running:
Magnetic Stripes





1)


"Solid Edge line" (Q 46) limits the portion of the roadway to be used by cars, motorcycles and mopeds large, and that can only exceed by stopping, parking or entrance and exit on the road.





Solid edge line may be exceeded by passing the right for a left-turning if the field to the right of the edge line is not a particular pathway (eg a bus lane, bike path or the like).



2)


"Dotted edge line" (Q 47) is used instead of Q 46 to indicate that it is allowed to cross the line, if otherwise is legal (eg when changing lane).



3)


»Wide edge line '(Q 46-47) indicates that outside line is room for cyclists and pedestrians, while the narrow edge line indicates that there usually is no room for them, and therefore they use the same portion of the roadway as cars.



4)


»Lane Line" (Q 41) indicates separation between lanes.



5)


"Alert Line" (Q 42) indicates that one must be especially careful when crossing of the line because of poor visibility, or because you will soon meet a barrier line.



6)


"Barring Line" (Q 44) that should not be exceeded, even when turning or entrance and exit, unless special circumstances make it necessary (eg roadworks or stationary or parked vehicle).



7)


'Locking surface "(Q 45) that should not be run or stop at. Barring surface must be passed to the page where the shading pointing forward.




Traffic signs


8) "Compulsory passage" (D 15) indicates that you have to go by the board to the side arrow points.
9) »Optional passage" (D 16) indicates that one must choose the side on which you want to pass the board.
10) 'Creep Track "(E 37) indicates that you have to drive into the slow lane when driving slower than the speed indicated on the board, and that they must leave the slow lane again, if you drive faster than the specified speed.

Helle Plant etc..


11) Heller, færdselsfyr or the like, head over to the right, unless otherwise indicated by traffic signs or road is one-way.

The student must master the following orientation skills during straight running:


12) Failing to keep your eyes on the road immediately in front of the car, but at short intervals see far ahead and as far as possible to be aware of road and traffic conditions 8-12 sec. ahead.
13) Keep your eyes moving and thus always be informed about the situation ahead and to the sides and rear conditions using mirrors.
14) See Ambient forward on the road, where the table is limited by hills and turns.
15) Utilizing the road optical guidance lines during cornering to stabilize the control.

7.2.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuver skills during straight running:


1) Set it in the right lane and only use the left lane for possible overtaking or passing.
2) Set it as far to the right as is required for any cyclists, moped riders, parked vehicles, pedestrians and conditions otherwise permit and otherwise place themselves in the middle of marked lanes.
3) Drag right on narrow roads before hilltop before incalculable curves.

4) Carry out steering corrections gradual and therefore without jerky steering movements.
5) Reduce the level of steering corrections with increasing speed.

7.3 speed during straight running
Overall dimensions
The student must learn that the road environment, process equipment, process and use, weather conditions, vehicle condition and load condition, driver's condition as well as other road users are important in the choice of speed.
The student must also learn about the markings on the carriageway and traffic signs that are important in relation to speed.
Subobjective
7.3.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of solo accidents:


1) Young drivers coming out for very many solo accidents where the driver without having any counterparty to take into account a sudden loss of vehicle control and running off the side of the road or an obstacle.
2) Eneulykkerne stuck primarily with too high speed for the conditions (possibly in connection with drink driving).
3) There are almost as many solo accidents in curves and straights.
4) curves happens most solo accidents when driving in addition to the wayside in the crank outside (the least curved road edge).
5) There are several solo accidents on narrow roads than on wide roads.
6) There is a solo accidents where the driver going too far to the right or left on the roadway (possibly out in rebate) and abruptly tried to turn back, thus losing control.

7.3.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risk factors in solo accidents:


1) Error evaluation of own speed.
2) Error evaluation of vejsvings sharpness.
3) Error evaluation of grip, especially in curves and slippery or greasy lead.
4) Incorrect tire pressure, tread wear or improper loading condition.
5) Fatigue or influenced by alcohol.
6) A sudden turn of the wheel, especially when driving at higher speeds

7.3.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential by selecting the speed and react appropriately to them:


1) curves or hills, which reduces inventory and hides any obstacles (slow vehicles or cyclists and pedestrians on the roadside).
2) Sharp bends that require special grip.
3) Railway Cross over ahead with poor visibility.
4) Magnetic Coating with low friction and thus reduced grip (gravel, cobble).
5) Speed ​​absorbing bumps.
6) Obstacles ahead in own lane (parked vehicles, vehicles in front, crossing pedestrians).
7) Weather conditions that reduce visibility (glare from the sun, rain, fog) or reduces grip (slippery or greasy lead).

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings inherent in the choice of speed:
Magnetic Stripes, etc..





8)


'Rumble Strips' (S 18). Narrow, noise-causing streaks across the direction of travel, which indicates that special precaution.



9)


'Bump' (S 32). Squared across the road, indicating bump.




Road signs regarding speed limits


10) "Local speed limit" (C 55) specifies the maximum speed on the line from the board.
11) "End of speed limit" (C 56).
12) "End of prohibition" (C 59) also removes the local speed limit.
13) "Minimum speed" (D 55) indicates that one must not run slower than the board shows. The current route may be indicated on the chart (U 2).
14) "End of minimum speed" (D 56).
15) "Closer built up area" (E 55) states among other things the general speed limit of 50 km / h.
16) "Termination of built-up area" (E 56) states among other things cessation of the general speed limit of 50 km / h.
17) "recommended speed" (E 39) indicates that the road is not suitable for driving at a higher speed than that specified. The current route may be listed on the blackboard.
18) "Recommended speed ceases" (E 40).

Traffic signs on the track surface



19) "Slippery road" (A 31) warns that the roadway can be abnormally smooth. The reason must be stated on the blackboard, such as "Smooth wet '(UA 31).
20) "Bumpy road" (A 37) warns of dangerous bumps in the road.
21) 'Loose stones "(A 33) warns of particular danger to stone chips.
22) 'Hazardous discount "(A 35). The reason can be specified on the blackboard, such as "soft discount" or "High edge '.
23) 'Bump' (A 36) indicates a traffic calming bumps ahead.
24) 'Area of ​​speed reduction "(E 53).
25) "Termination of the area with speed reduction" (E 54).

Road signs. on the course of the road


26) 'curves' (A 41.1-2 and A 42.1-2) warns respectively dangerous right turn and left turn dangerous and more dangerous turns.
27) 'Speed ​​Indication' (UA 41) indicates the speed at which curves can be traversed.
28) "Border Marking Poles" (N 41), 'edge marking plates "(N 42) and the' arrows' (O O 41- 42) enhances the selection of such curves.
29) "Steep descent" (A 46.1).
30) "Steep Climb" (A 46.2).
31) "Road narrows" (A 43, 1-3).

Road signs. on level crossings


32) »Other danger" (A 99), with additional panel 'Track' indicates intersecting tracks where staff warns of flags, lanterns or otherwise that the train is approaching.
33) "Railway at level crossings without barriers" (A 72) possibly with the board 'Look for trains' (UA 72), or "Pre-warning to stop" (UB 11.1) warns level crossing ahead.
34) 'level crossing with barriers "(A 73) warns level crossing ahead.
35) 'Stop' (B 13) indicates that running must stop before crossing railroad tracks.
36) "Notification of electrified rail '(UA 73).
37) 'Distance marks "(A 75) indicates the distance to the level crossing (of powers).
38) 'Cross-Brand for single-track or multi-track level crossing "(A 74.1-2) set up immediately in front of the railway crossing.
39) "Flashing red signal" (Z 72), possibly supplemented with bell and boom. The signal indicates that you have to stop before the stop line or at a safe distance from the tracks, signal or boom.

Road signs. For other hazards


40) "Pedestrian" (A 17) warns about pedestrian crossing ahead.
41) "traffic light" (A 19) used, for example, where the signal can not easily be recognized.
42) "Rock-fall" (A 34) indicates that there is danger of falling stones on the roadway.
43) "Crosswinds" (A 95) warns of strong crosswinds that can turn the car off course especially at higher speeds.
44) "Other danger" (A 99), where the nature of the hazard is indicated on the blackboard.
45) "Pedestrian" (E 17) is placed at the zebra crossing.
46) 'openable bridge "(A 91).
47) 'Havnekaj "(A 92).

The student must master the following orientation skills in order of speed:


48) Evaluate the rate by visual impressions from the road, feeling the vibrations from the car and sounds from the engine, wind noise, tire noise, etc..
49) Check the immediate hurry impression by quick glance at the speedometer.
50) Look for lane stripes and road signs that warn of bends, speed limit, level crossing, or other conditions that affect speed.
51) Judge at any time manageable, free stopping distance in front of the car.
52) Look for from behind, especially heavy vehicles is accelerating immediately before driving uphill.
53) Look for the following vehicles that may accelerate or overtake downhill.
54) The Look both for trains that might approaches the level crossing, even if the current warning signals.

7.3.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuvering skills in order to adapt speed to the conditions.


1) Adapt speed to the highest safe (road surface condition, road conditions, visibility conditions, etc.) And lawful on the line and including changes smoothly to a suitable gear.
2) Keep the speed relatively smooth at the restrained use of the accelerator.
3) Adapt the speed so as to be in full control of the car is preserved and so that the car can be stopped within the distance that can be overviewed, and in front of all obstacles that can be foreseen.

When driving on hills


4) Switching to a lower gear in good time uphill if there is slow moving front or the engine anstrenges.

5) Apply possibly slow lane if the required minimum speed can not be maintained uphill.
6) Any speeding right down before a daunting hill.
7) Choose the appropriate gear for driving downhill with the tray inclination and length.
8) Keep steady speed downhill by easing pressure on the accelerator, possibly shift to lower gear or brake lightly at intervals but not continuous braking over a longer stretch.

By cornering


9) Select appropriate gear before the turn of the road by the sharpness and drive through the curve with constant speed, ie without either accelerating or braking if conditions otherwise allow.
10) Accelerate light at the exit of the turn while the car corrected.

At the level crossing ahead


11) Reduce speed before the level crossing regardless of the Instruction kind so that you can manage to stop before the railway crossing when trains approach.
12) Stop at the stop line or safe distance before crossing brand, flashlight beam, if the train is approaching, or if indicating signal is on, booms lowered or raised, or to otherwise cautioned train.
13) Stop at the stop line where the stop sign is erected.

7.3.5 Legal provisions also
The student must be able to express the content of the following statute:


1) Outside built-up area (and apart from motorways) must not exceed a speed of 80 km / h.
2) When driving with switched to registration trailer must mum driving 70 km / h, however the highway more than 80 km / h.

7.4 Lane Change and Merge
Overall dimensions
The student must make lane change and merge, including being aware of other vehicles location, especially in blind spots.
The student must also learn about the markings on the road and on road signs, capable of influencing the lane change and merge.
Subobjective
7.4.1 Knowledge of accidents
Treat during recent maneuvers where lane change and merge part.
7.4.2 Knowledge of risk factors
Lane departure
The student must have knowledge of the following risk factors when changing lane:


1) The maneuver can often seem surprising because other running normally expect that holds its lane.
2) Error evaluation of distance and speed by coming from behind in the lane you want to switch to.
3) Orientation behind for long periods of time, thereby unforeseen obstacles ahead unnoticed.

Merging
The student must have knowledge of the following risk factors by interlacing:


4) Error evaluation of the Coming One behind distance and velocity merge maneuver.
5) Orientation behind for long periods of time, thereby unforeseen obstacles ahead unnoticed.
6) The risk of getting too close to other users on the merging maneuver.
7) Uncritical expectation that the ride, you have to merge with, always meet their merge duty.

7.4.3 Orienteering skills
Lane departure
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential of lane changes and react to them:


1) Rear coming, hidden in blind spots.
2) Behind the running or the vehicle in front that is about to change lanes.
3) Behind running close to the lane you want to switch to.

The student must master the following orientation skills when changing lane:


4) Begin briefing on the possibility of lane change in good time so that the maneuver is not forced.
5) Inform backwards using mirrors and check the blind spots by head turning.
6) On the basis of the rear Coming One speed and location determine whether a stay of traffic flow is large enough that you can change lanes without danger or undue inconvenience.

Merging
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential by interlacing and respond appropriately to them:


7) Running diagonally behind the right or left hidden in blind spots.
8) Signs that running diagonally rear left and right do not comply with their merge duty.
9) For short distance to other users on the merging maneuver.

The student must master the following orientation skills merge:



10) Begin briefing on the possibility of merging in good time so that the maneuver is not forced.
11) Inform backwards using mirrors and check the blind spots at the main turning to find out about traffic, you have to merge with.
12) On the basis of front or behind kørendes speed and location determine whether the merge can be done without risk.

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings inherent in the lane change and merge:
Magnetic Stripes, etc..


13) »Pile for lane change '(R 15) indicates that it will soon need to switch to the lane arrows pointing toward.
14) "Lane Lines" (Q 41) led through to a place where the number of lanes decreases, emphasizes rule for lane changes. This means that you only have to change lanes if it can be done without danger or undue inconvenience.
15) Lane Lines interrupted a while before the place where the number of lanes decreases, emphasizes rule merge. This means that you must adjust your speed to the running in the lane next door and use a suitably large residence to merge into. The running in the lane next to help those who want to merge into, for example, by changing the speed and thereby make room (mutual consideration).

Traffic signs


16) "Road narrows" (A 43.1-3).
17) 'Lane Changing Course "(E 16), indicating wagon track the progress and direction of traffic. E 16.1 indicates the reduction of lane number that the occupants must run following the rule merge. E 16.2 indicates the reduction of lane number that the occupants must run following the rule lane change.
18) 'Creep Track "(E 37). On leaving the slow lane of the rule for changing lane unless traffic signs indicate that you have to run after the rule merge.
19) 'Merging' (B 15) indicates that the rule of interlacing apply.

7.4.4 maneuvering skills
Lane departure
The student must master the following maneuver skills when changing lane:


1) As far as possible not to change lanes, the vehicles behind either in one's own lane or the lane you want to start, would be compelled to reduce the speed.
2) Give indicators to signal in time to show his intent, for example, if it can be to provide guidance to other traffic, for example if behind you are close.
3) Make lane changes without running a longer piece on any lane line.
4) Place the middle of the new lane.
5) Cease all signals, (unless U-turn or oscillation immediately be carried out).

Merging
The student must master the following maneuvering skills by interlacing:


6) Adapt speed to the ride, you want to merge with.
7) If necessary, provide evidence to merge in order to clarify the intent.
8) Cease any hand signals immediately after the merge.

7.4.5 Legal provisions also
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) You must provide indicators to signal when it can be for the guidance of others.

7.5 Vending
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to make U-turn and turn from the right path (trepunktsvending) and including particular attention to the choice of control place, other kørendes speed and the distance to them.
The student must also learn about the markings on the carriageway and traffic signs that are important when turning.
Subobjective
7.5.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of accidents related to the reversal:


1) The counterparties are primarily coming from behind, especially motorists, but also relatively many motorcyclists and then oncoming, especially motorists.

7.5.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risk factors for turning:
U-turn from the center of the road


1) Error evaluation of-coming speed and the distance to them.
2) Attention alone against the oncoming whereby other risk factors not noted.
3) Impatience because there is always the oncoming, you have to hold back.

Turning from the right road edge


4) Error evaluation of rear Coming One and-coming speed and the distance to them.

7.5.3 Orienteering skills

The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential when turning and respond appropriately to them:


1) Narrow margins for maneuver because of road width in relation to the car's steering characteristics (turning circle).
2) Uncritical choice of maneuvering place with insufficient visibility (when turning from the road edge).

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings inherent in the phrase:
Magnetic Stripes


3) 'locking Line "(Q 44), not to be exceeded when turning.

Traffic signs


4) 'U-turn' (C 12).
5) "No left" (C 11.2), which also prohibits the reversal.

The student must master the following orientation skills by turning:
U-turn from the center of the road


6) Inform as indicated under 7.4. "Lane departure and interlocking" before placement in the lane nearest the carriageway or center of the road.
7) Evaluate whether a stay in the oncoming traffic is large enough that the U-turn can be made.
8) Evaluate whether U-turn can be made safely without being a danger or inconvenience to other traffic.

Turning from the right road edge


9) Look for a suitable place to lawful arrest in the right side and subsequent reversal.
10) Inform about other traffic, especially behind you and possibly other stopped vehicles on the roadside before stopping.
11) Inform themselves before turning forward and backward using mirrors and check the blind spots by head turning.
12) Evaluate whether reversal can be carried out safely without being a danger or inconvenience to other traffic.
13) Keeping abreast of other traffic during the entire phrase.

7.5.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuvering skills by turning:
U-turn from the center of the road


1) Set it well in the lane nearest the carriageway or vejmidte as indicated under 7.4 "Lane departure and Merge" and give evidence.
2) Continue slowly in any left-turn lane and including change down and possibly stop.
3) Perform U-turn under low acceleration and sharp ratdrejning, who taught at the closed training ground, so that the phrase ends in the right lane in the new direction.
4) Correct the car up and position itself as specified in 7.2 'ranking during straight ahead'.
5) Cease all signals.
6) Adapt speed to the traffic flow in the new direction.

Turning from the right road edge


7) Give signs in time to halt the roadside.
8) Slow down in good time and make soft braking.
9) Maintain pressure on the brake pedal after stopping to insure himself against the car rolling.
10) Put in neutral, release the clutch, engage the parking brake and stop signals made, if the stoppage to last longer than a few moments.
11) Give sign and execute turnaround under low acceleration and sharp ratdrejning, who taught at the closed training ground, so that the phrase ends in the right lane in the new direction.
12) Correct the car up and position itself as specified in 7.2 'ranking during straight ahead'.
13) Cease all signals.
14) Adapt speed to the traffic flow in the new direction.

7.5.5 Legal provisions also
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) Always provide indicators to signal before turning.
2) Reversal should be forward to the left, unless the conditions do not allow this.

7.6 Driving past stationary vehicles and pedestrians, etc.
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to adjust speed and lateral distance relative to other road users and especially pay attention to children and the elderly.
The student must also learn about the markings on the carriageway and traffic signs that are important when driving past other.
Subobjective
7.6.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of the accidents associated with driving past cautious etc .:


1) The counterparty is most often the unattended vehicle is impacted, for the most part in the right side of the road, but also in the left side of the road.
2) Some collisions happen with cars or two-wheeled vehicles being driven away from the roadside chatting while driving past them.

3) Other counterparts are pedestrians, especially children and the elderly, which will come out on the roadway partially hidden by a stationary vehicle.

7.6.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risks when driving past the hesitant etc .:


1) For high speed, especially for small side distance while driving past the stopped car, considering the limited possibilities for averting action in view of all parties.
2) Minor children but also many elderly pedestrians flawed understanding of the danger of leaving behind a stopped car or bus.
3) Children often impulsive and therefore surprising behavior when they stay on the road, especially when they are with other children.
4) mopeds and bicycles tend to wobble at starting and stopping.

7.6.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential by driving past cautious etc. and respond appropriately to them:


1) Reduced visibility due to the stationary vehicle, etc.
2) Draw the starting of the vehicle is, (people hesitant car, visible exhaust smoke, lit lamps and brake lights, starting behavior of moped rider or cyclist).
3) Signs that passengers, pedestrians or other road users also enter or driving onto the highway (car doors that are being opened, the bus stopped at the stop, cyclist or moped rider who will cross the roadway, feet visible under the car).
4) Children on the road.
5) Horses, including riders, animal or animals on the road.
6) Roadworks.
7) Continuous heading for a pedestrian crossing.
8) School crossing.

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings inherent in driving past cautious etc .:
Magnetic Stripes


9) "Pedestrian" (S 17) specifies the part of the roadway that is intended for pedestrians crossing.

Road signs.


10) "Pedestrian" (A 17) warns about pedestrian crossing ahead.
11) "Cyclists" (A 21) warns that cyclists and moped riders driving onto the highway or crossing it.
12) "Children" (A 22) warns children near schools, youth centers, playgrounds and similar locations.
13) "Riders" (A 23) warns riders on the road especially in places with reduced inventory.
14) 'Animal Game "(A 26).
15) "Cattle" (A 27) warns of daily passage of cattle in places with poor visibility and the road can often be slippery or greasy.
16) "Road Construction" (A 39) warns including the workers on the roadway.


17) "Pedestrian" (E 17) set up immediately at the zebra crossing.


Marking of school bus


18) "School children Divorced with yellow flashing lights", placed front and back of vehicles used as school bus or the like for transporting children to and from school. Lighted lamps warns that children may be crossing the roadway to and from the bus.

The student must master the following orientation skills while driving past the hesitant etc .:


19) Inform in good time about the possibilities of driving past and then orient themselves as stipulated in 7.4 "Lane departure and interlocking".
20) Look for signs of sudden obstacles throughout the run past without locking eyes fixed solely on the stationary vehicle, etc., But also look to the future in its own lane.
21) Look for oncoming who can suddenly appear.
22) Inform backwards using mirrors and check the blind spots at the head turning after driving past the car before you pull over to the side again.
23) Look for signs that cutting or other road will cross the road at the pedestrian crossings or outside the pedestrian crossing.
24) Look for signs that any school crossing guard leader pupils of the road.

7.6.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuver skills while driving past the hesitant etc .:


1) Slow down in good distance before the vehicle is stationary, children, horses, cattle, road works, etc., As necessary to ensure the time for information and possible avoidance maneuver.
2) Stop if necessary to make room for a bus in the built-up area provides indicators to signal for starting from a stop.
3) Wait for any-coming passage before changing lanes if the road is narrow.

4) Pulling out a good distance before the obstacle.
5) Provide signal to the warning, if necessary, while being prepared to brake.
6) Give walking on the roadway, where there is no sidewalk, time to go over to the side and keep well away from them while driving past them.
7) Reduce speed when driving transient in inclement weather, so as far as possible not tilstænkes.
8) Keep adequate distance side also when passing.
9) Keep right again on the roadway after passing driving (unless you want to pass another stationary vehicle ahead).
10) Run with appropriate low speed towards a pedestrian crossing so that pedestrians who are in the pedestrian crossing or on the way out of it, you see that you will keep returning.
11) If necessary, hold back or stop to let the pedestrian or other road users cross the pedestrian crossing, even if that may be the green light for the occupants.
12) Run with appropriate low speed in front of places where school patrols work and stop when a school crossing guard is to lead students across the roadway.

7.7 Meeting
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to weather, road conditions, traffic conditions and oncoming special steering can cause the oncoming coming over the center of the road.
The student must also learn about the markings on the carriageway and traffic signs that are important at the meeting.
Subobjective
7.7.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of meeting accidents:


1) There is quite a number of accidents involving young drivers in connection with the meeting, usually on narrow, two-lane roads.
2) The counterparties are primarily passenger cars and vans, but also relatively many trucks and part two-wheeled vehicles.
3) There is also some collisions with oncoming cars overtaking, turning, or a vehicle in front that backs and pedestrian on the roadside.

7.7.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risk factors at the meeting:


1) Driving over the center of the road always entails a risk of oncoming and should therefore be avoided wherever possible and in any case be as short as possible.

7.7.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential by meeting and respond appropriately to them:


1) Obstacles ahead in own driving half.
2) Road conditions that can cause the oncoming coming over the center of the road (eg narrow road without striping, curves, holes, water lakes or slippery and greasy lead).
3) Road conditions eg hills where visibility conditions can make it difficult to assess-coming location.
4) Traffic Factors that could cause the oncoming coming over the center of the road (eg stationary vehicle on the left, oncoming close succession, the rear will overtake, car swings out from the parking lot on the left side).
5) Oncoming with steering that gives them tend to exceed the center of the road, especially in bends or on narrow road (eg large and heavy vehicles, motorcycles and vehicles with trailer).
6) Weather conditions (crosswind) that can cause you to partly themselves and partly closing meeting may be pushed off course.
7) Meeting with great combinations that can cause wind turbulence that can push the closing meeting off course and thus increase the risk of particularly 'soft' road users.

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings inherent in the meeting:
Magnetic Stripes


8) 'Warning Line "(Q 42) is used as harbingers of a stop line or center line on narrow roads with poor visibility conditions. By reversible lanes used warning lines as double line.
9) "Barring Line" (Q 44), which may not be exceeded unless special circumstances make it necessary (eg roadworks or illegally stopped or parked vehicle).

Traffic signs


10) "Oncoming Traffic" (A 18).
11) "Road narrows" (A 43.1-3).
12) "Free width '(UA 43). During the board, indicating the clear width narrowed stretches.
13) 'Hold back the oncoming "(B 18).
14) "Oncoming must hold back" (B 19).
15) "Vehicle width" (C 41).

signals



16) 'Lane Signal "(Y 17) where the red cross indicates that the driving lane is prohibited. A flashing yellow diagonal arrow indicates that you soon be run over in the lane, the arrow points to while green arrow indicates that the driving lane is allowed in the corresponding direction of traffic. If the signal turns red cross, you have to change lanes. If this is not possible, stop.

The student must master the following orientation skills by meeting:


17) Inform in good time of oncoming and on any impediments to the meeting.
18) Failing to see for a long time directly at the oncoming thereby counteracting the tendency to steer in the direction of the oncoming.
19) rightly look towards the center of the free lane and thereby stabilize the control.

7.7.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuvering skills by meeting:


1) Slow down in good time at the meeting on the narrow road and in situations where it will facilitate the meeting.
2) Keep to the right on the road in good time before the meeting to ensure sufficient lateral distance to the oncoming, but also take into account any drivers on the roadside.
3) Stay behind by pedestrians, cyclists or moped riders until the oncoming passed if the road is narrow.
4) Stop and let oncoming pass if the road is blocked, or there are other obstacles in one's own half of the roadway (unless otherwise specified by traffic signs or traffic light).
5) Maintain complete control of the car during the meeting and be prepared to react quickly to wind turbulence bumps in the road or the like.

7.7.5 Legal provisions also
The student must be able to express the content of the following statute:


1) On a road with three lanes Do not drive in the lane on the far left, unless traffic flow is unidirectional.

7.8 Driving preceded or followed by other
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to adjust the distance to the leading and trailing in terms of road, weather and traffic conditions.
The student must also learn about road signs that are important for driving front or after the other.
Subobjective
7.8.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of the accidents associated with driving in front or after the other:


1) There is quite a number of accidents involving young drivers in collisions with front or behind you, most often in heavier traffic.
2) The counterparties are primarily cars, but also relatively often two-wheeled road users.

7.8.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risks when driving in front or after the other:


1) A distance driving less than 2 seconds. is too short, you can always reach to avert collision if the vehicle in front suddenly slows or brakes.
2) smooth or oily lead and driving behind a vehicle which covers view, is 2 sec. not always sufficient for reaction and braking.
3) Lack of attention to changing the forankørendes speed or location.

7.8.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential by driving in front or after the other and respond appropriately to them:


1) Road conditions, which may require sudden deceleration or braking, (curves ahead, intersections, traffic signals, level crossing, obstacles on the roadway, etc.).
2) Traffic Conditions may require sudden deceleration or braking, (parked vehicle on the roadside, traffic congestion ahead, crossing pedestrians, children, etc.).
3) Weather conditions that reduce visibility or increase stopping distance (fog, heavy rain, snow, slippery and greasy lead, etc.).
4) Special features of the front or behind you, (large vehicle that takes vision, vehicle with limited braking performance, inattentive or place known driver, vehicles during emergency, etc.).

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings relating to driving in front or after the other:
Traffic signs


5) 'Queue' (A 20) indicates a particular risk of congestion.

The student must master the following orientation skills by driving in front or after the other:
Driving in front of others


6) See in the mirrors at frequent intervals and for brief moments at a time and thus keep still oriented around back kørendes distance, speed and intent.

7) Evaluate whether the distance to vehicles behind you all the time is safe enough.
8) Evaluate whether behind you intend to overtake.
9) Check on one's own speed is reasonably adapted to the conditions and not excessively low.

Driving for other


10) Evaluate whether the distance to the front under the circumstances is big enough for both reaction and braking.
11) Failing to keep your eyes on the vehicle in front alone, but orient themselves so far ahead on the road as possible, even in front of the vehicle ahead.
12) Check if the vehicle in front, swinging or changing lanes, has room to complete the maneuver.
13) Check for overtaking possibly pull abruptly into the front.

7.8.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuvering skills by driving in front or after the other:
Driving in front of others


1) If possible, keep the traffic flow, however, the speed shall not exceed the highest legal and safe speed on the line.
2) Slow down, drive all the way out to the right and possibly stop in order to facilitate overtaking, if you know its drive slows down the vehicles behind you, or limits the vehicles behind to run too close.
3) If possible, avoid sudden deceleration or braking if the following vehicles are close, especially if it is a vehicle with inferior braking, or road conditions are bad.
4) Give sign with the stop in good time before stopping or unexpected slowing of guidance for following vehicles are close.
5) Keep as far to the right as possible and speed should not be set up if the vehicles behind to overtake.

Driving for other


6) Keep sufficient safety distance to the front. This will in most cases correspond to about 2 sec. time interval in normal lead depending on the driver's routine and road conditions.
7) Increase the distance to the vehicle in front if road and traffic conditions, weather or road conditions make it necessary.

7.8.5 Regulatory and other factors
The student must be able to express the content of the following:


1) Vehicles with specific speed limits, for example, cars with trailers, to keep as much distance to the front outside built-up area that overtaking vehicles have room to pull in between.
2) When driving at low speed or with a particularly wide vehicle (eg car with trailer) on a narrow and winding road you should pay special attention to vehicles behind and facilitate overtaking, for example by reducing speed, drive right into the side and possibly halt .
3) In connection with unexpected traffic jams or other direct danger to the hazard warning lights used on roads other than motorways outside built-up area to alert vehicles behind road users to the dangers.
4) The stopping distance is the way to go, the car is running, from the braking begins until the car is stationary.
5) The stopping distance depends inter alia of how hard you step on the brake pedal.
6) The stopping distance, by doubling the speed will be quadrupled.
7) Maintain sufficient safety distance to the front. This will in most cases correspond to about 2 sec. time interval in normal lead depending on the driver's routine and road conditions.
8) The distance to the vehicle in front must be increased if the road and traffic conditions, weather or road conditions make it necessary.

7.9 Overtaking
Overall dimensions
The student must learn how to assess the necessary overtaking length in relation to their own vehicle acceleration and forankørendes speed.
The student must also learn about the markings on the road and on road signs and laws prohibiting overtaking that are important for overtaking.
Subobjective
7.9.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances when overtaking accidents:


1) Although the number of overtaking accidents are relatively modest, they will often get tremendous scope and serious consequences because of the speed.
2) the counterparties is first of all passed the vehicle is impacted, usually a driver, but very often also a cyclist.
3) The counterparties are also oncoming or from behind, which is also about to overtake.

7.9.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risks when overtaking:



1) Inadequate information on the conditions of overtaking or passing zones.
2) Underestimating the necessary overtaking length related to obstacles ahead (turns, hills, junctions, speed limit, the oncoming etc.).
3) Underestimating the necessary overtaking length for long vehicles or vehicle combinations (trucks and road trains are marked with different reflex planks).
4) Over Assessment of proper acceleration ability.
5) Extension of the reaction time when you are in doubt whether overtaking is possible, and thus loss of time overhalingens implementation.
6) Impatience after prolonged driving behind a slow moving.
7) Tendency to blindly follow the vehicle in front to overtake without even receiving information about the conditions of overtaking remains fulfilled.
8) Strong wind turbulence when overtaking of vehicles.
9) Risk of haze when overtaking large vehicles due to splashes from wet roadways.

7.9.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential for overtaking and respond appropriately to them:


1) Lack of visibility of the needed overhaul length because of the hills, swing, cross or bad weather (fog, snow, heavy rain, low sun).
2) Oncoming in the fast lane.
3) Rear future that is about to overtake, or behind you who start overtaking, possibly hidden in blind spots.
4) Evidence that the vehicle in front to overtake.
5) Evidence that the vehicle in front will stop or swing or otherwise change his driving.
6) Evidence that the vehicle in front is not aware of overtaking.
7) Signs that the vehicle in front has particular difficulties with regard to vehicle maneuverability or driver's orientation conditions.
8) Several vehicles in front of the column with a short distance between each other.

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings relating to overtaking:
Magnetic Stripes


9) 'Warning Line "(Q 42) is used as harbingers of a stop line or center line on narrow roads with poor visibility conditions. The intersection can alert line is used to manage traffic flow. In special cases, warning line is used to direct traffic flow by displacement of lanes.
10) "Barring Line" (Q 44) must not be exceeded during overtaking.
11) Locking Line are often used in places where overtaking is prohibited because of poor visibility conditions such as hills and curves. Such sites are, however, allowed to overtake if the direction of travel is sufficient space within the restricted line (ie more space than one lane) and oncoming must not occur.
12) "Double Lines" (Q 41-44), where you must follow the line closest to the car. Is it punctured, it must be exceeded, but is the solid, it must not be exceeded.
13) "Pedestrian" (S 17), where overtaking is allowed only if you have a full view of the field.

Traffic signs


14) "Overtaking prohibited" (C 51) prohibits overtaking of vehicles other than two-wheeled cycles and two-wheeled small mopeds. The ban can be at the blackboard restricted to only certain vehicles, such as car-trailer combination.
15) "Termination of passing zones" (C 53).
16) "End of prohibition" (C 59), which also indicates that overtaking again is allowed if the necessary conditions are present.
17) 'Cross-Brand for level crossing "(A 74.1-2), indicating among other things that overtaking is prohibited.

The student must master the following orientation skills by overtaking:


18) Inform several times whether the conditions for overtaking is present.
19) Evaluate the necessary time or path length for overtaking under the terms of the overview, distance to potential obstacles ahead, current speed limit, the car's own speed and acceleration as well as the front kørendes speed.
20) Evaluate whether there are safe opportunity to pull to the right on the roadway after overtaking without bothering overtaking, apart from driving in a lane where there must come oncoming, (eg by double barrier lines or highway).
21) Inform backwards using mirrors and check the blind spots at the main rotation before overtaking.
22) Inform about traffic conditions ahead and behind throughout overtaking and pay special attention to unforeseen obstacles.

23) Inform themselves about when overtaking is visible in the interior mirror.
24) Inform backwards using mirrors and check the blind spots by head turning.

Overhaul of several vehicles in front


25) Stay remains informed of the possibility of legal and safe overtaking before several vehicles in front overtaken in rapid succession.
26) Stay remains informed of the nearest residence in the series of overtaking vehicles.
27) Be aware of running that might break out of the range for overtaking.

Overhaul of turning left


28) Assess the possibility of overtaking on the right past the car ahead.
29) Be aware of crossing the road in front of the left-turning (especially pedestrians or oncoming swinging left) and pedestrians, cyclists and moped riders on the right side of the road.

7.9.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuver skills before overtaking:


1) Reduce speed and keep a safe distance to the vehicle in front as stated in 7.8 "Drive before or after the other '.
2) Increase the distance to the vehicle in front, if the vehicle is so large that it is not otherwise possible to orient themselves far enough forward.
3) Increase the distance again, if from behind overtakes and pulls into the front.
4) Pulling out a little to the left of the vehicle in front, if it is necessary to improve orientation.
5) Provide evidence to the fast left turn signal, if behind you are close to so that they can be aware of the intention.
6) Give signal to the vehicle in front if a van or truck with limited rear visibility, or if the vehicle in front seems inattentive.

The student must master the following maneuver skills during and after overtaking:


7) Accelerate, possibly after switching to a lower gear to achieve rapid acceleration.
8) Instant abort overtaking if circumstances have changed, and the opportunity to overtake has been questionable - and otherwise drag left out in the fast lane.
9) Ensure as soon as possible to get out of the front kørendes blind spot.
10) Keep sufficient lateral distance for overtaking.
11) Implement overtaking as quickly as possible without exceeding the legal speed limit.
12) Discontinued overtaking if an unforeseen obstacle comes up, or the possibility of overtaking is misjudged.
13) Get in the fast lane until it overtook visible in the interior mirror, and then immediately pull to the right on the road again (unless you want to overtake another vehicle and the necessary conditions are met).

Overhaul of several vehicles in front


14) Exploit nearest stay in the line of overtaking vehicles if overtaking may be interrupted.
15) Any interrupt overtaking if the overview forward thereby reduced because of running that breaks out of the range for themselves to overtake.

Overhaul of turning left


16) If necessary, slow and possibly stop if the vehicle in front slows down or stops.
17) Making fast to the right, under appropriate slow driving and sufficient lateral distance if the road is open.

7.9.5 Legal provisions also
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) You have to overtake other running to the left, however, running, swinging to the left or preparing a left turn, overtaken on the right. By overtaking on the right past the turning left are allowed to exceed a continuous edge line unless the field to the right of the edge line is marked as a special court, for example with a bicycle symbol.
2) It is prohibited to overtake at intersections unless:



a) there are several lanes reserved for traffic flow in the same direction
b) you overtake on the right past a vehicle turns left,
c) the intersection is regulated by signal lights or police
d) the transverse road unconditionally give way.


3) It is forbidden to overtake the front or on a level crossing.
4) You may only overtake on a hill or in a road curve with reduced inventory, if there is sufficient space within the restricted line (ie more space than one lane) where oncoming must not occur.

5) The general ban on overtaking at intersections, in front or on the level crossing, on the hill and in turn does not overtaking two-wheeled bicycles and two-wheeled small mopeds.
6) On a road with three lanes, do not use the lane on the far left, eg for overtaking, unless traffic flow is unidirectional.

10/7 Driving in trafiksanerede areas
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to drive in trafiksanerede areas, including pay attention to traffic calming measures and pedestrians, especially children playing.
The student must also learn about the markings on the road and on road signs and regulations that affect driving in trafiksanerede areas.
Subobjective
7.10.1 Knowledge of accidents
The statistical basis of the circumstances of accidents in areas with speed reduction, pedestrian streets and in living and play areas are not yet sufficient to enable that can be disclosed.
7.10.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risks when driving in trafiksanerede areas:


1) Special traffic calming measures on roads in the form of bumps and / or various obstacles on the roadway.
2) Continuous lawfully go anywhere on the roadway in pedestrian areas and are not likely to pay attention to running.
3) Continuous and especially playing children who are legally move across the width of the road in living and play areas, and can not be expected to be aware of the running.

7.10.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings relating trafiksanerede areas:
Magnetic Stripes, etc..


1) 'Bump' (S 32). Squared across the road, indicating bump.
2) 'Rumble Strips' (S18). Narrow, noise-causing streaks across the direction of travel, which indicates that special precaution.

Traffic signs





3)


'Area of ​​speed reduction "(E 53) indicates that the traffic calming measures usually do not make it possible to run faster than the specified speed.



4)


"Termination of the area with speed reduction" (E 54).



5)


"Pedestrian" (A 17) with additional panel bearing the words 'Pedestrian' indicates that you cross a pedestrian zone.




The student must be able to indicate the importance of following traffic signs:


6) "Pedestrian" (E 49) indicates an area where special traffic rules apply. Some driving may be permitted at the blackboard. Driving in the area must be supplied with very low speed (usually below 15 km / h). Parking the car must not be outside the marked areas.
7) "Termination of the pedestrian" (E 50). Running unconditionally give way on exit from a pedestrian zone.
8) 'Residence and play area "(E 51) indicates that the running road is subordinate to stay and play for adults and children that driving normally authorized only at speeds below 15 km / h and the parking of the car is prohibited without the special marked areas.
9) "Termination of living and play area" (E 52). Running unconditionally give way on exit from a living and play area.

The student must master the following orientation skills by driving in the area of ​​speed reduction:


10) Look for bumps and other traffic calming measures.
11) Be especially aware of pedestrians and children playing.

7.10.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuver skills at driving in the area of ​​speed reduction:


1) Driving exceeding the specified speed in areas with speed suppression and may slow further during the passage of traffic calming measures.
2) Keep the back for reaching at any driving over the pedestrian.

7.10.5 Regulatory otherwise
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) When driving in living and play areas should be kept back for walking and in no case continue driving until you have made sure that no one can come dangerously close to the car, and that those who are staying or playing on the road, has seen the car and made room for it.

2) When driving in the pedestrian must exercise special care and consideration for pedestrians, and if on the way foot traffic that can come dangerously close to the vehicle during its passage, do not continue driving until the driver has ensured that these people are aware of the vehicle, giving way to passage.

11.7 The Drive to cross
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to adjust the speed for driving through a cross taking into account visibility conditions, traffic regulations and other road users, both vehicular and pedestrian.
The student must also learn about the markings on the road and on road signs, traffic lights and rules on the right of way.
Subobjective
7.11.1 Knowledge of accidents
Treat during maneuvers straight ahead, turn right and left at junctions.
7.11.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risks when driving through a cross:


1) For high speed, so you do not have time to inform themselves adequately or stop before the intersection.
2) Inadequate attention to traffic control at the intersection.
3) Risk factors also mentioned under 7.4 "Lane departure and interlocking" and 7.8 "Drive before or after the other '.

7.11.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential by failing to stop at intersections and respond appropriately to them:


1) Poor overview of the intersection.
2) Evidence that the vehicle in front slows down or stops to swing into the driveway just before the intersection.
3) Evidence that the vehicle in front slows down or stops abruptly for yellow light or to orient themselves, hold back or swing.
4) Signs that running in the lane to the right or to the left suddenly changes lane and drive into the front.
5) Signs that pedestrians on the corners at the junction (especially children and the elderly) will cross the road (sometimes red light).
6) Signs that running from left or right do not comply with their possible right of way.

The student must have knowledge of the importance of following road signs etc .:


7) 'Pile Directories' (F 11-14) indicates the way to geographically target as well as ports, airports, sights, service facilities and the like.
8) "Exit Directory '(F 16) gives way to geographically target etc. and compiled by an exit lane beginning.
9) 'Table Directory "(F 18) indicates the distance to vejvisningsmålet and flight number and other information.
10) Orientation boards, available as "Portal Information signs (G 11)," Diagramorienteringstavler "(G 14)," Lane Information signs "(G 15) and 'Table Orientation Boards' (G 18) and informs about the direction of geographical targets etc.
11) "Distance switchboard" (H 41) indicate flight number and distances to locations.
12) 'Cul de Sac' (E 18).

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings relating to stop at a junction:
Magnetic Stripes, etc..


13) 'Lane Line "(Q 41) and wide" Dotted edge line "(Q 47) in front of the cross indicates that it is still permitted to change lanes.
14) 'locking Line "(Q 44) and wide' Solid Edge line" (Q 46) in front of the cross indicates that it is no longer allowed to change lanes.
15) 'Wide edge line "(Q 46) and (Q 47) defines normal lanes from which one can not keep going straight, but must swing to the right or left. marked by arrows.
16) 'Lane Arrows' (R 11) indicates that the lane is to be used to drive in it or the directions of the arrows. Is a vognbanepil located in close connection to U of 'BUS', the arrow only for bus.
17) »Double vognbanepil '(R 13) represents two cross following each other.
18) 'Vognbanepil with oscillation ban' (R 14) applies to a cross, located by a side road, that should not be swinging down (oscillation ban will also be indicated by signs).
19) 'Vige Line "(S 11) (' Shark teeth ') indicates that it has unconditional right of way. This means that you have to hold back for all the vehicular traffic on the road that run into or above.
20) 'Triangle Symbol' (V 11) indicates that you have unconditional right of way in the following intersection.
21) "Stop" (V 12) indicates that you have stop duty and unconditionally giving way at the following intersection.
22) "Stop the Line" (S 13) indicates where to stop in connection with the stop sign, red signal light or other stop signs.

23) "Pedestrian" (S 17). One should try to avoid stopping in the field.

Traffic signs


24) "Dangerous Intersection" (A 11) indicates that the intersections have unconditional right of way, but often bad plan and that, therefore, must drive with sharpened attention to traffic at the intersection. "Dangerous Intersection" (A11) can be displayed with the support of only one side.
25) "traffic light" (A 19) warns of traffic signals ahead.
26) "principal" (B 16) indicates that the intersections have unconditional right of way, unless otherwise specified by traffic signs on the main road.
27) 'principal ceases "(B 17).
28) 'Suspended pilafmærkning "(E 11) and the' Lanes by cross" (E 15) indicate the directions of the intersection, as the lanes are intended.
29) 'Prescribed direction "(D 11) indicates in which direction to run.
30) "Right turn prohibited" (C 11.1).
31) 'No left "(C 11.2).
32) 'Unconditional right of way "(B 11).
33) 'Pre-warning to stop "(UB 11.1) used in conjunction with B 11
34) "Bi-directional bike path" (11.2 MM) indicates the cross road is the cycle path, where the traffic in either direction is permitted.
35) 'Stop' (B 13) indicates that you have to stop at the stop line and then unconditionally give way.

Signal lights at intersections


36) The 'main Signals "(X 11).



a) Red light means stop, and that must stop at the stop line or at a safe distance from the intersection, if there is no stop line. Red and yellow light at the same time also means stop, but also indicate that the signal soon turns green.
b) Green light does run if the road is open. The driving for the go-ahead is not allowed if traffic conditions prevent you can get completely crossed and thus obstruct the transverse road when the signal changes.
c) Yellow light means stop, and also indicates that the signal soon turns red. One should not stop when the signal changes from green to yellow if you have come so far that the stoppage may cause danger.


37) 'signals without green light' (also called repetition signals or minus-green) with only yellow and red lights set up sometimes at the corners of the intersection. The signal indicates for turning left, which keeps the middle of the intersection when the light for the oncoming shift from extended green to yellow and red.
38) 'Pilsignaler' (X 12). Red, yellow or green arrow applies to running, which will in the direction of the arrow.
39) Signal light applies irrespective of markings on the unconditional right of way.
40) If the signal light at an intersection does not work, you have to abide by marking the unconditional right of way or, if not available, to the rule of priority to the right.

The student must be able to recognize and indicate that you have unconditional right of way following locations without highlighted by special road markings:


41) Exit from an area outside the road (car, property, plot, gas station or the like).
42) Exiting clearly subordinate road (pedestrian, living and play area, dirt road, path, or the like).
43) Exit from a road that takes over the sidewalk, bike path or discount that is beyond both side of the road and the more important road carriageway level. Level crossing are further clarified by the crossing's coating is made of a different coating than the side road (eg paving stones, concrete blocks) or the pavement and / or bicycle path is through the important way. Level crossing may also be clarified by a narrowing of the side of the road cross section.

The student must have knowledge that the unconditional right of way in a number of cases clarified by traffic signs and markings can only be omitted places where the unconditional right of way obvious from the road design.
However, there may be places where these conditions are not fully met. Such sites will also have the unconditional right of way.
The student must be able to recognize and indicate that you have priority to the right, ie that you have to hold back for all running from the right, in places where there is no unconditional right of way for some of the parties - but not by changing lanes or merging.
The student must be able to recognize and indicate that you have to allow free passage of vehicles during emergency.
The student must master the following orientation skills by driving through a cross:


44) Inform on traffic control at the intersection (signal lights, mandatory lanes, giving way relationship).

45) Evaluate the visibility at the intersection.
46) Look for walking on the path of the road or on the way out in any pedestrian crossing.
47) Evaluate the accessibility of traffic lights makes it possible to reach the intersection before the light turns green for cross traffic.

7.11.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuvering skills by driving through a cross:


1) Driving at low speeds, there will be time to find out about traffic control, right of way, traffic flow at the intersection and show that you will comply with his possible right of way.
2) Switch to the correct lane for the planned maneuver at the intersection.
3) On roads with two or more lanes for traffic in the same direction, but without lane arrows locate in the lane furthest to the right before turning right, in the lane farthest to the left before the left turn and the lane that best suits before driving straight ahead at the junction.
4) On roads with two or more lanes with lane arrows in the same direction position themselves in the right lane in the intended direction of travel, unless road conditions, traffic flow and the continued drive dictate otherwise.
5) On roads without marked lanes position themselves so far to the right on the roadway as possible before turning right and out of the middle of the roadway before the left turn.
6) On roads with one-way traffic position themselves completely over to the left side of the road before the left turn.

Cross with poor visibility where you have right of way


7) Slow down gradually at a suitable distance from the intersection to show that it will respect its rights of way and so that there can be stopped within the distance to the intersection with the transverse road or shark teeth, stop line or pedestrian crossing.
8) If necessary, hold back for pedestrians who are crossing the roadway, whether there is a pedestrian crossing or not.
9) Driving slowly with your foot on the brake and possibly stop at the intersection with the transverse road or right of way board / shark teeth, if it is necessary to inform themselves adequately about traffic flow.
10) Stop completely at stop line regardless of visibility conditions, if it is indicated by the panel, signal or similar.
11) Ensure the necessary visibility to both sides at the cross road at possibly running a little forward over the zebra crossing, shark teeth or stop line and stop.

Cross with poor visibility where traffic from side roads give way


12) Slow down gradually at a suitable distance from the intersection so that there can be stopped within the distance to the transverse road until it has secured sufficient visibility to both sides.

Cross where the exit is done over the sidewalk, discount or bike path


13) Slow down gradually at a suitable distance from the intersection and to show that it will respect its right of way so that you can stop within the distance to the intersection with the transverse road or shark teeth, stop line or pedestrian crossing.
14) Keep the back for walking on the pavement and ride on the bike path.
15) driving slowly with your foot on the brake and possibly stop at the sidewalk, rebate or bike path, if it is necessary to inform themselves adequately about the traffic flow at the junction / exit.
16) Ensure the necessary visibility to both sides by possibly run a little forward over the sidewalk, rebate or cycle track and stop.

Cross with good inventory


17) Failing stopping (unless traffic conditions make it necessary, or there are stop sign) at the intersection with the transverse or by shark teeth, whose history in the junction is so good that you can find out enough about the traffic flow at the intersection already during the run .

Cross with signal control


18) Prepare a stand if the signal shows red or have been green for a long time in failing to stop at the intersection.
19) Stopping before the pedestrian crossing or stop line if the signal shows red.
20) Proceed into the intersection when the signal changes from green to yellow if a slowdown gives danger of rear-end collisions, or stopping can not happen before the pedestrian crossing or stop line.
21) If necessary stop for pedestrians who are crossing the road, even if they go through a red light.
22) Put quick start when the signal turns green and the intersection is free.

23) Be cautious, although the signal shows green if traffic conditions do not allow to reach the intersection before the signal turns green for cross traffic.

7:12 Forward movement in the cross
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to judge speed and distance for running from right and left at the junction and learn to counteract a tendency to follow the vehicle in front and the expectation that other running always respect their rights of way.
Subobjective
7.12.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of the accidents during the straight running of the cross:


1) There are many accidents involving young drivers under the right exit at the intersection.
2) Counterparties is regardless of right of way first of all motorists, but also two-wheeled road users from the right, much of which turns left.
3) The counterparties are almost as often moving from left and oncoming swinging left without holding back.
4) Other counterparts are walking on the road above the ground both before and after the intersection.

7.12.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risk factors by straight driving in intersections:


1) Tendency to simply follow the vehicle in front and thus omit to inform themselves thoroughly.
2) Error evaluation of the speed of moving from right and left side of the intersection and the distance to them.
3) Uncritical expectation that moving from right and left side of the intersection always respect their rights of way or respect the signal light.
4) Non-critical expectations that oncoming to swing left especially in traffic lights, always holding back.
5) tendency to overlook pedestrians crossing at the exit of the junction.

7.12.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential by straight driving in intersections and respond appropriately to them:


1) Bi-directional bike path on the cross road at the intersection.
2) Running from the right or left side of the intersection with special orientation difficulties (eg children and the elderly bicycle, moped riders, motorcyclists in bad weather).
3) Vehicles for particular speed range, there may be an unexpected long time to pass the intersection.
4) Vehicles with speed characteristics that are easily underestimated (motorcycles, mopeds and road bikes).
5) Vehicles that take up less space in the image and therefore easily overlooked when they are with larger vehicles.
6) Signs that oncoming turn left without holding back.
7) Signs that the vehicle in front cyclist or moped rider will swing left without looking for.
8) The ride, which slows or stops to swing into the driveway or the like just after the intersection.
9) Starting at croup remotest corners.

The student must master the following orientation skills by straight driving in intersections:
Cross with poor visibility and intersections where you have right of way


10) Inform several times to both sides of the junction at the intersection with the transverse path of shark teeth or stop line (or where visibility is sufficient).
11) Evaluate whether a stay in the traffic flow is large enough to run completely crossed - (or to any waiting room in openwork carriageway) without forcing the occupants, as you have to hold back, to slow or change the location.
12) Evaluate whether the occupants from the left (at junctions with priority to the right) to respect their rights of way.
13) Evaluate whether oncoming traffic or vehicles in front cyclists and moped riders will turn left, holding back.
14) Look for reaching that might step out onto the roadway by croup opposite corners.
15) Inform on a clear path forward also before straight driving crossed.

Cross with poor visibility where traffic from side roads give way


16) Evaluate whether the occupants from the left or right to respect their rights of way
17) Evaluate whether oncoming traffic or vehicles in front cyclists and moped riders will turn left, holding back.
18) Look for reaching that might step out onto the roadway by croup opposite corners.
19) Inform on a clear path forward also before straight driving crossed.

Cross with signal control


20) Keep an eye on the signal light and any pilsignaler after stopping for a red light.

21) Failing to keep your eyes only on the signal light before driving through the green, but also familiarize themselves with the traffic flow at the intersection, especially walking, there are still crossing the roadway or perhaps will, although it is too late or running across, continues crossed in the last minute.
22) Look for oncoming who are particularly prone to swing left without holding back at signalized intersections.

7.12.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuver skills at the right exit at the intersection:


1) Putting soon as possible in the time after stopping at the intersection with the transverse road, by swerving line or stop line if there is a clear path straight.

07.13 Right turn at intersections
Overall dimensions
The student must match the speed to the sharpness and road conditions in general, so it will be possible to orient themselves critically about traffic flow from the left side of the intersection, pedestrians as well as from behind cyclists and moped riders.
Subobjective
7.13.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of the accidents during right turns at intersections:


1) The counterparties are primarily running from behind and then running from left and right side of the intersection.
2) Counterparties behind, especially cyclists and moped riders running up the right side of the car, and also a number of drivers coming from behind and collides with the right turning.
3) The counterparties from the left side of the intersection is especially motorists, but also relatively often cyclists and moped riders.
4) The counterparties from the right side is especially motorists.
5) Other counterparts are going to cross the roadway, you swing right onto.

7.13.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risk factors when turning right at intersections:


1) For high speed before and during højresvinget, so the orientation becomes deficient or bend too much at the risk of getting over in-coming lane.
2) Tendency to simply follow the vehicle in front that swings to the right, without even informing themselves adequately.
3) Error evaluation of the speed of moving from the left side of the intersection and the distance to them.
4) Uncritical expectation that running from the left side of the intersection always respect their rights of way or respect the signal light.
5) Inadequate briefing on from behind cyclists and moped riders or misjudgment of their speed.
6) Inadequate briefing on-going at the exit of the junction.

7.13.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential when turning right at intersections and respond appropriately to them:


1) Bi-directional bike path on the cross road at the intersection.
2) Reduced grip because of roadway coating or road conditions.
3) Running from the left side at the intersection with special orientation difficulties.
4) Vehicles with speed characteristics that are easily underestimated.
5) Rear coming cyclists and moped riders on the roadway or bike path, possibly hidden in the offset rear blind spot on the right.
6) Signs that straight cyclists and moped riders continue despite any red cyclist signal, despite the green right arrow or a green light for cars and motorcycles.
7) Oncoming cyclists and moped riders on two-cycle path.
8) Signs that oncoming turn left without holding back.
9) Continuous heading for pedestrian crossing or children on the corners at the exit from the intersection.
10) Blocked lane, for example, the vehicle is immediately after the intersection.

The student must master the following orientation skills by turning right at intersections:


11) Inform on special terms for right turn during the journey towards the junction, including cyclists and moped location, unidirectional or bi-directional bike path or shortened cycle track before the intersection.
12) Inform backwards using mirrors and check the blind spot at the front turning for cyclists and moped riders on the roadway before location to right turn.
13) Assess the possibility of overtaking in front of cyclists and moped riders before the timely location to right turn.
14) Inform several times to both sides of the junction at the intersection with the transverse path of shark teeth (or where the statement is sufficient) and at the stop line.

15) Evaluate whether a stay in the traffic flow from the left is large enough that højresvinget can be performed without forcing the occupants to reduce speed or change the location if you have right of way.
16) Look right at the junction to ensure that lane, which swung to be free, and if it is blocked by eg stationary vehicles when planning højresvinget then.
17) Evaluate whether running from the left side of the intersection meets their possible right of way.
18) Look for oncoming who will turn left at the junction and judge whether they hold back.
19) Inform backwards using mirrors and check the blind spot at the front turning for cyclists and moped riders who try to come from behind on the right side of the car.
20) Look for walking, which is coming out on the zebra crossing or crossing the roadway to the right at the intersection.

Cross with bike path and bike field


21) Inform backwards using mirrors and check the blind spots at the head turning after coming from behind cyclists and moped riders and oncoming cyclists and moped riders on two-cycle path and cyclists on the cycling field and assess whether højresvinget can be performed without forcing them to reduce the speed or stop.

Cross with signal control


22) Look for the signal light and any pilsignaler after stopping for red.
23) Failing to concentrate solely on the signal light in the drive for green, but also look for traffic flow at the intersection, especially walking that is still on the way of the road, or perhaps will even if it is too late.
24) Look for oncoming which signalized intersections are especially prone to swing left without holding back.
25) Evaluate whether cyclists and moped riders stop at a red signal cyclist on the bike path before højresvinget performed for the green light or green right arrow.

7.13.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuver skills at right turns at intersections:


1) Give characters right turn at a suitable distance from the intersection.
2) Place in the lane furthest to the right or in the correct lane Moreover, as stated under 11.7 "The Drive to cross."
3) Driving in the back cyclists and moped drivers if it is not possible to overtake them properly before timely location to right turn.
4) Run close to the carriageway edge (or edge line) or curb as far as possible to prevent cyclists and moped riders from rolling forward on the right side of the car.
5) Adapt speed to overview and right of way, as stated under 11.7 "The Drive to cross."
6) Comply with any rights of way and any stop duty for transverse traffic.
7) Initiate højresvinget soon as possible if the roads are clear.
8) Adapt speed and control for the corner's sharpness, traction and road conditions.
9) Keep sufficient distance to cyclists and moped riders, which also swings to the right from a bike path that terminates at the intersection.
10) Keep back for cyclists and moped riders from a bicycle lane to continue straight ahead at the junction.
11) Keep the back straight cyclists and moped riders who have come forward right side of the car.
12) Keep back for oncoming cyclists and moped riders on two-cycle path which terminates at the intersection.
13) If necessary, keeping back to pedestrians crossing the carriageway, which swung into or are on the way out of the pedestrian crossing.
14) Cease all signals after no right crank end.
15) Adapt speed and location after the traffic flow and the continued drive in the new direction.

T-junction with swinging from side road


16) remain at standstill at the intersection with the transverse path, at any stop line or the shark teeth (or in which the statement is sufficient), if it is necessary to wait for sufficient length of stay in the traffic flow from the left side to carry out the right turn. This also applies to T-junction with priority to the right as road users on the cross road often runs as the traffic from side roads have unconditional right of way.

14.7 Left turn at intersections
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to adjust the speed of the vibrations and traffic conditions and especially judge-coming speed and the distance to them.

The student must also learn to counteract a tendency to blindly follow the front and an expectation that other road users always respect their rights of way, and to counteract impatience and discomfort of waiting at the intersection.
Subobjective
7.14.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of the accidents during left turns at intersections:


1) There is quite a number of accidents involving young drivers turning left at intersections.
2) The counterparties are primarily oncoming, as the turning left does not hold back.
3) The oncoming counterparts is especially motorists, but also many two-wheeled road users, particularly motorcyclists and cyclists.
4) Other counterparts are running from the left side of the intersection, especially motorists, but also two-wheeled road users, as well as from behind the left side of the car.
5) A counterparty is also running from the right side of the intersection and pedestrians crossing the carriageway to turn left onto.

7.14.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risk factors at the left turn at intersections:


1) For high speed before and during the left turning, so the orientation becomes deficient and control uncertain.
2) Tendency to simply follow the vehicle in front that swings to the left, without even informing themselves adequately.
3) Error evaluation of the speed of motorists from both sides of the junction and at oncoming to be straight, and the distance to them.
4) Uncritical expectation that moving from left or right side of the intersection always respect their rights of way or respect the signal light.
5) attention solely on the oncoming whereby other risk factors overlooked.
6) Impatience because there is always the oncoming, you have to hold back.
7) Discomfort at the exposed wait space in the middle of major junctions or fear of getting in the way, when the signal light changes, and thus tend to careless completion of the left turn.
8) Attention alone against the signal light in the signal junctions and tend to erroneously perceive green light (or yellow / red light signals without green for left-turning) as a clear path to the left and thus overlook oncoming.
9) Tendency to overlook pedestrians crossing at the exit of the junction.
10) Tend to overlook from behind cyclists and moped riders on the two-way cycle track at the exit of the junction.

7.14.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential of left turn intersections and respond appropriately to them:


1) from behind on the left side of the car.
2) Bi-directional bike path on the cross road at the intersection.
3) Reduced grip because of roadway coating or road conditions.
4) Driving from the left side at the intersection with special orientation difficulties.
5) Vehicles with speed characteristics that are easily underestimated.
6) Vehicles which takes up less space in the image and therefore easily overlooked when they are with larger vehicles.
7) Oncoming to be straight in the intersection, wholly or partially hidden by oncoming awaiting left in croup midst.
8) Cyclists and moped riders on two-cycle path from the left at the exit of the junction.
9) terrain, crossing the roadway or on the way out of the pedestrian crossing at the exit of the junction.
10) Children on the corners at the exit of the junction.

The student must master the following orientation skills by left turns at intersections:


11) bearings on the optionally from behind on the left side of the car.
12) Inform several times to both sides of the junction at the intersection with the transverse path of shark teeth (or where the statement is sufficient) and at the stop line.
13) Evaluate whether a stay in the oncoming traffic and traffic flow from the left or right side is sufficient to complete the left turn (or to drive forward in any and approach the center of the cross or wait space in openwork carriageway) - without forcing the occupants that you have to hold back, to slow or change the location.
14) Look left at the junction to ensure that a clear path to complete turning left, and if the lane is blocked by eg stationary vehicles when planning your journey then.
15) Evaluate whether running from left or right side of the intersection meets their possible right of way.

16) Look for from behind cyclists and moped riders on two-cycle path to the left at the intersection.
17) Look for walking, which is coming out on the zebra crossing or crossing the roadway to the left at the intersection.

Cross with signal control


18) Look for the signal light and any pilsignaler after stopping for red.
19) Failing to concentrate solely on the signal light in the drive for green, but also about traffic flow at the intersection, especially walking that is still on the way of the road, or perhaps will even if it is too late, and oncoming, one must hold back.
20) Evaluate whether the oncoming holding back and also ensure that the junction is free when the signal changes to yellow or shows green left arrow.

7.14.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuvering skills by left turn at intersections:


1) Provide evidence to the left at a suitable distance from the intersection.
2) Place in the lane on the far left or mandatory lane Moreover, as stated under 11.7 "The Drive to cross."
3) Adapt speed to overview and right of way, as stated under 11.7 "The Drive to cross."
4) Driving slowly to croup center and here hold back for any oncoming traffic.
5) Keeping back for cyclists and moped drivers who run out at the junction of the unidirectional or bi-directional bike path.
6) If necessary, hold back for pedestrians who are on the road over the carriageway, to swing into or are on the way out of the pedestrian crossing.
7) The location or direction towards croup center show how you will drive past an oncoming who also will swing to the left.
8) Follow any turn lane at the intersection.
9) Wait to complete the left turning from the middle of the intersection, if visibility is covered by oncoming, also must turn left.
10) Initiate the left turning as soon as possible when the roads are clear.
11) Place the right side of the lane, you swing into, or if there are more lanes in the same direction as the position itself in the lane that is most appropriate in regard to other traffic and the continued driving.
12) Cease signals made later by the left crank end.
13) Adapt speed to the traffic flow in the new direction.

Cross, where you have unconditional right of way


14) remain at standstill by shark teeth (or in which the statement is sufficient) and at the stop line, if it is necessary to wait for sufficient residence in the oncoming traffic and traffic conditions from the left and right side to carry out the left turn.
15) Wait sufficient stays in traffic flow from the left to the driving and stopping in any turn lane closing out the intersection or waiting place in pierced carriageway and complete turning left from here when the road is open.

Cross with priority to the right


16) Be cautious about croup start until the run can take place without the risk of blocking traffic flow.
17) Wait sufficient stay in the oncoming traffic and traffic flow from the right side before the completion of the left turn.

Cross, where transverse traffic has unconditional right of way as well as T-junction at oscillation into the side road


18) Driving slowly to croup center and await sufficient stay in the oncoming traffic before completing the left turn.

Cross, where the oscillation is made from the middle of a road with no turn lane and no median strip


19) Failing to turn the front wheels to the left before oscillation begins.

T-junction with swinging from side road


20) Be cautious at the intersection with the transverse road, at any stop line or shark teeth (or where the statement is sufficient) if it is necessary to await sufficient stays in traffic flow from the left and right side to complete the left turn. This also applies to T-junction with priority to the right as road users on the cross road often runs as the traffic from side roads have unconditional right of way.

Cross with signal control


21) Ensure enough time for detailed information on oncoming traffic by possibly stopping in croup center or turning the runway end.

22) Join up behind any vehicle in front, which also turns left, but only if it is deemed that the left turning can be completed before the light turns green light for cross traffic.
23) Any hold back for pedestrians walking through a red light.

15/7 Driving in roundabout
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to drive on roundabouts of different sizes and, if possible, also in roundabout with traffic signals and including learn proper location both before and at the roundabout.
The student must also learn about the markings on the carriageway and traffic signs that are important when driving in the roundabout.
Subobjective
7.15.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of the accidents at roundabouts:


1) The most common type of accidents with drivers at roundabouts are solo accidents where the driver loses control of the car and collides with central reservation.
2) There is also a number of accidents at the entrance to the roundabout where drivers not holding back for cyclists and moped riders.
3) Other counterparts are pedestrians crossing the roadway at the exit from the roundabout.

7.15.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risks when driving in roundabout:


1) For high speed by driving through a roundabout, so the orientation becomes deficient, and give way easily be observed.
2) Error evaluation of traction in slippery or greasy lead.
3) Error evaluation of the speed of running from left at the roundabout, especially cyclists and moped riders.
4) For high speed in the roundabout, so you can not keep the right location.
5) Inadequate briefing on from behind cyclists and moped riders and going on the road over the roadway at the exit from the roundabout.

7.15.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential when driving in the roundabout and respond appropriately to them:


1) Reduced grip due to road conditions.
2) Vehicles from the left at the roundabout with speed characteristics that are easily underestimated.
3) Rear coming cyclists and moped riders on carriageway or cycle track, possibly hidden in the offset rear blind spot on the right.
4) Signs that cyclists and moped riders continue for possibly red cyclist signal, despite the green right arrow or a green light for cars on exit from the roundabout.
5) Continuous heading for pedestrian crossing or crossing pedestrians also at the exit from the roundabout.

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road signs, etc., Concerning roundabouts:





6)


"Roundabout" (A 16) warns roundabout ahead.



7)


"Unconditional right of way" (B 11), which together with "Vigeland Line" (S 11) ( 'Shark teeth') indicates that you should hold back running before entering the roundabout.



8)


"Mandatory direction to the right" (D 11) indicates that traffic is one-way in the roundabout.



9)


"Prescribed direction of the roundabout" (D 12) set up immediately before a roundabout, where there is no room for road signs in the central island.




The student must master the following orientation skills by driving in roundabout:
The forward towards the roundabout


10) Inform about traffic regulations at the roundabout (designated lanes, signal lights, giving way).
11) Inform about cyclists and moped riders as for right turn before placement in the right lane.
12) Inform itself as lane departure before placement in the left lane.
13) Look for crossing pedestrians and vehicular left at the roundabout and judge whether a stay is sufficient to drive into the roundabout.

Exiting roundabout


14) Inform the roundabout as stated under 7.4 "Lane departure and interlocking" and 7.8 "Drive before or after the other '.
15) inform themselves prior to leaving as when turning right at intersections.

7.15.4 maneuvering skills

The student must master the following maneuver skills at driving in the roundabout:
The forward towards the roundabout


1) Driving with appropriate low speed, so there is time to find out about traffic regulations, respect the signal or adhere to give way as for failing to stop at intersections.
2) If the roundabout, leaving the first side road position itself in relation to cyclists and moped riders as when turning right at intersections and give character to the right turn.
3) If the roundabout, leaving the last side road position itself as at left turn at intersections.
4) Furthermore, choose the lane which is most appropriate, or place themselves in any designated lane after driving goal.
5) If necessary, hold back for walking and otherwise comply with give way before entering the roundabout.
6) Drive into the roundabout, where the road is open.

Exit onto the first side road


7) Normally be in the roundabout right lane and drive as close to the road edge as possible or choose any designated lane and continue tegngivningen for right turn.
8) Place in relation to cyclists and moped riders as when turning right at intersections.
9) Keep left before the exit for cyclists and moped riders, as when turning right at intersections.
10) If necessary, keeping back to pedestrians crossing the roadway at the exit, or who are heading out on the zebra crossing.

Exit onto the last side road


11) Place at the roundabout left lane or in any designated lane and possibly sign with left turn signal for the guidance of others.
12) Switch to the roundabout right lane (following the rule changing lanes) or in any designated lane and give character to the right turn out of the side road before, you will run out together.
13) Place in relation to cyclists and moped riders as when turning right at intersections.
14) If necessary, keeping back to pedestrians crossing the roadway at the exit, or who are heading out on the zebra crossing.

Retraction between first and last byway


15) Choose the lane that is most appropriate for road conditions and driving goal.
16) Change to the right lane and give characters at exit onto the last side road.
17) Placing in relation to cyclists and moped riders as when turning right at intersections.
18) If necessary, keeping back to pedestrians crossing the roadway at the exit, or who are heading out on the zebra crossing.

16/7 Driving on the highway
Overall dimensions
The student must perform the previously learned maneuvers - to the extent that they are relevant for highway driving - with the more demanding orientation and maneuvering skills, which are necessary because of the motorway special design and traffic specific nature, in particular the usually high speed.
The student must also learn about the markings on the road and on road signs and laws of importance when driving on the highway.
Driving on the highway is mandatory where a double lesson allows driving back and forth to the highway and driving on the highway. In other cases, the driving instructor team up with several students who take turns to run.
Where conditions then exclude driving on motorways, to run teacher conduct exercises in the access to merge, for example, to an expressway or a major road where higher speeds are permitted.
Subobjective
7.16.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of the accidents on the highway:


1) The most common type of accident with motorists on the highways as well as access and exit lanes for these are solo accidents.
2) Other accidents are especially rear-end collision or collision with the vehicle in front.

7.16.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risks when driving on the motorway:


1) Usually tend orientation and handling errors due to the motorway particular genotype, (major road width, softer curves and hills, no buildings along the road and almost unlimited inventory), in particular:
2) Underestimating own and others' speed.
3) Over Assessment of distances.
4) For the safety distance when driving in heavier traffic and by obtaining.
5) Brief information forward and backward relative to the speed.
6) The assessment of the car's maneuverability.
7) Underestimating strong cross wind influence on management.

8) Fatigue and decreased alertness after prolonged highway driving.
9) Speed ​​blindness when driving and especially at the exit from the highway.

7.16.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential when driving on the motorway and respond appropriately to them:


1) Behind running on the access track keeps short distance.
2) In front running from the approach path miss opportunities to driveway. but stops.
3) Behind running on the access track runs in before we even entered the highway.
4) Rear coming on the motorway, hidden in blind spots.
5) Driving on the highway shows no signs of wanting to ease driveway.
6) Evidence of unexpected reactions in front of you at the exits and division or confluence of freeways.
7) Hazard options as at maneuvers on ordinary roads to the extent they can occur on the motorway.
8) Rear coming on the combined approach and departure path, possibly hidden in blind spots associated with forwarders.

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings relating to driving on the motorway:
Magnetic Stripes





9)


"Solid edge line '(Q 46), which is followed by dotted edge line (Q 47). Merging made by the dashed line.



10)


In the combined approach and departure path may merge be performed if the broken edge line ceases. Is the broken edge line passed through without interruption, the rule is changing lanes.



11)


»Vige Line" (S 11) ( 'Shark teeth') indicating that the exceptional unconditional right of way at the entrance to the highway.




Road signs.


12) 'motorway' (E 42) indicates motorway beginning.
13) 'Motorway cease "(E 44). Usually set up only at the motorway's end and not at the exits.
14) 'Unconditional right of way "(B 11) indicates that, exceptionally unconditionally give way when entering the highway.


15) 'Merging' (B 15) indicates that you have to run after the rule merge.

16) 'Lane Changing Scenario with interlocking "(E 16.1) indicates the reduction of lane number that you have to run after the rule merge.
17) 'Lane Changing Scenario with lane changes "(E 16.2) indicates the reduction of lane number that you have to run after the rule lane change.
18) "Dangerous Intersection" (A 11) indicates that the occupants from the access path of exception has unconditional right of way, but also difficult to run into, including because the access path is short. The board can be displayed with the support of only one side.
19) "recommended speed" (E 39) indicates that the road is not suitable for driving at a higher speed than that specified.
20) 'Speed ​​Indication for exit «(E 41) indicates the speed at which a bend on a slip road under normal conditions can be traversed.

The student must have knowledge of the importance of following directory boards:


21) 'designated lanes "(J 11) indicates possibly by downward arrows which lanes are intended to run against the objectives listed on the board.
22) 'Pre-warning of lane course "(J 12) indicates the lane course and direction of traffic. At the bottom of the board specified distance from the board to exit or junction.
23) 'Diagramorienteringstavle for highways "(J 13) indicate flight number and vejvisningsmål for each of a fork directions. At the bottom of the board specified distance from the board to the bifurcation.
24) 'Exit Directory "(I 11) indicates that the exit path leads toward the goals listed on the board.
25) "500 m exit slate '(I 12) of the warning in 11
26) '1,000-m exit blackboard "(I 13) indicates frakørslens number followed by frakørslens name. The board is usually also provided with next frakørsels number and name and distance from this.
27) 'Motorvejskryds "(I 20).

The student must master the following orientation skills by driving on the motorway:
Approaching the merge



28) Inform about access conditions, including access track and merge pull the length, visibility conditions, and in front of or behind you on the access track.
29) Look for coming from behind in the nearest lane of the highway and judge their speed and distance.
30) Evaluate whether a stay in the traffic flow is large enough that merging can be done without risk.
31) Check if the running for the nearest lane of the highway facilitates the merge by reducing speed or change lanes.
32) Look ahead on the highway and make sure the roads are clear just before the merge.
33) Look for running on the highway that gives character to the junction for combined access and exit lanes.

The access lane changes


34) Inform in good time before the lane change of the access conditions, including access field length, visibility conditions, and in front of or behind you on the access track.
35) Look for coming from behind in the lane desired run-on and judge their speed and distance.
36) Evaluate whether a stay in the traffic flow is large enough to change lanes without danger or undue inconvenience.
37) Look ahead on the highway and make sure the roads are clear immediately before the lane shift.
38) Look for running on the highway that gives character to the exit for combined access and exit lanes.

Approaching the right of way


39) Inform in good time of access conditions and visibility conditions.
40) Look for coming from behind in the lane desired run-on and judge their speed and distance.
41) To assess whether a stay in the traffic flow is large enough to run in without endanger or inconvenience.

Driving on the highway


42) Stay still informed about road and traffic conditions far ahead and behind and regular, quick glance out about the nearest running in time to anticipate changes in their driving or prepare their own maneuvers.
43) Check the immediate speed perception by frequent and fast readings of the speedometer.
44) Be aware of the traffic lane stripes and road signs, etc., Especially on designated lanes, lane course, merging and termination of the highway.
45) Look for running that will run in from the access lanes, and quickly judge how best to facilitate the driveway.
46) Furthermore orient themselves earlier and more thoroughly than by maneuvers on ordinary roads to the extent they occur on the motorway.

exit


47) Inform in good time by road signs, etc., Indicating exit.
48) Inform about exit conditions, including exit the runway length, and in front of or behind you.
49) Look for running that allows characters to drive onto the highway.
50) Evaluate whether retraction can be accomplished without risk.
51) Inform about the exit road to proceed and be aware of any speed indication.

7.16.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuvering skills by driving on the highway.
Approaching the merge


1) Adapt speed to the access track and merge pull the length, increase or decrease and the kørendes rate in the near lane on the highway.
2) Provide evidence to merge with the left turn signal.
3) Set it out for a suitable stay in traffic on the motorway or slightly in front of a running, which slows or changing lanes to facilitate the merge.
4) Utilize the possibility of merging by aggressively accelerate, drive onto the highway and quickly adapt to the kørendes speed here.
5) Get behind any vehicle in front of the access field to the entire indfletningsmanøvren and keep distance as specified under 7.8 "Drive before or after the other '.

The access lane changes


6) Adapt speed to access field length, increase or decrease and the kørendes speed in the lane that you want to switch to.
7) Provide evidence lane change with the left turn signal.
8) Give space to the vehicle in front on the highway can change lanes until you do it yourself.
9) Vise behind you on the highway by appropriate acceleration and by driving close to the motorway edge that will change lanes into the highway, if the necessary conditions are present.

10) Reduce speed if the driveway can not be carried out after orientation backward and warning with brake light for vehicles behind and possibly stop with such a long free access path ahead as possible and await the opportunity driveway.

Approaching the right of way


11) Adapt speed to access the field.
12) Provide evidence to the driveway with the left turn signal.
13) Display running on the highway that will respect its right of way.

Driving on the highway


14) Stay in the right lane for a short time after ramp and get used to the road and traffic conditions before possibly changing lanes in preparation for overhaul.
15) Give indicators to signal when changing lanes or other significant modification to the vehicle's location to the next.
16) Place the middle of the right-hand lane and use only the lane to the left of it in the context of overtaking, to allow room for others to run into, or to take designated lanes for the intended kørselsmål.
17) Helping running on the access lanes to run in by either accelerate or slow down or change lanes if there is free.
18) Apply hazard warning associated with unexpected traffic jams or other direct danger to alert vehicles behind road users to the dangers.
19) Change only one lane at a time in places where multiple lane changes in succession is appropriate for the continued driving.
20) Accelerate up to the highest safe and legal line speed.
21) Prepare and execute the various maneuvers with significantly higher safety margin than on public roads, ie previous hand signals, premature start of the maneuver, softer ratdrejning and more careful use of the brakes.

exit


22) Change to the right lane well away from the exit track beginning.
23) Give signs to exit in time with the right turn signal.
24) If possible, reduce the speed of the highway, especially if the vehicles behind are close.
25) Driving from the highway immediately at exit runway beginning.
26) Reduce speed to the changed road conditions and speed limits.

Departing on combined approach and departure path


27) Give space for the vehicle in front of the slip track can run into before you even run out.
28) Vise behind you on the slip track by appropriate acceleration and by driving close to the motorway edge that you will run out in front of the vehicles behind you, if the conditions for exit also present.

7.16.5 Regulatory otherwise
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) Driving on the highway as well as access and exit roads is only allowed with vehicles that can legally drive at least 40 km / h.
2) The maximum speed on motorways as well as access and exit roads is 130 km / h. For car with trailer not exceeding 80 km / h.
3) The driveway to the highway is only allowed at the access lanes or by motorway beginning.
4) Exit the motorway is only allowed at exit lanes or by motorway's end.
5) Driving over dual carriageway, turning, reversing, parking and stopping is not allowed on motorways and on and exits to these, as well as grass verges etc..
6) Termination of emergency is only allowed if you have to call for help, and the stoppage should be done where possible off the carriageway.
7) In connection with unexpected traffic jams or other direct danger to highway hazard warning must be used to alert vehicles behind road users to the dangers.
8) On the highway with three or more lanes in the same direction must vehicles (car + trailer) longer than 7 m only run for one of the two lanes on the far right, unless you have to prepare a left turn in relation to the motorway's end.
9) Towing on highway prohibited.

7.16.6 Driving on the expressway
The student must have knowledge of the rules, road markings and conditions for traveling on the expressway in the same way as when driving on motorways.
The student must also be aware of the following specific risks when driving on the expressway:


1) Option for oncoming traffic over the center of the road, as there is rarely carriageway on roads.

2) Ability traffic across the junction where both vehicular and pedestrian allowed to cross the dual carriageway.

The student must also recognize and indicate the importance of following traffic signs:





3)


"Express road" (E 43) indicates the motor traffic road start.



4)


"Express road ceases" (E 45). Usually set up only by the dual carriageway road's end and not at the exits or crossing roads.




The student must be able to express the content of the following statute:


5) The maximum speed on the expressway as well as access and exit roads is 80 km / h, but may locally be raised to 90 km / h by signage. For car with trailer not exceeding 70 km / h.
6) Towing on the expressway is prohibited.

17/7 Driving alongside other
Overall dimensions
The student must learn that driving in heavy traffic in several rows resulting in limited visibility and maneuverability and especially pay attention to other vehicles steering and blind spots.
The student must also learn about the markings on the carriageway and traffic signs that are important in heavy traffic.
Subobjective
7.17.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of the accidents associated with driving alongside others:


1) The counterparties are both drivers, moped riders and cyclists who unexpectedly turns left in front of the car in an intersection.
2) Other counterparties motorists from left or right side are pressing or 'clamps'.

7.17.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risks while driving alongside others:


1) difficulty with accurate assessment of side distance, especially for cyclists and moped riders because of their wobble trend.
2) Reduced steering precision in slippery or greasy lead.
3) Limited visibility and maneuverability due to vehicles on the right and left in closer traffic and consequent tendency to unquestioningly follow with the flow.
4) Tendency to look for long directly on the occupants to the right or left with the consequent tendency to pull slowly towards them, while losing track forward and backward.

7.17.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential while driving next to others and respond appropriately to them:


1) Running diagonally behind the lane to the right or left, hidden in blind spots.
2) Signs that the motorcyclist will run from between bilrækker in close and slow traffic.
3) Vehicles of the lane to the right or left with a tendency to wobble or particularly sensitivity to crosswinds.
4) Vehicles in front of the lane to the right to use more than one lane for maneuvers, such as trucks with trailers or semi-trailer to be swinging to the right.
5) Signs that the steering willing vehicles suddenly changing lanes in close and slow traffic or turn left in front of the intersection.
6) Blind between angles location and size of vehicles in the lane to the right or left.
7) Switch between crosswind and sheltered by the passage of large vehicles.

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings relating to driving alongside others:
Magnetic Stripes, etc..


8) »Bicycle Symbol" (V 21) indicates that cyclists and drivers of small mopeds must use the part of the road. Cycling symbol in a path bounded with continuous edge line, indicating that the circuit is a cycle path.
9) 'Bussymbol "(V 42). The text BUS in a path bounded with continuous edge line indicates that the field can only be used by buses in the route.

(It is not as fast, but passing, passing over vehicles (eg buses) in a special lane reserved for these vehicles (eg bus lane)).
Traffic signs


10) "Cyclists" (A 21) warns bicyclists and drivers of small mopeds on the roadway, for example, after the cessation of a bike path.
11) "Road narrows" (A 43.1-3) warns that the road narrows, and that one can anticipate lane changes or merging.
12) "Crosswinds" (A 95) warns of difficulties in keeping its lane.

13) 'Merging' (B 15) indicates that you have to run after the rule merge.
14) 'Lane Changing Scenario with interlocking "(E 16.1) and' Lane Changing Scenario with lane changes" (E 16.2).

The student must master the following orientation skills while driving alongside others:


15) Inform themselves by quick glance on the distance to the running beside and for their attention and intention.
16) In addition, see the furthest possible forward in own lane while driving in traffic closer in order to stabilize management and location, and in good time to prepare for possible lane change.
17) Look for running, legally passing on the right side of the car in close traffic, also on roads outside marked lanes.
18) Look for cyclists and moped riders on the right, be aware that their speed easily underestimated in close and slow traffic, and that they usually overtakes the inside.
19) Look for signs that running slightly ahead in the lane next to, especially cyclists and moped riders, will change lanes or turning left in front of the car in the intersection.

7.17.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuver skills while driving alongside others:


1) Keep lane in close road and only change lanes if it is necessary to prepare the oscillation and drive past the timid, or drag to the right on the roadway to stop or park, and only after careful orientation behind.
2) Connect up the column in front, even if this causes the passage to the right passing in the left lane, as this is not considered fast, but passing in close traffic.
3) If possible, avoid placing themselves in the blind spots on vehicles to the right or left, either run further forward or hold back a little in your own lane.
4) Keeping good side distance for cyclists and moped riders and vehicles in general with wobble trend.
5) If possible, avoid driving next to a motorcycle in the same lane.
6) Do not squeeze cyclists and moped riders by holding the appropriate side distance while driving past stationary vehicles on the right.

18.7 Stopping and parking
Overall dimensions
The student must perform parking maneuvers along the carriageway outer edge and parking space in the most commonly occurring traffic conditions. Eleven must including learning to ensure that the car can not be put off by itself, and that it wrongly can be used by others.
The student must also learn about the markings on the road and on road signs and on the legal provisions relevant to stopping and parking.
Subobjective
7.18.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of the accidents where parked cars are hit:


1) Most collisions of parked cars is at 2-lane roads in urban areas and very often in the dark.
2) The counterparties are almost equally motorists, cyclists and moped riders.
3) Serious accidents during the parking maneuver, are few, but there are in return many accidents involving only property damage.

7.18.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risk factors when parking:


1) Attention alone toward finding parking or maneuvering into the square, which other risk factors not noted.
2) Lack of respect for that parking maneuvers and especially driveway to the curb often seems surprising in from behind, because they usually expect that traffic ahead is continuing at a steady pace.
3) For high speed during the parking maneuver, then track opportunities decline.
4) Uncritical choice of parking place without sufficient regard for others' orientation and safety.

7.18.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings related to stopping and parking:
Magnetic Stripes, etc..





1)


"Solid yellow line '(T 61) at the curb or roadway edge indicates that stopping is prohibited.



2)


»Dotted yellow line '(T 62) at the curb or roadway edge indicate that parking is prohibited.



3)



"The parking stall" (T 33) can be marked with white, unbroken lines or marked by special coating, indicating that the parking can only be done within a bay. Text or symbol for certain vehicles indicates that the stall reserved for these vehicles. »Parking Symbol '(V 33) indicates that the area is intended for parking.




Traffic signs


4) 'No stopping' (C 61) indicates that stopping on the roadway is prohibited in the side where the board is set up, except for the sake of other traffic.
5) "parking prohibited" (C 62) indicate that parking on the roadway is prohibited in the side where the board is set up.
6) "During the board with arrows':



a) (UC 60.1) indicates that the prohibition applies both before and after the board at the nearest intersection or next grid.
b) (UC 60.2) indicates that the prohibition applies from the board and forwards to the nearest intersection or next grid.
c) (UC 60.3) indicates that the prohibition applies from the board and backward to the nearest intersection or previous grid.


7) "switchboards with discount ':



a) (UC 60.5) indicates that stopping the discount is prohibited.
b) (UC 60.6) indicates that the parking discount is prohibited.


8) "During the board with time stamp '.



a) (UC 61) indicates that stopping is prohibited for the indicated time (day or time).
b) (UC 62) indicate that parking is prohibited in the specified time-space.
c) (UC 33) indicate that parking is only allowed in the period specified.
d) Time with black or white numerals denote weekdays except Saturday, numbers in parentheses denote Saturdays and red figures include Sundays and holidays.


9) 'Zone Board "(E 68) indicate an area where parking is prohibited or parking restriction is in force after the board further details.
10) "End Zone" (E 69).
11) "Parking" (E 33) indicate that parking is allowed in the roadside or in the area where the board is set up. Parking Restrictions can also only be given the same kind under the boards as if parking ban, or at the blackboard be reserved for specific kinds of vehicles. If the board eg symbol is attached to the truck and the words "authorized" for that fishery, no parking restriction for passenger cars and vans. If the board is provided with the symbol of the truck, it is forbidden to park the cars and vans.
12) "principal" (B 16) indicate that parking on the roadway is prohibited outside built-up area.
13) 'principal ceases "(B 17).
14) 'Busstop "(E 31.1-2) and" Taxi stand "(E 31.3) indicates that stopping and parking is prohibited for other vehicles, including ordinary cars.
15) 'Hazardous discount "(A 35) warns against driving into the discount. The reason can be specified on the blackboard.

The student must be able to recognize and indicate that stopping and parking is prohibited in the following locations without highlighted by special markings:


16) On the left side of the road, except less busy roads and roads with one-way traffic.
17) On the walkway, bike path, carriageway, traffic island, blocking face or the like, and in general on the sidewalk.
18) In the pedestrian crossing or closer than 5 m ahead of the field.
19) When leaving before the bike path or closer than 5 m before the exit.
20) In intersection or within 10 meters from the nearest edge of the transverse lane or bike path, however, always allowed in designated areas.
21) More than 5 m from a spærrelinies beginning at the intersection.
22) Next to the locking line if the distance between the car and the stop line is less than 3 m, and no broken line to the right of the stop line.
23) On a level crossing or another crossing.
24) On the bridge over the motorway, the viaduct or tunnel.
25) At or near the hilltop.
26) or by a confusing turn of the road.
27) In a way, so the car covers traffic signs or signals.
28) In the slow lane.
29) On the marked space for taxis (taxi).
30) At the bus stop, and no closer than 12 meters on each side of the board for the bus stop (E 31.1-2), if there is no curb markings. Is the distance of 12 m extended by yellow curb markings, the prohibition throughout the marked route.


The student must be able to recognize and indicate that parking is prohibited in the following locations without highlighted by special markings:


31) For more than 30 m from a level crossing.
32) In the entrances and exits to buildings or so that the feed and exit considerably more difficult.
33) On the roadway on the main roads outside built-up area.
34) Next to another vehicle that keeps the wayside, except for 2-wheel bike, 2-wheel moped or two-wheel motorcycle.
35) So close to another vehicle, you can not get to it, or it can not be driven away from the site.

The student must master the following orientation skills by stopping and parking:


36) Inform all the time on other traffic and traffic regulations while searching for parking.
37) Look behind before slowing or short halt to further investigate whether a parking space is usable.
38) Fast judge on an empty parking space is large enough, useful or legitimate and possible to maneuver into without slowing down other traffic noticeably.
39) Quickly and safely judge distances to the pedestrian crossing, exit from the bike path intersections, etc.., In which stopping and parking is prohibited.
40) Evaluate whether a stay in the traffic flow is sufficiently large to make parking without cause undue disadvantage.
41) inform themselves thoroughly during the whole maneuver both in mirrors and in head turning.
42) inform themselves thoroughly on from behind, especially cyclists, moped riders and pedestrians before opening car doors.
43) Evaluate whether the recommended car poses no risk or significant obstacle for other traffic.

7.18.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuvering skills by stopping or parking:


1) Keeping a rate that is significantly lower than any behind kørendes while searching for parking.
2) Give signs of stopping or parking with stoplights and possibly turn signals.
3) Carry out parking maneuvers along the carriageway outer edge or parking space "(the park or along the roadway) 'as taught at the closed training ground.
4) Activate the parking brake, possibly putting the car in gear, turn off the lights, remove the ignition key and make sure that mandatory theft protection is in operation.
5) Wait to open the doors until you have made sure that it can be done without risk to others.

7.18.5 Regulatory otherwise
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) Parking is any hensætning of a vehicle with or without driver. Stopping shorter than 3 minutes, stopping for loading or embarkation and loading or unloading of goods shall not be regarded for parking.
2) Stopping and parking should not be at such place or in such a way that there is danger or inconvenience to traffic.
3) When stopping or parking the car must, if possible, entirely from the roadway.
4) Ensure that mandatory theft protection is put into operation.
5) When opening the carriage door or loading and unloading must be ensured that there is no danger or undue inconvenience to others.
6) Where parking spaces outside built-up area is brought in close connection to the road, as far as possible use the car park at the road's right side.
7) When stopping or parking on the tracks, or more than 2 m from the tracks in the road, on a harbor space or the like is not to be further away from the car than you can constantly be aware of the coming train on track and one should immediately move the car for the train.
8) When parking a conventional vehicle without a trailer, in daytime and along the roadside in the built-up area need only turn on the parking lamp and tail lamp towards the center of the road.
9) Set and place the parking disc or buy parking ticket where this is required.

The student must also have knowledge of specific parking provisions for vehicles according to local regulations.
19/7 Driving in the dark and in the daytime also
Overall dimensions

The student must perform the previously learned maneuvers during the difficult orientation issues arising in the dark. There is special emphasis on maneuvers, where proper use of the lamps included, ie meeting, driving in front or after the other and overtaking. The exercise should be shelved for the period from one hour after sunset to one hour before sunrise and implemented on lines in and outside urban areas with good and less good lighting and the completely dark roads with turns and hills.
Subobjective
7.19.1 Knowledge of accidents
The student must have knowledge of the following circumstances of the accidents in the dark:


1) There are especially many single accidents with motorists in twilight or darkness and some accident when colliding walking by parked cars, animals and objects on the road.

7.19.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risks when driving in the dark and in the daytime also:


1) Significant reduction of orientation opportunities in twilight and darkness, and otherwise in fog, mist, heavy rain and snow also during the day and by driving against the low sun.
2) Difficulties in judging speed and distance correctly because of lack of evidence.
3) For high speed compared to term conditions and lighting, including the limited scope of the light from one's own vehicle.
4) Complete or partial glare of light from oncoming, which further reduces the orientation possibilities.
5) unmarked or inadequately marked obstacles, eg parked vehicles, dark-clad pedestrians and cyclists without lights.
6) Uneven lights in the running, especially in twilight or in the daytime during the day.

7.19.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess risk opportunities in the dark, as stated in the individual maneuvers in daylight, and respond appropriately to them, but otherwise run with increased awareness of the potential danger signs in view of the deteriorating orientation conditions.
The student must master the following orientation skills by driving in the dark and in the daytime also:


1) Seizing lane stripes and reflective edge and delineators most for information about the course of the road and be aware that any edge stakes have orange reflectors on the right side of the road and the white reflector on the left side of the road.
2) Assess the vehicle to be stopped within the scope of the light used and within the length of the open track ahead.

meeting


3) Look for oncoming or signs that oncoming approaches (eg glare or lights ahead).
4) Evaluate the appropriate distance for dimming the low beam in the dark.
5) Inform about oncoming vehicle type and size for the headlamp number and location.
6) Discourage glare by not look directly into the light-coming and instead look ahead along the right road edge for possible obstacles.

Driving before or after other


7) Judge the distance to the front (for example, the distance between the front kørendes taillights) and assess the appropriate time for dimming the low beam.
8) Inform on the front of the moving vehicle type and size for the tail lights number and location and reflectors.
9) Inform about the following vehicles and their intention.

overtaking


10) bearings with particular care on the conditions for overtaking are present due to the reduced sight capabilities.
11) Check the fast stretch of completely dark roads if necessary with a short main beam flash after being pulled out of the fast lane.
12) Look for when it overtook passed so that the beam can be switched on as soon as possible (provided that it does not dazzle oncoming).

7.19.4 maneuvering skills
The student must before driving in the dark ensure that the vehicle lights are lit, as they should, and must be correctly set in section 1.2.4 "Lights, reflectors and horn '.
The student must master the following maneuver skills while driving in the dark, especially the proper use of lights, low beam and high beam:
Normally, the use of the light


1) Use low beam as normal throughout the illuminated roads and only use the position light when parking or stopping.
2) Use high beam on roads without lighting, the visual length is insufficient dipped at the current rate, but only if other road users can not be blinded.

3) Use any fog lamps, but only in fog and under heavy rainfall and only if it can be done without inconvenience to others.
4) Furthermore adapting speed to the deteriorated opportunities for orientation in the dark, so that the car can be stopped within the light range.
5) Use visual (flashing headlights) instead of audible warning unless the danger is imminent.
6) Use the rear fog light, but only when it is very foggy, but only if it can be done without inconvenience to others.

meeting


7) Switching to low beam at a suitable distance from the oncoming about 200-300 m before a car or motorbike and about 100-150 m before a bike or moped and immediately prior to adapt the speed to low-beam range.
8) Switching to low beam at a suitable distance from the train that runs along the road, if there is a risk that the driver blinded by the beam.
9) Reduce speed when meeting with the cars on the narrow and quite dark roads to a maximum of 40 km / h to reach to see and react in time to possible barriers on the roadside.
10) Stop if-coming lighting dazzles so strongly that you can not see.
11) Switch to the beam (where legal) immediately before the passage of the oncoming.

Driving before or after other


12) Switching to low beam by obtaining, if there is a risk that the beam can dazzle the vehicle in front through his mirrors and low beam also allows sufficient light to continue safe driving.
13) Keep a greater distance to the vehicle in front than in daylight, because opportunities to orient themselves over the vehicle in front is little in the dark.
14) Keep remote lights on (where legal) if coming from behind is about to overtake, to help in the best possible light.
15) Switching to low beam as soon as the overtaking start running into right again after overtaking.

overtaking


16) Switching to low beam, gathering in front of you if there is a risk that the beam can dazzle the vehicle in front through his mirrors and low beam also allows sufficient light to continue safe driving.
17) Switch to the beam (where legal) immediately before the vehicle ahead passes to ensure the best possible light during the overtaking.

stopping


18) Apply the brake lights to warn from behind, eg in anticipation of opportunity left in the middle of the roadway.
19) Keep only position lights on when stopping or parking on the roadside on roads that are not sufficiently informed.

Use of light in the daytime during the day


20) Use low beam as normal - never position the light - when fog, mist, rain or term conditions otherwise are bad (rather than low beam can be used front fog lights).
21) Any other use beam in particularly dense fog during the day, to ensure that one is seen at the longest possible distance.
22) Turn on the low beam when driving with low sun in the back for the sake of orientation-coming.

7.19.5 Regulatory otherwise
The student must be able to express the content of the following legislation:


1) During daytime, the time from sunset to sunrise, or whenever the use of vehicle lights are required due to darkness, fog, mist, rain or the like poor visibility or light conditions - either to make the car visible to other road users , or that one can see enough.
2) Special daytime running lights do not meet lights when driving in the daytime.

20/7 Driving in tunnel
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to run in the tunnel, where orientation and maneuvering skills are more demanding because of tunnels, special design and traffic special character.
The student must also learn about the markings on the carriageway and traffic signs that are important when driving in the tunnel.
Driving in tunnel to be included in the practical lessons, where possible.
Subobjective
7.20.1 Knowledge of accidents
There is no information on accidents in tunnels.
7.20.2 Knowledge of risk factors
The student must have knowledge of the following risks when driving in the tunnel:


1) Vehicles that stop in the tunnel, for example because they are wrecked or have run out of fuel.
2) Lack of respect for tunnels, height restriction so happens collision of the tunnel itself.

3) At the entrance to the tunnel to the lighting conditions change and it takes time for the eye to adjust to a possible reduced amount of light, whereby obstacles can be overlooked.

7.20.3 Orienteering skills
The student must be able to perceive and assess the hazard potential driving in a tunnel and respond appropriately to them:


1) Any stop signal before the tunnel.
2) For fast driving into a tunnel, so vision is not given time to adjust to the changing light conditions.

The student must be able to recognize and indicate the importance of following road markings:
Traffic signs, etc .:





3)


'Tunnel' (A 44). The length of the tunnel can be specified on the blackboard U2.



4)


"Nødplads" (E 34) indicates a space that can be used for emergency stops. Can be supplemented with the board "Fire extinguisher and emergency" (UE 34).




The student must master the following orientation skills driving in a tunnel:


5) When driving in the tunnel must pay attention to traffic signs showing emergency exits, emergency equipment (fire extinguishers), emergency station and possible. sign with the radio frequency, you can listen to to get information about the tunnel.
6) Many tunnels are equipped with traffic in lane signals. Be aware of the lane signals change. At the red cross must pitch vacated immediately by yellow arrow must motorist search for a suitable opportunity to leave the field. If there is a red light over all lanes is prohibited on driving.
7) Any switch on the radio and listen to traffic.

7.20.4 maneuvering skills
The student must master the following maneuver skills driving in a tunnel:
Driving toward a tunnel


1) Stop for red stop signal.
2) Before driving into the tunnel turn on low beam.
3) Any sunglasses made of.

Driving in tunnel


4) Keeping a longer safety distance to the front than normal.
5) If traffic in the tunnel stops, turns on the hazard warning lights during braking and stop with good distance from the car ahead. The engine is stopped.
6) Fire exited the vehicle and seek the nearest exit or rescue.
7) The motor stops and other casualty should seek to stop at an emergency telephone. There is rarely an emergency lane, then possibly hazard warning lights should illuminate. When driving with a motorcycle with a sidecar set up warning triangle. When you call the emergency services should emergency phone used over mobile phone.
8) In many cases it is automatically red cross over right lane if alarm box in the tunnel opened.
Annex 10
8. SPECIAL RISK FACTORS IN TRAFFIC
The purpose of education is to give the student sufficient knowledge of some specific risk factors relating to motoring, it helps the student to become familiar with their own abilities and to develop a road safety, attitude and behavior.
The training also aims to provide the student with such an understanding of the specific risk factors of speed, alcohol and seat belt use, it helps the student to learn to anticipate possible errors or thoughtless entirety in traffic flow and in a timely manner to respond appropriately to them.
8.1 Specific risk factors
Overall dimensions
The student must learn that the three risk factors: speed, alcohol and seat belt use particularly dominates among young people of 18-19 years. The student must have an understanding of the risk increase, which occurs when two or all three of these factors occur simultaneously.
Eleven to gain sufficient knowledge and discretion to avoid putting themselves and others in critical situations due. Speed, alcohol and not wearing seat belts.
The student must gain insight into the social relations and psychological factors in the form of norms and peer pressure, which contributes to creating critical situations. Accidents can be avoided by focusing on the social and psychological factors that influence young people's risk.
Subobjective
8.1.1 Alcohol as accident and injury factor
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Alcohol is the cause of every 4 deaths and every 6 injured.
2) Driving with alcohol in the blood increases the risk of accidents significantly, especially for young drivers.

3) 18-24 year old drivers with a BAC of 0.8-1.2 have accident that is 20-30 times higher than among 35-44-year-old with the same alcohol level.
4) The body's ability to break down alcohol is very individual. The combustion depends first and foremost on the person's weight, but also include of the stomach contents, liver combustion ability, muscle mass, and so on. As a rule, a person at 60 kg 1½ - 2 hours to burn an object.
5) A BAC of 0.5-0.8 increases accident risk by 2-3 times.
6) A count of 0.8-1.2 increases the risk of accidents by 4-10 times.
7) A BAC of over 1.2 increases the risk of accidents by 100 times.

The student must be able to express the content of the following conditions:


8) 18-19 year olds have much higher accident risk with alcohol in their blood than 35-44-year-olds.
9) The risk of an accident increases on trips to and from the party at the weekend, where there are more young peers in the car.
10) It is very difficult to assess the combustion of alcohol and know when you can drive after consuming alcohol.
11) Have you drunk a part the night before, the alcohol levels are still too high to run the next day.
12) You can not increase the metabolism of alcohol and it is almost impossible to camouflage alcohol intake to the police.
13) Never drive with a blood alcohol greater than 0.5 (DUI).
14) One should prevent others from driving drunk driving.
15) Førstegangserhververe of driving licenses - the holder of the license to either motorcycle or car - ( »license to the test ') is a driving ban by thousandths of 0,51- 1.2.
16) At a BAC above 1.2 get their driving license suspended unconditionally.

The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


17) Drinking and driving can be avoided if you follow these tips:



a) If you want to drink, then leave the car. Agree on who that stays sober to drive or spend the night or the like.
b) Do not be influenced by others to drink and drive.
c) As a passenger, you should always make sure that the driver is not driving drunk driving.
d) Take action to others' drinking and driving.



8.1.2 Speed ​​as accident and injury factor
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Speed ​​includes a flat rate of accident and injury factor in between 25 and 50% of accidents involving personal injury.
2) Men aged 18-19 years have 2-3 times higher risk of an accident than women of the same age. Speed ​​is often a factor in young men's accidents than young women.
3) If you increase the speed by 10 km / h increases at the same time the risk of a fatal accident by about 45% and injury accidents by about 20%.
4) The braking distance increases four times when doubling speed.
5) When two cars respectively. 50 and 60 km / h brakes at the same time driving the car at 60 km / h still 44 km / h, which is where the car at 50 km / h stops.
6) The most serious accidents where speed is a major accident and injury factor occurs in rural areas.
7) At a collision speed of 30 km / h door 2 out of 10 pedestrians at 50 km / h door 4 out of 10 and at 60 km / h door 7 out of 10

The student must be able to express the content of the following conditions:


8) Speed ​​is a major accident and injury factor in road accidents involving personal injury.
9) The speed is often crucial to the severity of an accident triggered by their own and other road defects.
10) A pedestrian's risk of dying by being hit by a car increases significantly even within small speed increments.
11) There are especially many accidents due to high speed when driving to and from the party at the weekend with more young peers in the car.
12) Always observe speed limits.
13) Exceeding the speed limit by more than 30% gives one driving license.
14) The first 3 years when the license is on probation, you only have 2 clips map to driving.
15) Førstegangserhververe get driving at a speed difference of more than 60% or when traveling at 160 km / h or more on the highway.

The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


16) You can almost avoid all typical accidents where speed is essential for accident and injury risk by following these tips:



a) Observe speed limits.

b) Reduce speed if conditions do not allow to run at the maximum speed.
c) Never be influenced by others to violate the speed limit.
d) Do drivers need it, if the speed limit is violated.



8.1.3 Failure to use seat belts which injury factor
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Estimated every 4 deaths could have been saved by seatbelts, corresponding to approximately 100 people each year.
2) The risk of being killed is 5 times greater if you are thrown out of the car than if you stay in the car.
3) The seat belt increases the chances of surviving an accident by about 50% for the front occupants and about 25% of people in the back seat.
4) If, for instance, weighs 75 kilos and is running into a brick wall at 50 km / h, must be able to withstand a pressure of approximately 1.5 tons, if you will be sitting in the car. Even at speeds of 10 km / h can not resist a seatbelt.
5) There are many accidents while driving at relatively low speed. Here seatbelts also great effect and can be the difference whether one seriously injured - or escape completely unscathed.
6) 18-24-year-old drivers are involved in accidents, wear seat belts are less likely than experienced drivers who are involved in accidents.
7) The risk of an accident increases on trips to and from the party at the weekend with many young peers in the car. On such trips increased propensity for not using seat belts.

The student must be able to express the content of the following conditions:


8) The risk of being killed in an accident is many times greater if you are thrown out of the car than if you stay in the car.
9) 18-24-year-old drivers are more often than others involved in accidents where the car rolls around and the risk of being thrown out is great. In these accidents have seat belt use special high power.
10) The car's airbag can be downright dangerous when you are not using a seat belt.
11) If you are not tightened, thrown often around in the car during an accident. This is very high risk that harm themselves and others in the car.
12) No one can resist the pressure which occurs during a collision when you are not wearing a seat belt. Even at speeds below 10 km / h. can not resist a seatbelt.
13) One should always make sure that everyone in the car wearing seat belts.
14) You get a clean license if passengers under 15 not wearing a seat belt while driving. 2 clips within 3 years gives driving ban for new drivers with driver's license on probation.

The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


15) You can avoid almost all typical damage due to lack of seat belt use by following these tips:



a) Always use seatbelts - even on short trips.
b) Never be influenced by others to drive without a seatbelt.
c) Make sure everyone in the car wearing seat belts.
d) Do not carry more passengers than there are seat belts for.


Annex 11
9. MANOEUVRES ON DRIVING TECHNICAL SERVICES
The purpose of education is to give the student sufficient knowledge of some basic physical aspects of motoring that it helps the student to understand the importance of adjusting speed, steering and braking to the conditions.
The training also aims to give the student any skill in mastering the car under moderate speed in certain critical situations. There is thus necessary slowdown in the shortest possible distance, braking and evasive action on the road with high and low friction and alignment of the car after skidding. The training also aims to give the student any ability to return the car to the road after driving beyond the high road edge.
The exercises do not aim to encourage students to run faster or less gently than they otherwise would have done, but rather give them insight into velocity crucial to whether an avoidance maneuver can be implemented. Students will also gain insight into the car's reactions in critical situations so that panic reactions are avoided.

The order of the exercises should follow this section breakdown. The exercises on public roads must be carried out before the exercises on a slippery road to learn how much speed on the slippery road to be reduced to one can safely perform the same maneuver on public roads. If appropriate, several of the exercises on public roads implemented before the corresponding exercises carried out on a slippery road.
Each excercisecap precise content set out in the milestones.
The individual exercises are considered successfully completed when they can be performed with the degree of precision, as shown in milestones descriptions. Eleven be leading at least the 4 lessons at least 45 minutes in maneuvers on road safety center. Besides driving time should be allotted for instruction to the individual exercises. The total course will experience take at least 4 hours. The student must first have completed training on driving technical issues in the classroom.
Driving teacher must be responsible for no more than 6 cars at the same time. Driving teacher must during the exercises and the access and exit to these, be able to monitor the students properly. Students must not return driving drills and exercises.
Requirements for road safety center
The driving center must be approved. About approval and arrangement of the driving center refer to the license Order and its Annex.
At a road safety center must be kept lists of students who have received driving lessons in the described in paragraph 9 exercises. The list shall contain information on:


1) The teaching driving instructor's name and address.
2) The student's name and address.
3) Date and time (from and to) for teaching.

The lists kept by the driving center at least three years and must be presented to the police on request.
Speed ​​
Exercises on road safety center should - for the sake of students' rings routine - usually not performed at higher speed than 70 km / h. For some exercises speed may be less, see. Milestones descriptions.
9.1 traction and loading condition
Overall dimensions
The student must learn that grip is necessary to carry out any maneuver and the grip changed road conditions. By load and especially by improper loading condition of the car, incorrect tire pressure, tread worn and defective shock absorbers changed traction and steering performance as well.
The student must also learn that the speed and operation of the accelerator and brake tailored to fit the road conditions and road conditions.
Subobjective
9.1.1 Vejgrebets importance
The student must repeat the targets of "Magnetic Coating type and mode 'in Section 5.2.3" The road equipment and standard' and gain knowledge of the following conditions:


1) The grip arises from frictional resistance (friction) between the tire and road and partly by the tires grabs down and get hold of the irregularities in the road surface.
2) Power, braking and steering actions can only be exercised through the grip, which is therefore a condition for any maneuver (acceleration, braking and steering).
3) The grip is considerably reduced in wet and oily grip and especially in snow, sand and slippery road where the accelerator, clutch, brake and steering wheel therefore be operated with great caution, and the speed is kept suitably low.

9.1.2 loading condition, tire pressure and tread pattern
The student must repeat the milestones in Section 3.1.2 "Control Properties" and acquire knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Heavy loads in the rear of the vehicle increases the pressure on the rear wheels, while the pressure on the front wheels is facilitated. It can cause the car to have a strong oversteer tendency and - in particular heavy load - can grip reduced so much that the possibility of controlling reduced and impair stability in straight driving and increases crosswind sensitivity. On front-wheel drive cars, the possibility of transferring engine power reduced.

The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


2) Inappropriate loading of the car provides a significant change in gravity position. Especially in improper placement of goods and goods in roof box for increased risk of tipping.
3) Both too high and too low tire pressure results in poor contact between the tire and the road, which deteriorates the grip and the car's steering characteristics can change significantly.
4) Worn tread impairs traction in the wet. When driving in heavy rain or through pools of water can cause aquaplaning, even with new tires and at relatively low speeds.


In all these circumstances, it is essential that the velocity is kept sufficiently low. This is especially important if more of these conditions are present simultaneously.
9.2 speed, centrifugal force, braking distances and vejgrebets utilization
Overall dimensions
The student must learn that there is a definite correlation between speed, kinetic energy and braking distance and the braking distance also depends on the braking force, vejgrebets size slope and possible strong winds.
The student must also learn about centrifugal importance when cornering as well as learn the speed must be reduced on a slippery road compared to ordinary road.
Subobjective
9.2.1 kinetic energy and speed
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) A car that is set in motion, thereby achieves kinetic energy, which means that it can continue to run for a while, even after the connection between the engine and the wheels stopped.
2) Bevægelsesenergiens size depends on the weight and speed. By doubling the weight doubled kinetic energy, while doubling the speed quadruples kinetic energy.
3) With the help of the brakes can shorten the long way, the car can run solely by means of kinetic energy.
4) the kinetic energy is transformed into heat in the brakes when braking. By collision kinetic energy is converted rather to harm to the person and the vehicle. The damage increases significantly when the speed increases.

9.2.2 Centrifugal force
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) A car driving through a turn or make an avoidance maneuver is influenced by a force acting across the vehicle and will seek to "pull" the car "out of the turn (the basket)." This force is called the centrifugal force.
2) There is a link between speed and centrifugal force that a doubling of speed gives a quadrupling of centrifugal force.
3) When cornering, a halving of the radius of curvature double centrifugal force, whereas a doubling of the radius of curvature will halve the centrifugal force.
4) These conditions are very important, especially when driving with tall structures (eg, van or car with roof box). When driving with excessive speed of such vehicles in curves, there will be an increased risk of tipping.

9.2.3 stopping distances
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) The stopping distance is the way to go, the car is running, from the braking begins until the car is stationary.
2) The stopping distance depends inter alia of how hard you step on the brake pedal.
3) At a speed of eg 60 km / h on a level, ordinary road braking distance:



a) about 50 m at a quite soft braking, (about 2.75 m / s2),
b) about 30 m at a rather strong braking, (approximately 4.5 m / s2)
c) about 20 m at a very hard braking, (about 7.0 m / s2). and
d) about 17 m at an emergency braking (8.0 m / s2)


4) The braking distance will almost double by relatively small increases in speed, eg:



a) from about To about 30 40 km / h,
b) from about To about 60 80 km / h, and
c) from about To about 80 110 km / h.


5) The stopping distance, by doubling the speed will be quadrupled.
6) The braking distance also depends on vejgrebets size, and to maintain, for example, a lower braking distance of about 35 m at 80 km / h on a horizontal plain way and without locking the wheels must reduce speed to:



a) about 60 km / h on wet asphalt or gravel,
b) about 40 km / h on firm snow, and
c) about 30 km / h on the icy roads.


7) The stopping distance will also be increased when driving downhill.
8) If the service brake is legally able, the braking distance at 30 km / h more than 6 m for an ordinary passenger car and a maximum of 7 m for a van not exceeding 3,500 kg total weight.
9) If the parking brake is legally able, should the braking distance at 30 km / h more than 20 m.

The pupil must at workouts gain experience of the following incidents on public roads:


10) Make a very soft braking at a speed of approximately 60 km / h, corresponding to a stopping distance of approximately 50 m.
11) Make a rather strong braking at a speed of approximately 60 km / h, corresponding to a stopping distance of approximately 30 m.

12) Make a very hard braking at a speed of approximately 60 km / h, corresponding to a stopping distance of approximately 20 m.
13) Make emergency braking.

9.2.4 Vejgrebets utilization
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) In a car without ABS brake must braking on slippery road due to the reduced grip performed with light pressure on the brake pedal to prevent blocked wheels (ie wheels that do not rotate).
2) braking with blocked wheels increases the stopping distance in relation to the wheels just kept in rotation.
3) If braking with a car without anti-lock brakes, the driver, to regulate the pressure on the brake pedal so the wheels just kept in rotation, and thus still hold optimally.
4) On vehicles with anti-lock brakes, the brake pedal down and hold for maximum braking.
5) If braking with a vehicle with ABS braking the ABS braking system for the wheels just kept in rotation. When the ABS braking system regulates may cause excessive vibration in the brake pedal. This is normal and means that the system is in operation. Regardless of vibrations, the pressure on the brake pedal maintained as long braking is desired.
6) Sharp ratdrejning on a slippery road causes the car not follow the steering wheel movement due to the reduced grip or speeding to the desired rotation.
7) A sudden braking or acceleration during turns on slippery road user risks that the car can not be kept on course through the turn due to the reduced grip or the high speed (the same risk can be present in the usual way).
8) Braking with one pair of wheels on a public road and the second pair of wheels on a slippery road causes excessive skew of the car. Offbeat drawing can occur in vehicles with ABS braking.
9) Most new cars are equipped with electronic stability control (ESC) / Electronic Stability Program (ESP), which can counteract skidding or overturning.
10) Cars with ESC is equipped with sensors (sensors) that detect vehicle movements in all directions. When the system senses that a skid is coming, braked one or more wheels for longer or shorter time, in order to fix the car up.

The student must know exercise achieve proficiency in following the common path:


11) Brake at about 60 km / h with a severe and persistent pressure so the braking distance is as short as possible.

The student must know exercise achieve proficiency in the following on a slippery road:


12) brake in the shortest possible distance at incremental speeds up to approximately 50 km / h
13) Adapt the speed so that the student can judge what it should be reduced to, for the braking distance of approximately 20 m - which was achieved on a public road at about 60 km / h - may be retained.
14) Put off on a slippery road without wheel spin or skid.

The student must know exercise gain experience on the following conditions by braking at incremental speeds with one pair of wheels on a public road and the second pair of wheels on a slippery road:


15) That car can be kept almost stable.
16) The braking distance is longer than on ordinary road.
17) The braking distance is shorter than on a slippery road.

9.3 Obstacles on the road and slalom
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to react properly to sudden obstacles on the way in which the killing alone can not be achieved partly by steering round obstacles, and partly by braking and steering. The student must also learn how much the speed must be reduced on a slippery road compared to ordinary road.
Subobjective
9.3.1 Slalom
The student must achieve any proficiency in the following maneuver on public roads:


1) Driving slalom with appropriate speed (50 km / h) between 5-7 cones with 15-20 m distance. The impact of the car must be as small as possible and control shall be such that the car comes to rest between each turn. The student must also mark the importance of sitting properly in the seat and in relation to the steering wheel.

9.3.2 Double evasive action without braking
The student must know exercise achieve any proficiency in the following maneuver on public roads:


1) Make fast lane changes by appropriate high speed (50-60 km / h, depending on the student's abilities), to avoid collisions marked obstacle and then quickly switch to the original path when the obstacle is passed.

The student must know exercise achieve any proficiency in the following maneuver on a slippery road:



2) Perform the same exercise as above, but where the pupil must judge what speed must be reduced to that exercise can be completed safely.
3) Exercise-up must be the same as on an ordinary road.

9.3.3 Combined braking and evasive action
The student must know exercise achieve any proficiency in the following maneuver on public roads:


1) Brake at 70 km / h, before a selected obstacle that is so close that arrest alone is not possible, control over the obstacle with not too violent steering movements and bring the car to a halt.

The student must know exercise achieve any proficiency in the following maneuver on a slippery road:


2) Repeat the same exercise as above, but where the pupil to judge what speed must be reduced in order to exercise can be completed safely.
3) Exercise-up must be the same as on an ordinary road.

9.4 of regaining traction after slipping
Overall dimensions
The student must learn that speed is crucial to whether the maneuvers can be carried out within a marked lane in curves. The student must also learn to respond correctly to regain grip and get the car on track after skidding on a slippery road.
Subobjective
9.4.1 Driving in curve
The student must know exercise gain experience on the following maneuvers when cornering on slippery roads:


1) Experience as speed's influence when driving around curves with different radius.

9.4.2 rear wheel skid
The student must know exercise gain any skill in following maneuvers by the rear wheels skidding on slippery roads:





1)


Instant depress the clutch pedal and keep it depressed during the actual alignment.



2)


Turn the steering wheel in the original direction - ie to the same side as the rear end skidding.



3)


Where the rear then straightens up, turn the steering wheel while back toward the straight-ahead - or you risk a new skid to the opposite side.



4)


When traction is regained, and the car again is on the right course, lift the clutch slowly and provides simultaneous cautiously gas.





The exercise carried out without connected ESC system.




9.4.3 Frnt wheel-skid
The student must know exercise gain any skill in the following maneuvers while driving through a turn on a slippery road:





1)


Turn the steering wheel to the straight-ahead if the car does not follow the steering wheel movement



2)


Depress the clutch pedal and keep it depressed during the entire alignment.



3)


When traction is regained, continued driving through the turn in as flat an arc as possible.



4)


Never touch either the brake or accelerator, as it only exacerbates the slipping.





The exercise carried out without connected ESC system.




9.5 Maintain domination after running off the high road edge
Overall dimensions
The student must learn to respond properly after running off the high road edge.
Subobjective
9.5.1 Returning the car after running off the high road edge
The student must have knowledge of the following conditions:


1) Driving out of a high road edge and into the rebate is a risk that you lose control of your vehicle when you abruptly forcing the car back to the road at high speed.
2) Driving out of the rebate may be both right and left, for example, on the highway in central reserve.

The pupil must at workouts gain experience of the following incidents on public roads:



3) Driving out of high roadside least 3 times at gradually increasing speeds (40-60 km / h.).
4) Slow down by braking gently and simultaneously control the car straight ahead along the edge.
5) First rule over the edge and thus back on the road when the speed is so low that it can be done without risk.
6) If conditions permit, the student must also implement the aforementioned exercise with the raised edge on the left side.
Annex 12
10. PREPARATION FOR DRIVING LICENCE
The purpose of education is to give the student knowledge about the conditions to be set for the driving test and obtain licenses and to make the student familiar with the main legal provisions on driving licenses.
The training also aims to inform the student about the requirements of the driving test and through evaluative tests in the driving school to give the pupils the opportunity to acquire experience on the terms and procedure during the implementation of the road test theoretical and practical part.
The conditions necessary for the description of the requirements to run the program and the conditions for setting the driving test must be conducted in accordance with the teacher's guide on driver training for category B.
10.1 Conditions for license
Overall dimensions
The student must be informed of the main legal provisions relating to driving instruction, application for license with the necessary certificates etc. and what leads right to license category B covers.
Subobjective
10.1.1 Driving lessons etc.
The student must have knowledge of the following legislation:


1) For the first time the acquisition of entitlements to license normally issued only to applicants who have completed a traffic-related first aid course. The certificate must the filing of the application for license not be older than one year.
2) If you have not previously had a B license, you must within driving test receive training from an authorized instructor for category B.
3) Education shall be in accordance with the curriculum for category B and include both theoretical and practical curriculum.
4) In this instruction, a lesson plan. Lesson plan shall be designed in two copies, one copy provided to run the student, in accordance with the provisions of the license tender. Lesson plan must, among other things fall into lessons respectively in theory room (theoretical subjects) and in practical driving lessons (practice run). After the end of each lesson, instructor and student run with their signatures in running teacher's copy of the lesson plan verify the implementation of the lesson.
5) During practice driving on public roads must be an approved driving instructor be in the car and take a seat next to the pupil. Driving teacher is then considered to be the driver of the car.
6) Except for a brief instruction by driving the teacher, the student must be alone in the car during the learning of closed training ground and road safety center.
7) Education Plan with accompanying teacher's guide is available at the National Police website (www.politi.dk) and www.retsinfo.dk.

10.1.2 Setting for driving
The student must have knowledge of the following legislation:


1) Driving license issued by the police after passing the driving test.
2) Driving prepared for police driving examiner. Military personnel and personnel of rescue services prepared the driving test for specific drive judges.
3) Setting the driving test is done by completing and signing an approved application form and submit it to the driver's license office.
4) Once the course is completed, the driving instructor's signature on the application form to confirm that the applicant has received training in accordance with the curriculum, including the initial practical training has been conducted in closed training ground.
5) The application form must be accompanied by:



a) Medical certificate with information about the applicant's health and state of health.
b) Health Maps or similar documentation for personal identification.
c) passport photograph (portrait without headgear) in size 35 x 45 mm and without stamps, but with a doctor's endorsement on the back.



10.1.3 Driving license categories and entitlements
The student must have knowledge that the license category B entitles the holder to drive the following vehicle:


1) Passenger car and light commercial vehicle of not more than 3,500 kg GVW. Passenger must have at most eight seats excluding the driver's seat.

2) Car as above towing a trailer on either does not exceed 750 kg or 750 kg, provided the car and the trailer does not exceed 3.500 kg GVW.
3) 3-wheel motorcycle with and without trailer (but not 2-wheel motorcycle), tractor, power equipment and large moped.

10.2 Driving test run
Overall dimensions
The student must be informed of the current guidelines for running the content and implementation and by prior evaluative tests in the driving school to gain experience in the test situation conditions.
Subobjective
10.2.1 Requirements of the driving test
The student must have knowledge of the following legislation:


1) For the driving test, the examiner will assess whether the applicant has acquired the knowledge and skills specified in the description of the targets in the curriculum of the relevant license category.
2) Driving exam is divided into a theory test and a practical test. Theory test must be passed before moving up to the practical test.
3) Applicants must know the theory test and the practical test to bring the application for a license and run the teacher's copy of the lesson plan.
4) Candidates can not take the driving test unless run training has been conducted in accordance with the provisions of the license tender. Theory exam can only be taken once the student has received training in teaching plan first section to 8. Title, and in the relevant sections of the Education Plan 10 section. The practical test can only be taken once the student has received training in all sections of the curriculum.

10.2.2 Theory exam
The student must have knowledge of the following guidelines for the theory test and in evaluative tests in the driving school have obtained knowledge of the test conditions:


1) The sample usually have a duration of approximately half an hour.
2) The exam is written and performed by the presentation of a randomly selected series from the National Police approved lysbilledsæt with voice issues and associated afkrydsningsskema for reply.
3) Applicants who, because of special circumstances, which must be documented, can not carry the usual written test may be referred to a special test where the expert eg presenter questions or stops the tape recorder between each question. Lysbilledserierne and afkrydsningsskemaerne also used during the special stage. Dyslexia can not justify a special test.
4) The enclosure closed by fixed meeting time. Candidates who arrive late and after the test has begun, can not access the enclosure and must set a date new test fee.
5) Before the sample aspirants guided the conduct of the test and conditions, including how afkrydsningsskemaet be completed, and it is emphasized that the use of aids is not allowed.
6) During the test, the only test experts and apprentices access to the enclosure.
7) The theory test, applicants bring:



a)


The application duly completed.



b)


Special identification:





i)


Any previous license (Community model (credit card type), or





ii)


Valid passport or





iii)


original baptism, name or birth certificate and photo ID.





iv)


If personal identification number or date of birth and place of birth not obvious from the passport or driving license must also be presented an identity card issued by a public authority, including personal number or name and place of birth clearly apparent.





v)


If there is a change of name, and that name does not appear in the above mentioned documents, the name change demonstrated by showing a marriage certificate, name certificate or documentation for review to the marriage authority or national register.




c)


Driving teacher's copy of the lesson plan, duly completed.






8) The exam is assessed by the National Police proper guidance.
9) The result of the test must be notified immediately after the test evaluation. Applicants must be informed of the subjects in the curriculum, which is mistakenly answered.

10.2.3 The practical test
The student must have knowledge of the following guidelines for the practical test and by evaluating samples of the driving school have obtained knowledge of the test conditions:


1) The driving in order to assess the applicant's skills and behavior in traffic must not be less than 25 minutes at the practical test for category B.
2) In addition to driving time must set aside time to check the applicant's identity, information on its duration, checks on vehicle equipment, evaluation of the test procedure, etc. The probationary period may be extended and may be stopped if the applicant's driving skills are very poor.
3) The examination in driving carried out by the examiner in next aspirant in an accredited school vehicle that the aspirant himself to be made available. Driving teacher may, unless the aspirant or the examiner has major objections to it, attend sample from the backseat of the car. As part of the test center quality assurance of the practical test, additional sample expert with the prior knowledge of the driving instructor attend the test.
4) During the test considered the aspirant as the driver with the resulting responsibilities and obligations.
5) Ability to control the vehicle's statutory equipment is part of the practical test. During the checks, the aspirant, without tools, to investigate and decide whether the parts being tested, meets the legal requirements, including explain how checks are carried out.
6) Applicants must run after the examiners instructions on the route and maneuvers. The instructions given clearly and in good time, the trainee can perceive and understand them and have time to prepare and execute the assigned. The driving examiner leading the examination in such a way that the applicant is not forced into abnormal traffic situations or induced to act against traffic rules and safety considerations in general.
7) The maneuvers are practiced on a closed training ground and road safety center, not in the test carried out separately, but in connection with the normal operation of the vehicle while driving. However, reversing, including reversing around corners included random, but may be required only done with any precision. For example, the drive for 8 numbers, as well as forward and reverse slalom is not required for execution.
8) The expert must intervene using the vehicle's operating equipment, if needed for safety reasons or to avoid collision.
9) A few minor errors can not in itself mean that the sample is evaluated as fail because the aspirant drive must be assessed as a whole.
10) The result of the test must be notified immediately after completing the test. Candidates who have not passed must be notified of the skill requirements of the curriculum that are not satisfactorily met.
11) The exam is assessed also by the National Police Guidelines for driving examiner.
12) In the practical test, applicants bring:



a)


The application form duly completed and signed.



b)


Any previous license.



c)


Special identification:





i)


Any previous license (Community model (credit card type), or





ii)


Valid passport or





iii)


original baptism, name or birth certificate and photo ID.





iv)



If personal identification number or date of birth and place of birth not obvious from the passport or driving license must also be presented an identity card issued by a public authority, including personal number or name and place of birth clearly apparent.





v)


If there is a change of name, and that name does not appear in the above mentioned documents, the name change demonstrated by showing a marriage certificate, name certificate or documentation for review to the marriage authority or national register.



d)


Driving teacher's copy of the lesson plan completed.




10.3 Regulations regarding license
Overall dimensions
The student must be informed of the main legal provisions for driving licenses.
Subobjective
10.3.1 driving license validity
The student must have knowledge of the following legislation:


1) The license is normally valid until the age of 70, but can be issued in special cases with shorter validity and subject to certain conditions.
2) When the validity period has expired, the license renewed for shorter periods of time by contacting the municipality.
3) While driving, you must have a license with him, and upon request, show it to the police.
4) If the license is damaged or lost, contact your municipality to obtain a new one.

10.3.2 Recovery and restoration / reproduction of license
The student must have knowledge of the following legislation:


1) If the police have reason to believe that a driver no longer meets the conditions to hold a driving license, police can withdraw it or call that person to pass a driving test.
2) Is driving disqualified, the license usually only be restored after passing the driving test.
3) If driving is disqualified as a result of drunk driving (or before September 1, 2005 for drunken driving) requires a course in alcohol and traffic (A / T course) before the driving test
4) Førstegangserhververe of licenses (ie holders of licenses for categories A or B, and who have not yet held a driving license for 3 years) should be within the presentation of the driving test implement special driver training when the withdrawal is due to drive failure. Due to the withdrawal alone drunk driving, must only be carried out a course on alcohol and driving (A / T course) before the presentation of the driving test. The special driving instruction shall be completed with an approved driving instructor and must include at least certain lessons in the classroom and in practical driving lessons (practice run).
5) Driving license-holders will have at certain traffic offenses in addition to a fine also a 'clean license. " For example, if you drive over 30 per cent. too strong, running through a red light, or if children under 15 are not strapped into the car. 3 clips within 3 years results in a suspension of their license. Voucher system applies to gross violations of the Road Traffic Act, which does not in itself result in disqualification, but endangers others.
6) For førstegangserhververe of license rules are tighter, because driving is reached after 2 clips within 3 years.
Official notes
1) The Order contains provisions that implement Council Directive no. 91/439 / EEC on driving licenses (Official Journal 1991 L 237, p. 1) as amended, and certain parts of the European Parliament and Council Directive 2006/126 / EC of 20 december 2006 on driving licenses (EU gazette 2006 no. L 403, page 18)