Penal Code, Part 3. Of Imprisonment And The Death Penalty , Article 1. Civil Rights


Published: 2015-07-09

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Penal Code - PEN
PART 3. OF IMPRISONMENT AND THE DEATH PENALTY [2000 - 10007]
  ( Part 3 repealed and added by Stats. 1941, Ch. 106. )TITLE 1. IMPRISONMENT OF MALE PRISONERS IN STATE PRISONS [2000 - 3105]
  ( Title 1 repealed and added by Stats. 1941, Ch. 106. )CHAPTER 3. Civil Rights of Prisoners [2600 - 2643]
  ( Heading of Chapter 3 amended by Stats. 1975, Ch. 1175. )
ARTICLE 1. Civil Rights [2600 - 2603]
  ( Article 1 repealed and added by Stats. 1975, Ch. 1175. )
2600.
  (a) A person sentenced to imprisonment in a state prison or to imprisonment pursuant to subdivision (h) of Section 1170 may during that period of confinement be deprived of such rights, and only such rights, as is reasonably related to legitimate penological interests.

(b) Nothing in this section shall be construed to overturn the decision in Thor v. Superior Court, 5 Cal. 4th 725.

(Amended (as amended by Stats. 2011, Ch. 15, Sec. 462) by Stats. 2011, Ch. 665, Sec. 1.5. Effective January 1, 2012.)

2601.
  Subject only to the provisions of that section, each person described in Section 2600 shall have the following civil rights:

(a) Except as provided in Section 2225 of the Civil Code, to inherit, own, sell, or convey real or personal property, including all written and artistic material produced or created by the person during the period of imprisonment. However, to the extent authorized in Section 2600, the Department of Corrections may restrict or prohibit sales or conveyances that are made for business purposes.

(b) To correspond, confidentially, with any member of the State Bar or holder of public office, provided that the prison authorities may open and inspect incoming mail to search for contraband.

(c) (1) To purchase, receive, and read any and all newspapers, periodicals, and books accepted for distribution by the United States Post Office. Pursuant to this section, prison authorities may exclude any of the following matter:

(A) Obscene publications or writings, and mail containing information concerning where, how, or from whom this matter may be obtained.

(B) Any matter of a character tending to incite murder, arson, riot, violent racism, or any other form of violence.

(C) Any matter concerning gambling or a lottery.

(2) Nothing in this section shall be construed as limiting the right of prison authorities to do the following:

(A) Open and inspect any and all packages received by an inmate.

(B) Establish reasonable restrictions as to the number of newspapers, magazines, and books that the inmate may have in his or her cell or elsewhere in the prison at one time.

(d) To initiate civil actions, subject to a three dollar ($3) filing fee to be collected by the Department of Corrections, in addition to any other filing fee authorized by law, and subject to Title 3a (commencing with Section 391) of the Code of Civil Procedure.

(e) To marry.

(f) To create a power of appointment.

(g) To make a will.

(h) To receive all benefits provided for in Sections 3370 and 3371 of the Labor Code and in Section 5069.

(Amended by Stats. 1996, Ch. 886, Sec. 3. Effective January 1, 1997.)

2602.
  (a) Except as provided in subdivision (b), no person sentenced to imprisonment or housed in a state prison shall be administered any psychiatric medication without his or her prior informed consent.

(b) If a psychiatrist determines that an inmate should be treated with psychiatric medication, but the inmate does not consent, the inmate may be involuntarily treated with the medication. Treatment may be given on either a nonemergency basis as provided in subdivision (c), or on an emergency or interim basis as provided in subdivision (d).

(c) The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation may seek to initiate involuntary medication on a nonemergency basis only if all of the following conditions have been
met:

(1) A psychiatrist has determined that the inmate has a serious mental disorder.

(2) A psychiatrist has determined that, as a result of that mental disorder, the inmate is gravely disabled and does not have the capacity to refuse treatment with psychiatric medications or is a danger to self or others.

(3) A psychiatrist has prescribed one or more psychiatric medications for the treatment of the inmate?s disorder, has considered the risks, benefits, and treatment alternatives to involuntary medication, and has determined that the treatment alternatives to involuntary medication are unlikely to meet the needs of the patient.

(4) The inmate has been advised of the risks and benefits of, and treatment alternatives to, the psychiatric medication and
refuses or is unable to consent to the administration of the medication.

(5) The inmate is provided a hearing before an administrative law judge.

(6) The inmate is provided counsel at least 21 days prior to the hearing, unless emergency or interim medication is being administered pursuant to subdivision (d), in which case the inmate would receive expedited access to counsel. The hearing shall be held not more than 30 days after the filing of the notice with the Office of Administrative Hearings, unless counsel for the inmate agrees to extend the date of the hearing.

(7) The inmate and counsel are provided with written notice of the hearing at least 21 days prior to the hearing, unless emergency or interim medication is being administered pursuant to subdivision (d), in which case the inmate would receive an expedited
hearing. The written notice shall do all of the following:

(A) Set forth the diagnosis, the factual basis for the diagnosis, the basis upon which psychiatric medication is recommended, the expected benefits of the medication, any potential side effects and risks to the inmate from the medication, and any alternatives to treatment with the medication.

(B) Advise the inmate of the right to be present at the hearing, the right to be represented by counsel at all stages of the proceedings, the right to present evidence, and the right to cross-examine witnesses. Counsel for the inmate shall have access to all medical records and files of the inmate, but shall not have access to the confidential section of the inmate?s central file which contains materials unrelated to medical treatment.

(C) Inform the inmate of his or her
right to contest the finding of an administrative law judge authorizing treatment with involuntary medication by filing a petition for writ of administrative mandamus pursuant to Section 1094.5 of the Code of Civil Procedure, and his or her right to file a petition for writ of habeas corpus with respect to any decision of the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation to continue treatment with involuntary medication after the administrative law judge has authorized treatment with involuntary medication.

(8) An administrative law judge determines by clear and convincing evidence that the inmate has a mental illness or disorder, that as a result of that illness the inmate is gravely disabled and lacks the capacity to consent to or refuse treatment with psychiatric medications or is a danger to self or others if not medicated, that there is no less intrusive alternative to involuntary medication, and that the medication is in the inmate?s best
medical interest. Failure of the department to provide timely or adequate notice pursuant to this section shall be excused only upon a showing of good cause and the absence of prejudice to the inmate. In making this determination, the administrative law judge may consider factors, including, but not limited to, the ability of the inmate?s counsel to adequately prepare the case and to confer with the inmate, the continuity of care, and, if applicable, the need for protection of the inmate or institutional staff that would be compromised by a procedural default.

(9) The historical course of the inmate?s mental disorder, as determined by available relevant information about the course of the inmate?s mental disorder, shall be considered when it has direct bearing on the determination of whether the inmate is a danger to self or others, or is gravely disabled and incompetent to refuse medication as the result of a mental disorder.

(10) An inmate is entitled to file one motion for reconsideration following a determination that he or she may receive involuntary medication, and may seek a hearing to present new evidence, upon good cause shown.

(d) This section does not prohibit a physician from taking appropriate action in an emergency. An emergency exists when there is a sudden and marked change in an inmate?s mental condition so that action is immediately necessary for the preservation of life or the prevention of serious bodily harm to the inmate or others, and it is impractical, due to the seriousness of the emergency, to first obtain informed consent. If psychiatric medication is administered during an emergency, the medication shall only be that which is required to treat the emergency condition and shall be administered for only so long as the emergency continues to exist. If the Department of Corrections
and Rehabilitation?s clinicians identify a situation that jeopardizes the inmate?s health or well-being as the result of a serious mental illness, and necessitates the continuation of medication beyond the initial 72 hours pending the full mental health hearing, the department shall give notice to the inmate and his or her counsel of the department?s intention to seek an ex parte order to allow the continuance of medication pending the full hearing. The notice shall be served upon the inmate and counsel at the same time the inmate is given the written notice that the involuntary medication proceedings are being initiated and is appointed counsel as provided in subdivision (c). The order may be issued ex parte upon a showing that in the absence of the medication the emergency conditions are likely to recur. The request for an ex parte order shall be supported by an affidavit from the psychiatrist showing specific facts. The inmate and the inmate?s appointed counsel shall have two business days to respond to
the department?s ex parte request to continue interim medication, and may present facts supported by an affidavit in opposition to the department?s request. An administrative law judge shall review the ex parte request and shall have three business days to determine the merits of the department?s request for an ex parte order. If an order is issued, the psychiatrist may continue the administration of the medication until the hearing described in paragraph (5) of subdivision (c) is held.

(1) The Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall file with the Office of Administrative Hearings, and serve on the inmate and his or her counsel, the written notice described in paragraph (7) of subdivision (c) within 72 hours of commencing medication pursuant to this subdivision, unless either of the following occurs:

(A) The inmate gives informed consent to continue the medication.

(B) A psychiatrist determines that the psychiatric medication is not necessary and administration of the medication is discontinued.

(2) If medication is being administered pursuant to this subdivision, the hearing described in paragraph (5) of subdivision (c) shall commence within 21 days of the filing and service of the notice, unless counsel for an inmate agrees to a different period of time.

(3) With the exception of the timeline provisions specified in paragraphs (1) and (2) for providing notice and commencement of the hearing pursuant to the conditions specified in this subdivision, the inmate shall be entitled to and be given the same due process protections as specified in subdivision (c). The department shall prove the same elements supporting the involuntary administration of psychiatric medication and the
administrative law judge shall be required to make the same findings described in subdivision (c).

(e) The determination that an inmate may receive involuntary medication shall be valid for one year from the date of the determination, regardless of whether the inmate subsequently gives his or her informed consent.

(f) If a determination has been made to involuntarily medicate an inmate pursuant to subdivision (c) or (d), the medication shall be discontinued one year after the date of that determination, unless the inmate gives his or her informed consent to the administration of the medication, or unless a new determination is made pursuant to the procedures set forth in subdivision (g).

(g) To renew an existing order allowing involuntary medication, the department shall file with the Office of Administrative
Hearings, and shall serve on the inmate and his or her counsel, a written notice indicating the department?s intent to renew the existing involuntary medication order.

(1) The request to renew the order shall be filed and served no later than 21 days prior to the expiration of the current order authorizing involuntary medication.

(2) The inmate shall be entitled to, and shall be given, the same due process protections as specified in subdivision (c).

(3) Renewal orders shall be valid for one year from the date of the hearing.

(4) An order renewing an existing order shall be granted based on clear and convincing evidence that the inmate has a serious mental disorder that requires treatment with psychiatric medication, and that, but for the medication,
the inmate would revert to the behavior that was the basis for the prior order authorizing involuntary medication, coupled with evidence that the inmate lacks insight regarding his or her need for the medication, such that it is unlikely that the inmate would be able to manage his or her own medication and treatment regimen. No new acts need be alleged or proven.

(5) If the department wishes to add a basis to an existing order, the department shall give the inmate and the inmate?s counsel notice in advance of the hearing via a renewal notice or supplemental petition. Within the renewal notice or supplemental petition, the department shall specify what additional basis is being alleged and what qualifying conduct within the past year supports that additional basis. The department shall prove the additional basis and conduct by clear and convincing evidence at a hearing as specified in subdivision (c).

(6) The hearing on any petition to renew an order for involuntary medication shall be conducted prior to the expiration of the current order.

(h) Pursuant to Section 5058, the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shall adopt regulations to fully implement this section.

(i) In the event of a conflict between the provisions of this section and the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 4.5 (commencing with Section 11400) of Part 1 of Division 3 of the Government Code), this section shall control.

(Amended by Stats. 2013, Ch. 76, Sec. 157. Effective January 1, 2014.)

2603.
  (a) Except as provided in subdivision (b), no person sentenced to imprisonment in a county jail shall be administered any psychiatric medication without his or her prior informed consent.

(b) If a psychiatrist determines that an inmate should be treated with psychiatric medication, but the inmate does not consent, the inmate may be involuntarily treated with the medication. Treatment may be given on either a nonemergency basis as provided in subdivision (c), or on an emergency or interim basis as provided in subdivision (d).

(c) A county department of mental health, or other designated county department, may seek to initiate involuntary
medication on a nonemergency basis only if all of the following conditions have been met:

(1) A psychiatrist or psychologist has determined that the inmate has a serious mental disorder.

(2) A psychiatrist or psychologist has determined that, as a result of that mental disorder, the inmate is gravely disabled and does not have the capacity to refuse treatment with psychiatric medications, or is a danger to self or others.

(3) A psychiatrist has prescribed one or more psychiatric medications for the treatment of the inmate?s disorder, has considered the risks, benefits, and treatment alternatives to involuntary medication, and has determined that the treatment alternatives to involuntary medication are unlikely to meet the needs of the patient.

(4) The
inmate has been advised of the risks and benefits of, and treatment alternatives to, the psychiatric medication and refuses, or is unable to consent to, the administration of the medication.

(5) The inmate is provided a hearing before a superior court judge, a court-appointed commissioner or referee, or a court-appointed hearing officer, as specified in subdivision (c) of Section 5334 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

(6) The inmate is provided counsel at least 21 days prior to the hearing, unless emergency or interim medication is being administered pursuant to subdivision (d), in which case the inmate would receive expedited access to counsel. The hearing shall be held not more than 30 days after the filing of the notice with the superior court, unless counsel for the inmate agrees to extend the date of the hearing.

(7) The inmate and counsel are provided with written notice of the hearing at least 21 days prior to the hearing, unless emergency or interim medication is being administered pursuant to subdivision (d), in which case the inmate would receive an expedited hearing. The written notice shall do all of the following:

(A) Set forth the diagnosis, the factual basis for the diagnosis, the basis upon which psychiatric medication is recommended, the expected benefits of the medication, any potential side effects and risks to the inmate from the medication, and any alternatives to treatment with the medication.

(B) Advise the inmate of the right to be present at the hearing, the right to be represented by counsel at all stages of the proceedings, the right to present evidence, and the right to cross-examine witnesses. Counsel for the inmate shall have access to all medical
records and files of the inmate, but shall not have access to the confidential section of the inmate?s central file which contains materials unrelated to medical treatment.

(C) Inform the inmate of his or her right to appeal the determination to the superior court or the court of appeal as specified in subdivisions (e) and (f) of Section 5334 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and his or her right to file a petition for writ of habeas corpus with respect to any decision of the county department of mental health, or other designated county department, to continue treatment with involuntary medication after the superior court judge, court-appointed commissioner or referee, or court-appointed hearing officer has authorized treatment with involuntary medication.

(8) A superior court judge, a court-appointed commissioner or referee, or a court-appointed hearing officer determines by
clear and convincing evidence that the inmate has a mental illness or disorder, that as a result of that illness the inmate is gravely disabled and lacks the capacity to consent to or refuse treatment with psychiatric medications or is a danger to self or others if not medicated, that there is no less intrusive alternative to involuntary medication, and that the medication is in the inmate?s best medical interest. In the event of any statutory notice issues with either initial or renewal filings by the county department of mental health, or other designated county department, the superior court judge, court-appointed commissioner or referee, or court-appointed hearing officer shall hear arguments as to why the case should be heard, and shall consider factors such as the ability of the inmate?s counsel to adequately prepare the case and to confer with the inmate, the continuity of care, and, if applicable, the need for protection of the inmate or institutional staff that would be compromised by a procedural
default.

(9) The historical course of the inmate?s mental disorder, as determined by available relevant information about the course of the inmate?s mental disorder, shall be considered when it has direct bearing on the determination of whether the inmate is a danger to self or others, or is gravely disabled and incompetent to refuse medication as the result of a mental disorder.

(10) An inmate is entitled to file one motion for reconsideration following a determination that he or she may receive involuntary medication, and may seek a hearing to present new evidence, upon good cause shown.

(d) Nothing in this section is intended to prohibit a physician from taking appropriate action in an emergency. An emergency exists when there is a sudden and marked change in an inmate?s mental condition so that action is
immediately necessary for the preservation of life or the prevention of serious bodily harm to the inmate or others, and it is impractical, due to the seriousness of the emergency, to first obtain informed consent. If psychiatric medication is administered during an emergency, the medication shall only be that which is required to treat the emergency condition and shall be administered for only so long as the emergency continues to exist. If the clinicians of the county department of mental health, or other designated county department, identify a situation that jeopardizes the inmate?s health or well-being as the result of a serious mental illness, and necessitates the continuation of medication beyond the initial 72 hours pending the full mental health hearing, the county department may seek to continue the medication by giving notice to the inmate and his or her counsel of its intention to seek an ex parte order to allow the continuance of medication pending the full hearing. Treatment of the inmate in a
facility pursuant to Section 4011.6 shall not be required in order to continue medication under this subdivision unless the treatment is otherwise medically necessary. The notice shall be served upon the inmate and counsel at the same time the inmate is given the written notice that the involuntary medication proceedings are being initiated and is appointed counsel as provided in subdivision (c). The order may be issued ex parte upon a showing that, in the absence of the medication the emergency conditions are likely to recur. The request for an ex parte order shall be supported by an affidavit from the psychiatrist or psychologist showing specific facts. The inmate and the inmate?s appointed counsel shall have two business days to respond to the county department?s ex parte request to continue interim medication, and may present facts supported by an affidavit in opposition to the department?s request. A superior court judge, a court-appointed commissioner or referee, or a court-appointed hearing officer
shall review the ex parte request and shall have three business days to determine the merits of the department?s request for an ex parte order. If an order is issued, the psychiatrist may continue the administration of the medication until the hearing described in paragraph (5) of subdivision (c) is held.

(1) If the county elects to seek an ex parte order pursuant to this subdivision, the county department of mental health, or other designated county department, shall file with the superior court, and serve on the inmate and his or her counsel, the written notice described in paragraph (7) of subdivision (c) within 72 hours of commencing medication pursuant to this subdivision, unless either of the following occurs:

(A) The inmate gives informed consent to continue the medication.

(B) A psychiatrist determines that
the psychiatric medication is not necessary and administration of the medication is discontinued.

(2) If medication is being administered pursuant to this subdivision, the hearing described in paragraph (5) of subdivision (c) shall commence within 21 days of the filing and service of the notice, unless counsel for the inmate agrees to a different period of time.

(3) With the exception of the timeline provisions specified in paragraphs (1) and (2) for providing notice and commencement of the hearing in emergency or interim situations, the inmate shall be entitled to and be given the same due process protections as specified in subdivision (c). The county department of mental health, or other designated county department, shall prove the same elements supporting the involuntary administration of psychiatric medication and the superior court judge, court-appointed commissioner or
referee, or court-appointed hearing officer shall be required to make the same findings described in subdivision (c).

(e) The determination that an inmate may receive involuntary medication shall be valid for one year from the date of the determination, regardless of whether the inmate subsequently gives his or her informed consent.

(f) If a determination has been made to involuntarily medicate an inmate pursuant to subdivision (c) or (d), the medication shall be discontinued one year after the date of that determination, unless the inmate gives his or her informed consent to the administration of the medication, or unless a new determination is made pursuant to the procedures set forth in subdivision (g).

(g) To renew an existing order allowing involuntary medication, the county department of mental health, or other
designated county department, shall file with the superior court, and shall serve on the inmate and his or her counsel, a written notice indicating the department?s intent to renew the existing involuntary medication order.

(1) The request to renew the order shall be filed and served no later than 21 days prior to the expiration of the current order authorizing involuntary medication.

(2) The inmate shall be entitled to, and shall be given, the same due process protections as specified in subdivision (c).

(3) Renewal orders shall be valid for one year from the date of the hearing.

(4) An order renewing an existing order shall be granted based on clear and convincing evidence that the inmate has a serious mental disorder that requires treatment with
psychiatric medication, and that, but for the medication, the inmate would revert to the behavior that was the basis for the prior order authorizing involuntary medication, coupled with evidence that the inmate lacks insight regarding his or her need for the medication, such that it is unlikely that the inmate would be able to manage his or her own medication and treatment regimen. No new acts need be alleged or proven.

(5) If the county department of mental health, or other designated county department, wishes to add a basis to an existing order, it shall give the inmate and the inmate?s counsel notice in advance of the hearing via a renewal notice or supplemental petition. Within the renewal notice or supplemental petition, as described in subdivision (g), the county department of mental health, or other designated county department, shall specify what additional basis is being alleged and what qualifying conduct within the past year supports
that additional basis. The county department of mental health, or other designated county department, shall prove the additional basis and conduct by clear and convincing evidence at a hearing as specified in subdivision (c).

(6) The hearing on any petition to renew an order for involuntary medication shall be conducted prior to the expiration of the current order.

(h) In the event of a conflict between the provisions of this section and the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 4.5 (commencing with Section 11400) of Part 1 of Division 3 of the Government Code), this section shall control.

(Added by Stats. 2012, Ch. 814, Sec. 3. Effective January 1, 2013.)

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