Air Navigation (General) Regulations

Link to law: http://laws.bahamas.gov.bs/cms/images/LEGISLATION/SUBORDINATE/1965/1965-0021/AirNavigationGeneralRegulations_1.pdf
Published: 1965-01-01

Air Navigation (General) Regulations
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AIR NAVIGATION (GENERAL) REGULATIONS
(ARTICLE 77)
[Commencement 1st January, 1965]

1. These Regulations may be cited as the Air
Navigation (General) Regulations.

2. (1) In these Regulations “the Order” means the
Colonial Air Navigation Order, 1961.

(2) Expressions used in these Regulations shall, unless
the context otherwise requires, have the same respective
meanings as in the Order.

(3) The Interpretation Act shall apply to these
Regulations as it applies to an Act of Parliament.

3. (1) Every load sheet required by Article 23(4) of
the Order shall contain the following particulars —

(a) the nationality mark of the aircraft to which the
load sheet relates, and the registration mark
assigned to that aircraft by the Governor-
General;

(b) particulars of the flight to which the load sheet
relates;

(c) the total weight of the aircraft as loaded for that
flight;

(d) the weights of the several items from which the
total weight of the aircraft, as so loaded, has
been calculated including in particular the
weight of the aircraft prepared for service and
the respective total weights of the passengers,
crew, baggage and cargo intended to be carded
on the flight;

(e) the manner in which the load is distributed and
the resulting position of the centre of gravity of
the aircraft which may be given approximately if
and to the extent that the relevant certificate of
airworthiness so permits,

and shall include at the foot or end of the load sheet a
certificate, signed by the person referred to in Article 23(1)
of the Order as responsible for the loading of the aircraft,
that the aircraft has been loaded in accordance with the
written instructions furnished to him by the operator of the
aircraft pursuant to the said Article 23.

G.N. 21/1965

Citation.

Interpretation.

Ch. 2.

Load sheets.

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(2) For the purpose of calculating the total weight of
the aircraft the respective total weights of the passengers
and crew entered in the load sheet shall be computed from
the actual weight of each person and for that purpose each
person shall be separately weighed:

Provided that in the case of an aircraft with a total
seating capacity of twelve or more persons and subject to
the provisions of paragraph (3) of this regulation the said
weights may be calculated according to the following table,
and the load sheet shall bear a notation to that effect.

TABLE
Males over 12 years of age .................................... 165 lbs.
Females over 12 years of age .......................... 143 lbs.
Children aged 2 years or more, but not over
12 years of age .................................................

85 lbs.

Infants under 2 years of age ............................ 17 lbs.
(3) The commander of the aircraft shall, if in his

opinion it is necessary to do so in the interests of the safety
of the aircraft, require any or all of the passengers and crew
to be actually weighed for the purpose of the entry to be
made in the load sheet.

4. (1) In this regulation, unless the context otherwise
requires —

“approach to landing” means that portion of the flight
of the aircraft in which it is descending below a
height of 1,000 feet above the critical height of
the relevant minimum for landing;

“cloud ceiling” in relation to an aerodrome means the
vertical distance from the elevation of the
aerodrome to the lowest part of any cloud
visible from the aerodrome which is sufficient
to obscure more than one-half of the sky so
visible;

“critical height” means the minimum height above
the elevation of the aerodrome to which an
approach to landing can safely be continued
without visual reference to the ground;

Minimum
weather
conditions for
take-off, etc., by
public transport
aircraft.

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“minimum weather conditions” in relation to an
aerodrome means the cloud ceiling and runway
visual range for take-off and the critical height
and runway visual range for landing below
which the aircraft cannot safely take-off or land
(as the case may be) at that aerodrome, and the
expression “relevant minimum” shall be con-
strued accordingly;

“runway visual range” in relation to a runway or
landing strip means the maximum distance in the
direction of take-off or landing, as the case may
be, at which the runway or landing strip or the
markers or lights delineating it can be seen from a
point fifteen feet above its centre line; and in the
case of an aerodrome in The Bahamas the
distance, if any, communicated to the comman-
der of the aircraft by or on behalf of the person in
charge of the aerodrome as being the runway
visual range shall be taken to be the runway visual
range for the time being;

“specified” in relation to an aircraft means specified
in or ascertainable by reference to the
operations manual relating to that aircraft.

(2) In compliance with Article 21(2) of the Order
and paragraph (xii) of Part A of the Tenth Schedule
thereto, the operator of every aircraft to which that Article
applies shall establish and include in the operations manual
relating to the aircraft, particulars of minimum weather
conditions appropriate to every aerodrome of intended
departure or landing and every alternate aerodrome:

Provided that, in respect of aerodromes to be used
only on a flight which is not a scheduled journey or any
part thereof it shall be sufficient to include in the
operations manual data and instructions by means of which
the appropriate minimum weather conditions can be
calculated by the commander of the aircraft.

(3) The minimum weather conditions specified shall
not, in respect of any aerodrome, be less favourable than any
declared in respect of that aerodrome by the competent
authority, unless that authority otherwise permits in writing.

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(4) In establishing minimum weather conditions for
the purpose of this regulation the operator of the aircraft
shall take into account the following matters —

(a) the type and performance and handling char-
acteristics of the aircraft and any relevant
conditions in its certificate of airworthiness;

(b) the composition of its crew;
(c) the physical characteristics of the relevant aero-

drome and its surroundings;
(d) the dimensions of the runways which may be

selected for use;
(e) whether or not there are in use at the relevant

aerodrome any aids, visual or otherwise, to
assist aircraft in approach, landing or take-off,
being aids which the crew of the aircraft are
trained and equipped to use; the nature of any
such aids that are in use; and the procedures for
approach, landing and take-off which may be
adopted according to the existence or absence of
such aids,

and shall establish in relation to each runway which may
be selected for use minimum weather conditions appro-
priate to each set of circumstances which can reasonably be
expected.

(5) With reference to Article 24(2) of the Order, an
aircraft shall not commence a flight at a time when —

(a) the cloud ceiling or the runway visual range at
the aerodrome of departure is less than the
minimum respectively specified for take-off; or

(b) according to the information available to the
commander of the aircraft it would not be able,
without contravening paragraph (6) of this
regulation, to commence or continue an ap-
proach to landing at the aerodrome of intended
destination at the estimated time of arrival there
and at any alternate aerodrome at any time at
which according to a reasonable estimate the
aircraft would arrive there.

(6) With reference to Article 24(3) of the Order, an
aircraft shall not —

(a) commence or continue an approach to landing at
any aerodrome if the runway visual range at that


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aerodrome, established or determined as afore-
said, is at the time less than the relevant
minimum for landing; or

(b) continue an approach to landing at any aero-
drome by flying below the critical height of the
relevant minimum for landing if from that height
the approach to landing cannot be completed
entirely by visual reference to the ground.

(7) If according to the information available an
aircraft would as regards any flight be required by the
Rules of the Air and Air Traffic Control to be flown in
accordance with the Instrument Flight Rules at the
aerodrome of intended landing, the commander of the
aircraft shall select prior to take-off an alternate aero-
drome unless no aerodrome suitable for that purpose is
available.

5. (1) The assessment of the ability of an aeroplane
to comply with the requirements of regulations 6 to 9
inclusive (relating to weight and performance) shall be
based on the specified information as to its performance:

Provided that, if, in the case of an aeroplane in respect
of which there is in force under the Order a certificate of
airworthiness which does not include a performance group
classification, the assessment may be based on the best
information available to the commander of the aircraft in so
far as the relevant information is not specified.

(2) In assessing the ability of an aeroplane to comply
with condition (7) in the Schedule hereto, conditions (d) and
(e) of regulation 7, and conditions (b)(i)(b) and (b)(ii) of
regulation 9, account may be taken of any reduction of the
weight of the aeroplane which may be achieved after the
failure of a power unit by such jettisoning of fuel as is
feasible and prudent in the circumstances of the flight and in
accordance with the flight manual included in the certificate
of airworthiness relating to the aircraft.

(3) In regulations 5 to 9 inclusive, and in the
Schedule hereto, unless the context otherwise requires —

“specified” in relation to an aircraft means specified
in, or ascertainable by reference to —
(a) the certificate of airworthiness in force

under the Order in respect of that aircraft;
or

Weight and
performance:
general
provisions.

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(b) the flight manual or performance schedule
included in that certificate;

“the emergency distance available” means the dis-
tance from the point on the surface of the
aerodrome at which the aeroplane can com-
mence its take-off run to the nearest point in the
direction of take-off at which the aeroplane
cannot roll over the surface of the aerodrome
and be brought to rest in an emergency without
risk of accident;

“the landing distance available” means the distance
from the point on the surface of the aerodrome
above which the aeroplane can commence its
landing, having regard to the obstructions in its
approach path, to the nearest point in the
direction of landing at which the surface of the
aerodrome is incapable of bearing the weight of
the aeroplane under normal operating
conditions or at which there is an obstacle
capable of affecting the safety of the aeroplane;

“the take-off distance available” means either the
distance from the point on the surface of the
aerodrome at which the aeroplane can com-
mence its take-off run to the nearest obstacle in
the direction of take-off projecting above the
surface of the aerodrome and capable of affect-
ing the safety of the aeroplane or one and one-
half times the take-off run available, whichever
is the less;

“the take-off run available” means the distance from
the point on the surface of the aerodrome at
which the aeroplane can commence its take-off
run to the nearest point in the direction of take-
off at which the surface of the aerodrome is
incapable of bearing the weight of the aeroplane
under normal operating conditions.

(4) For the purposes of regulations 5 to 9 inclusive.
and of the Schedule hereto —

(a) the weight of the aeroplane at the commence-
ment of the take-off run shall be taken to be its
gross weight including everything and everyone
carried in or on it at the commencement of the
take-off run;

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(b) the landing weight of the aeroplane shall be taken
to be the weight of the aeroplane at the estimated
time of landing allowing for the weight of the fuel
and oil expected to be used on the flight to the
aerodrome at which it is intended to land or
alternate aerodrome, as the case may be;

(c) where any distance referred to in paragraph (3)
of this regulation has been declared in respect of
any aerodrome by the authority responsible for
regulating air navigation over the territory of the
Contracting State in which the aerodrome is
situate, and in the case of an aerodrome in The
Bahamas, notified, that distance shall be deemed
to be the relevant distance.

(5) Nothing in regulations 5 to 9 inclusive shall
apply to any aircraft flying solely for the purpose of
training persons to perform duties in aircraft.

6. With reference to Article 24(1) of the Order, an
aeroplane registered in The Bahamas in respect of which
there is in force under the Order a certificate of air-
worthiness which does not include a performance group
classification shall not fly for the purpose of public
transport, except for the sole purpose of training persons to
perform duties in aircraft, unless the weight of the
aeroplane at the commencement of the take-off run is such
that the conditions in the Schedule hereto as apply to that
aircraft are satisfied.

7. With reference to Article 24(1) of the Order an
aeroplane registered in The Bahamas in respect of which
there is in force under the Order a certificate of air-
worthiness in which the aeroplane is designated as being of
performance group A shall not fly for the purpose of public
transport, except for the sole purpose of training persons to
perform duties in aircraft, unless the weight of the
aeroplane at the commencement of the take-off run is such
that the following conditions are satisfied:

(a) That weight does not exceed the maximum take-
off weight for altitude and temperature specified
for the altitude and the air temperature at the
aerodrome at which the take-off is to be made.

Public transport
aeroplanes of no
performance
group.

Schedule.

Public transport
aeroplanes in
performance
group A.

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(b) The take-off run, take-off distance and the
emergency distance respectively required for
take-off, specified as being appropriate to —

(i) the weight of the aeroplane at the com-
mencement of the take-off run;

(ii) the attitude at the aerodrome;
(iii) the air temperature at the aerodrome;
(iv) the slope of the surface of the aerodrome in

the direction of take-off over the take-off run
available, the take-off distance available and
the emergency distance available, re-
spectively; and

(v) not more than 50 per centum of the reported
wind component opposite to the direction of
take-off or not less than 150 per centum of
the reported wind component in the
direction of take-off,

do not exceed the take-off run, the take-off
distance and the emergency distance available,
respectively, at the aerodrome at which the take-
off is to be made; in ascertaining the emergency
distance required, the point at which the pilot is
assumed to decide to discontinue the take-off
shall not be nearer to the start of the take-off run
than the point at which, in ascertaining the take-
off run required and the take-off distance
required, he is assumed to decide to continue the
take-off, in the event of power unit failure.

(c) (i) The net take-off flight path with one
power unit inoperative, specified as being
appropriate to —
(a) the weight of the aeroplane at the

commencement of the take-off run;
(b) the altitude at the aerodrome;
(c) the air temperature at the aerodrome;

and
(d) not more than 50 per centum of the

reported wind component opposite to
the direction of take-off or not less than
150 per centum of the reported wind
component in the direction of take-off,


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and plotted from a point 35 feet or 50
feet, as appropriate, above the end of the
take-off distance required at the
aerodrome at which the take-off is to be
made to a height of 1,500 feet above the
aerodrome, shows that the aeroplane
will clear any obstacle in its path by a
vertical interval of at least 35 feet,
except that if it is intended that the
aeroplane shall change its direction of
flight by more than 15 degrees the
vertical interval shall not be less than 50
feet during the change of direction.

(ii) For the purpose of subparagraph (i) hereof
an obstacle shall be deemed to be in the
path of the aeroplane if the distance from
the obstacle to the nearest point on the
ground below the intended line of flight of
the aeroplane does not exceed —
(a) a distance of 200 feet plus half the

wind span of the aeroplane plus one-
eighth of the distance from such point
to the end of the take-off distance
available measured along the intended
line of flight of the aeroplane; or

(b) 5,000 feet,
whichever is less.

(iii) In assessing the ability of the aeroplane to
satisfy this condition, it shall not be
assumed to make a change of direction of
a radius less than the radius of steady turn
specified.

(d) The aeroplane will, in the meteorological condi-
tions expected for the flights, in the event of any
one power unit becoming inoperative at any point
on its route or on any planned diversion therefrom
and with the other power units or unit operating
within the maximum continuous power con-
ditions specified, be capable of continuing the
flight, clearing by a vertical interval of at least
2,000 feet obstacles within 5 nautical miles either
side of the intended track, to an aerodrome at
which it can comply with condition (g) in this
regulation relating to an alternate
aerodrome, and on arrival over such aerodrome


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the gradient of the specified net flight path with
one power unit inoperative shall not be less than
zero at 1,500 feet above the aerodrome; and in
assessing the ability of the aeroplane to satisfy
this condition it shall not be assumed to be
capable of flying at an altitude exceeding the
specified maximum permissible altitude for
power unit restarting.

(e) The aeroplane will, in the meteorological condi-
tions expected for the flight, in the event of any
two power units becoming inoperative at any
point along the route or on any planned
diversion therefrom more than 90 minutes flying
time in still air (assuming all power units
operating at economical cruising speed) from the
nearest aerodrome at which it can comply with
condition (g) in this regulation, relating to an
alternate aerodrome, be capable of continuing
the flight with all other units operating within
the specified maximum continuous power condi-
tions, clearing by a vertical interval of at least
2,000 feet obstacles within 5 nautical miles
either side of the intended track to such an
aerodrome, and on arrival over such aerodrome
the gradient of the specified net flight path with
two power units inoperative shall not be less
than zero at 1,500 feet above the aerodrome; and
in assessing the ability of the aeroplane to satisfy
this condition it shall not be assumed to be
capable of flying at an altitude exceeding the
specified maximum permissible altitude for
power unit restarting.

(f) The landing weight of the aeroplane will not
exceed the maximum landing weight specified for
the altitude and the expected air temperature for
the estimated time of landing at the aerodrome at
which it is intended to land and at any alternate
aerodrome.

(g) (i) The landing distances required, respectively
specified as being appropriate to aero-
dromes of destination and alternate aero-
dromes, do not exceed at the aerodrome at
which it is intended to land or at any
alternate aerodrome, as the case may be, the
landing distance available on —

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(a) the most suitable runway for a
landing in still air conditions; and

(b) the runway that may be required for
landing because of the forecast wind
conditions:
Provided that if an alternate aero-

drome is designated in the flight plan, the
specified landing distance required may be
that appropriate to an alternate aerodrome
when assessing the ability of the aeroplane
to satisfy this condition at the aerodrome
of destination in respect of the runway that
may be required for landing because of the
forecast wind conditions.

(ii) For the purposes of subparagraph (i)
hereof the landing distance required shall
be that specified as being appropriate to —
(a) the landing weight;
(b) the altitude of the aerodrome;
(c) the temperature in the specified inter-

national standard atmosphere appro-
priate to the altitude at the aerodrome;

(d) (i) a level surface in the case of run-
ways usable in both directions;

(ii) the average slope of the runway
in the case of runways usable in
only one direction; and

(e) (i) still air conditions in the case of
the most suitable runway for a
landing in still air conditions;

(ii) not more than 50 per centum of
the forecast wind component
opposite to the direction of
landing or not less than 150 per
centum of the forecast wind
component in the direction of
landing in the case of the
runway that may be required for
landing because of the forecast
wind conditions.

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8. (1) With reference to Article 24(1) of the Order
an aeroplane registered in The Bahamas in respect of
which there is in force under the Order a certificate of air-
worthiness in which the aeroplane is designated as being of
performance group C or of performance group D shall not
fly for the purpose of public transport, except for the sole
purpose of training persons to perform duties in aircraft,
unless the weight of the aeroplane at the commencement of
the take-off run is such that the following conditions are
satisfied:

(a) That weight does not exceed the maximum take-
off weight specified for the altitude and the air
temperature at the aerodrome at which the take-
off is to be made.

(b) The take-off run required and the take-off
distance required, specified as being appropriate
to —

(i) the weight of the aeroplane at the com-
mencement of the take-off run;

(ii) the altitude at the aerodrome;
(iii) the air temperature at the aerodrome;
(iv) the average slope of the surface of the

aerodrome in the direction of take-off over
the emergency distance available;

(v) not more than 50 per centum of the
reported wind component opposite to the
direction of take-off or not less than 150
per centum of the reported wind
component in the direction of take-off,

do not exceed the take-off run available and the
emergency distance available, respectively, at the
aerodrome at which the take-off is to be made.

(c) The net take-off flight path with all power units
operating, specified as being appropriate to —

(i) the weight of the aeroplane at the com-
mencement of the take-off run;

(ii) the altitude at the aerodrome;
(iii) the air temperature at the aerodrome;
(iv) not more than 50 per centum of the reported

wind component opposite to the direction of
take-off or not less than 150 per centum of
the reported wind component in the
direction of take-off,

Public transport
aeroplanes in
performance
group C or D.

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and plotted from a point 50 feet above the end of
the take-off distance required at the aerodrome
at which the take-off is to be made to the point
at which the aeroplane reaches the minimum
altitude for safe flight on the first stage of the
route to be flown stated in or calculated from the
information contained in the operations manual
relating to the aircraft, shows that the aeroplane
will clear by a safe margin any obstacle the
distance from which to the nearest point on the
ground below the intended line of flight of the
aeroplane does not exceed 200 feet plus half the
wing span of the aeroplane. In assessing the
ability of the aeroplane to satisfy this condition
it shall not be assumed to make a change of
direction of a radius less than the specified
radius of steady turn.

(d) The aeroplane will, if it is designated in its
certificate of airworthiness as an aeroplane of
performance group C and if it is necessary for it to
be flown solely by reference to instruments for any
period before reaching the minimum altitude for
safe flight on the first stage of the route to be flown,
stated in, or calculated from the information
contained in, the operations manual, during such
period also satisfy condition (c) in regulation 7.

(e) The aeroplane will, in the meteorological condi-
tions expected for the flight, in the event of any
one power unit becoming inoperative at any
point on its route or on any planned diversion
therefrom, and with the other power units or
power unit, if any, operating within the specified
maximum continuous power conditions —

(i) in the case of an aeroplane designated as an
aeroplane of performance group C, be
capable of continuing the flight at altitudes
not less than the relevant minimum altitudes
for safe flight stated in, or calculated from
the information contained in, the operations
manual to a point 1,500 feet above an
aerodrome at which a safe landing can be
made and after arrival at that point be
capable of maintaining that height;

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(ii) in the case of an aeroplane designated as
an aeroplane of performance group D, be
capable of continuing the flight to a point
1,000 feet above a place at which a safe
landing can be made:
Provided that in assessing the ability of the

aeroplane to satisfy this condition it shall not be
assumed to be capable of flying at any point on
its route at an altitude exceeding the perfor-
mance ceiling with all power units operating
specified as being appropriate to its estimated
weight at that point.

(f) The landing weight of the aeroplane will not
exceed the maximum landing weight specified
for the altitude and the expected air temperature
for the estimated time of landing at the
aerodrome at which it is intended to land and at
any alternate aerodrome.

(g) The distance required by the aeroplane to land
from a height of 50 feet does not, at the
aerodrome at which it is intended to land and at
any alternate aerodrome, exceed 70 per centum
of the landing distance available on the most
suitable runway for a landing in still air
conditions, or on the runway that may be
required for the landing because of the forecast
wind conditions, and for the purposes of this
subparagraph the distance required to land from
a height of 50 feet shall be taken to be that
specified as being appropriate to —

(i) the landing weight;
(ii) the altitude at the aerodrome;
(iii) the expected air temperature for the esti-

mated time of landing at the aerodrome;
(iv) (a) a level surface in the case of runways

usable in both directions;
(b) the average slope of the runway in

the case of runways usable in only
one direction; and

(v) (a) still air conditions in the case of the
most suitable runway for a landing in still
air conditions;

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(b) not more than 50 per centum of the
forecast wind component opposite to
the direction of landing or not less
than 150 per centum of the forecast
wind component in the direction of
landing in the case of the runway that
may be required for landing because
of the forecast wind conditions.

(2) An aeroplane designated as aforesaid as an
aeroplane of performance group D shall not fly for the
purpose of public transport (except for the sole purpose of
training persons to perform duties in aircraft) at night or
when the cloud ceiling or visibility prevailing at the
aerodrome of departure and forecast for the estimated time
of landing at the aerodrome at which it is intended to land
and at any alternate aerodrome are less than 1,000 feet and
one mile respectively.

9. With reference to Article 24(1) of the Order an
aeroplane in respect of which there is in force under the
Order a certificate of airworthiness designating the aero-
plane as being of performance group X shall not fly for the
purpose of public transport, except for the sole purpose of
training persons to perform duties in aircraft, unless the
weight of the aeroplane at the commencement of the take-
off run is such that the following conditions are satisfied —

(a) (i) That weight does not exceed the
maximum take-off weight specified for
the altitude at the aerodrome at which the
take-off is to be made, or for the altitude
and the air temperature at such aerodrome,
as the case may be.

(ii) The minimum effective take-off runlength
required, specified as being appropriate to —
(a) the weight of the aeroplane at the

commencement of the take-off run;
(b) the attitude at the aerodrome;
(c) the air temperature at the time of

take-off;
(d) the overall slope of the take-off run

available; and

Public transport
aeroplanes in
performance
group X.

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(e) not more than 50 per centum of the
reported wind component opposite to
the direction of take-off or not less than
150 per centum of the reported wind
component in the direction of take-off,

does not exceed the take-off run available at
the aerodrome at which the take-off is to be
made.

(iii) (a) The take-off flight path with one
power unit inoperative, specified as
being appropriate to —
(i) the weight of the aeroplane at the

commencement of the take-off run;
(ii) the altitude at the aerodrome; and

(iii) not more than 50 per centum of the
reported wind component opposite
to the direction of take-off or not
less than 150 per centum of the
reported wind component in the
direction of take-off,

and plotted from a point 50 feet above
the end of the minimum effective take-
off runway length required at the
aerodrome at which the take-off is to
be made, shows that the aeroplane will
thereafter clear any obstacle in its path
by a vertical interval of not less than
the greater of 50 feet or 35 feet plus
one hundredth of the distance from the
point on the ground below the intended
line of flight of the aeroplane nearest to
the obstacle to the end of the take-off
distance available, measured along the
intended line of flight of the aeroplane.

(b) For the purpose of subparagraph (a),
an obstacle shall be deemed to be in
the path of the aeroplane if the
distance from the obstacle to the
nearest point on the ground below the
intended line of flight does not
exceed —

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LRO 1/2002 STATUTE LAW OF THE BAHAMAS

(i) a distance of 200 feet plus half the
wing span of the aeroplane plus one-
eighth of the distance from such point
to the end of the take-off distance
available measured along the intended
line of flight; or

(ii) 5,000 feet,
whichever is the less.

(c) In assessing the ability of the aeroplane to
satisfy this condition, insofar as it relates to
flight path, it shall not be assumed to make
a change of direction of a radius less than
the radius of steady turn corresponding to
an angle of bank of 15 degrees.

(b) (i) (a) Subject to subparagraph (b), the weight of
the aeroplane at any point on the route or
any planned diversion therefrom, having
regard to the fuel and oil expected to be
consumed up to that point, shall be such
that the aeroplane, with one power unit
inoperative and the other power unit or
units operating within the maximum
continuous power conditions specified,
will be capable of a rate of climb of at
least K(Vso/100)2 feet per minute at an
altitude not less than the minimum altitude
for safe flight stated in or calculated from
the information contained in the
operations manual, where Vso is in knots
and K has the value of 797-1060/N, N
being the number of power units installed

(b) As an alternative to (a), the aeroplane may be
flown at an altitude from which, in the event
of failure of one power unit, it is capable of
reaching an aerodrome where a landing can
be made in accordance with condition (c) (ii)
in this regulation relating to an alternate aero-
drome. In that case, the weight of the
aeroplane shall be such that, with the
remaining power unit or units operating
within the maximum continuous power


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STATUTE LAW OF THE BAHAMAS LRO 1/2002

conditions specified, it is capable of main-
taining a minimum altitude on the route to such
aerodrome of 2,000 feet above all obstacles
within five nautical miles on either side of the
intended track and —

(i) the rate of climb, specified for the
appropriate weight and altitude, used in
calculating the flight path shall be
reduced by an amount equal to
K(Vso/100) 2 feet per minute;

(ii) the aeroplane shall comply with the
climb requirements of condition (b)(i)(a)
at 1,000 feet above the chosen aero-
drome;

(iii) account shall be taken of the effect of
wind and temperature on the flight path;
and

(iv) the weight of the aeroplane may be
assumed to be progressively reduced
by normal consumption of fuel and oil.

(ii) An aeroplane having four power units shall,
if any two power units become inoperative
at any point along the route or any planned
diversion therefrom, being a point more
than 90 minutes flying time (assuming all
power units to be operating) from the
nearest aerodrome at which a landing can be
made in compliance with condition (c)(ii) of
this regulation relating to an alternate aero-
drome, be capable of continuing the flight at
an altitude of not less than 1,000 feet above
ground level to a point above that
aerodrome. In assessing the ability of the
aeroplane to satisfy this condition, it shall
be assumed that the remaining power units
will operate within the specified maximum
continuous power conditions, and account
shall be taken of the temperature and wind
conditions expected for the flight.

(c) (i) The landing weight of the aeroplane will not
exceed the maximum landing weight speci-
fied for the altitude at the aerodrome at
which it is intended to land and at any
alternate aerodrome.

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LRO 1/2002 STATUTE LAW OF THE BAHAMAS

(ii) The required landing runway lengths respec-
tively specified as being appropriate to the
aerodromes of intended destination and the
alternate aerodromes do not exceed at the
aerodrome at which it is intended to land or
at any alternate aerodrome, as the case may
be, the landing distance available on —
(a) the most suitable runway for a

landing in still air conditions; and
(b) the runway that may be required for

landing because of the forecast wind
conditions,

the required landing runway lengths being taken
to be those specified as being appropriate to —

(a) the landing weight;
(b) the altitude at the aerodrome;
(c) still air conditions in the case of the

most suitable runway for a landing in
still air conditions; and

(d) not more than 50 per centum of the
forecast wind component opposite to
the direction of landing or not less than
150 per centum of the forecast wind
component in the direction of landing
in the case of the runway that may be
required for landing because of the
forecast wind conditions.

10. With reference to Article 64 of the Order, the
conditions under which noise and vibration may be caused
by aircraft (including military aircraft) on Government
aerodromes, licensed aerodromes or on aerodromes at
which the manufacture, repair or maintenance of aircraft is
carried out by persons carrying on business as
manufacturers or repairers of aircraft, shall be as follows,
that is to say, that, whether in the course of the manufac-
ture of the aircraft or otherwise —

(a) the aircraft is taking off or landing; or
(b) the aircraft is moving on the ground or water; or
(c) the engines are being operated in the aircraft —

(i) for the purpose of ensuring their satisfac-
tory performance;

Noise and
vibration caused
by aircraft on
aerodromes.

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STATUTE LAW OF THE BAHAMAS LRO 1/2002

(ii) for the purpose of bringing them to a
proper temperature in preparation for, or at
the end of, a flight; or

(iii) for the purpose of ensuring that the instru-
ments, accessories or other components of
the aircraft are in a satisfactory condition.

SCHEDULE (Regulation 6)

WEIGHT AND PERFORMANCE OF PUBLIC TRANSPORT
AEROPLANES HAVING NO PERFORMANCE GROUP
CLASSIFICATION IN THEIR CERTIFICATES OF AIR-

WORTHINESS.
PART I

APPLICATION OF CONDITIONS
(a) Conditions (1) and (2) apply to all aeroplanes to

which regulation 6 applies.
(b) Conditions (3) and (9) inclusive apply to all

aeroplanes to which regulation 6 applies —
(i) of which the specified maximum total

weight authorized exceeds 12,500lbs.; or
(ii) of which the specified maximum total

weight authorized does not exceed
12,500lbs. and which comply with neither
condition (1)(a) nor condition (1)(b).

(c) Conditions (10) to (17) inclusive apply to all
aeroplanes to which regulation 6 applies, of
which the specified maximum total weight
authorized does not exceed 12,500lbs., and
which comply with condition (1)(a) or condition
(1)(b) or with both these conditions.

PART II
CONDITIONS TO WHICH REGULATION 6 RELATES

All aeroplanes
(1) Either —
(a) the wing loading of the aeroplane does not exceed 20 lbs.

per square foot; or
(b) the stalling speed of the aeroplane in the landing

configuration does not exceed 60 knots; or

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LRO 1/2002 STATUTE LAW OF THE BAHAMAS

(c) the aeroplane, with any one of its power units inoperative
and the remaining power unit or units operating within the
maximum continuous power conditions specified, is
capable of a gradient of climb of at least 1 in 200 at an
altitude of 5,000 feet in the specified international standard
atmosphere.
(2) The weight of the aeroplane at the commencement of

the take-off run does not exceed the maximum take-off weight,
if any, specified for the altitude and the air temperature at the
aerodrome at which the take-off is to be made.
Aeroplanes of a specified maximum total weight authorized
exceeding 12,500lbs., and aeroplanes of a specified maximum
total weight authorized not exceeding 12,500lbs. which comply
with neither condition (1)(a) nor condition (1)(b).

(3) (a) The distance required by the aeroplane to attain a
height of 50 feet, with all power units operating within the
maximum take-off power conditions specified, does not exceed
the take-off run available at the aerodrome at which the take-off
is to be made.

(b) The distance required by the aeroplane to attain a
height of 50 feet with all power units operating within the
maximum take-off power conditions specified, when multiplied
by a factor of either 1.33 for aeroplanes having two power units
or by a factor of 1.18 for aeroplanes having four power units,
does not exceed the emergency distance available at the
aerodrome at which the take-off is to be made.

(c) For the purpose of sub-paragraphs (a) and (b) the
distance required by the aeroplane to attain a height of 50 feet
shall be that appropriate to —
(i) the weight of the aeroplane at the commencement of the

take-off run;
(ii) the altitude at the aerodrome;
(iii) the air temperature at the aerodrome;
(iv) the slope of the surface of the aerodrome in the direction of

take-off over the take-off run available and the emergency
distance available, respectively; and

(v) not more than 50 per centum of the reported wind
component opposite to the direction of take-off or not less
than 150 per centum of the reported wind component in the
direction of take-off.
(4) (a) The take-off flight path with one power unit

inoperative and the remaining power unit or units operating within
the maximum take-off power conditions specified, appropriate to —
(i) the weight of the aeroplane at the commencement of the take-

off run;
(ii) the altitude at the aerodrome;

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STATUTE LAW OF THE BAHAMAS LRO 1/2002

(iii) the air temperature at the aerodrome; and
(iv) not more than 50 per centum of the reported wind

component opposite to the direction of take-off or not less
than 150 per centum of the reported wind component in the
direction of take-off,

and plotted from a point 50 feet above the end of the appropriate
factored distance required for take-off under condition (3)(b) of
this regulation at the aerodrome at which the take-off is to be
made, shows that the aeroplane will clear any obstacle in its path
by a vertical interval of at least 35 feet except that if it is
intended that an aeroplane shall change its direction by more
than 15 degrees the vertical interval shall be not less than 50 feet
during the change of direction.

(b) For the purpose of subparagraph (4)(a) an obstacle
shall be deemed to be in the path of the aeroplane if the distance
from the obstacle to the nearest point on the ground below the
intended line of flight does not exceed —
(i) a distance of 200 feet plus half the wing span of the

aeroplane plus one-eighth of the distance from such point
to the end of the take-off distance available, measured
along the intended line of flight; or

(ii) 5,000 feet,
whichever is the less.

(c) In assessing the ability of the aeroplane to satisfy this
condition, it shall not be assumed to make a change of direction
of a radius less than a radius of steady turn corresponding to an
angle of bank of 15 degrees.

(5) The aeroplane will, in the meteorological conditions
expected for the flight, in the event of any one power unit
becoming inoperative at any point on its route or on any planned
diversion therefrom and with the other power units or unit
operating within the maximum continuous power conditions
specified, be capable of continuing the flight clearing obstacles
within 10 nautical miles either side of the intended track by a
vertical interval of at least —
(a) 1,000 feet when the gradient of the flight path is not less

than zero; or
(b) 2,000 feet when the gradient of the flight path is less than

zero, to an aerodrome at which it can comply with
condition (9), and on arrival over such aerodrome the flight
path shall have a positive gradient of not less than 1 in 200
at 1,500 feet above the aerodrome.
(6) The aeroplane will, in the meteorological conditions

expected for the flight, at any point on its route or on any planned
diversion therefrom be capable of climbing at a gradient of at least
1 in 50, with all power units operating within the maximum
continuous power conditions specified, at the following altitudes —

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LRO 1/2002 STATUTE LAW OF THE BAHAMAS

(a) the minimum altitudes for safe flight on each stage of the
route to be flown or of any planned diversion therefrom
specified in, or calculated from the information contained
in the operations manual relating to the aeroplane; and

(b) the minimum altitudes necessary for compliance with condi-
tions (5) and (7), as appropriate.
(7) If on the route to be flown or any planned diversion

therefrom, the aeroplane will be engaged in a flight over water
during which at any point it may be more than 90 minutes flying
time in still air from the nearest shore, it will in the event of two
power units becoming inoperative during such time and with the
other power units or unit operating within the maximum
continuous power conditions specified be capable of continuing
the flight having regard to the meteorological conditions
expected for the flight, clearing all obstacles within 10 nautical
miles either side of the intended track by a vertical interval of at
least 1,000 feet, to an aerodrome at which a safe landing can be
made.

(8) The landing weight of the aeroplane will not exceed
the maximum landing weight, if any, specified for the altitude
and the expected air temperature for the estimated time of
landing at the aerodrome at which it is intended to land and at
any alternate aerodrome.

(9) The distance required by the aeroplane to land from
a height of 50 feet does not, at the aerodrome at which it is
intended to land and at any alternate aerodrome, exceed 70 per
centum of the landing distance available on —
(i) the most suitable runway for a landing in still air

conditions; and
(ii) the runway that may be required for landing because of the

forecast wind conditions,
the distance required to land from a height of 50 feet being taken
to be that appropriate to —
(a) the landing weight;
(b) the altitude at the aerodrome;
(c) the temperature in the specified international standard

atmosphere appropriate to the altitude at the aerodrome;
(d) (i) a level surface in the case of runways usable in both

directions;
(ii) the average slope of the runway in the case of runways

usable in one direction; and
(e) (i) still air conditions in the case of the most suitable

runways for a landing in still air conditions;

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STATUTE LAW OF THE BAHAMAS LRO 1/2002

(ii) not more than 50 per centum of the forecast wind
component opposite to the direction of landing or not
less than 150 per centum of the forecast wind
component in the direction of landing in the case of
the runway that may be required for landing because
of the forecast wind conditions.

Aeroplanes of specified maximum total weight authorized not
exceeding 12,500lbs. and which comply with either condition
(1)(a) or condition (1)(b), or with both those conditions.

(10) If the aeroplane is engaged in flight at night or when
the cloud ceiling or visibility prevailing at the aerodrome of
departure and forecast for the estimated time of landing at the
aerodrome of destination or at any alternate aerodrome, are less
than 1,000 feet and 1 mile respectively, it will, with any one of
its power units inoperative and the remaining power unit or units
operating within the maximum continuous power conditions
specified, be capable of climbing at a gradient of at least 1 in
200 at an altitude of 2,500 feet in the specified international
standard atmosphere.

(11) (a) The distance required by the aeroplane to attain a
height of 50 feet with all power units operating within the
maximum take-off power conditions specified, does not exceed
the take-off run available at the aerodrome at which the take-off
is to be made.

(b) The distance required by the aeroplane to attain a
height of 50 feet, with all power units operating within the
maximum take-off power conditions specified, when multiplied
by a factor of 1.33 does not exceed the emergency distance
available at the aerodrome at which the take-off is to be made.

(c) For the purpose of sub-paragraphs (a) and (b) the
distance required by the aeroplane to attain a height of 50 feet
shall be that appropriate to —
(i) the weight of the aeroplane at the commencement of the

take-off run;
(ii) the altitude at the aerodrome;
(iii) the temperature in the specified international standard

atmosphere appropriate to the altitude at the aerodrome, or
if greater, the air temperature at the aerodrome less 15
degrees centigrade;

(iv) the slope of the surface of the aerodrome in the direction of
take-off over the take-off run available and the emergency
distance available, respectively; and

(v) not more than 50 per centum of the reported wind
component opposite to the direction of take-off or not less
than 150 per centum of the reported wind component in the
direction of take-off.

CIVIL AVIATION [CH.284 – 781






LRO 1/2002 STATUTE LAW OF THE BAHAMAS

(12) The take-off flight path, with all power units operating
within the maximum take-off power conditions specified, appro-
priate to —
(i) the weight of the aeroplane at the commencement of the

take-off run;
(ii) the altitude at the aerodrome;
(iii) the temperature in the specified international standard

atmosphere appropriate to the altitude at the aerodrome, or,
if greater, the air temperature at the aerodrome less 15
degrees centigrade; and

(iv) not more than 50 per centum of the reported wind
component opposite to the direction of take-off or not less
than 150 per centum of the reported wind component in the
direction of take-off,

and plotted from a point 50 feet above the end of the factored
distance required for take-off under condition (11)(b), at the
aerodrome at which the take-off is to be made, shows that the
aeroplane will clear any obstacle lying within 200 feet plus half
the wing span of the aeroplane on either side of its path by a
vertical interval of at least 35 feet. In assessing the ability of the
aeroplane to satisfy this condition it shall not be assumed to
make a change of direction of a radius less than a radius of
steady turn corresponding to an angle of bank of 15 degrees.

(13) The aeroplane will, in the meteorological conditions
expected for the flight, in the event of any one power unit
becoming inoperative at any point on its route or on any planned
diversion therefrom and with the other power unit or units, if
any, operating within the maximum continuous power
conditions specified, be capable of continuing the flight so as to
reach a point above a place at which a safe landing can be made
at a suitable height for such landing.

(14) The aeroplane will, in the meteorological conditions
expected for the flight, at any point on its route or any planned
diversion therefrom, be capable of climbing at a gradient of at least
1 in 50, with all power units operating within the maximum
continuous power conditions specified, at the following altitudes —
(a) the minimum altitudes for safe flight on each stage of the

route to be flown or on any planned diversion therefrom
specified in, or calculated from, the information contained
in the operations manual relating to the aeroplane; and

(b) the minimum altitudes necessary for compliance with
condition (13).

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STATUTE LAW OF THE BAHAMAS LRO 1/2002

(15) If on the route to be flown or any planned diversion
therefrom the aeroplane will be engaged in a flight over water
during which at any point it may be more than 30 minutes flying
time in still air from the nearest shore, it will, in the event of one
power unit becoming inoperative during such time and with the
other power unit or units operating within the maximum
continuous power conditions specified, be capable of climbing at
a gradient of at least 1 in 200 at an altitude of 5,000 feet in the
specified international standard atmosphere.

(16) The landing weight of the aeroplane will not exceed
the maximum landing weight, if any, specified for the altitude
and the expected air temperature for the estimated time of
landing at the aerodrome at which it is intended to land and at
any alternate aerodrome.

(17) The distance required by the aeroplane to land from
a height of 50 feet does not, at the aerodrome at which it is
intended to land and at any alternate aerodrome, exceed 70 per
centum, or, if a visual approach and landing will be possible in
the meteorological conditions forecast for the estimated time of
landing, 80 per centum of the landing distance available on —
(i) the most suitable runway for a landing in still air

conditions; and
(ii) the runway that may be required for landing because of the

forecast wind conditions,
the distance required to land from a height of 50 feet being taken
to be that appropriate to —
(a) the landing weight;
(b) the altitude at the aerodrome;
(c) the temperature in the specified international standard atmo-

sphere appropriate to the altitude at the aerodrome;
(d) (i) a level surface in the case of runways usable in both

directions;
(ii) the average slope of the runway in the case of runways

usable in only one direction; and
(e) (i) still air conditions in the case of the most suitable

runway for a landing in still air conditions;
(ii) not more than 50 per centum of the forecast wind

component opposite to the direction of landing or not less
than 150 per centum of the forecast wind component in the
direction of landing in the case of the runway that may be
required for landing because of the forecast wind condi-
tions.
Read Entire Law on laws.bahamas.gov.bs