Antarctic Regulations 1998

Link to law: http://www.bermudalaws.bm/Laws/Annual%20Laws/1998/Statutory%20Instruments/Antarctic%20Regulations%201998.pdf

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Antarctic Regulations 1998
Title 20
Laws of Bermuda Item 19(a)

1989 Revision 1

BERMUDA STATUTORY INSTRUMENT

BR 11/1998

THE ANTARCTIC REGULATIONS 1998

[made under sections 9(1), 10(1), 11(1), 14(1), 15, 25(1) and (3), 29 and 32
of the Antarctic Act 1994 of the United Kingdom as extended to Bermuda

by the Antarctic Act (Overseas Territories) Order 1995 {title 20 item 19] and
brought into operation on 30 January 1998]

Citation and commencement
1 These Regulations may be cited as the Antarctic Regulations
1998 and shall come into operation on the 30th day of January 1998.

Interpretation
2 (1) In these Regulations, "the Act" means the Antarctic Act
1994, and expressions used in these Regulations have, unless the
contrary intention appears, the meaning which they bear in the Act.

(2) Any reference in these Regulations to a communication "in
writing" shall include a reference to a communication by telex, facsimile
or other similar instantaneous means which produces a document
containing a text of the communication.

(3) Any reference in these Regulations to a numbered
regulation shall be construed as a reference to the regulation bearing
that number in these Regulations.

(4) Any period of time specified in these Regulations by
reference to days, working days or months—

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(a) where such period is expressed to begin after a
particular date, shall begin on the first day after that
date, and shall be inclusive of the last day unless that
day falls on a Saturday, Sunday, Christmas Day, Good
Friday or any other day appointed by law to be a public
holiday in Bermuda, in which case the period shall run
to the immediately following working day; and

(b) where such period is expressed to run or to expire before
a particular date or event, the period shall be calculated
to expire on the last working day before the particular
date or the date of that event.

(5) In computing any period of time specified in these
Regulations by reference to working days there shall be disregarded the
whole of any Saturday, Sunday, Christmas Day, Good Friday or any
other day appointed by law to be a public holiday.

Service of documents
3 (1) Anything required to be served on any person unless these
Regulations shall be set out in a notice in writing which may be served
either—

(a) by delivering it to that person;

(b) by leaving it at his proper address;

(c) by sending it by post to that address; or

(d) by sending it to him at that address by telex, facsimile or
other similar instantaneous means which produces a
document containing a text of the communication, in
which event the document shall be regarded as served
when it is transmitted,

and where the person is a body corporate the document may be served,
by any of these means, upon the Secretary of that body.

(2) When a document is sent by post it shall be deemed to have
been received [seven] working days after despatch if posted to an address
within Bermuda and [fifteen] working days if posted to an address
elsewhere.

(3) For the purposes of this regulation the proper address of
any person shall, in the case of a body corporate, be the registered or
principal office of that body, and in any other case, shall be the last
known address of the person.

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1989 Revision 3

PART 2

PERMITS

Applications for permits under sections 3, 4, 5 and 6 of the Act
4 (1) An application for a permit under section 3, 4, 5 or 6 of the
Act shall be made to the Governor in such form, and accompanied by
such number of copies, as he may require.

(2) No later than ten days after making the application, the
applicant shall cause notice of the application to be published in the
London Gazette in such form and containing such information as the
Governor may require.

(3) The applicant shall, during the period the application is
pending—

(a) make available a copy of the application for inspection
during normal office hours by any person who may so
request; and

(b) provide copies of the application to any person on receipt
of a request in writing, subject to payment of reasonable
charges for supplying the copies, including postage.

Initial Environmental Evaluation
5 (1) If the Governor considers that the activity for which an
application has been made under regulation 4 is likely to have more than
a negligible impact on the environment of Antarctica, he shall, unless he
has required the applicant to submit a draft Comprehensive
Environmental Evaluation in accordance with regulation 6(1), require the
applicant to submit to him an Initial Environmental Evaluation.

(2) An Initial Environmental Evaluation shall be in such form,
and accompanied by such number of copies, as the Governor may
require and shall contain sufficient information for the Governor to be
able to assess—

(a) the scale of the impact which the proposed activity may
have on the environment of Antarctica;

(b) whether, in the light of existing and known planned
activities, it may have a cumulative impact; and

(c) whether there may be alternative ways of carrying out
the proposed activity which might lessen the
environmental impact or possible cumulative impact.

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(3) The applicant shall, during the period the application is
pending—

(a) make available a copy of the Initial Environmental
Evaluation for inspection during normal office hours by
any person who may so request; and

(b) provide copies of the Initial Environmental Evaluation to
any person on receipt of a request in writing, subject to
payment of reasonable charges for supplying the copies,
including postage.

(4) The Governor shall annually send to the Secretary of State
a list of the Initial Environmental Evaluations submitted to the Governor
in accordance with this regulation during the preceding twelve months.

Comprehensive Environmental Evaluation
6 (1) If the Governor at any time after the making of an
application considers that the activity which is the subject of the
application is likely to have more than a minor or transitory impact on
the environment of Antarctica, he shall require the applicant to submit to
him a draft Comprehensive Environmental Evaluation.

(2) Such draft Comprehensive Environmental Evaluation shall
be in such form, and accompanied by such number of copies, as the
Governor may require and shall contain sufficient information for the
Governor to be able to consider or determine—

(a) possible alternatives to the proposed activity, including
the alternative of not proceeding with it;

(b) the initial environmental reference state with which
predicted changes are to be compared, and the likely
future environmental state in the absence of the
proposed activity;

(c) whether the methods and data used to forecast the
impacts of the proposed activity are satisfactory for that
purpose;

(d) the nature, extent, duration and intensity of the likely
direct impacts of the proposed activity;

(e) possible indirect or second order impacts of the
proposed activity;

(f) any cumulative impacts of the proposed activity in the
light of existing activities and other known planned
activities;

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(g) the measures which could be taken to minimise or
mitigate impacts of the proposed activity, and whether a
monitoring programme to verify foreseen impacts or
detect unforeseen impacts, and provide early warning of
any adverse effects of the activity, should be provided
for;

(h) the measures which could be taken to deal promptly and
effectively with accidents;

(i) whether there may be any unavoidable impacts of the
proposed activity;

(j) the effects of the proposed activity on the conduct of
scientific research and on other existing uses and
values; and

(k) whether there are gaps in knowledge or uncertainties
with regard to the possible impact of the proposed
activity.

(3) When so required by the Governor, the applicant shall
submit to him a final Comprehensive Environmental Evaluation in such
form, and accompanied by such number of copies, as the Governor may
require.

(4) When making a requirement under paragraph (3), the
Governor shall provide the applicant with—

(a) any comments in writing on the draft Comprehensive
Environmental Evaluation which have been received by
the Governor from any person in accordance with
paragraph (6);

(b) any comments on such Evaluation from another
Contracting Party;

(c) any advice in respect of such Evaluation from the
Committee for Environmental Protection established
under the Protocol; and

(d) an account of the consideration by the Antarctic Treaty
Consultative Meeting of such Evaluation in the light of
such advice,

and the applicant shall, in preparing the final Comprehensive
Environmental Evaluation, take into account such comments, advice
and account and include or summarise them in the final Comprehensive
Environmental Evaluation.

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(5) The Governor shall as soon as conveniently may be after
receipt transmit the draft and the final Comprehensive Environmental
Evaluation to the Secretary of State and shall provide any person with
copies on request in writing subject to payment of reasonable charges for
supplying the copies, including postage.

(6) The Governor shall, by a notice published in the London
Gazette, notify receipt by him of each draft Comprehensive
Environmental Evaluation and each final Comprehensive Environmental
Evaluation, state where the same may be inspected, and where and how
copies may be obtained and invite comments in writing, in the case of a
draft Comprehensive Environmental Evaluation, within ninety days of
publication of the notice and, in the case of a final Comprehensive
Environmental Evaluation, within thirty days of the publication of the
notice.

(7) The Governor in taking his decision whether to grant a
permit shall take into account any comments in writing submitted to him
by any person in accordance with paragraph (6), if the comments are
received within the relevant period specified in that paragraph.

Refusal of Permits under sections 3, 4, 5 and 6 of the Act
7 If the Governor decides not to grant a permit under section 3, 4,
5 or 6 of the Act he shall so inform the applicant in writing giving his
reasons.

Applications for and refusals of permits under sections 11 and 12 of
the Act
8 (1) An application for a permit under section 11 or 12 of the
Act shall be made to the Governor in such form, and accompanied by
such number of copies, as he may require.

(2) If the Governor decides not to grant such a permit he shall
so inform the applicant in writing giving his reasons.

Production of permits
9 (1) Subject to the provisions of this regulation, where there is
reason to believe that a person has carried out (or is carrying out or may
be about to carry out) an activity for which a permit is required by
section 3(1), 4(1), 5(1), 6(1), 7(1), 8(1), 9(1) or 11(1) of the Act, an
authorised person may require that person to produce, or cause to be
produced, within five days after the request has been made, a permit
granted under the Act authorising that activity.

(2) Where a permit has been granted to a person in respect of
another specified person or of persons of a specified description, the

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1989 Revision 7

requirement in paragraph (1) to produce the permit shall apply also to
such person or persons.

(3) The requirements of the preceding paragraphs may be
satisfied by the production of a true photocopy of the permit.

(4) An authorised person shall have the power to inspect and
copy any permit which he has the power pursuant to this regulation to
require to be produced to him.

(5) For the purpose of this regulation—

"authorised person" means the Governor and the Secretary of
State and—

(a) in Bermuda—

(i) a justice of the peace;

(ii) a police officer;

(iii) a customs or immigration officer; or

(iv) any other person authorised by the Governor in
writing for the purpose of this regulation either
generally or in a particular case,

(b) anywhere in Antarctica—

(i) a station manager (that is to say any person who
is for the time being running a station in
Antarctica on behalf of the Director of the British
Antarctic Survey);

(ii) any person authorised by the Governor in
writing for the purpose of this regulation either
generally or in a particular case; or

(iii) in respect of permits granted under section 12 of
the Act, any person designated as an observer
by a party to the Antarctic Treaty in accordance
with Article VII thereof;

(c) only in the British Antarctica Territory—

(i) a magistrate of the British Antarctic Territory; or

(ii) a public officer of the British Antarctic Territory;

(d) south of the Antarctic Convergence, in respect of permits
granted under section 11 of the Act, any person
designated as an inspector by a Member of the

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Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine
Living Resources under Article XXIV of the Convention;

(e) in respect of a British vessel in the seas south of 60
degrees South latitude

(i) a British naval officer; or

(ii) the master of a vessel operated by or on behalf
of the British Antarctic Survey.

Revocation and suspension of permits
10 (1) Subject to the provisions of this regulation, the Governor
may revoke or suspend wholly or in part any permit granted under the
Act; and where a permit has been granted in respect of more than one
specified person (or vessel or aircraft), or in respect of persons (or vessels
or aircraft) of a description specified in the permit, the revocation or
suspension may be limited to such persons (or such vessels or aircraft),
or to persons (or vessels or aircraft) of such description, as may be
specified by the Governor in the notice of revocation or suspension.

(2) Save as provided in paragraph (3), the Governor may
exercise his powers under paragraph (1) only after giving twenty-eight
days notice to the permit-holder of his intention to do so and after due
consideration of any representations made in writing by or on behalf of
the permit-holder (or any person specified or of a description specified in
the permit).

(3) If, by reason of the urgency of the matter, it appears to the
Governor to be necessary for him to do so he may provisionally suspend
a permit without complying with the requirements of paragraph (2), but
he shall in any such case comply with those requirements as soon
thereafter as is reasonably practicable, and shall then either—

(a) revoke the provisional suspension of the permit; or

(b) substitute therefor a definitive revocation or suspension
which, if a definitive suspension, may be for the same or
a different period as the provisional suspension (if any).

(4) The powers vested in the Governor by paragraph (1) and
paragraph (3) may be exercised by them if it appears to him that—

(a) the permit was procured by fraud or misrepresentation;

(b) the application for the permit contained a material error
or omission;

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(c) the holder of the permit, or a person or persons specified
in it, or of a description specified in it, are not fit and
proper persons to carry out an activity authorised by the
permit;

(d) there has been a material change in the circumstances
under which an activity authorised by the permit would
be or is being carried out (including receipt by the
Governor of information as to the environmental impact
of the activity which was not previously available) such
that the continuation of the activity would have an
unacceptable impact on the Antarctic environment;

(e) the carrying out or continuation of an activity authorised
by the permit would be undesirable because of an
emergency which has arisen subsequent to the grant of
the permit;

(f) the person to whom the permit was granted (or any
person or persons specified in it or of a description
specified in it) will not be able to comply with a material
condition of the permit;

(g) there has been a breach of a condition of the permit;

(h) the holder of the permit has purposed to transfer, or has
given possession of, the permit (or a copy of it) to a
person who is not entitled to hold it; or

(i) the permit (or a copy of it) has been altered or defaced.

(5) The permit-holder or any person having possession or
custody of any permit which has been revoked or suspended under this
regulation shall surrender it and any copies of it to the Governor within a
reasonable time of being required by him to do so.

(6) References in this regulation to the "permit-holder" are
references to the person to whom any permit to which this Part applies
has been granted.

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PART 3

APPEALS

Appeals against revocation of permits granted under section 3, 4, 5
or 6 of the Act
11 (1) Subject to the modifications specified in paragraph (2) of
this regulation, Part 3 of the United Kingdom Regulations shall have
effect in Bermuda so as—

(a) to confer a right of appeal to the Antarctic Act Tribunal
("the Tribunal") established by regulation 11(1) of the
United Kingdom Regulations from and against the
revocation or suspension by the Governor under
regulation 10 of a permit granted under section 3, 4, 5
or 6 of the Act in its application to Bermuda under the
Order in Council ("Bermuda Appeals"), in the same way
as it confers a right of appeal from and against the
revocation or suspension by the Secretary of State under
regulation 10 of the United Kingdom Regulations of a
permit granted by the Secretary of State under sections
3, 4, 5 or 6 of the Act in the form it has effect in the
United Kingdom ("United Kingdom Appeals");

(b) to confer upon the Tribunal the like jurisdiction and
powers in relation to Bermuda Appeals as it has under
the United Kingdom Regulations in relation to United
Kingdom Appeals; and

(c) to make the like provision in relation to procedural and
other matters in relation to Bermuda islands Appeals as
is made in relation to United Kingdom Appeals by
regulation 13 of the United Kingdom Regulations.

(2) For the purpose of the application of Part 3 of the United
Kingdom Regulations in accordance with paragraph (1) above, the words
"Secretary of State" in regulations 11(3), 11(4), and 13(7)(b) of the United
Kingdom Regulations shall be replaced by the word "Governor".

(3) In this regulation—

(a) "the Order in Council" means the Antarctic Act 1994
(Overseas Territories) Order 1995; and

(b) "the United Kingdom Regulations" means the Antarctic
Regulations 1995 (SI 1995 No. 490).

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PART 4

SPECIAL AREAS

Restricted Areas
12 For the purposes of section 9(1) of the Act, the areas listed and
described in Schedule 1 to these Regulations are hereby designated as
areas restricted under the Protocol.

Antarctic Historic Sites and Monuments
13 For the purposes of section 10(1) of the Act, the sites and
monuments listed in Schedule 2 to these Regulations are hereby
designated as Antarctic Historic Sites and Monuments.

Protected Places
14 For the purposes of section 11(1) of the Act, the places listed in
Schedule 3 to these Regulations are hereby designated as places
protected under the Convention.

PART 5

OFFENCES UNDER THE ACT

Application of Part 5
15 This Part applies when the Governor has reasonable grounds for
believing that a United Kingdom national (hereinafter referred to as "the
suspect") has committed an offence under the Act (hereinafter referred to
as "the offence") and is in any part of Antarctica or, in respect of those
offences related to in section 29(1)(a), is in any part of the area south of
the Antarctic Convergence.

Arrest and conveyance in custody
16 (1) A court in Bermuda may, on the application of a person
entitled under section 28 of the Act to institute proceedings in that court
in respect of the offence, issue a warrant for the arrest of the suspect and
his conveyance in custody to Bermuda.

(2) Once arrested, the person the subject of the warrant
(hereinafter referred to as "the accused"), shall be deemed to be in legal
custody at any time when, being in the British Antarctic Territory (or any
other part of Antarctica), or other British territory, or on board a British
ship, British aircraft or British hovercraft, he is being taken under the
warrant to or from any place or being kept in custody under the warrant.

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(3) A person authorised by the warrant to take the accused to
or from any place or to keep him in custody (hereafter referred to as "the
authorised person") shall have all the powers, authority, protection and
privileges of a police officer.

(4) If the accused escapes he may be arrested without warrant
by a constable and taken to any place to which he may be taken under
the warrant.

(5) In paragraph (2)—

"British aircraft" means a British-controlled aircraft within the
meaning of section 92 of the Civil Aviation Act 1982
(application of criminal law to aircraft) or one of Her Majesty's
aircraft;

"British hovercraft" means a British-controlled hovercraft within
the meaning of that section as applied in relation to
hovercraft by virtue of provisions made under the Hovercraft
Act 1968 or one of Her Majesty's hovercraft; and

"British ship" means a British ship for the purpose of the
Merchant Shipping Acts 1894 to 1988 or one of Her Majesty's
ships;

and in this paragraph references to Her Majesty's aircraft, hovercraft or
ships are references to aircraft, hovercraft or, as the case may be, ships
belonging to or exclusively employed in the service of Her Majesty in right
of the Government of the United Kingdom.

(6) In paragraph (4) "police officer" means—

(a) in relation to Bermuda, any person who is a police officer
in Bermuda and any person who at the place in question
has under any enactment, including paragraph (3), the
powers of a police officer in Bermuda; or

(b) in relation to a British territory outside Bermuda, any
person who is a police officer in that territory or any
person who in that territory has the powers of a police
officer.

Physical evidence
17 (1) The authorised person may seize and detain any article
which may be evidence connected with the offence and convey it to
Bermuda.

(2) Where it is necessary for any article to be accompanied by
any certificate, affidavit or other verifying document the authorised

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person shall also furnish for transmission such document of that nature
as may be specified in any direction given by the Governor.

(3) Where the article consists of a document, the original or a
copy may be transmitted, and where it consists of any other article the
article itself or a description, photograph or other representation of it
may be transmitted.

Attendance of witnesses
18 (1) This regulation applies where the Governor is notified by the
court in Bermuda where the accused is being tried or is to be tried that a
United Kingdom national who has been called to give evidence
(hereinafter referred to as "the witness") has failed to comply with the
order of the court, or is believed by the court to be unlikely to comply,
and is in Antarctica or in the area south of the Antarctic Convergence, as
the case may be.

(2) If the Governor receives a notification in accordance with
paragraph (1) he may issue a warrant for the arrest of the witness.

(3) The provisions of paragraphs (2) to (6) of regulation 16 shall
apply to the arrest and conveyance in custody of the witness as they
apply to the accused.

(4) Once in the Bermuda the witness shall be delivered by the
authorised person to the court which made the notification under
paragraph (1).

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SCHEDULE 1 (regulation 12)

RESTRICTED AREAS

Specially Protected Area No. 1
Taylor Rookery, MacRobertson Land

Latitude 67 degrees 26'S; Longitude 60 degrees 50'E

The Area consists of the whole of the northernmost rock exposure on the
east side of Taylor Glacier, MacRobertson Land (Lat. 67 degrees 26'S;
Longitude 60 degrees 50'E). The rookery is located on a low lying rock
outcrop in the south-west corner of a bay formed by Taylor Glacier to the
west, the polar ice cap to the south and the islands of Colbeck
Archipelago to the east. The Area is surrounded by sea ice to the north
and east. The Area is some 90 km west of Mawson station. There is ice-
free terrain adjacent to the glacier on the western boundary and to the
south the rock rises steeply to meet the ice of the plateau.

There are no boundary markers since the Area is easily defined by its
natural features.

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Specially Protected Area No. 2
Rookery Islands, Holme Bay, MacRobertson Land

Latitude 67 degrees 37'S; Longitude 62 degrees 33'E

The Rookery Islands are a group of small islands and rocks in the south-
western part of Holme Bay, MacRobertson Land, approximately 10 km to
the west of Mawson station. The Area comprises the islands and rocks
lying within the rectangular area shown on the maps below, the general
location of which is latitude 67 degrees 37'S, longitude 62 degrees 33'E.
There are no boundary markers delimiting the site.

There are approximately 75 small islands. They range in size from small
rocks which barely remain above water at high tide to the largest islands
of the group which are Giganteus Islands (approximately 400 m
Longitude, 400 m wide and 30 m wide and 30 m high) and Rookery
Island which is of similar size but slightly more elongated. Rookery
Island is the highest of the group reaching an altitude of 62 m.

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Specially Protected Area No. 3
Ardery Island and Odbert Island, Budd Coast

Lat. 66 degrees 22'S; Longitude 110 degrees 33'E

Ardery Island (Lat. 66 degrees 22'S, Longitude. 110 degrees 28' E) and
Odbert Island (Lat. 66 degrees 22'S, Longitude. 110 degrees 33'E) form
part of the Windmill Islands group lying in the eastern end of Vincennes
Bay off the Budd Coast. They are located 5 km and 0.6 km respectively
to the west of Robinson Ridge, south of Casey Station. Odbert Island is
approximately 2.5 km Longitude and 0.5 km wide. In some years the
island remains joined to Robinson Ridge on the mainland by sea ice.
Ardery Island is a steep ice-free island approximately 1 km Longitude
and 0.5 km wide, with an east-west orientation.

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Specially Protected Area No. 20
"College Valley", Caughley Beach, Cape Bird, Ross Island

Latitude 77 degrees 14'S; Longitude 166 degrees 23'E

The Area is in latitude 77 degrees 14'S, longitude 166 degrees 23'E, in
the northern part of the Cape Bird ice-free area. It lies between Northern
Rookery and Middle Rookery and is about 250 m south of the summer
research station, Cape Bird Hut.

The Area consists of the generally west-facing ice-free slopes lying
between the cliff top above Caughley Beach and a line parallel to and
about 100 m west of the edge of the Mount Bird Ice Cap, and between a
line south of the main stream bed of "Keble Valley" and the south ride of
"New College Valley". Its total area is about 10 hectares.

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SCHEDULE 2 (regulation 13)

ANTARCTIC HISTORIC SITES AND MONUMENTS

1. Flag mast erected in December 1965 at the South Geographical
Pole by the First Argentine Overland Polar Expedition.

2. Rock cairn erected in January 1961 and plaques at Syowa
Station (Latitude 69 degrees 00'S, Longitude 39 degrees 35'E) in memory
of Shin Fukushima.

3. Rock cairn and plaque on Proclamation Island, Enderby Land
(Latitude 65 degrees 51'S, Longitude 53 degrees 41'E), erected in
January 1930 by Sir Douglas Mawson to commemorate the British,
Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition of 1929-31.

4. Station building to which a bust of V.I. Lenin is fixed, together
with a plaque in memory of the conquest of the Pole of Inaccessibility by
Soviet Antarctic explorers in 1958 (Latitude 83 degrees 06' S, Longitude
54 degrees 58'E).

5. Rock cairn and plaque at Cape Bruce, MacRobertson Land
(Latitude 67 degrees 25'S, Longitude 60 degrees 47'E), erected in
February 1931 by Sir Douglas Mawson to commemorate the British,
Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition.

6. Rock cairn at Walkabout Rocks, Vestfold Hills, Princess
Elizabeth Land (Latitude 68 degrees 22'S, Longitude 78 degrees 33'E),
erected in 1939 by Sir Hubert Wilkins.

7. Stone with inscribed plaque, erected at Mirny Observatory,
Mabus Point (Latitude 66 degrees 33'S, Longitude 93 degrees 01'E), in
memory of Ivan Kharma.

8. Metal monument-sledge at Mirny Observatory, Mabus Point
(Latitude 66 degrees 33'S, Longitude 93 degrees 01'E), with plaque in
memory of Anatoly Shcheglov.

9. Cemetery on Buromskiy Island, near Mirny Observatory
(Latitude 66 degrees 32'S, Longitude 93 degrees 01'E), in which are
buried Soviet, Czechoslovak and GDR citizens, members of Soviet
Antarctic Expeditions.

10. Building (Magnetic observatory) at Dobrowolsky Station, Bunger
Hills (Latitude 66 degrees 16'S, Longitude 100 degrees 45'E), with plaque
in memory of the opening of Oasis Station in 1956.

11. Heavy tractor at Vostok Station (Latitude 78 degrees 28'S,
Longitude 106 degrees 48'E), with plaque in memory of the opening of
the station in 1957.

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12. Cross and plaque at Cape Denison, George V Land (Latitude 67
degrees 00'S, Longitude 142 degrees 42'E), erected in 1913 by Sir
Douglas Mawson. The cross and plaque commemorate Lieutenant B. E.
S. Ninnis and Dr X Mertz, members of the Australasian Antarctic
Expedition of 1911-14.

13. Hut at Cape Denison, George V Land (Latitude 67 degrees 00'S,
Longitude 142 degrees 42'E), built in January 1912 by Sir Douglas
Mawson for the Australasian Antarctic Expedition of 1911-14.

14. Remains of rock shelter at Inexpressible Island, Terra Nova Bay
(Latitude 74 degrees 54'S, Longitude 163 degrees 43'E), constructed in
March 1912 by Victor Campbell's Northern Party, British Antarctic
Expedition, 1910-13.

15. Hut at Cape Royds, Ross island (Latitude 77 degrees 38'S,
Longitude 166 degrees 07'E), built in February 1908 by Ernest
Shackleton.

16. Hut at Cape Evans, Ross Island (Latitude 77 degrees 38'S,
Longitude 166 degrees 24'E), built in February 1911 by Captain Robert
Falcon Scott.

17. Cross on Wind Vane Hill, Cape Evans, Ross Island (Latitude 77
degrees 38'S, Longitude 166 degrees 24'E), erected by the Ross Sea Party
of Ernest Shackleton's Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1914-16, in memory
of three members of the party who died in the vicinity in 1916.

18. Hut at Hut Point, Ross Island (Latitude 77 degrees 51'S,
Longitude 166 degrees 37'E), built in February 1902 by Captain Robert
Falcon Scott.

19. Cross at Hut Point, Ross Island (Latitude 77 degrees 51'S,
Longitude 166 degrees 37'E), erected in February 1904 by the British
Antarctic Expedition, 1901-04, in memory of T. Vince.

20. Cross on Observation Hill, Ross Island (Latitude 77 degrees 51'S,
Longitude 166 degrees 40'E), erected in January 1913 by the British
Antarctic Expedition 1910-13, in memory of Captain Robert Falcon
Scott's party which perished on the return journey from the South Pole,
March 1912.

21. Stone hut at Cape Crozier, Ross Island (Latitude 77 degrees
32'S, Longitude 169 degrees 18'E), constructed in July 1911 by Edward
Wilson's party (British Antarctic Expedition 1910-13).

22. Hut at Cape Adare (Latitude 71 degrees 17'S, Longitude 170
degrees 15'E), built in February 1899 during the Southern Cross
Expedition led by C. E. Borchgrevink.

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23. Grave at Cape Adare (Latitude 71 degrees 17'S, Longitude 170
degrees 15'E), of Norwegian biologist, Nicolai Hanson, a member of C.E.
Borchgrevink's Southern Cross' Expedition, 1899-1900. (The first
known grave in the Antarctic.)

24. Rock cairn, known as 'Amundsen's Cairn', on Mount Betty,
Queen Maud Range (Latitude 85 degrees 11'S, Longitude 163 degrees
45'W) erected by Roald Amundsen on 6 January, 1912, on his way back
to 'Framheim' from the South Pole.

25. Hut and plaque on Peter I Oy (Latitude 68 degrees 47'S,
Longitude 90 degrees 42'W), built by the Norwegian Captain Nils Larsen
in February 1929 at Framnaesodden.

26. Abandoned installations of Argentine Station 'General San
Martin' on Barry Island, Debenham Islands, Marguerite Bay (Latitude 68
degrees 08'S), Longitude 67 degrees 08'W), with cross, flag mast, and
monolith built in 1951.

27. Cairn with plaque on Megalestris Hill, Petermann Island
(Latitude 65 degrees 10'S, Longitude 64 degrees 10'W), erected in 1908
by the second French expedition led by J-B. Charcot.

28. Rock cairn at Port Charcot, Booth Island (Latitude 65 degrees
03'S, Longitude 64 degrees 01'W), with wooden pillar and plaque
inscribed with the names of the first French expedition led by J-B.
Charcot which wintered here in 1904 aboard Le Francais.

29. Lighthouse named 'Primero de Mayo' erected on Lambda Island,
Melchior Islands (Latitude 64 degrees 18'S, Longitude 62 degrees 59'W).

30. Shelter at Paradise Harbour (Latitude 64 degrees 49'S, Longitude
62 degrees 51'W), erected in 1950 near the Chilean Base 'Gabriel
Gonzales Videla' to honour Gabriel Gonzales Videla.

31. Memorial plaque marking the position of a former cemetery on
Deception Island (Latitude 62 degrees 59'S, Longitude 60 degrees 34'W)
where some 40 Norwegian whalers were buried in the first half of the
twentieth century.

32. Concrete monolith, near Arturo Prat Base on Greenwich Island
(Latitude 62 degrees 29'S, Longitude 59 degrees 40'W), erected in 1947.

33. Shelter and cross with plaque near Arturo Prat Base, Greenwich
Island (Latitude 62 degrees 30'S, Longitude 59 degrees 41'W), erected in
memory of Lieutenant-Commander Gonzalez Pacheco.

34. Bust of the Chilean naval hero Arturo Prat erected in 1947 at the
base of the same name on Greenwich Island (Latitude 62 degrees 30'S,
Longitude 59 degrees 41'W).

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35. Wooden cross and statute of the Virgin of Carmen erected in
1947 near Arturo Prat Base on Greenwich Island (Latitude 62 degrees
30'S, Longitude 59 degrees 41'W).

36. Metal plaque at Potter Cove, King George Island (Latitude 62
degrees 13'S, Longitude 58 degrees 42'W), erected by Eduard Dallmann
to commemorate the visit of his German expedition on 1 March, 1874.

37. Statue of Bernard O'Higgins, erected in 1948, in front of the
station of the same name (Latitude 63 degrees 19'S, Longitude 57
degrees 54'W).

38. Hut on Snow Hill Island (Latitude 64 degrees 24'S, Longitude 57
degrees 00'W) built in February 1902 by the main party of the Swedish
Polar Expedition, led by Otto Nordenskjold.

39. Stone hut at Hope Bay (Latitude 63 degrees 24'S, Longitude 56
degrees 59'W), built in January 1903 by a party of the Swedish South
Polar Expedition.

40. Bust of General San Martin, grotto with a statue of the Virgin of
Lujan, and a flag mast at Base 'Esperanza', Hope Bay (Latitude 63
degrees 24'S, Longitude 56 degrees 59'W), erected in 1955 together with
a graveyard with stele in memory of members of Argentine expeditions
who died in the area.

41. Stone hut on Paulet Island (Latitude 63 degrees, 35'S, Longitude
55 degrees 47's W), built in February 1903 by the Norwegian C. A.
Larsen, of the Swedish South Polar Expedition led by Otto Nordenskjold,
together with the grave of a member of that expedition.

42. Area at Scotia Bay, Laurie Island, South Orkney Island (Latitude
60 degrees 46'S, Longitude 44 degrees 40'W), in which are found: stone
hut built in 1903 by the Scottish Expedition led by W. S. Bruce; the
Argentine Meteorological and Magnetic Observatory, built in 1903; and a
graveyard with seven tombs dating from 1903.

43. Cross erected in 1955, at a distance of 1,300 metres north-east
of the Argentine Base 'General Belgrano' at Piedrabuena Bay, Filchner
Ice Shelf (Latitude 77 degrees 49'S, Longitude 38 degrees 02'W).

44. Plaque erected at the temporary Indian station 'Dakshin
Gangotri', Princess Astrid Kyst, Dronning Maud Land (Latitude 70
degrees 45'S, Longitude 11 degrees 38'E), listing the names of the
members of the First Indian Antarctic Expedition which landed nearby
on 9 January 1982.

45. Plaque on Brabant Island, on Metchnikoff Point, (Latitude 64
degrees 02' S, Longitude 62 degrees 34'W), erected by de Gerlache to

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commemorate the first landing on Brabant Island by the Belgian
Antarctica expedition 1897-99.

46. The building and installations of Port Martin base, Terre Adelie
(Latitude 66 degrees 49'S, Longitude 141 degrees 24'E) constructed in
1950 by the 3rd French expedition and partly destroyed by fire during
the night of 23 to 24 January 1952.

47. Wooden building called 'Base Marret' on the Ile des Petrels, Terre
Adelie (Latitude 66 degrees 40'S, Longitude 140 degrees 01'E).

48. Cross erected on the North-East headland of the Ile des Petrels,
Terre Adelie (Latitude 66 degrees 40'S, Longitude 140 degrees 01'E) in
memory of Andre Prudhomme.

49. The concrete pillar erected in January 1959 by the First Polish
Antarctic Expedition at Dobrolowski Station on the Bunger Hill (Latitude
66 degrees 16.3'S, Longitude 100 degrees 45'E, h = 35.4m) to measure
acceleration due to gravity.

50. A commemorative plaque mounted on a sea cliff on the Fildes
Peninsula, King George Island, Maxwell Bay (Latitude 62 degrees 12'S,
Longitude 58 degrees 54'W), south-west of the Chilean and Soviet
stations in memory of Professor Siedlecki Tazar.

51. The grave of Wlodzimierz Puchalski, surmounted by an iron
cross, on a hill to the south of Arctowski Station on King George Island
(Latitude 62 degrees 09'S, Longitude 58 degrees 28'W).

52. Monolith erected to commemorate the establishment in February
1985 of the 'Great Wall Station' on Fildes Peninsula, King George Island
(Latitude 62 degrees 13'S, Longitude 58 degrees 58'W), in the South
Shetland Islands.

53. Monoliths and commemorative plaques and bronze busts of Luis
Pardo Villalon on Elephant Island (Latitude 61 degrees 03'S, Longitude
54 degrees 50'W) and their replicas on the Chilean bases 'Arturo Prat'
(Latitude 62 degrees 30'S, Longitude 59 degrees 49'W) and 'Rodolfo
Marsh' (Latitude 62 degrees 12'S, Longitude 62 degrees 12'W),
celebrating the rescue of survivors of the British ship "Endurance" by the
Chilean Navy cutter "Yelcho".

54. Richard E. Byrd Historic Monument, McMurdo Station,
Antarctica (Latitude 77 degrees 51'S, Longitude 166 degrees 40'E) with
inscriptions describing the polar achievements of Richard Evelyn Byrd.

55. East Base, Antarctica, Stonington Island (Latitude 68 degrees
11'S, Longitude 67 degrees 00'W). Buildings and artefacts used during
the Antarctic Service Expedition (1940-41) and the Ronne Antarctic
Research Expedition (1947-48).

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56. Waterboat Point, Danco Coast, Antarctic Peninsula (Latitude 64
degrees 49'S, Longitude 62 degrees 52'W). The remains and immediate
environs of the Waterboat Point hut, situated close to the unoccupied
Chilean station, 'President Gabriel Gonzalez Videla'.

57. Commemorative plaque at Yankee Bay, MacFarland Strait,
Greenwich Island, South Shetland Islands, near the Chilean refuge
located at Latitude 62 degrees 32'S, Longitude 59 degrees 45'W, to the
memory of Captain Robert MacFarlane.

58. Cairn with memorial plaque erected at Whalers' Bay, Deception
Island, South Shetland Islands, in the vicinity of the whalers' cemetery
(Latitude 62 degrees 59'S, Longitude 60 degrees 34'W) to honour Captain
Adolfus Amadus Andresen.

59. A cairn on Half Moon beach, Cape Shirreff, Livington Island,
South Shetland Islands (Latitude 62 degrees 29'S, Longitude 60 degrees
47'W), commemorating the officers, soldiers and seamen on board the
San Telmo, which sank in September 1819.

60. Wooden plaque and rock cairn located at Penguins bay,
southern coast of Seymour Island (Marambio), James Ross Archipelago
(Latitude 64 degrees 16'00" S, Longitude 56 degrees 39'10"W) in memory
of the 1903 Swedish Expedition led by Dr Otto Nordenskjold.

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SCHEDULE 3 (regulation 14)

PROTECTED PLACES

No. 1
Seal Islands, South Shetland Islands

Latitude 60 degrees 59'S; Longitude 55 degrees 23'W

The Seal Islands are composed of small islands and skerries located
approximately 7 km north of the Northwest corner of Elephant Island,
South Shetland Islands. The Seal Islands Protected Place includes the
entire Seal Islands group, which is defined as Seal Island plus any land
or rocks exposed at mean low tide within a distance of 5.5 km of the
point of highest elevation on Seal Island. Seal Island is the largest island
of the group, and is situated at Lat. 60 degrees 59'S, Longitude, 55
degrees 23'W.

The Seal Islands cover an area approximately 5.7 km from east to west
and 5 km from north to south. Seal Island is joined to the adjacent
island to the west by a narrow sand bar that is approximately 50 m
Longitude.

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No. 2
Cape Shirreff and the San Telmo Islands,

South Shetland Islands
Lat. 62 degrees 27'S; Longitude 60 degrees 47'W

Cape Shirreff is a low, ice-free peninsula towards the western end of the
north coast of Livingston Island, South Shetland Islands, situated at Lat.
62 degrees 27'S, Longitude 60 degrees 47'W, between Barclay Bay and
Hero Bay. San Telmo Island is the largest of a small group of ice-free
rock islets, approximately 2 km west of Cape Shirreff. Cape Shirreff is
approximately 3 km from north to south and 0.5 to 1.2 km from east to
west.

No man-made markers indicate the limits of the Protected Place, the
boundaries being defined by natural features (i.e. coastlines or glacial
margins). Its southern boundary is bordered by a permanent glacial ice
barrier, which is located at the narrowest part of the Cape. The eastern
side of the base of the Cape has two beaches with a total length of about
600 m. Above this the extremity of the Cape has a rocky barrier about
150 m Longitude. The western side is formed by almost continuous cliffs
10 to 15 m high. Near the southern base of the Cape on the western side
is a small sandy beach approximately 50 m Longitude.

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