CASA 244/12 - Direction under regulation 209 - conduct of parachute training operations

Link to law: https://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/F2012L01836

Instrument number CASA 244/12
I, JONATHAN ALECK, Associate Director of Aviation Safety, a delegate of CASA, make this instrument under regulation 209 of the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988 (CAR 1988).
[Signed Jonathan Aleck]
Jonathan Aleck
Associate Director of Aviation Safety
30 August 2012
Direction under regulation 209 — conduct of parachute training operations
1          Duration
                 This instrument:
(a)   commences on the day after registration; and
(b)   stops having effect at the end of June 2015.
2          Revocation
                 Instrument CASA 405/09 is revoked.
3          Definitions
        (1)     In this instrument:
APF means the Australian Parachute Federation Inc.
APF Jump Pilot’s Handbook means a manual issued by the APF, acceptable to CASA, setting out rules and procedures for a pilot carrying out parachute training operations.
APF Jump Pilot’s authorisation means an authorisation issued by the APF to certify that a pilot is qualified to carry out parachute training operations.
ATC means Air Traffic Control.
ATC frequency means a radio frequency used by Air Traffic Control.
controlled airspace (CTA) means airspace that is Class A, C, D or E airspace or a GAAP Control Zone.
Chief Instructor means an instructor “A” approved by the APF in accordance with the APF Operations Regulations to supervise parachute training operations for a training organisation.
CTAF means a common traffic advisory frequency.
drop zone means the area within which parachutists taking part in a parachute training operation are required to land.
jump aircraft means any aircraft engaged in the dropping of parachutists in parachute training operations.
member organisation means an organisation that is a member of the APF.
parachute training operation means an operation involving a descent by a student parachutist or a novice parachutist, and includes all tandem descents.
training organisation means a member organisation authorised by the APF to conduct parachute training operations.
        (2)     The terms novice parachutist and student parachutist have the same respective meanings as in the APF Operations Regulations as in force when this direction is issued.
4          Application
                 This instrument applies to aircraft engaged in parachute training operations by member organisations.
5          Direction
                 Aircraft engaged in parachute training operations must comply with the conditions set out in this instrument.
6          General Conditions
        (1)     A jump aircraft when dropping parachutists must be operated in accordance with the APF Jump Pilot’s Handbook.
        (2)     A pilot in command of a jump aircraft must hold an APF Jump Pilot’s authorisation.
        (3)     A jump aircraft that is not a Class A aircraft must:
(a)   have a current maintenance release;
(b)   undergo a maintenance release inspection at the earlier of the following:
             (i)  100 flight hours; or
            (ii)  12 months; and
(c)   have all engines maintained in accordance with:
             (i)  for piston engines ‑ requirement 2 of AD/ENG/4; and
            (ii)  for turbine engines ‑ requirement 1 of AD/ENG/5.
        (4)     Any alteration of the APF Jump Pilot’s Handbook must be notified to CASA for acceptance.
7          Supervision of parachute training operations
        (1)     Parachute training operations must be conducted under the supervision of a Chief Instructor.
        (2)     Parachute training operations must be conducted in accordance with a training operations manual approved by the APF and acceptable to CASA.
8          Conduct of parachute operations
        (1)     The pilot in command of a jump aircraft must take all reasonable measures to ensure that:
(a)   parachutists exit the aircraft only if there is no risk of any part of the aircraft being fouled by parachutists or their equipment when they exit; and
(b)   the operation does not impose any adverse stress on any part of the aircraft structure; and
(c)   loose objects, that if dropped could create a hazard to persons or property on ground or water, are not carried by parachutists exiting the aircraft.
        (2)     Except in accordance with a written specification issued by CASA under regulation 152 of CAR 1988 — the person in charge of the parachuting operation, the parachutist and the pilot in command of the aircraft must ensure that:
(a)   a parachute descent is made in meteorological conditions in which the target is clearly visible; and
(b)   the parachutist does not enter cloud.
9          Equipment
        (1)     A jump aircraft must be equipped with:
(a)   2 VHF radio transceivers; or
(b)   if operating in Class G airspace — 1 VHF radio transceiver.
        (2)     The radio transceivers or transceiver must be used to make broadcasts in accordance with this approval.
10        Radio procedures
        (1)     Subject to subsection 10 (5), a broadcast advising the intention to drop parachutists must be made from the jump aircraft not less than 2 minutes before the parachutists exit the aircraft.
        (2)     A broadcast under subsection 10 (1) must be made on all relevant frequencies for the airspace through which the parachutists descend and in which the jump aircraft operates.
        (3)     A broadcast made under subsection 10 (1) must give notice of:
(a)   the location of the drop zone; and
(b)   the altitude at which the parachutists will exit the aircraft.
        (4)     The relevant frequencies include:
(a)   any ATC frequency for airspace used by the jump aircraft; and
(b)   any other frequency used in airspace through which the parachutists may descend after exiting the aircraft; and
(c)   where the landing area for the parachutists is located in the vicinity of an aerodrome where an air traffic control service is not provided — the CTAF for the surrounding airspace.
        (5)     A broadcast made by ATC on an ATC frequency advising that parachutists will be dropped at a time stated in the broadcast is taken to be a broadcast on that frequency under subsection 10 (1), subject to meeting the requirements of subsections 10 (3) and 10 (4).
11        Additional requirements in controlled airspace
        (1)     The pilot in command must not allow parachutists to exit a jump aircraft in controlled airspace until he or she has received from ATC the clearance “[Aircraft call-sign] clear to drop”.
        (2)     A jump aircraft must use its VHF radio transceivers to communicate with ATC and to monitor and advise air traffic outside the controlled airspace.
        (3)     If parachutists will not be dropped within 3 nautical miles radius of the centre of the drop zone, the pilot in command must advise ATC of the direction and extent of any extension required to the drop zone.
12        Additional requirements at aerodromes requiring radio carriage
        (1)     A jump aircraft must not engage in an operation involving parachute descents at, or in the vicinity of, an aerodrome where radio carriage is required, unless the pilot in command uses its VHF radio transceivers to monitor and advise air traffic in the vicinity of the aerodrome and the surrounding areas, using the relevant CTAF and any other relevant frequencies.
        (2)     In addition to the broadcast required under subsection 10 (1), a broadcast advising the intention to drop parachutists at the location specified in the broadcast must be made from the jump aircraft on the relevant frequencies not less than 4 minutes before the parachutists exit the aircraft.
        (3)     A broadcast under subsection 12 (2) must be made on the relevant frequencies specified in subsection 10 (4).
        (4)     The pilot in command must ensure that parachutists do not exit a jump aircraft at, or in the vicinity of, an aerodrome where radio carriage is required, if the descent would take place 15 minutes or less before the estimated time of arrival of an aircraft engaged in regular public transport operations (an RPT aircraft).
        (5)     Subsection 12 (4) does not apply if:
(a)   the 2 aircraft are in direct radiocommunication with each other; and
(b)   all parachutists are able to exit the aircraft and land before the RPT aircraft arrives within the circuit area of the aerodrome.
        (6)     After an RPT aircraft arrives at an aerodrome where radio carriage is required, the pilot in command of a jump aircraft must ensure that parachutists do not exit the aircraft at, or in the vicinity of, the aerodrome until the RPT aircraft has landed and taxied clear of the runway.
        (7)     After an RPT aircraft has broadcast that it is taxiing for departure from an aerodrome where radio carriage and use is required, the pilot in command of a jump aircraft must ensure that parachutists do not exit the aircraft at, or in the vicinity of, the aerodrome until the RPT aircraft is clear of the circuit area of the aerodrome.
13        Additional requirements at certified or registered aerodromes
        (1)     The pilot in command must ensure that parachutists do not exit a jump aircraft at a certified or registered aerodrome, unless:
(a)   the operation is carried out in accordance with a written agreement between a parachute training organisation and the aerodrome operator; and
(b)   the APF has approved the written agreement as being in accordance with its Operational Regulations and its Training Operations Manual.
        (2)     Subsection 13 (1) does not apply to an operation at a certified or registered aerodrome if written specifications issued under regulation 152 of CAR 1988 require or allow those descents to be conducted differently.
        (3)     The pilot in command must ensure that parachutists do not exit a jump aircraft at a certified or registered aerodrome if the pilot in command of another aircraft is carrying out an instrument approach procedure at the aerodrome.
14        Additional requirements for operations more than 10 000 feet above mean sea level (amsl)
        (1)     A flight crew member who is on duty in an unpressurised jump aircraft must be provided with, and continuously use, supplemental oxygen:
(a)   if the aircraft is above flight level 120; or
(b)   if the aircraft operates above 10 000 feet amsl:
             (i)  for more than 15 minutes during an operation involving parachute descents; or
            (ii)  at night; or
           (iii)  in I.M.C.
Note   As a direction, this instrument will take priority over AIP ENR provisions in relation to jump aircraft.
 
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