Antarctic Treaty (Environment Protection) Amendment (2012 and 2013 Measures—Historic Sites and Monuments) Proclamation 2014

Link to law: https://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/F2014L01740

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Antarctic Treaty (Environment Protection) Amendment (2012 and 2013 Measures—Historic Sites and Monuments) Proclamation 2014
 
Select Legislative Instrument No.   , 2014
I, General the Honourable Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Ret’d), Governor‑General of the Commonwealth of Australia, acting with the advice of the Federal Executive Council, make the following Proclamation.
Signed and sealed with the Great Seal of Australia
on 11 December 2014
Peter Cosgrove
Governor‑General
By His Excellency’s Command
Greg Hunt
Minister for the Environment
  
  
Contents
1............ Name................................................................................................... 1
2............ Commencement................................................................................... 1
3............ Authority............................................................................................. 1
4............ Schedules............................................................................................ 1
Schedule 1—Amendments                                                                                                2
Antarctic Treaty (Environment Protection — Historic Sites and Monuments) Proclamation 2007               2
 
1  Name
                   This instrument is the Antarctic Treaty (Environment Protection) Amendment (2012 and 2013 Measures—Historic Sites and Monuments) Proclamation 2014.
2  Commencement
                   This instrument commences on the day after it is registered.
3  Authority
                   This instrument is made under section 8A of the Antarctic Treaty (Environment Protection) Act 1980.
4  Schedules
                   Each instrument that is specified in a Schedule to this instrument is amended or repealed as set out in the applicable items in the Schedule concerned, and any other item in a Schedule to this instrument has effect according to its terms.
Schedule 1—Amendments
  
Antarctic Treaty (Environment Protection — Historic Sites and Monuments) Proclamation 2007
1  Section 3 (note)
Repeal the note, substitute:
Note:          Details of Antarctic historic sites and monuments could in 2014 be viewed on the Antarctic Treaty Secretariat’s website (http://www.ats.aq).
2  Section 4
Repeal the section.
3  Schedule 1 (note 1)
Omit “Note 1”, substitute “Note”.
4  Schedule 1 (note 2)
Repeal the note.
5  Schedule 1 (table item for site number 4)
Repeal the item, substitute:
4
Pole of Inaccessibility Station building
Station building to which a bust of V.I. Lenin is fixed, together with a plaque in memory of the conquest of the Pole of Inaccessibility by Soviet Antarctic explorers in 1958. The bust of Lenin is erected on a wooden stand mounted on the building’s roof. In 2007, the station building was covered by snow and the bust was about 1.5 m above the snow surface.
82°06′42″S, 55°01′57″E
6  Schedule 1 (table items for site numbers 7 to 11)
Repeal the items, substitute:
7
Ivan Khmara’s Stone
Stone with inscribed plaque erected at Buromskiy Island in memory of Ivan Kharma, driver‑mechanic, the member of the First Complex Antarctic Expedition of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (First Soviet Antarctic Expedition) who perished on fast ice in the performance of duties on 21 January 1956. Initially the stone was erected at Mirny Observatory, Mabus Point. In 1974, during the 19th Soviet Antarctic Expedition, the stone was moved to Buromskiy Island because of construction activity.
66°32′04″S, 92°59′57″E

8
Anatoly Shcheglov’s Monument
Metal stele with plaque in memory of Anatoly Shcheglov, driver‑mechanic, who perished in the performance of duties, erected on a sledge on the Mirny‑Vostok route, 2 km from Mirny Station.
66°34′43″S, 92°58′23″E

9
Buromskiy Island Cemetery
Cemetery on Buromskiy Island, near Mirny Observatory, in which are buried citizens of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (Russian Federation), Czechoslovakia, German Democratic Republic and Switzerland (members of the Soviet and Russian Antarctic Expeditions) who perished in the performance of their duties.
66°32′04″S, 93°00′E

10
Soviet Oasis Station Observatory
Magnetic observatory building at Dobrowolsky Station (a part of the former Soviet station Oasis transferred to Poland) at Bunger Hills, with a plaque in memory of the opening of Oasis Station in 1956.
66°16′30″S, 100°45′03″E

11
Vostok Station Tractor
Heavy tractor ATT 11 at Vostok Station which participated in the first traverse to the South Geomagnetic Pole, with a plaque in memory of the opening of the station in 1957.
78°27′48″S, 106°50′06″E

7  Schedule 1 (table item for site number 37)
Repeal the item, substitute:
37
O’Higgins Historic Site
Site located on Cape Legoupil, Antarctic Peninsula, comprising the following:
(a) Capitán General Bernardo O’Higgins Riquelme Bust, erected in 1948 opposite the base known by the same name. General O’Higgins was the first ruler of Chile to recognise the importance of Antarctica. It has a symbolic meaning in the history of Antarctic exploration since it was during General O’Higgins’ government that the vessel Dragon landed on the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula in 1820. This monument is also representative of pre‑International Geophysical Year activities in Antarctica. (63°19′14.3″S, 57°53′53.9″W);
(b) Former Capitán General Bernardo O’Higgins Riquelme Antarctic Base, unveiled on 18 February 1948 by the President of Chile, Gabriel González Videla, the first President in the world to visit Antarctica. It is considered to be a model pioneering base in the modern period of Antarctic exploration. (63°19′S, 57°54′W);
(c) Plaque in memory of Lieutenants Oscar Inostroza Contreras and Sergio Ponce Torrealba, who perished on 12 August 1957 in Antarctica for the sake of peace and science. (63°19′15.4″S, 57°53′52.9″W);
(d) Virgen del Carmen Grotto, located in the surroundings of the base mentioned in paragraph (b), built in the early 1970s. It has served as a place of spiritual withdrawal for the staff of the different Antarctic stations and expeditions. (63°19′15.9″S, 57°54′03.2″W).
63°19′S, 57°54′W
8  Schedule 1 (at the end of the table)
Add:
87
Site of the Antarctic research station “Georg Forster”
Site of the first permanently occupied German Antarctic research station “Georg Forster” at the Schirmacher Oasis, Dronning Maud Land. It is marked by a commemorative bronze plaque with the following inscription:
Antarktisstation
Georg Forster
70°46 39″S
11°51′03″E
von 1976 bis 1996.
The plaque is well preserved and fixed to a rock wall at the southern edge of the site. The station was opened on 21 April 1976 and closed in 1993. The entire site has been cleaned up since the dismantling of the station finished on 12 February 1996. The site is about 1.5 km east of the Russian Antarctic research station Novolazarevskaya, and is 141 m above sea level.
70°46′39″S, 11°51′03″E
 

88
Professor Kudryashov’s Drilling Complex Building
The drilling complex building was constructed in the summer of 1983‑1984, and is 3 488 m above sea level. Under the leadership of Professor Boris Kudryashov, ancient mainland ice samples were obtained.
78°28′S, 106°48′E

89
Upper “Summit Camp” for Terra Nova Expedition 1910‑1912
Upper “Summit Camp” was used during the survey of Mount Erebus in December 1912. The camp site location is about 3 410 m above sea level, and includes part of a circle of rocks which were likely used to weight the tent valances. The site was used by a science party on Captain Scott’s Terra Nova Expedition, which undertook mapping and collected geological specimens on Mount Erebus.
77°30.348′S, 167°10.223′E

90
Lower “Camp E” for Terra Nova Expedition 1910‑1912
Lower “Camp E” was used during the survey of Mount Erebus in December 1912. The camp site is about 3 410 m above sea level, and consists of a slightly elevated area of gravel and includes some aligned rocks which may have been used to weight the tent valances. The site was used by a science party on Captain Scott’s Terra Nova Expedition, which undertook mapping and collected geological specimens on Mount Erebus.
77°30.348′S, 167°9.246′E