Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code – Schedule 22 – Foods and classes of foods

Link to law: https://www.comlaw.gov.au/Details/F2015L00433

 
Food Standards (Proposal P1025 – Code Revision) Variation
 
 
The Board of Food Standards Australia New Zealand gives notice of the making of this standard under section 92 of the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Act 1991. The Standard commences on 1 March 2016.
 
Dated 25 March 2015
Standards Management Officer
Delegate of the Board of Food Standards Australia New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
Note: 
 
This Standard will be published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette No. FSC 96 on 10 April 2015.
 
Schedule 22           Foods and classes of foods
Note 1        This instrument is a standard under the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Act 1991 (Cth). The standards together make up the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code. See also section 1.1.1—3.
                   This Standard describes foods and classes of foods for subsection 1.4.1—2(2), subsection 1.4.2—3(4), subsection 1.5.3—4(3), paragraph S5—4(2)(b), section S19—4 and section S19—5, and portions of food for subsection 1.4.2—3(2).
Note 2        The provisions of the Code that apply in New Zealand are incorporated in, or adopted under, the Food Act 2014 (NZ). See also section 1.1.1—3.
S22—1                Name
                            This Standard is Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code – Schedule 22 – Foods and classes of foods.
                                      Note    Commencement:
This Standard commences on 1 March 2016, being the date specified as the commencement date in notices in the Gazette and the New Zealand Gazette under section 92 of the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Act 1991 (Cth). See also section 93 of that Act.
S22—2                Foods and classes of foods
Animal food commodities
Mammalian products
Meat (mammalian)
Meats are the muscular tissues, including adhering fatty tissues such as intramuscular, intermuscular and subcutaneous fat from animal carcasses or cuts of these as prepared for wholesale or retail distribution. Meat (mammalian) includes farmed and game meat. The cuts offered may include bones, connective tissues and tendons as well as nerves and lymph nodes. It does not include edible offal. The entire commodity except bones may be consumed.
 
Commodities: Buffalo meat; Camel meat; Cattle meat; Deer meat; Donkey meat; Goat meat; Hare meat; Horse meat; Kangaroo meat; Pig meat; Possum meat; Rabbit meat; Sheep meat; Wallaby meat.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity (without bones). When the commodity description is qualified by (in the fat) a proportion of adhering fat is analysed and the MRLs apply to the fat.
Edible offal (mammalian)
Edible offal is the edible tissues and organs other than muscles and animal fat from slaughtered animals as prepared for wholesale or retail distribution. Edible offal includes brain, heart, kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, thymus, tongue and tripe. The entire commodity may be consumed.
 
Commodities: Buffalo, edible offal of; Cattle, edible offal of; Camel, edible offal of; Deer, edible offal of; Donkey, edible offal of; Goat, edible offal of; Hare, edible offal of; Horse, edible offal of; Kangaroo, edible offal of; Pig, edible offal of; Possum, edible offal of; Rabbit, edible offal of; Sheep, edible offal of; Wallaby, edible offal of.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Fats (mammalian)
Mammalian fats, excluding milk fats are derived from the fatty tissues of animals (not processed). The entire commodity may be consumed.
 
Commodities: Buffalo fat; Camel fat; Cattle fat; Goat fat; Horse fat; Pig fat; Rabbit fat; Sheep fat.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
 
Milks
Milks are the mammary secretions of various species of lactating herbivorous ruminant animals.
 
Commodities: Buffalo milk; Camel milk; Cattle milk; Goat milk; Sheep milk. The entire commodity may be consumed.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity. When an *MRL for cattle milk or milks is qualified by ‘(in the fat)’ the compound is regarded as fat-soluble, and the MRL and *ERL apply to the fat portion of the milk. In the case of a derived or a manufactured milk product with a fat content of 2% or more, the MRL also applies to the fat portion. For a milk product with fat content less than 2%, the MRL applied should be 1/50 that specified for ‘milk (in the fat)’, and should apply to the whole product.
Poultry
Poultry meat
Poultry meats are the muscular tissues, including adhering fat and skin, from poultry carcasses as prepared for wholesale or retail distribution. The entire product may be consumed. Poultry meat includes farmed and game poultry.
 
Commodities: Chicken meat; Duck meat; Emu meat; Goose meat; Guinea-fowl meat; Ostrich meat; Partridge meat; Pheasant meat; Pigeon meat; Quail meat; Turkey meat.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity (without bones). When the commodity description is qualified by (in the fat) a proportion of adhering fat is analysed and the *MRLs apply to the fat.
Poultry, edible offal
Poultry edible offal is the edible tissues and organs, other than poultry meat and poultry fat, as prepared for wholesale or retail distribution and include liver, gizzard, heart, skin. The entire product may be consumed.
 
Commodities: Chicken, edible offal of; Duck, edible offal of; Emu, edible offal of; Goose, edible offal of; Ostrich, edible offal of; Turkey, edible offal of.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
 
Note that poultry meat includes any attached skin, but poultry skin on its own (not attached) is considered as ‘poultry edible offal’.
Poultry fats
Poultry fats are derived from the fatty tissues of poultry (not processed). The entire product may be consumed.
 
Commodities: Chicken fat; Duck fat; Goose fat; Turkey fat.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Eggs
Eggs are the reproductive bodies laid by female birds, especially domestic fowl. The edible portion includes egg yolk and egg white after removal of the shell.
 
Commodities: Chicken eggs; Duck eggs; Goose eggs; Quail eggs.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole egg whites and yolks combined after removal of shell.
Fish, crustaceans and molluscs
Fish includes freshwater fish, diadromous fish and marine fish.
Diadromous fish
Diadromous fish include species which migrate from the sea to brackish and/or fresh water and in the opposite direction. Some species are domesticated and do not migrate. The fleshy parts of the animals and, to a lesser extent, roe and milt are consumed.
 
Commodities: Barramundi; Salmon species; Trout species; Eel species.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity including bones and head (in general after removing the digestive tract).
Freshwater fish
Freshwater fish include a variety of species which remain lifelong, including the spawning period, in fresh water. Several species of freshwater fish are domesticated and bred in fish farms. The fleshy parts of the animals and, to a lesser extent, roe and milt are consumed.
 
Commodities: a variety of species.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity including bones and head (in general after removing the digestive tract).
Marine fish
Marine fish generally live in open seas and are almost exclusively wild species. The fleshy parts of the animals and, to a lesser extent, roe and milt are consumed.
 
Commodities: a variety of species.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity including bones and head (in general after removing the digestive tract).
Molluscs – and other marine invertebrates
Molluscs includes Cephalopods and Coelenterates. Cephalopods and Coelenterates are various species of aquatic animals, wild or cultivated, which have an inedible outer or inner shell (invertebrates). A few species of cultivated edible land snails are included in this group. The edible aquatic molluscs live mainly in brackish water or in the sea.
 
Commodities: Clams; Cockles; Cuttlefish; Mussels; Octopus; Oysters; Scallops; Sea-cucumbers; Sea urchins; Snails, edible; Squids.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity after removal of shell.
Crustaceans
Crustaceans include various species of aquatic animals, wild and cultivated, which have an inedible chitinous outer shell. A small number of species live in fresh water, but most species live in brackish water and/or in the sea.
 
Crustaceans are largely prepared for wholesale and retail distribution after catching by cooking or parboiling and deep freezing.
 
Commodities: Crabs; Crayfish; Lobsters; Prawns; Shrimps.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity or the meat without the outer shell, as prepared for wholesale and retail distribution.
Honey and other miscellaneous primary food commodities of animal origin
Honey
Commodity: Honey.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Crop commodities
Fruit
Tropical and sub-tropical fruit—edible peel
Tropical and sub-tropical fruits - edible peel are derived from the immature or mature fruits of a large variety of perennial plants, usually shrubs or trees. The fruits are fully exposed to pesticides applied during the growing season. The whole fruit may be consumed in a succulent or processed form.
 
Commodities: Ambarella; Arbutus berry; Babaco; Barbados cherry; Bilimbi; Brazilian cherry (Grumichama); Carambola; Caranda; Carob; Cashew apple; Chinese olive; Coco plum; Cumquats; Date; Fig; Hog plum; Jaboticaba; Jujube; Natal plum; Olives; Otaheite gooseberry; Persimmon, Japanese; Pomerac; Rose apple; Sea grape; Surinam cherry; Tree tomato (Tamarillo).
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity. Dates and olives: Whole commodity after removal of stems and stones but residue calculated and expressed on the whole fruit.
Tropical and sub-tropical fruit—inedible peel
Tropical and sub-tropical fruits - inedible peel are derived from the immature or mature fruits of a large variety of perennial plants, usually shrubs or trees. Fruits are fully exposed to pesticides applied during the growing season but the edible portion is protected by skin, peel or husk. The edible part of the fruits may be consumed in a fresh or processed form.
 
Commodities: Akee apple; Avocado; Banana (includes banana dwarf); Bread fruit; Canistel; Cherimoya; Custard apple; Doum; Durian; Elephant fruit; Feijoa; Guava; Ilama; Jackfruit; Jambolan; Java apple; Kiwifruit; Longan; Litchi; Mammy apple; Mango; Mangosteen; Marmalade box; Mombin, yellow; Naranjilla; Passionfruit; Papaya (Pawpaw); Persimmon, American; Pineapple; Plantain; Pomegranate; Prickly pear; Pulasan; Rambutan; Rollinia; Sapodilla; Sapote, black; Sapote, green; Sapote, mammey; Sapote, white; Sentul; Soursop; Spanish lime; Star apple; Sugar apple; Tamarind; Tonka bean.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole fruit. Avocado, mangos and similar fruit with hard seeds: whole commodity after removal of stone but calculated on whole fruit. Banana: whole commodity after removal of any central stem and peduncle. Longan, edible aril: edible portion of the fruit. Pineapple: after removal of crown.
Berries and other small fruits
Berries and other small fruits are derived from a variety of perennial plants and shrubs having fruit characterised by a high surface to weight ratio. The fruits are fully exposed to pesticides applied during the growing season. The entire fruit, often including seed, may be consumed in a succulent or processed form.
 
Commodities: Bilberry; Blackberries; Blueberries; Cranberry; Currants, black, red, white; Dewberries (including Boysenberry, Loganberry and Youngberry); Elderberries; Gooseberry; Grapes; Juneberries; Mulberries; Raspberries, Red, Black; Rose hips; Strawberry; Vaccinium berries.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity after removal of caps and stems. Currants: fruit with stem.
Citrus fruits
Citrus fruits are produced on trees and shrubs of the family Rutaceae. These fruits are characterised by aromatic oily peel, globular form and interior segments of juice-filled vesicles. The fruit is fully exposed to pesticides applied during the growing season. Post-harvest treatments with pesticides and liquid waxes are often carried out to avoid deterioration due to fungal diseases, insect pests or loss of moisture. The fruit pulp may be consumed in succulent form and as a juice. The entire fruit may be used for preserves.
 
Commodities: Citron; Grapefruit; Lemon; Lime; Mandarins; Oranges, sweet, sour; Shaddock (Pomelo); Tangelo; Tangors.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Pome fruits
Pome fruits are produced on trees and shrubs belonging to certain genera of the rose family (Rosaceae), especially the genera Malus and Pyrus. They are characterised by fleshy tissue surrounding a core consisting of parchment-like carpels enclosing the seeds.
 
Pome fruits are fully exposed to pesticides applied during the growing season. Post-harvest treatments directly after harvest may also occur. The entire fruit, except the core, may be consumed in the succulent form or after processing.
 
Commodities: Apple; Crab-apple; Loquat; Medlar; Pear; Quince.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity after removal of stems.
Stone fruits
Stone fruits are produced on trees belonging to the genus Prunus of the family Rosaceae. They are characterised by fleshy tissue surrounding a single hard shelled seed. The entire fruit, except the seed, may be consumed in a succulent or processed form. The fruit is fully exposed to pesticides applied during the growing season. Dipping of fruit immediately after harvest, especially with fungicides, may also occur.
 
Commodities: Apricot; Cherries; Nectarine; Peach; Plums*.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity after removal of stems and stones, but the residue calculated and expressed on the whole commodity without stem.
 
*where plums is specified as ‘(including Prunes)’ it includes all relevant prunes.
Vegetables
Brassica (cole or cabbage) vegetables
Cole vegetables (cabbage and flowerhead brassicas) are foods derived from the leafy heads and stems of plants belonging to the genus Brassica of the family Cruciferae. The edible part of the crop is partly protected from pesticides applied during the growing season by outer leaves, or skin. The entire vegetable after discarding obviously decomposed or withered leaves may be consumed.
 
Commodities: Broccoli; Broccoli, Chinese; Brussels sprouts; Cabbages, head; Cauliflower; Kohlrabi.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): Head cabbages and kohlrabi, whole commodity as marketed, after removal of obviously decomposed or withered leaves. Cauliflower and broccoli: flower heads (immature inflorescence only). Brussels sprouts: ‘buttons only’.
Bulb vegetables
Bulb vegetables are pungent, highly flavoured bulbous vegetables derived from fleshy scale bulbs of the genus Allium of the lily family (Liliaceae). Bulb fennel has been included in this group as the bulb-like growth of this commodity gives rise to similar residues. The subterranean parts of the bulbs and shoots are protected from direct exposure to pesticides during the growing season. Although chives are alliums they have been classified with herbs. The entire bulb may be consumed after removal of the parchment-like skin. The leaves and stems of some species or cultivars may also be consumed.
 
Commodities: Fennel, bulb; Garlic; Leek; Onion, bulb; Onion, Chinese; Onion, Welsh; Shallot; Spring onion; Tree onion.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): Bulb/dry. Onions and garlic: Whole commodity after removal of roots and adhering soil and whatever parchment skin is easily detached. Leeks and spring onions: Whole vegetable after removal of roots and adhering soil.
 
Fruiting vegetables, cucurbits
Fruiting vegetables, Cucurbits are derived from the immature and mature fruits of various plants, belonging to the botanical family Cucurbitaceae. These vegetables are fully exposed to pesticides during the period of fruit development.
 
The edible portion of those fruits of which the inedible peel is discarded before consumption is protected from most pesticides by the skin or peel, except from pesticides with a systemic action.
 
The entire fruiting vegetable or the edible portion after discarding the inedible peel may be consumed in the fresh form or after processing.
 
Commodities: Balsam apple; Balsam pear; Bottle gourd; Chayote; Cucumber; Gherkin; Loofah; Melons, except Watermelon; Pumpkins; Snake gourd; Squash, summer (including Zucchini); Squash, winter; Watermelon.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity after removal of stems.
Fruiting vegetables, other than cucurbits
Fruiting vegetables, other than Cucurbits are derived from the immature and mature fruits of various plants, usually annual vines or bushes. The group includes edible fungi and mushrooms, being comparable organs of lower plants. The entire fruiting vegetable or the edible portion after discarding husks or peels may be consumed in a fresh form or after processing. The vegetables of this group are fully exposed to pesticides applied during the period of fruit development, except those of which the edible portion is covered by husks, such as sweet corn.
 
Commodities: Cape gooseberry (ground cherries); Egg plant; Fungi, edible; Mushrooms; Okra; Pepino; Peppers, sweet, Chili; Roselle; Sweet corn*; Tomato.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity after removal of stems. Mushrooms: Whole commodity. Sweet corn and fresh corn: kernels plus cob without husk.
 
*sweet corn is specified as either ‘(corn-on-the-cob)’ to indicate that the *MRL is set on the cob plus kernels, or as ‘(kernels)’ to indicate that the MRL is set on the kernels only.
Leafy vegetables (including brassica leafy vegetables)
Leafy vegetables are foods derived from the leaves of a wide variety of edible plants. They are characterised by a high surface to weight ratio. The leaves are fully exposed to pesticides applied during the growing season. The entire leaf may be consumed either fresh or after processing.
 
Commodities: Amaranth; Box thorn; Chard (silver beet); Chervil; Chicory leaves; Chinese cabbage (Pe-tsai); Choisum; Cress, garden; Dandelion; Dock; Endive; Grape leaves; Indian mustard; Japanese greens; Kale; Kangkung; Komatsuma; Lettuce, Head; Lettuce, Leaf; Marsh marigold; Mizuna; Mustard greens; New Zealand spinach; Pak-choi; Pokeweed; Purslane; Radish leaves (including radish tops); Rape greens; Rucola; Sowthistle; Spinach; Turnip greens; Watercress.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity after removal of obviously decomposed or withered leaves.
Legume vegetables
Legume vegetables are derived from the succulent seed and immature pods of leguminous plants commonly known as beans and peas. Pods are fully exposed to pesticides during the growing season, whereas the succulent seed is protected within the pod from most pesticides, except pesticides with systemic action.
 
Commodities: Beans, except broad bean and soya bean; Broad bean (green pods and immature seeds); Chick-pea (green pods); Cluster bean (young pods); Common bean (pods and/or immature seeds); Cowpea (immature pods); Garden pea (young pods); Garden pea, shelled; Goa bean (immature pods); Haricot bean (green pods and/or immature seeds); Hyacinth bean (young pods, immature seeds); Lentil (young pods); Lima bean (young pods and/or immature beans); Lupin;
Mung bean (green pods); Pigeon pea (green pods and/or young green seeds); Podded pea (young pods); Snap bean (immature seeds); Soya bean (immature seeds); Vetch.
 
Common bean (pods and/or immature seeds) includes Dwarf bean (immature pods and/or seeds); Field bean (green pods); Flageolet (fresh beans); French bean (immature pods and seeds); Green bean (green pods and immature seeds); Kidney bean (pods and/or immature seeds); Navy bean (young pods and/or immature seeds) and Runner bean (green pods and seeds).
 
Podded pea (young pods) includes sugar snap pea (young pods) and snow pea.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity (seed plus pod) unless otherwise specified.
Pulses
Pulses are derived from the mature seeds, naturally or artificially dried, of leguminous plants known as beans (dry) and peas (dry). The seeds in the pods are protected from most pesticides applied during the growing season except pesticides which show a systemic action. There may be registered post harvest treatments for dried peas and beans.
 
Commodities: Beans (dry); Peas (dry); Adzuki bean (dry); Broad bean (dry); Chick-pea (dry); Common bean (dry); Cowpea (dry); Field pea (dry); Hyacinth bean (dry); Lentil (dry); Lima bean (dry); Lupin (dry); Mung bean (dry); Pigeon pea (dry); Soya bean (dry).
 
Common bean (dry) includes Dwarf bean (dry); Field bean (dry); Flageolet (dry); Kidney bean (dry); Navy bean (dry).
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity (dried seed only).
Root and tuber vegetables
Root and tuber vegetables are the starchy enlarged solid roots, tubers, corms or rhizomes, mostly subterranean, of various species of plants. The underground location protects the edible portion from most pesticides applied to the aerial parts of the crop during the growing season, however the commodities in this group are exposed to pesticide residues from soil treatments. The entire vegetable may be consumed in the form of fresh or processed foods.
 
Commodities: Arrowroot; Beetroot; Canna, edible; Carrot; Cassava; Celeriac; Chicory, roots; Horseradish; Jerusalem artichoke; Parsnip; Potato; Radish; Radish, Japanese; Salsify; Scorzonera; Sugar beet; Swede; Sweet potato; Taro; Turnip, garden; Yams.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity after removing tops. Remove adhering soil (e.g. by rinsing in running water or by gentle brushing of the dry commodity).
Stalk and stem vegetables
Stalk and stem vegetables are the edible stalks, leaf stems or immature shoots from a variety of annual or perennial plants. Globe artichokes have been included in this group. Depending upon the part of the crop used for consumption and the growing practices, stalk and stem vegetables are exposed, in varying degrees, to pesticides applied during the growing season. Stalk and stem vegetables may be consumed in whole or in part and in the form of fresh, dried or processed foods.
 
Commodities: Artichoke, globe; Asparagus; Bamboo shoots; Celery; Celtuce; Palm hearts; Rhubarb; Witloof chicory.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity after removal of obviously decomposed or withered leaves. Rhubarb: leaf stems only. Globe artichoke: flowerhead only. Celery and asparagus: remove adhering soil.
 
Grasses
Cereal grains
Cereal grains are derived from the (heads) of starchy seeds produced by a variety of plants, primarily of the grass family (Gramineae). The edible seeds are protected to varying degrees from pesticides applied during the growing season by husks. Husks are removed before processing and/or consumption. There may be registered post harvest treatments for cereal grains.
 
Commodities: Barley; Buckwheat; Maize; Millet; Oats; Popcorn; Rice*; Rye; Sorghum; Triticale; Wheat; Wild rice.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity
 
* ‘Rice’ means ‘Rice in Husk.’
Grasses for sugar or syrup production
Grasses for sugar or syrup production, includes species of grasses with a high sugar content especially in the stem. The stems are mainly used for sugar or syrup production.
 
Commodities: Sugar cane.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Nuts and seeds
Tree nuts
Tree nuts are the seeds of a variety of trees and shrubs which are characterised by a hard inedible shell enclosing an oily seed. The seed is protected from pesticides applied during the growing season by the shell and other parts of the fruit. The edible portion of the nut is consumed in succulent, dried or processed forms.
 
Commodities: Almonds; Beech nuts; Brazil nut; Cashew nut; Chestnuts; Coconut; Hazelnuts; Hickory nuts; Japanese horse-chestnut; Macadamia nuts; Pecan; Pine nuts; Pili nuts; Pistachio nuts; Sapucaia nut; Walnuts.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity after removal of shell. Chestnuts: whole in skin.
Oilseed
Oilseed consists of seeds from a variety of plants used in the production of edible vegetable oils. Some oilseeds are used directly, or after slight processing, as food or for food flavouring. Oilseeds are protected from pesticides applied during the growing season by the shell or husk.
 
Commodities: Acacia seed; Cotton seed; Linseed; Mustard seed; Palm nut; Peanut; Plantago ovata seed; Poppy seed; Rape seed; Safflower seed; Sesame seed; Sunflower seed.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): seed or kernels, after removal of shell or husk.
Seed for beverages and sweets
Seeds for beverages and sweets are derived from tropical and sub-tropical trees and shrubs. These seeds are protected from pesticides applied during the growing season by the shell or other parts of the fruit.
 
Commodities: Cacao beans; Coffee beans; Cola nuts.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
 
Herbs and spices
Herbs
Herbs consist of leaves, flowers, stems and roots from a variety of herbaceous plants, used in relatively small amounts as condiments to flavour foods or beverages. They are used either in fresh or naturally dried form. Herbs are fully exposed to pesticides applied during the growing season. There may be registered post-harvest treatments for dried herbs.
 
Commodities: Angelica; Balm leaves (Melissa officinalis); Basil; Bay leaves; Burnet, great (Banguisorba officinalis); Burnet, salad; Burning bush (Dictamnus albus); Catmint; Celery leaves; Chives; Curry leaves; Dill (Anethum graveolens); Fennel; Hops; Horehound; Hyssop; Kaffir lime leaves; Lavender; Lemon balm; Lemon grass; Lemon verbena; Lovage; Marigold flowers (Calendula officinalis); Marjoram; Mints; Nasturtium leaves (Tropaeolum majus L.); Parsley; Rosemary; Rue (Ruta graveolens); Sage; Sassafras leaves; Savoury, summer, winter; Sorrel; Sweet cicely; Tansy; Tarragon; Thyme; Winter cress; Wintergreen leaves (Gaultheria procumbens L.); Woodruff (Asperula odorata); Wormwoods (Artemisia spp.).
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Spices
Spices consist of the aromatic seeds, roots, berries or other fruits from a variety of plants, which are used in relatively small quantities to flavour foods. Spices are exposed in varying degrees to pesticides applied during the growing season. There may be registered post-harvest treatments for dried spices.
 
Commodities: Angelica seed; Anise seed; Calamus root; Caper buds; Caraway seed; Cardamom seed; Cassia buds; Celery seed; Cinnamon bark; Cloves; Coriander, seed; Cumin seed; Dill seed; Elecampane root; Fennel seed; Fenugreek seed; Galangal, rhizomes; Ginger, root; Grains of paradise; Juniper berry; Licorice root; Lovage seed; Mace; Nasturtium pods; Nutmeg; Pepper, black, white; Pepper, long; Pimento, fruit; Tonka bean; Turmeric, root; Vanilla, beans.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Processed foods of plant and animal origin
Derived edible commodities of plant origin
‘Derived edible products’ are foods or edible substances isolated from primary food commodities or raw agricultural commodities using physical, biological or chemical processing. This includes groups such as vegetable oils (crude and refined), by-products of the fractionation of cereals and teas (fermented and dried).
Cereal grain milling fractions
This group includes milling fractions of cereal grains at the final stage of milling and preparation in the fractions, and includes processed brans.
 
Commodities: Cereal brans, processed; Maize flour; Maize meal; Rice bran, processed; Rye bran, processed; Rye flour; Rye wholemeal; Wheat bran, processed; Wheat germ; Wheat flour; Wheat wholemeal.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Tea
Teas are derived from the leaves of several plants, principally Camellia sinensis. They are used mainly in a fermented and dried form or only as dried leaves for the preparation of infusions.
 
Commodities: Tea, green, black.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
 
Vegetable oils, crude
This group includes the crude vegetable oils derived from oil seed, tropical and sub-tropical oil-containing fruits such as olives, and some pulses. Exposure to pesticides is through pre-harvest treatment of the relevant crops or post-harvest treatment of the oilseeds or oil-containing pulses.
 
Commodities: Vegetable oils, crude; Cotton seed oil, crude; Coconut oil, crude; Maize oil, crude; Olive oil, crude; Palm oil, crude; Palm kernel oil, crude; Peanut oil, crude; Rape seed oil, crude; Safflower seed oil, crude; Sesame seed oil, crude; Soya bean oil, crude.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Vegetable oils, edible
Vegetable oils, edible are derived from the crude oils through a refining and/or clarifying process. Exposure to pesticides is through pre-harvest treatment of the relevant crops or post-harvest treatment of the oilseeds or oil-containing pulses.
 
Commodities: Vegetable oils, edible; Cotton seed oil, edible; Coconut oil, refined; Maize oil, edible; Olive oil, refined; Palm oil, edible; Palm kernel oil, edible; Peanut oil, edible; Rape seed oil, edible; Safflower seed oil, edible; Sesame seed oil, edible; Soya bean oil, refined; Sunflower seed oil, edible.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Manufactured multi-ingredient cereal products
The commodities of this group are manufactured with several ingredients; products derived from cereal grains however form the major ingredient.
 
Commodities: Bread and other cooked cereal products; Maize bread; Rye bread; White bread; Wholemeal bread.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Miscellaneous
Commodities: Olives, processed; peppermint oil; Sugar cane molasses.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Secondary commodities of plant origin
The term ‘Secondary food commodity’ refers to a primary food commodity which has undergone simple processing, such as removal of certain portions, drying (except natural drying), husking, and comminution, which do not basically alter the composition or identity of the product. For the commodities referred to in dried fruits, dried vegetables and dried herbs refer to the commodity groupings for fruits, vegetables and herbs. Naturally field dried mature crops such as pulses or cereal grains are not considered as secondary food commodities.
Dried fruits
Dried fruits are generally artificially dried. Exposure to pesticides may arise from pre-harvest application, post-harvest treatment of the fruits before processing, or treatment of the dried fruit to avoid losses during transport and distribution.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity after removal of stones, but the residue is calculated on the whole commodity.
Dried herbs
Dried herbs are generally artificially dried and often comminuted. Exposure to pesticides is from pre-harvest applications and/or treatment of the dry commodities.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
 
Dried vegetables
Dried vegetables are generally artificially dried and often comminuted. Exposure to pesticides is from pre-harvest application and/or treatment of the dry commodities.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Milled cereal products (early milling stages)
The group ‘milled cereal products (early milling stages)’ includes the early milling fractions of cereal grains, except buckwheat, such as husked rice, polished rice and the unprocessed cereal grain brans. Exposure to pesticides is through pre-harvest treatments of the growing cereal grain crop and especially through post-harvest treatment of cereal grains.
 
Commodities: Bran, unprocessed; Rice bran, unprocessed; Rice, husked; Rice, polished; Rye bran, unprocessed; Wheat bran, unprocessed.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Secondary commodities of animal origin
The term ‘secondary food commodity’ refers to a primary food commodity which has undergone simple processing, such as removal of certain portions, drying, and comminution, which do not basically alter the composition or identity of the commodity.
Animal fats, processed
This group includes rendered or extracted (possibly refined and/or clarified) fats from mammals and poultry and fats and oils derived from fish.
 
Commodities: Tallow and lard from cattle, goats, pigs and sheep; Poultry fats, processed.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Dried meat and fish products
For the commodities referred to in dried meat and dried fish products refer to the commodity groupings for meat and fish. Dried meat and fish products includes naturally or artificially dried meat products and dried fish, mainly marine fish.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
Milk fats
Milk fats are the fatty ingredients derived from the milk of various mammals.
 
Portion of the commodity to which the MRL and ERL apply (and which is analysed): whole commodity.
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