Rs 0.784.01 Constitution Of The International Telecommunication Union, Of 22 December 1992 (With Annex)

Original Language Title: RS 0.784.01 Constitution de l’Union internationale des télécommunications, du 22 décembre 1992 (avec annexe)

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0.784.01 original text Constitution of the International Telecommunication Union concluded in Geneva on December 22, 1992, approved by the Federal Assembly on 14 June 1994 ratification Instrument deposited by the Switzerland on 15 September 1994 entry into force for the Switzerland on 15 September 1994 (State August 29, 2012) preamble 1 1 in full recognition of the sovereign right to regulate its telecommunications and in view of the growing importance of telecommunications for the safeguarding of peace in each State and the economic and social development of all States, States parties to this Constitution, fundamental instrument of the international telecommunications Union, and the Convention of the International Telecommunication Union (hereinafter referred to as 'the Convention') that the complete, in order to facilitate peaceful relations and international cooperation among peoples and economic and social development by the proper functioning of telecommunications , have agreed to the following: RS 0.784.02 chapter I Basic provisions art. 1 purpose of the Union 19 2 1. The Union has for object: 3A) to maintain and extend international cooperation between all members of the Union for the improvement and rational use of telecommunications of all kinds;
4 (b) to promote and offer technical assistance to developing countries in the field of telecommunications, and also promote the mobilization of material and financial resources required for its implementation;
5 (c) to promote the development of technical means and their more effective use, to increase the performance of telecommunications services, to increase their utility and to generalize the most possible use by the public;
6 d) to strive to extend the benefits of new technologies of telecommunications to all inhabitants of the planet;
7 e) to promote the use of telecommunication services to facilitate peaceful relations;
8 (f) to harmonize the efforts of members to these ends;
9 (g) to promote, at the international level, the adoption of a more general approach of telecommunications issues, the globalization of the economy and the information society, by working with other intergovernmental organizations regional and international as well as with non-governmental organizations dealing with telecommunications.
10-2. For this purpose, and more particularly, the Union: 11A) performs the assignment of radio spectrum frequency bands, the allotment of radio frequency and the recording of assignments of frequency, and any orbital position associated with geostationary satellites orbit in order to avoid harmful interference between different countries radio stations;
12 (b) coordinates the efforts to eliminate harmful interference between the different country radio stations and improve the use of the spectrum of radio frequencies as well as the orbit of geostationary satellites for radiocommunication services;
13 (c) facilitates the global standardization of telecommunications, with a satisfactory quality of service;
14 (d) encourages international cooperation to provide technical assistance to developing countries as well as the creation, development and the development of facilities and telecommunication networks in developing countries by all means at its disposal, including its participation in the appropriate programs of the United Nations and the use of its own resources, as required;
15 e) coordinates the efforts to harmonize the development of telecommunications, including those involving space technology, so as to make the best use of the opportunities they offer;
16 (f) promotes collaboration between its members for the establishment of rates to levels as low as possible, consistent with good quality service and financial management of healthy and independent telecommunications;
17 g) causes the adoption of measures to ensure the safety of human life through the cooperation of telecommunications services;
18 h) shall conduct studies, stop regulations, resolutions, recommendations and the greeting formula, collects and publishes information on telecommunications;
19 i) is working with the international financing and development, to promote the establishment of preferential and favourable credit lines intended for the development of social projects, among other things, to extend telecommunications services to the most remote areas in the country.

Art. 2 composition of the Union 23 20 the international telecommunications Union, having regard to the principle of universality and the interest of universal participation in the Union, is composed of: 21a) any State which is a member of the Union as a party to any International Telecommunication Convention before the entry into force of this Constitution and of the Convention;
22 (b) any other State member of the Organization of the United Nations, which adheres to this Constitution and to the Convention in accordance with the provisions of article 53 of this Constitution;
23 (c) any other State, not a member of the Organization of the United Nations, which seeks membership of the Union and which, once its application has been approved by two thirds of the members of the Union, adheres to this Constitution and to the Convention in accordance with the provisions of article 53 of the Constitution. If such a request admission as a member is made during the period between two Plenipotentiary Conferences, the Secretary-General consults with members of the Union; a member will be considered as abstain as if he has not responded within a period of four months from the day where it was consulted.

Art. 3 rights and obligations of the members 28 24 1. Members of the Union have rights and are subject to the obligations laid down in this Constitution and in the Convention.
25-2. Members rights, with respect to their participation in conferences, meetings and consultations of the Union, are the following: 26A) any Member has the right to participate in the conferences, is eligible for the Council and has the right to present candidates for the election of the officers of the Union or of the members of the Committee of the radio regulations;
27 any Member b), subject to the provisions of numbers 169 and 210 of the Constitution, also right to a voice in all the Conferences of Plenipotentiaries, to all the global conferences, and all meetings of the radio as well as to all meetings of the study groups and, if it is part of the Council, in all the sessions of this Council. Regional conferences, only members of the region have the right to vote;
28 (c) every Member has, subject to the provisions of numbers 169 and 210 of the Constitution, also right to a voice in any consultation by correspondence. In the case of consultations on regional conferences, only members of the region have the right to vote.

Art. Instruments of the Union 32 29 1 4. The instruments of the Union are: - the Constitution of the International Telecommunication Union, - the Convention of the International Telecommunication Union, and - by-laws.

30 2. The present Constitution, whose provisions are supplemented by the Convention is the fundamental instrument of the Union.
31 3. The provisions of this Constitution and of the Convention is increasingly supplemented by administrative, listed below, regulations that regulate the use of telecommunications and bind all members;
-the international telecommunications regulations, the radio regulations.

32 4. In case of discrepancy between a provision of this Constitution and any provision of the Convention or the by-laws, the Constitution prevails. In the event of conflict between a provision of the Convention and a provision of the by-laws, the Convention prevails.

Art. 5 definitions 36 33 unless inconsistent with the context: 34A) the terms used in this Constitution and defined in the annex, which is an integral part of this Constitution, have the meaning assigned to them in this annex;
35 (b) terms - other than those set out in the annex to this Constitution - used in the Convention and defined in the annex to this Convention, which is part of the Convention, have the meaning assigned to them in this annex;
36 c) the other terms defined in the by-laws have the meaning assigned to them in these regulations.

Art. 6 execution of the instruments of the Union 38 37

1. members are required to comply with the provisions of this Constitution, the Convention and the laws in all offices and stations of telecommunication established or operated by them, and that provide international services or which may cause harmful interference to other countries radio services, except in the case of services which escape those obligations under the provisions of article 48 of the present Constitution.
38 2. Members are also required to take the necessary measures to impose the observation of the provisions of this Constitution, the Convention and the by-laws to the operations authorized by them to establish and operate telecommunications and providing international services or operate stations that may cause harmful interference to other radiocommunication services.

Art. 7 the Union 46 39 the Union structure: 40 a) the Conference of Plenipotentiaries, supreme organ of the Union;
41 (b) the Council, which acts as a representative of the Conference of Plenipotentiaries;
42 (c) global conferences of international telecommunications;
43 d) the Radiocommunication sector, including the conferences of world and regional radiocommunication, meetings of the radiocommunica-tion and the Committee of the radio regulations, 44 e) sector of the standardization of telecommunications, including the global standardization of telecommunications conferences;
45 (f) development of the telecommunications sector, including global and regional telecommunication development conferences;
46 g) general Secretariat.

Art. 8. the Conference of Plenipotentiaries 59 47 1. The Plenipotentiary Conference is composed of delegations representing the members. It is convened every four years.
48 2. The Conference of Plenipotentiaries: 49A) determines the General principles to meet the purpose of the Union set out in article 1 of this Constitution;
50 (b) after consideration of the reports prepared by the Council on the activities of the Union since the last Conference of Plenipotentiaries as well as on policy and strategic planning recommended for the Union, adopts all decisions it considers appropriate;
51 c) establishes the bases of the EU budget and fixed, given the decisions taken on the basis of the reports mentioned at number 50 above, the ceiling of its expenditure for the period up to the next Plenipotentiary Conference, after reviewing all the relevant aspects of the activity of the Union during this period;
52 (d) formulates all general guidelines concerning the size of the Union and fixed, if necessary, treatment of base, the scales of salaries and the regime of allowances and pensions of all officials of the Union;
53 e) examines the accounts of the Union and approves them permanently if there is place;
54 f) elects the members of the Union called upon to compose the Board.
55 g) elects the Secretary general, the Deputy Secretary-General and the directors of the offices in their capacity as elected officials of the Union;
56 h) elects the members of the Committee of the radio regulations;
57 (i) consider and adopt, if there is place, the proposed amendments to this Constitution and the Convention in accordance with, respectively, the provisions of article 55 of the Constitution and the relevant provisions of the Convention;
58 (j) concludes or revise, as appropriate, agreements between the Union of other international organizations, reviews any provisional agreement reached by the Council on behalf of the Union with such organizations and gives it more it deems appropriate;
59 k) treats all other telecommunications issues deemed necessary.

Amended in Kyoto on 14 oct. 1994; entered into force for the Switzerland on 14 March 1996. The text of these amendments is not published in the RO. It can be obtained, in the English and French languages, from OFCOM, the future 44, p.o. box, 2501 Biel Street.
Amended in Kyoto on 14 oct. 1994; entered into force for the Switzerland on 14 March 1996. The text of these amendments is not published in the RO. It can be obtained, in the English and French languages, from OFCOM, the future 44, p.o. box, 2501 Biel Street.
Amended in Kyoto on 14 oct. 1994; entered into force for the Switzerland on 14 March 1996. The text of these amendments is not published in the RO. It can be obtained, in the English and French languages, from OFCOM, the future 44, p.o. box, 2501 Biel Street.

Art. 9 principles in the 64 60 1 related issues and elections. During the elections referred to in numbers 54 to 56 of the present Constitution, the Conference of Plenipotentiaries shall ensure that: 61A) the members of the Council should be elected with due regard to the need for a fair distribution of the seats in the Council in all regions of the world;
62 (b) the Secretary-General, the Deputy Secretary-General, the directors offices and members of the Committee of the radio regulations are all nationals of different members and that, in their election, it due account is taken of geographical balance between the regions of the world; in regards to elected officials, should also take due account of the principles set out in the number 154 of this Constitution;
63 (c) members of the radio regulations Board elected individually, from among candidates proposed by the members of the Union; each Member may propose only one candidate, who must be one of its nationals.
64 2. The procedures for these elections are established by the Conference of plenipotentiaries. The provisions relating to entry into functions, job vacancies and the re are in the Convention.

Amended in Kyoto on 14 oct. 1994; entered into force for the Switzerland on 14 March 1996. The text of these amendments is not published in the RO. It can be obtained, in the English and French languages, from OFCOM, the future 44, p.o. box, 2501 Biel Street.
Amended in Kyoto on 14 oct. 1994; entered into force for the Switzerland on 14 March 1996. The text of these amendments is not published in the RO. It can be obtained, in the English and French languages, from OFCOM, the future 44, p.o. box, 2501 Biel Street.

Art. 10. the Council 72 65 1. (1) the Council shall consist of members of the Union elected by the Conference of plenipotentiaries in accordance with number 61 of this Constitution.
66 (2) each Member of the Board designated to serve on the Board a person who can be assisted by one or more assessors.
67 2. The Board shall establish its own rules of procedure.
68 3. In the interval between Plenipotentiary Conferences, the Board, as the governing body of the Union, acts as a representative of the Conference of Plenipotentiaries within the limits of the powers delegated by the Commission.
69 4. (1) the Council is responsible for taking all measures to facilitate the implementation, by Member, the provisions of this Constitution, of the Convention, by-laws, decisions of the Conference of Plenipotentiaries and, where applicable, of the decisions of other conferences and meetings of the Union, as well as to perform all other tasks assigned by the Conference of plenipotentiaries.
70 (2) it examines the great questions of telecommunications policy in accordance with the guidelines of the Conference of Plenipotentiaries so that policy and strategy of the Union are perfectly adapted to the constant evolution of the telecommunications environment.
71 (3) it ensures effective coordination of the activities of the Union and exercises effective financial control over the general Secretariat and the three sectors.
72 (4) it helps, in accordance with the purpose of the Union, the development of telecommunications in the developing countries by all means at its disposal, including through the participation of the Union in the appropriate programs of the United Nations.

Art. Secretariat general 77 73 1 11. (1) the general Secretariat is headed by a Secretary general attended a Deputy Secretary-General.
74 (2) the Secretary-General, with the assistance of the coordination committee, develops policies and strategic plans of the Union and coordinates its activities.
75 (3). the Secretary-General takes all necessary measures to ensure that the resources of the Union are used with economy and is responsible to the Council for all of the administrative and financial aspects of the activities of the Union.
76 (4) the Secretary-General acts as representative of the Union.
77 2. The Deputy Secretary-General is accountable to the Secretary-General; He assists the Secretary-General in the exercise of its functions and specific responsibilities entrusted to the Secretary-General. The responsibilities of the Secretary general in the absence of the latter.

Chapter II article radiocommunication sector 12 88 78 structures and functions

1. (1) The functions of the Radiocommunication sector are to meet the purpose of the Union concerning radio, as it is stated in article 1 of the present Constitution, - ensuring the use rational, equitable, effective and economic of the radio spectrum by all radiocommunication services, including those using the orbit of geostationary satellites, subject to the provisions of article 44 of this Constitution , and - by conducting studies without limitation as to the range of frequencies, and by adopting recommendations on radiocommunication.

79 (2) the specific powers of the radiocommunications and telecommunications standardization sector sector must be reviewed continuously in close cooperation, regarding the problems interesting the two sectors, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention. Close coordination should be ensured between Radiocommunication, standardization of telecommunications, and the development of telecommunications sectors.
80 2. The operation of the Radiocommunication sector is ensured by: 81A) conferences world and regional radiocommunication;
82 (b) the Committee of the radio regulations;
83 (c) meetings of radiocommunications, associated with the world radiocommunication conferences;
84 (d) of the study groups;
85 e) the Radiocommunication Bureau headed by an elected Director.
86 3. The Radiocommunication sector has for members: 87 (a), of law, the authorities of all members of the Union, 88 b) any entity or organisation approved in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention.

Art. 13 radio conferences and assemblies of the 92 89 1 radio. A world radiocommunication conference can a partial revision or, exceptionally, of the radio regulations and deal with any other issues of a global nature of jurisdiction and related to its agenda. The other functions of this conference are set out in the Convention.
90 2. World radiocommunication conferences are normally convened every two years; However, in accordance with the provisions relevant to the Convention, such a conference may not be convened or an additional conference can be convened.
91 3. Radiocommunication assemblies are similarly normally convened every two years and are associated in place and dates the world radiocommunication conferences so as to improve the efficiency and productivity of the Radiocommunication sector. Radiocommunication assemblies establish the technical foundations for the work of the World Radiocommunication Conferences and give all requests of such conferences; their duties are set out in the Convention.
92 4. Decisions of global conferences of the radio, the Regional Radiocommunication Conference and radiocommunication assemblies must comply, in all cases, the provisions of this Constitution and of the Convention. The decisions of the meetings of the radio or the regional radiocommunication conferences must be also, in all cases, consistent with the provisions of the radio regulations. When they adopt resolutions and decisions, the conferences must take into account the foreseeable financial implications and should avoid adopting resolutions and decisions likely to lead the upper limits exceeding funds established by the Conference of plenipotentiaries.

Art. 14 of the 101 93 1 Radio Regulations Committee. The rules of the radio Committee is composed of members elected fully qualified in the field of radiocommunications and possessing practical experience in assignment and use of frequencies. Each Member must be aware of the terms geographic, economic and demographic of a particular region of the world. Members exercise their duties in the service of the Union of independent and part-time.
94 2. The functions of the Committee of the radio regulations are: 95A) to approve rules of procedure, which include technical criteria, in accordance with the radio regulations and the decisions of the competent radiocommunication conferences. These rules of procedure are used by the Director and the Bureau in the application of the radio regulations to record assignments of frequencies made by members. These rules may be the subject of comments on the part of Governments and, in case of persistent disagreement, the matter is referred to a next world radiocommunication conference;
96 (b) to consider any other problem that cannot be solved by the application of the above rules of procedure;
97 c) to run additional tasks relating to the assignment and use of frequencies, as shown in the number 78 of this Constitution, in accordance with the procedures provided by the radio regulations, prescribed by a competent conference or by the Council with the consent of the majority of the members of the Union for the preparation of such a conference or in the execution of its decisions.
98 3. (1) the members of the Committee of the radio regulations, in discharging their duties in the Committee, do not represent their Member State or a region, but are invested with international public office. In particular, each Member of the Committee must refrain from participate in decisions directly about his administration.
99 (2) no member of the Committee shall, with respect to the exercise of its functions in the service of the Union, seek or receive instructions from any Government or any member of any Government, or any organization or public or private entity. Members must refrain from taking any measure or to be associated with any decision that may be incompatible with their status as defined in the No. 98 above.
100 (3) every Member shall respect the exclusively international character of the functions of the members of the Committee and refrain from seeking to influence them in the exercise of their functions within the Committee.
101 (4) methods of work of the Committee of the radio regulations are defined in the Convention.

Art. 15 102 102 radiocommunication study groups the functions of the radiocommunication study groups are set out in the Convention.

Art. 16 103 103 radiocommunication bureau the functions of the Director of the Radiocommunication Bureau are set out in the Convention.

Chapter III the art Telecommunication Standardization sector 17 functions and 112-104-1 structure. (1) the functions of the Telecommunication Standardization sector are to fully respond to the purpose of the Union on the standardisation of telecommunications, as set out in article 1 of this Constitution, conducting studies on technical issues, pricing and operations and adopting recommendations thereon to the standardization of telecommunications around the world.
105 (2) the specific responsibilities of the sector of the Radiocommunication sector and Telecommunication Standardization should be reviewed continuously in close cooperation, regarding the problems interesting the two sectors, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention. Close coordination should be ensured between Radiocommunication, standardization of telecommunications and the development of telecommunications sectors.
106 2. The operation of the Telecommunication Standardization sector is ensured by: 107a) global conferences of Telecommunication Standardization;
108 (b) of the Telecommunication Standardization study groups;
109 c) the Bureau of standardization of telecommunications, headed by an elected Director.
110-3. The Telecommunication Standardization sector has for members: 111A) right, the administrations of all members of the Union;
112 (b) any entity or organisation approved in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention.

Art. 18 115-113-1 Telecommunication Standardization world conferences. The role of the global conferences of Telecommunication Standardization is defined in the Convention.
114 2. World Telecommunication Standardization conferences are convened every four years; However, an additional conference can be organized in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention.
115-3. The decisions of global conferences of Telecommunication Standardization should be, in all cases, consistent with the provisions of this Constitution, the Convention and the by-laws. When they adopt resolutions and decisions, the conferences must take into account the foreseeable financial implications and should avoid adopting resolutions and decisions likely to lead the upper limits exceeding funds established by the Conference of plenipotentiaries.


Art. 19 studies of telecommunications 116 116 standardization commissions study of standardization of telecommunications functions are outlined in the Convention.

Art. 20 office of the standardization of telecommunications 117 117 the functions of the Director of the Telecommunication Standardization Bureau are set out in the Convention.

Chapter IV the development of telecommunications art sector 21 functions and 136 118 1 structure. (1) the functions of the development of the telecommunications sector are to meet the purpose of the Union as set out in article 1 of this Constitution and to fulfil, within its sphere of specific competence, the double responsibility of the Union as a specialized agency of the United Nations and enforcement agent for the implementation of projects under the development of the United Nations system or other financing arrangements in order to facilitate and improve the development of telecommunications by providing, organizing and coordinating the activities of cooperation and technical assistance, 119 (2) activities of sectors of radiocommunications, standardization of telecommunications and the development of telecommunications are a close cooperation regarding issues related to development, in accordance with the relevant provisions of this Constitution.
120 2. In the above context, the specific functions of the development of the telecommunications sector are: 121 a) increase awareness of decision-makers to the important role of telecommunications in economic and social development programmes and provide information and advice on options for policy and structure;
122 b) to encourage the development, expansion and operation of networks and telecommunications services, particularly in developing countries, in view of the activities of the other bodies concerned, by strengthening the means of development of the human resources, planning, management, mobilization of resources, and research and development;
123 c) to stimulate the growth of telecommunications by cooperation with regional organizations and telecommunications with global and regional development finance institutions, following the status of successful projects in its development agenda, to ensure their successful implementation, 124 d) encourage the mobilization of resources to provide assistance to the developing countries in the field of telecommunications by encouraging the establishment of preferential and favourable credit lines and in cooperation with the funding and development agencies international and regional;
125 e) to promote and coordinate programs to speed up the transfer of technologies appropriate for developing countries, taking into account the evolution and the changes that occur in the networks of the developed countries;
126 (f) to encourage the participation of industry in the development of telecommunications in the developing countries, and to give advice on the choice and the transfer of appropriate technologies;
127 (g) to provide advice, to perform or to sponsor studies, if any, on questions of technique, of Economics, finance, management, regulation, and policy, including studies on specific projects in the field of telecommunications;
128 h) to collaborate with other sectors, the general Secretariat and other concerned bodies to develop a comprehensive plan for international and regional networks of telecommunications, in order to facilitate the coordination of their development for the provision of telecommunications services;
129 (i) particularly interested in exercising the above-mentioned functions, the needs of the least developed countries.
130-3. The development of the telecommunications sector is run by: 131a) conferences world and regional telecommunication development;
132 (b) commissions for studies of the development of telecommunications.
133 (c) headed by an elected Director Telecommunication Development Bureau.
134 4. The development of the telecommunications sector has for members: 135a) right, the administrations of all members of the Union;
136 (b) any entity or organisation approved in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention.

Art. 22 143 137 1 telecommunication development conferences. Telecommunication development conferences constitute a framework for discussion which are discussed issues, projects and programmes in the development of telecommunications and where are given guidance to the Office of telecommunication development.
138 2. Telecommunication development conferences include: 139 a) World Telecommunication development conferences;
140 (b) regional telecommunication development conferences.
141 3. He stands between two Plenipotentiary Conferences a world conference of telecommunications and development, according to resources and priorities, regional telecommunication development conferences.
142 4. Telecommunication development conferences are not final acts. Their conclusions in the form of resolutions, decisions, recommendations or reports. These findings must be, in all cases, consistent with the provisions of this Constitution, by-laws and the Convention. When they adopt resolutions and decisions, the conferences must take into account the foreseeable financial implications and should avoid adopting resolutions and decisions likely to lead the upper limits exceeding funds established by the Conference of plenipotentiaries.
143 5. The role of telecommunication development conferences is defined in the Convention.

Art. 23 commissions for studies of the development of telecommunications 144 144 the functions of boards of studies of the development of telecommunications are set out in the Convention.

Art. 24 office of development of telecommunications 145 145 the Director of the Office of telecommunication development are outlined in the Convention.

Chapter V other provisions on the functioning of the Union art. 25 147 146 1 international telecommunications conferences. A world conference of the international telecommunications can review partial, or exceptionally total, of the international telecommunications regulations and address any other issue of global nature of jurisdiction or relating to its agenda.
147 2. The decisions of the conferences of the International Telecommunication are, in all cases, consistent with the provisions of this Constitution and of the Convention. During the adoption of the resolutions and decisions, conferences should take into account the foreseeable financial implications and should avoid adopting such resolutions and decisions that can cause the upper limits exceeding funds established by the Conference of plenipotentiaries.

Art. 26 149 148 1 Coordinating Committee. The coordination Committee is composed of the Secretary-General, the Deputy Secretary-General and the directors of the three offices. It is chaired by the Secretary-General and, in his absence, by the Deputy Secretary-General.
149 2. The coordination Committee is an internal management team that advises the Secretary-General and provides practical help for questions about administration, finance, information systems and technical cooperation that are not exclusively the jurisdiction of a given sector or the general Secretariat as well as in the areas of external relations and public information. In the review of these issues, the Committee takes full account of the provisions of this Constitution, of the Convention, the decisions of the Council and of the interests of the entire Union.

Art. 27. the elected officials and the staff of the Union 154 150 1. (1) in the performance of their duties, public servants elected as well as the staff of the Union must solicit nor accept instructions from any Government or from any authority outside the Union. They must refrain from any act incompatible with international officials.
151 (2) each Member shall respect the exclusively international character of the functions of these elected officials and staff of the Union, and to refrain from seeking to influence them in the performance of their tasks.
152 (3) apart from their duties, elected officials, and the staff of the Union, must not have participation or financial interest of any kind whether, in a company any dealing with telecommunications. However, the expression 'financial interests' should not be interpreted as opposing to the continuation of payments for retirement due to employment or past service.
153

(4) to ensure the functioning of the Union, while Member whose national has been elected Secretary-General, Deputy Secretary-General and Director of an Office must, to the extent possible, refrain from remembering what national between two Plenipotentiary Conferences.
154 2. The dominant consideration in recruitment and the establishment of the conditions of employment of staff should be the need to provide the Union with the services of people with the highest standards of efficiency, competence and integrity. The significance of a recruitment on a broadest possible geographical basis should be duly taken into account.

Art. 28 Finance of the Union 170 155 1. Union expenses include fees: 156 a) the Council;
157 (b) to the general Secretariat and the sectors of the Union;
158 (c) Conference of Plenipotentiaries and the global conferences of the international telecommunications.
159 2. Union expenses are covered by the contributions of its members and of the entities and organizations admitted to participate in the activities of the Union in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention. These contributions are determined according to the number of units corresponding to the class of contributions selected by each Member and any entity or organization authorized, in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention.
160 3. (1) members freely choose the class of contribution that they intended to participate in the expenses of the Union.
161 (2) this choice is made within the six months following the end of a Conference of plenipotentiaries in accordance with the scale of the contribution indicated in the Convention classes.
162. (3) If a Conference of plenipotentiaries to adopt an amendment to the scale of contribution classes contained in the Convention, the Secretary-General shall inform each Member of the date of entry into force of the amendment. Each member informed the Secretary-General, within six months following the date of this communication, of the class of contribution that is chosen according to the scale changed to force.
163 (4) the contribution class chosen by each Member, in accordance with the number 161 or 162 above, number shall apply only from 1 January following a period of one year from the expiration of the period of six months referred to in number 161 or 162 above.
164 4. Members who have not made their decision known within the time specified respectively numbers 161 and 162 above retain the contribution class they had chosen previously.
165 5. The class of contribution chosen by a member cannot be reduced in accordance with numbers 161, 162 and 163 above. However, in exceptional circumstances, such as natural disasters requiring the launch of international aid programs, the Council may authorize a reduction in the number of units of contribution when a member requests and provides evidence that it can no longer sustain its contribution in the initially chosen class.
166 6. Similarly, members may, with the approval of the Council, choose a contribution class less than they have chosen in accordance with the number 161 above, if their relative position of contribution, from the date set at number 163 above for a new period of contribution is significantly worse than their last previous position.
167 7. The expenses of the regional conferences referred to in number 43 of this Constitution are the responsibility of all members of the region, according to the class of contribution of the latter and, on the same basis, of those members from other regions which, if any, participated in such conferences.
168 8. Members and entities and organizations referred to in number 159 above pay in advance their contributory share annual, calculated according to the biennial budget adopted by the Council and taking into account the adjustments that it may adopt.
169 9. A member in arrears in its payments to the Union loses its right to vote set to the numbers 27 and 28 of this Constitution, when the amount of its arrears equals or greater than the amount of the contributions payable by the Member for the previous two years.
170 10. The specific provisions governing the financial contributions of the entities and organizations referred to in number 159 above and other international organizations are in the Convention.

Amended in Kyoto on 14 oct. 1994; entered into force for the Switzerland on 14 March 1996. The text of these amendments is not published in the RO. It can be obtained, in the English and French languages, from OFCOM, the future 44, p.o. box, 2501 Biel Street.

Art. 29 languages 174 171 1. (1) the Union is working and official languages: English, Arabic, Chinese, Spanish, the french and Russian.
172 (2) these languages are used, in accordance with the relevant decisions of the Conference of Plenipotentiaries for the establishment and publication of documents and texts of the Union as equivalent by their form and their content, as well as interpreting versions mutual during the conferences and meetings of the Union.
173 (3) in the event of disagreement or dispute, the french text makes faith.
174 2. When all the participants to a conference or meeting agree to this procedure, the debates can take place in fewer languages than mentioned above.

Art. 30 seat the Union 175 175. the Union has its headquarters in Geneva.

Art. 31 legal capacity of the Union 176 176 the Union enjoys on the territory of each of its members, the legal capacity, which is necessary to perform its functions and achieve its objectives.

Art. 32 rules of procedure of conferences and other meetings 178 177 1. For the Organization of their work and the conduct of their business, conferences and meetings of the Union apply the rules contained in the Convention.
178 2. Conferences, and the Council can adopt rules as necessary to supplement those of the rules of procedure. However, these additional rules must be consistent with the provisions of this Constitution and of the Convention; If it's complementary rules, adopted by conferences, they are published as documents of the latter.

Chapter VI General provisions on telecommunications art. 33 right of the public to use the international telecommunication service 179 179 members recognize the right to correspond through the international public correspondence service to the public. Services, taxes and benefits are the same for all users, within each category of correspondence, without any priority or preference any.

Art. 34 181 180 1 telecommunications station. Members reserve the right to stop the transmission of any private telegram that would appear dangerous to the security of the State or contrary to its laws, public order or good morals, responsibility to immediately notify the office of origin of the telegram or a total shutdown any portion of it, except in the case where such notification would appear dangerous to the security of the State.
181 2. Members also reserves the right to interrupt any other private telecommunication which may appear dangerous to the security of the State or contrary to its laws, public order or good morals.

Art. 35 suspension of the 182 182 each member service reserves the right to suspend the international service of telecommunication, either generally, or only for certain relationships or for certain types of matches of departure, arrival or transit, in charge for him to immediately notify each other member through the Secretary-General.

Art. 36 responsibility 183 183 members accept no responsibility for users of international telecommunications services, particularly in regard to claims seeking damages and interest.

Art. 37 185 184 1 telecommunications secret. The members are committed to take all steps possible, compatible with the system of telecommunication used, to ensure the secrecy of international correspondence.
185 2. However, they reserve the right to communicate these correspondences to the competent authorities, in order to ensure the application of their national legislation or enforcement of international conventions to which they are parties.

Art. 38 establishment, operation and backup channels and 189 186 1 telecommunications facilities. Members take steps to establish, in the best conditions techniques, ways and facilities to ensure fast and uninterrupted international telecommunications exchanges.
187 2. As much as possible, these channels and installations must be operated according to the practical experience of the operation has revealed the best methods and procedures, maintained in good condition of use and maintained at the level of scientific and technical progress.
188 3. Members ensure the backup of these channels and installations within their jurisdiction.
189

4. less to specific arrangements setting other conditions, all members take the appropriate measures to ensure the maintenance of the sections of international telecommunication circuits that are included within the limits of their control.

Art. 39 notification of tickets 190 190 to facilitate the application of the provisions of article 6 of the present Constitution, members undertake to inquire each other about the contraventions of the provisions of this Constitution, by-laws and the Convention.

Art. 40 priority of telecommunications relating to the security of human life 191 191 international telecommunications services must give top priority to all telecommunications relating to the safety of human life at sea, on land, in the air and in outer space, as well to the World Health Organization's exceptional emergency epidemiological telecommunications.

Art. 41 priority of telecommunications of State 192 192 under the provisions of articles 40 and 46 of the present Constitution, telecommunications of State (see the annex to this Constitution, number 1014) enjoy a right of priority over other telecommunications, to the extent possible, when demand is made by the person concerned.

Art. 42 special arrangements 193 193 members reserve, for themselves, for farms recognized by them and for other operations duly authorized for this purpose, the Faculty of special arrangements on telecommunications issues that do not interest the membership. However, these arrangements should not go against the provisions of this Constitution, the agreement or the by-laws, with respect to harmful interference that their implementation would be likely to cause to radio services of other members, and in general regarding technical losses that this implementation could cause operating other services of telecommunications of other members.

Art. 43 regional conferences, regional arrangements, regional organizations 194 194 members reserve the right to hold regional conferences, regional arrangements and to create regional organizations, to address telecommunication issues likely to be addressed on a regional basis. Regional arrangements should not be in contradiction with the Constitution or the Convention.

Chapter VII special provisions on radio art. 44 the spectrum of radio frequencies and the 196-195-1 geostationary satellites orbit. Members are trying to limit the number of frequencies and the spectrum used to the minimum necessary to ensure satisfactory functioning of necessary services. To this end, they are trying to apply promptly the latest advances in technology.
196 2. When using frequency bands for radio communications, members consider that the frequencies and the geostationary satellite orbit are limited natural resources that should be used in rational, efficient and economic way, in accordance with the provisions of the radio regulations, in order to allow a fair access to orbit and these frequencies to different countries , or groups of countries, given the special needs of developing countries and the geographical situation of some countries.

Art. 45 199 197 1 harmful interference. All stations, whatever their purpose, must be established and operated so as not to cause harmful interference to communications or radio services of other members, recognized farms and other farms duly authorized to provide a radio service, and which operate in accordance with the provisions of the radio regulations.
198 2. Each Member undertakes to require farms recognized by him and other farms duly authorized to that effect, observation of the requirements of the number 197 above.
199 3. In addition, members recognize the need to practically possible measures to prevent the operation of devices and electric plants of all kinds does not cause harmful interference to communications or radio services referred to in number 197 above.

Art. 46 calls and distress messages 200 200 radio stations are forced to accept absolute priority calls and distress messages regardless of the origin, to respond similarly to these messages and give immediately thereafter that they require.

Art. 47 signals distress, emergency, security, or false or misleading identification 201 201 members are committed to take necessary steps to crack down on the transmission or the release of signals of distress, urgency, safety or identification, false or misleading and to work to locate and identify the stations under their jurisdiction which emit such signals.

Art. 48 204 202 1 national defence facilities. Members retain their full freedom with regard to military radio installations.
203 2. However, these facilities should, as much as possible, to observe regulatory provisions to lend distress relief and the measures to prevent harmful interference, as well as the requirements of the administrative regulations concerning emission types and frequencies to use, depending on the nature of the service they provide.
204 3. In addition, when these facilities are involved in public correspondence service or other services that are governed by the by-laws, they must comply with, in general, the regulatory requirements for these services.

Chapter VIII Relations with the United Nations, other international organizations and States non-members art. 49 relations with the Organization of the United Nations 205 205 the relationship between the United Nations and the International Telecommunication Union are defined in the agreement concluded between the two organizations.

Art. 50 relationships with other international organizations 206 206 to help the realization of a full international coordination in the field of telecommunications, the Union is working with international organizations who have interests and related activities.

Art. 51 relations with non-members 207 207 all Member States reserve, for themselves and for the recognized farms, the faculty to determine the conditions in which they admit telecommunications exchanged with a State which is not a member of the Union. If a telecommunication originating in such a State is accepted by a member, it must be submitted and, insofar as it borrows the ways of telecommunications of a member, the provisions required of this Constitution, the Convention and the by-laws so that normal taxes are applied to him.

Chapter IX provisions final art. 52 ratification, acceptance or approval 1 208 211. The present Constitution and the Convention is ratified, accepted or approved simultaneously by any signatory, according to its constitutional rules, in the form of a single instrument. This instrument is deposited in the shortest possible time, with the Secretary-General. The Secretary-General shall inform the members of the deposit of each instrument.
209 2. (1) for a period of two years from the date of entry into force of this Constitution and of the Convention, any signatory member enjoys the rights conferred upon the members of the Union at the numbers 25 to 28 of this Constitution, even if it has not filed a instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval to the terms of number 208 above.
210 (2) at the expiration of a period of two years from the date of entry into force of this Constitution and of the Convention, a member who has not filed an instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval under the terms of the 208 number above has more quality to vote in any conference of the Union, to any session of the Council, to any meeting of the sectors of the Union , or during any consultation by correspondence conducted in accordance with the provisions of this Constitution and of the Convention, and that as long as that instrument has not been filed. The rights of that Member, other than the voting rights, are not affected.
211 3. After the entry into force of this Constitution and of the Convention in accordance with article 58 of this Constitution, an instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval takes effect on the date of deposit with the Secretary-General.

Art. Membership 214 212 53

1. a member which has not signed this Constitution and the Convention or, subject to the provisions of article 2 of this Constitution, any State mentioned in the article, may at all times adhere to this Constitution and the Convention. This membership is at the same time in the form of a single instrument covering both the Constitution and the Convention.
213 2. The instrument of accession is deposited with the Secretary-General who shall notify the members the deposit of each instrument of accession as soon as it receives it, and transmits an authenticated copy of it to each of them.
214 3. After the entry into force of this Constitution and of the Convention in accordance with article 58 of this Constitution, an instrument of accession takes effect on the date of deposit with the Secretary-General, unless otherwise provided by that instrument.

Art. 54 223 215 1 bylaws. Such policies and administrative regulations as specified in article 4 of this Constitution are binding international instruments and must comply with the provisions of this Constitution and of the Convention.
216 2. Ratification, acceptance or approval of this Constitution and of the Convention or accession to those instruments, in accordance with articles 52 and 53 of this Constitution, implies also a consent to be bound by the by-laws adopted by the world conferences relevant prior to the date of signature of the present Constitution and the Convention. This consent is given any reservation made at the time of the signature of the said regulations or of any revision of the latter and insofar as it is held at the time of the deposit of the instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession.
217-3. Revisions of regulations administrative, partial or total, adopted after the above date, tentatively, apply with respect to all members who signed these revisions, to the extent permitted by their national law. This provisional application takes effect on the date or dates that are mentioned, in view of the reservations that have been made at the signing of these revisions.
218 4. This provisional application continues: 219 a) until the Member shall notify to the Secretary-General its consent to be bound by such revision and indicate, if necessary, to what extent he maintains any reservation made about this revision at the signing thereof; or 220 b) sixty days after receipt by the Secretary-General of the notification of the Member informing him that he does not consent to be bound by such revision.
221 5. If the Secretary-General has received, under numbers 219 and 220 above, any notification of a member having signed such a review before the expiry of a period of thirty-six months from the date or dates indicated for the beginning of the provisional application, that Member is considered as having consented to be bound by the revision taking into account any reservations he might have made about this revision, when it was signed.
222 6. Any member of the Union which has not signed such a revision of the by-laws, partial or total, adopted after the date specified in the 216-number on it, attaches to promptly notify its consent to be bound by this revision to the Secretary-General. If no notification has been received by the Secretary-General from this member before the expiry of the stipulated time at number 221 above, this member is considered as having consented to be bound by such revision.
223 7. The Secretary-General shall promptly inform members of any notification received under this section.

Art. 55 provisions to amend this Constitution 232 224 1. Any member of the Union may propose any amendment to this Constitution. In order to be transmitted to all members of the Union and be considered by them in due time, such a proposal must reach the Secretary-General no later than eight months before the date fixed for the Conference of plenipotentiaries. The Secretary-General shall, as soon as possible, and no later than six months before that date, such a proposal to all members of the Union.
225 2. However, any proposal for amendment of an amendment in accordance with the number 224 above can be submitted at any time by a member of the Union or its delegation to the Plenipotentiary Conference.
226 3. The quorum at any plenary meeting of the Conference of Plenipotentiaries for the review of any proposal to amend this Constitution or of any change of such a proposal is more than half of the delegations accredited to the Conference of plenipotentiaries.
227 4. To be adopted, any proposed amendment to an amendment, as well as the proposed amendment in its entirety, modified or not, must be approved at a plenary meeting, by at least two thirds of the delegations accredited to the Conference of Plenipotentiaries and having the right to vote.
228 5. The General provisions for the conferences and the rules of procedure of conferences and other meetings in the Convention apply, unless otherwise provided in the preceding paragraphs of this article, prevailing.
229 6. All amendments to this Constitution adopted by a Conference of Plenipotentiaries take effect at a date fixed by the Conference, in their entirety and in the form of a single amendment instrument, among members who will have deposited their instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession to the present Constitution and the instrument of amendment before that date. Ratification, acceptance, approval or accession to some of this instrument of amendment is excluded.
230 7. The Secretary-General shall notify all members the deposit of each instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession.
231 8. After the entry into force of any amendment, the ratification, acceptance, approval or accession, in accordance with articles 52 and 53 of this Constitution, shall apply to the amended Constitution.
232 9. After the entry into force of such an instrument of amendment, the Secretary-General registers it with the Secretariat of the United Nations, in accordance with the provisions of article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations. Number 241 of the Constitution also applies to any instrument of amendment.

RS 0.120 art. 56 235 233 1 dispute settlement. Members can settle their differences on issues related to the interpretation or application of this Constitution, the Convention bylaws, through negotiation, through diplomatic channels, or following the procedures established by bilateral or multilateral treaties concluded between them to settle international disputes, or by any other method they may decide by mutual agreement.
234 2. In case none of these regulations should be adopted, any Member, party in a dispute, may have recourse to arbitration, in accordance with the procedure laid down in the Convention.
235 3. The Optional Protocol concerning the compulsory settlement of disputes to this Constitution, the Convention and the by-laws is applicable between the parties to this Protocol.

Art. 57 denunciation of the present Constitution and the Convention 237 236 1. Any Member that has ratified, accepted or approved the Constitution and the Convention, or joined, has the right to denounce them. In such cases, the present Constitution and the Convention are reported simultaneously in the form of a single instrument, by notification to the Secretary-General. Upon receipt of this notification, the Secretary-General shall notify the other members.
237 2. Such denunciation produces its effect on the expiry of a period of one year from the date on which the Secretary-General has received notification.

Art. 58 entry into force and 242 238 1 related issues. The present Constitution and the Convention will come into force on July 1, 1994, between members who have deposited their instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession before that date.
239 2. The date of entry into force specified at number 238 above, this Constitution and the Convention repeal and replace, between the parties, the International Convention of telecommunications of Nairobi (1982).
240 3. In accordance with the provisions of article 102 of the Charter of the United Nations, the Secretary general of the Union will record this Constitution and the Convention to the Secretariat of the United Nations.
241 4. The original of this Constitution and of the Convention, established in the languages English, Arabic, Chinese, Spanish, French and Russian, will remain deposited in the archives of the Union. The Secretary general will send in the required languages, a certified copy to each of the signatory members.
242

5. in the case of divergence between the texts of this Constitution and of the Convention in the different languages, the french text shall be authentic.
In faith whereof, the undersigned Plenipotentiaries have signed this Constitution of the International Telecommunication Union for the original and the original of the Convention of the International Telecommunication Union.
Done at Geneva, on 22 December 1992.
(Follow signatures)

RS 0.784.16 RS 0.120 annex Definition of some terms used in this Constitution, in the Convention and in the bylaws of the International Union telecommunications 1001 for the purposes of the Union's instruments referred to above, the following terms have the meaning given in the definitions which the Administration accompagnent.1002: any service or Government Department responsible for the measures to take to perform the obligations of the Constitution of the International Telecommunication Union of the Convention of the international telecommunications and administratifs.1003 harmful interference regulations: used interference affecting the functioning of a radionavigation service or other safety services or seriously degrades, interrupted repeatedly or prevents a radiocommunication service operating in accordance with the rules of the radiocommunications.1004 public correspondence: any telecommunication offices and stations, by the fact of their making available to the public , must accept for the purposes of transmission.1005 Delegation: all of the delegates and, possibly, representatives, advisors, officers or interpreters sent by a Membre.Chaque member is free to compose its delegation at his convenience. In particular, it may include, among other things, as delegates, advisers or researchers, persons belonging to any entity or organisation approved in accordance with the relevant provisions of the Convention.
1006 delegate: Person sent by the Government of a member of the Union at a Conference of Plenipotentiaries, or person representing the Government or the administration of a member of the Union at a conference or a meeting of the Union.1007 operation: any individual, company, business or any government institution which operates a telecommunications facility intended to provide a telecommunication service international or likely to cause interference harmful to a such recognized operation service.1008 : Any exploitation according to the definition above, that operates a public correspondence or broadcasting service and on which the obligations laid down in article 6 of this Constitution are imposed by the Member on whose territory the headquarters of this operation or by the Member who has authorized this operation is installed to establish and operate an on his territoire.1009 Radiocommunication telecommunication service : Telecommunication by radioelectriques.1010 Broadcasting Service radio: Radio Service whose emissions are intended to be received directly by the general public. This service may include sound transmissions, television programs or other types of emission.1011 international telecommunications Service: provision of telecommunications between offices or stations television-communication of any kind, located in different countries or from countries differents.1012 telecommunications: any transmission, emission or reception of signs, signals, writings, images, sounds or information of any kind by wire, mediums, optics or other systems electromagnetiques.1013 telegram: writing intended to be transmitted by telegraph with a view to its delivery to the addressee. The term also includes the radiotelegram, unless contraire.1014 State Telecommunications: Telecommunications from - head of State; - head of Government or member of a Government; - Commander in Chief of the military, ground, naval or air forces; - diplomatic or consular agents; - Secretary general of the Organization of the United Nations; Heads of the principal organs of the Nations United; - International Court of Justice;

or responses to telecommunications of State mentioned above.
1015 private telegrams: cables other than the telegrams of State or service.1016 telegraphy: a form of telecommunication in which the transmitted information is intended to be registered upon arrival in the form of a graphic document. This information can in some cases be presented in another form or stored for later use.

Note: A graphic document is an information support on which is recorded permanently written or printed text or an image, and who is likely to be ranked and consulted.
1017 phone: Form of telecommunication mainly for the exchange of information in the form of speech.

State August 29, 2012 scope on April 29, 2010 States parties Ratification, accession (A) entry into Afghanistan, November 5, 2006 November 5, 2006 South Africa 30 June 1994 was 1 July 1994 Albania 15 October 1999 15 October 1999 Algeria 13 August 1996 August 13, 1996 Germany 8 October 1996 October 8, 1996 Andorra 24 January 1994 has 1 July 1994 10 November 2006 Angola has 10 November 2006 Saudi Arabia October 8, 1997 October 8

1997 Argentina 17 November 1997 November 17, 1997 Armenia 29 September 1995 was 29 September 1995 Australia 29 September 1994 September 29, 1994 Austria October 23, 1997 October 23, 1997 Azerbaijan 3 August 2000 has 3 August 2000 Bahamas 4 August 1994 4 August 1994 Bahrain July 12, 1996 July 12, 1996 Bangladesh 28 July 1994 has 28 July 1994 Barbados July 28, 1998 28 July 1998 Belarus 15 June 1994 July 1, 1994 Belgium August 18, 1997 August 18

1997 Belize 9 November 1993 to July 1, 1994 Benin April 24, 1997 April 24, 1997 Bhutan 16 April 1996 16 April 1996 Bolivia 30 December 1993 1 July 1994 Bosnia and Herzegovina September 2, 1994 September 2, 1994 Botswana 12 October 1998 October 12, 1998 Brazil 19 October 1998 October 19, 1998 Brunei 20 November 1996 November 20, 1996 Bulgaria 9 September 1994 September 9, 1994 Burkina Faso 21 October 1994 October 21, 1994 Burundi 9 November

1998 November 9, 1998 Cambodia 14 August 1997 was August 14, 1997 Cameroon April 18, 1995 April 18, 1995 Canada June 21, 1993 1 July 1994 Cap - green April 27, 1998 27 April 1998 Chile September 2, 1998 September 2, 1998 China 15 July 1997 July 15, 1997 Hong Kong June 6, 1997 1 July 1997 Macau July 3, 1999 December 20, 1999 Cyprus 1 November 1995 November 1, 1995 the Vatican may 3, 1996 3 May 1996 Colombia 2 April 1997 April 2, 1997 Comoros August 11, 1998 August 11, 1998 Congo (Brazzaville) August 9, 1994 was August 9, 1994 Congo (Kinshasa) 25 March 2009 March 25, 2009 (North) Korea August 9, 1994 August 9, 1994 (South) Korea August 5, 1994 August 5, 1994 Costa Rica, on 20 August 2002 has 20 August 2002 Ivory Coast March 22, 1996 22 March 1996 Croatia 3 June 1994 July 1, 1994 Cuba November 25, 1996 25 November 1996 Denmark June 18

1993 1 July 1994 Djibouti 10 March 1997 March 10, 1997 Dominique 28 October 1996 has 28 October 1996 Egypt 15 May 1996 15 May 1996 El El Salvador may 25, 1998 25 May 1998 UAE United 2 August 1995 August 2, 1995 Ecuador August 1, 1994 A 1 August 1994 Eritrea 31 January 1994 A 1 July 1994 Spain 15 April 1996 April 15, 1996 Estonia 23 January 1996 January 23, 1996 United States October 26, 1997 October 26, 1997

Ethiopia 13 October 1994 October 13, 1994 Fiji 11 October 1998 October 11, 1998 Finland 30 May 1996 30 May 1996 France may 18, 1994 July 1, 1994 Gabon September 28, 1998 September 28, 1998 Gambia February 9, 1998 February 9, 1998 Georgia 20 June 1994 was July 1, 1994 Ghana 16 October 1998 October 16, 1998 Greece 25 September 1998 September 25, 1998 Guatemala 8 May 2000 has 8 May 2000 Guinea 5 August 1994 5 August 1994 Guinea Equatorial 21 September 2002 September 21, 2002 Guinea - Bissau 17 July 2002 has July 17, 2002 Guyana 19 September 1994 has 19 September 1994 Haiti 22 May 1995 22 May 1995 Honduras June 23, 2000 June 23, 2000 Hungary 14 November 1997 November 14, 1997 Marshall Islands February 22, 1996 was 22 February 1996 India November 3, 1995 November 3, 1995 Indonesia 16 April 1996 16 April 1996 Iran July 11, 1996 July 11, 1996 Iraq February 8, 2006 At February 8, 2006 Ireland 16 October 1996 October 16, 1996 Iceland November 17, 1997 November 17, 1997 Israel August 25, 1994 August 25, 1994 Italy 3 May 1996 May 3, 1996 Jamaica October 20, 1998 October 20, 1998 Japan January 18, 1995 January 18, 1995 Jordan 16 October 1995 October 16, 1995 Kazakhstan 5 September 1994 has 5 September 1994 Kenya August 25, 1994 25 August 1994 Kyrgyzstan 29 June 1994 was 1 July 1994 Kiribati January 10, 2007 January 10, 2007 Kuwait 6 June 1997 6 June 1997 24 January 1994 Laos has 1 July 1994 Lesotho 22 March 2002 March 22, 2002 Latvia 1 June 2001 June 1, 2001 Lebanon 3 August 1998 3 August 1998 Liberia 8 October 2008 October 8, 2008 Libya 10 July 2007 has


July 10, 2007 Liechtenstein 2 January 1995 2 January 1995 Lithuania 28 March 2000 28 March 2000 Luxembourg 5 February 1997 5 February 1997 Macedonia 11 July 1994 has 11 July 1994 Madagascar 3 June 1996 3 June 1996 Malaysia April 11, 1994 1 July 1994 Malawi 19 October 1998 October 19, 1998 Maldives 22 August 1994 has 22 August 1994 Mali April 25, 1995 April 25, 1995 Malta 30 August 1995 August 30, 1995 Morocco 9 May 1996 9 May 1996 Mauritius 6 December 1993 has 1 July 1994 Mauritania 30 July 1998 July 30, 1998 Mexico September 27, 1993 July 1, 1994 Micronesia 7 August 1995 A August 7, 1995 Moldova February 18, 1997 February 18, 1997 Monaco 5 August 1997 August 5, 1997 Mongolia, on June 4, 1997 June 4, 1997 Montenegro June 21, 2006 A June 21, 2006 19 September 1994 Mozambique has 19 September 1994 Myanmar October 5, 1998 October 5, 1998 Namibia 4 August 1994 At August 4, 1994 Nepal 10 November 1997 10 November 1997 Nicaragua 12 October 1998 was October 12, 1998 Niger 3 September 1998 September 3, 1998 Nigeria December 24, 1999 24 December 1999 Norway 15 July 1994 15 July 1994 New Zealand 6 December 1994 6 December 1994 Oman may 18, 1994 July 1, 1994 Uganda 27 July 1994 has 27 July 1994 22 September 1994 Uzbekistan has 22 September 1994 Pakistan November 4, 1997 November 4, 1997 Panama 13 July

1998 13 July 1998 Papua New Guinea 10 May 1996 May 10, 1996 Paraguay 26 September 1994 was September 26, 1994 Netherlands June 13, 1996 June 13, 1996 Netherlands Antilles 13 June 1996 June 13, 1996 Aruba 13 June 1996 June 13, 1996 Peru September 30, 1994 was 30 September 1994 Philippines 23 May 1996 23 May 1996 Poland 17 October 1995 October 17, 1995 Portugal November 30, 1995 November 30, 1995 Qatar 13 October 1998 October 13, 1998 Central African Republic 11 May 1995 May 11, 1995 Dominican Republic 23 April 2002 A April 23, 2002 Czech Republic 29 August 1994 has 29 August 1994 Romania 29 November 1993 July 1, 1994 United Kingdom 27 June 1994 July 1, 1994 Russia August 1, 1995 August 1, 1995 Rwanda June 27, 2002 A June 27, 2002 Saint - Lucie 4 September 1997 September 4, 1997 Saint - Kitts - and - Nevis March 15, 2006 March 15, 2006 San - Marino August 31, 1994 August 31, 1994 Saint - Vincent and the Grenadines 20 September 1994 At 20 September 1994 Samoa 29 August 1994 29 August 1994 Sao Tome - and - principle 15 July 1996 July 15, 1996 South Africa November 18, 1994 18 November 1994 Serbia June 1, 2001 June 1, 2001 Seychelles 17 September 1999 was September 17, 1999 Singapore 2 May 1996 2 May 1996 Slovakia 1 July 1994 has 1 July 1994 Slovenia 12 December 1994 December 12, 1994 Somalia 24 June 2005 A June 24, 2005 Sudan February 13, 1997 February 13

1997 Sri Lanka 26 July 1996 July 26, 1996 Sweden 15 September 1994 September 15, 1994 Switzerland 15 September 1994 15 September 1994 Suriname 27 October 1997 October 27, 1997 Swaziland 5 October 1998 October 5, 1998 Syria 14 December 1993 has 1 July 1994 Tajikistan 19 July 1994 has 19 July 1994 Tanzania September 16, 1998 September 16, 1998 Chad August 25, 1997 August 25, 1997 Thailand 3 April 1996 April 3, 1996 Togo 19 September 1994 has 19 A September 1994 Tonga 9 September 1994 September 9, 1994 Trinidad and Tobago 20 September 1994 was September 20, 1994 Tunisia 27 October 1997 October 27, 1997 Turkmenistan 27 April 1994 was 1 July 1994 Turkey 3 May 2000 may 3, 2000 Tuvalu 15 August 1996 A August 15, 1996 Ukraine August 4, 1994 4 August 1994 Uruguay 1 October 1998 1 October 1998 Vanuatu October 13, 1998 was October 13, 1998 Venezuela 17 September 1996 September 17, 1996 Viet Nam June 19

1996 June 19, 1996 Yemen October 5, 1998 October 5, 1998 Zambia 12 October 1998 October 12, 1998 Zimbabwe 5 December 1994 December 5, 1994 * reservations and declarations.
Declarations and reservations made at the end of the additional Plenipotentiary Conference of the International Union of telecommunications are part of the final acts of the Conference. They are not published to the RO. Texts in french, German and English will be available to the Directorate of public international law (FDFA), Section of international treaties, 3003 Bern.

RO 24 245, 27 200 and RS 2 3 amended by amendment adopted 18 oct Instruments. 2002 (RS 0.784.011), Nov. 24. 2006 (RS 0.784.012) and Oct. 22. 2010, in force for Switzerland since August 29, 2012 (RS 0.784.013).
RO 1996 1254 a version of the update scope is published on the web site of the FDFA (www.dfae.admin.ch/traites).

State August 29, 2012

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