Rs 0.120 Un Charter June 26, 1945

Original Language Title: RS 0.120 Charte des Nations Unies du 26 juin 1945

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0.120 original text of the UN Charter concluded in San Francisco on 26 June 1945, approved by the Federal Assembly on 5 October 2001, Declaration of acceptance of the obligations contained in the Charter of the United Nations filed by Switzerland on 10 September 2002 entry into force for the Switzerland on 10 September 2002 (State June 23, 2015), peoples of the United Nations determined to preserve future generations from the scourge of war, which twice in the span of a human life has inflicted on humanity unspeakable suffering, to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women, and of nations, large and small to create the necessary conditions for the maintenance of justice and respect for obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law, to promote social progress and establish better conditions of life in larger freedom, and for these ends to practice tolerance and live in peace with each other in a spirit of good neighbourliness to unite our strength to maintain international to accept principles and establish methods guaranteeing that it will be not peace and security use of the force of arms, save in the common interest, to use international institutions to promote the economic and social progress of all peoples, decided to combine our efforts to achieve those purposes.

Chapter I purposes and principles art. 1. the purposes of the United Nations are the following: 1. maintaining peace and security international and to this end: take effective collective measures to prevent and remove threats to peace and to suppress any act of aggression or other breaches of the peace, and achieve, by peaceful means, in accordance with the principles of justice and international law , adjustment or settlement of disputes or situations, of international character, likely to lead to a breach of the peace;
2. develop between the nations of friendly relations based on respect for the principle of equal rights of peoples and their right to self-determination, and take any other measures to consolidate peace in the world.
3. achieve international cooperation in solving international economic, social, intellectual or humanitarian problems, by developing and encouraging respect for the rights of man and fundamental freedoms for all, without distinction of race, sex, language or religion;
4. to be a centre where harmonize the efforts of nations towards these common ends.

Art. 2. the United Nations and its members, in pursuit of the goals set out in art. 1, must act in accordance with the following principles: 1. the organization is based on the principle of the sovereign equality of all its members.
2. members of the Organization, to ensure that all the enjoyment of the rights and benefits resulting from membership, shall fulfill in good faith the obligations they have assumed under the terms of the present Charter.
3. the members of the Organization settle their international disputes by peaceful means in such a manner that international justice are not put at risk the peace and security.
4. members of the Organization refrain in their international relations, from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of any State, or in any other manner inconsistent with the purposes of the United Nations.
5. the members of the Organization give it every assistance in any action taken by it in accordance with the provisions of the present Charter and refrain from assisting a State against which the Organization undertakes preventive or coercive action.
6. the organization ensures that States that are not members of the United Nations Act in accordance with these principles insofar as necessary for the maintenance of peace and international security.
7. nothing in the present Charter only allows the United Nations to intervene in matters that fall essentially within the national jurisdiction of a State, nor requires members to submit cases of this kind to a settlement procedure under the terms of the present Charter; However, this principle does not affect the application of the coercive measures provided for in Chapter VII.

Chapter II members article 3 are members from the United Nations the States which, having participated in the United Nations Conference for the international organization in San Francisco, or having previously signed the Declaration of the United Nations, as of January 1, 1942, sign the present Charter and ratify it in accordance with art. 110 art. 4 (1) can become members of all United Nations other peaceful States which accept the obligations of the present Charter and, in the judgment of the Organization, are able to fill and willing to do.
(2) admission as member of the United Nations of any meeting these conditions is by decision of the General Assembly on the recommendation of the Security Council.

Art. 5. a member of the United Nations against which preventive or enforcement action been taken by the Security Council may be suspended by the General Assembly, on the recommendation of the Security Council, in the exercise of the rights and privileges of membership. The exercise of these rights and privileges may be restored by the Security Council.

Art. 6. If a member of the Organization violates the principles set out in this Charter persistently, it may be excluded from the organization by the General Assembly on the recommendation of the Security Council.

Chapter III organs article 7. (1) there is established as the principal organs of the Organization of the United Nations: a General Assembly, a Security Council, an economic and social Council, a Trusteeship Council, an International Court of Justice, and a Secretariat.
(2) the subsidiary bodies which would prove necessary may be established in accordance with the present Charter.

Art. 8. no restrictions will be imposed by the Organization to the access of men and women, under equal conditions, to all functions, in its main and subsidiary bodies.

Chapter IV general meeting art. 9 composition (1) the General Assembly consists of all members of the United Nations.
(2) each Member has five representatives in the General Assembly.

Art. 10 functions and powers the General Assembly may discuss any questions or business covered by the present Charter or relating to the powers and duties of one any of the bodies provided for in the present Charter, and, subject to the provisions of art. 12, formulate on these issues or business recommendations to the members of the Organization of the United Nations, to the Security Council, or to the members of the Organization and the Security Council.

Art. 11 (1) the General Assembly may consider the General principles of cooperation for maintaining peace and international security, including the principles governing disarmament and the regulation of armaments, and, on these principles, recommendations, either to members of the Organization, either at the Security Council, or to the members of the Organization and the Security Council.
(2) the General Assembly may discuss any questions relating to the maintenance of peace and international security that was received by one any of the United Nations, or by the Security Council, or by a State which is not a member of the Organization in accordance with the provisions of the by. 2 of art. 35, and, subject to art. 12, do on all questions of this kind of recommendations either to the State or States concerned or to the Security Council, or States and the Security Council. Any such which action is referred to the Security Council by the General Assembly either before or after discussion.
(3) the General Assembly may draw the attention of the Security Council to situations which are likely to endanger international peace and security.
(4) the powers of the General Assembly listed in this section do not limit the general scope of the art. 10 art. 12 (1) as long as the Security Council meets, with respect to a dispute or situation, the functions assigned to him by the present Charter, the General Assembly shall make no recommendation on this dispute or situation, unless the Security Council never requested.
(2) the Secretary-General, with the consent of the Security Council, brings to the attention of the General Assembly, at each session, affairs relating to the maintenance of peace and international security dealt with by the Security Council; He advises even General Assembly or, if the Assembly is not sitting, the members of the Organization, as soon as the Security Council ceases to deal with such cases.

Art. 13 (1) the General Assembly cause studies and makes recommendations with a view to:

a. develop international cooperation in the political field and encouraging the development of international law and its codification; b. develop international cooperation in the economic, social, intellectual culture and education, public health, and facilitate the enjoyment of the rights of man and fundamental freedoms for all, without distinction of race, sex, language or religion,.

(2) the other responsibilities, functions and powers of the General Assembly, relatively to the issues mentioned in the by. 1, b, above, are set out in chapters IX and X.

Art. 14 subject to the provisions of art. 12, the General Assembly may recommend measures to ensure the fit peaceful of any situation, regardless of origin, which is likely to adversely affect the general good or to jeopardize the friendly relations among nations, including situations resulting from a violation of the provisions of this Charter which set out the goals and principles of the United Nations.

Art. 15 (1) the General Assembly receives and reviews the annual reports and special reports of the Security Council; These reports shall include an account of the measures that the Security Council has decided upon or taken to maintain international peace and security.
(2) the General Assembly receives and reviews the reports of other bodies of the organization.

Art. 16. the General Assembly meets, with respect to the international trusteeship system, the functions that fall under Chapters XII and XIII; among other things, it approved the Trusteeship agreements for areas not designated as strategic.

Art. 17 (1) the General Assembly reviews and approves the budget of the organization.
(2) the expenses of the Organization are supported by the members according to the distribution established by the General Assembly.
(3) the General Assembly reviews and approves all financial and budgetary arrangements with specialized agencies referred to in art. 57 and examines budget administration of such institutions for their recommendations.

Art. 18 vote (1) each Member of the General Assembly shall have a vote.
(2) the decisions of the General Assembly on important issues are taken by a majority of two thirds of the members present and voting. Are considered to be important issues: recommendations for maintaining peace and international security, the election of non-permanent members of the Security Council, the election of the members of the economic and social Council, the election of members of the Trusteeship Council in accordance with the by. 1, c, art. 86, the admission of new members into the Organization, the suspension of the rights and privileges of members, exclusion of members, issues relating to the operation of the Trusteeship System, and budgetary questions.
(3) decisions on other questions, including the determination of additional categories of questions to be decided by a majority of two-thirds to a majority of the members present and voting.

Art. 19. a United Nations Member in arrears in the payment of its contribution to the expenses of the organization may participate in the vote in the General Assembly if the amount of its arrears is equal to or greater than the contribution by him for the full two years passed. Nevertheless, the General Assembly may authorize the Member to participate in the vote if it finds that the failure is due to circumstances beyond his will.

Art. 20 procedure the General Assembly holds a regular annual session and, where necessary, of special sessions. These are convened by the Secretary-General at the request of the Security Council or of a majority of the members of the United Nations.

Art. 21. the General Assembly establishes its rules of procedure. It designates its President for each session.

Art. 22. the General Assembly may establish subsidiary bodies as it considers necessary to the exercise of its functions.

Chapter V Council of security art. 23 composition (1) the Security Council consists of 15 members of the organization. The Republic of China, the France, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the United States are permanent members of the Security Council. Ten other members of the Organization are elected as non-permanent members of the Security Council, by the General Assembly who holds specially account, first of all, the contribution of the members of the Organization in the maintenance of peace and international security and to the other purposes of the Organization, and also to equitable geographical distribution.
(2) non-permanent members of the Security Council are elected for a period of two years. The first election of non-permanent members once the number of members of the Security Council will be increased from eleven to fifteen, two of the four additional members will be elected for a period of one year. The outgoing members are not immediately eligible for re-election.
(3) each Member of the Security Council has a representative on the Board.

Art. 24 functions and powers (1) in order to ensure the fast and effective action by the Organization, its members confer on the Security Council the primary responsibility for the maintenance of peace and international security and agree that in carrying out the duties under this responsibility the Security Council acts on their behalf.
(2) in the performance of these duties, the Security Council acts in accordance with the purposes and principles of the United Nations. The specific powers granted to the Security Council to enable it to perform such duties are defined in chapter VI, VII, VIII, and XII.
(3) the Security Council shall submit annual reports and, if any, of the special reports to the General Assembly for review.

Art. 25. the members of the Organization agree to accept and to implement the decisions of the Security Council under the Charter.

Art. 26. in order to facilitate the establishment and maintenance of peace and international security, diverting to the arms that the minimum of the human and economic resources of the world, the Security Council is responsible, with the assistance of the Committee of staff provided for in art. 47, plans to be submitted to the members of the Organization to establish a system of regulation of armaments.

Art. 27 vote (1) each Member of the Security Council have one vote.
(2) the decisions of the Security Council on procedural matters are made by an affirmative vote of nine members.
(3) the decisions of the Security Council on all other matters are made by an affirmative vote of nine of its members in which are included the voices of all the permanent members, with the understanding that, in decisions under the terms of Chapter VI and by. 3 of art. 52, a party to a dispute fails to vote.

Art. 28 procedure (1) the Security Council is set up to be able to exercise its functions continuously. To this end, each Member of the Security Council must at all times have a representative at the headquarters of the organization.
(2) the Security Council shall hold periodic meetings at which each of its members may, if it so desires, be represented by a member of his Government or by some other specially designated representative.
(3) the Security Council may hold meetings at such places other than the seat of the Organization considers the cleaner to facilitate its work.

Art. 29. the Security Council may establish subsidiary bodies as it deems necessary to the exercise of its functions.

Art. 30. the Security Council establishes its rules of procedure, in which it sets the mode of nomination of its President.

Art. 31 any member of the organization who is not a member of the Security Council may participate, without the right to vote, in the discussion of any question brought before the Security Council whenever it considers that the interests of that Member are particularly affected.

Art. 32 all Member United Nations which is not a member of the Security Council or any State which is not member of the United Nations, if it is a party to a dispute under consideration by the Security Council, is invited to participate, without the right to vote, in the discussion relating to this dispute. The Security Council determines the conditions as it deems just for the participation of a State which is not a member of the organization.

Chapter VI Pacific settlement of disputes art. 33 (1) the parties to any dispute which the extension is likely to endanger the maintenance of peace and international security must search for the solution, above all, by negotiation, inquiry, mediation, conciliation, arbitration, judicial settlement, resort to regional arrangements or agencies, or by other peaceful means of their choice.
(2) the Security Council, if necessary, invite the parties to settle their dispute by such means.

Art. 34


The Security Council may investigate any dispute, or any situation which might lead to a disagreement between nations or lead to a dispute, in order to determine if the extension of the dispute or situation is likely to threaten the maintenance of peace and international security.

Art. 35 (1) any member of the organization can attract the attention of the Security Council or of the General Assembly on a dispute, or any situation of the nature referred to in art. 34. (2) a State which is not a member of the organization may draw the attention of the Security Council or of the General Assembly any dispute to which it is party, as long as it accepts, for the purposes of this dispute, the obligations of Pacific settlement provided in the present Charter.
(3) the acts of the General Assembly in cases brought to its attention under this section are subject to the provisions of art. 11 and 12.

Art. 36 (1) the Security Council may, at any time in the evolution of a dispute of the nature referred to in art. 33 or a similar situation, recommend the procedures or methods of adjustment.
(2) the Security Council should take into consideration all procedures already adopted by the parties for the settlement of this dispute.
(3) in making the recommendations set out in this article, the Security Council should also take into account the fact that, generally speaking, the legal disputes should be referred by the parties to the International Court of Justice in accordance with the provisions of the Statute of the Court.

SR 0.193.501 art. 37. (1) if the parties to a dispute of the nature referred to in art. 33 fail to settle it by the means indicated that article, they submit it to the Security Council.
(2) if the Security Council considers that the extension of the dispute seems, in fact, threaten the maintenance of peace and international security, he decides to act in application of art. 36 or to recommend such terms of settlement as it deems appropriate.

Art. 38. without prejudice to the provisions of art. 33 to 37, the Security Council may, if all the parties to a dispute so request, make recommendations to them with a view to a peaceful settlement of this dispute.

Chapter VII Action in case of threat to the peace, breach of peace or act of aggression art. 39. the Security Council shall determine the existence of any threat to the peace, breach of the peace or an act of aggression and made recommendations, or decide what measures will be taken in accordance with the art. 41 and 42, to maintain or restore international peace and security.

Art. 40 in order to prevent the situation from worsening, the Security Council, before making recommendations or to decide on the measures to be taken in accordance with art. 39, may invite interested parties to comply with the interim measures it deems necessary or desirable. These interim measures don't prejudice the rights, claims, or position of interested parties. In the event of non-performance of these interim measures, the Security Council take due account of this failure.

Art. 41. the Security Council may decide what measures not involving the use of armed force are to be taken to give effect to its decisions, and may invite the members of United Nations to apply such measures. These may include complete or partial interruption of economic relations and communications railway, maritime, air, postal, telegraphic, radio and other means of communication, as well as the rupture of diplomatic relations.

Art. 42 security if the Council deems that the measures provided for in art. 41 would be inadequate or that they have proved to be such, it may take any action it deems necessary to maintain or restore peace and international security through air, sea or land forces. This action may include demonstrations, blockade measures and other operations by air, sea or land to members of the United Nations forces.

Art. 43. (1) all members of the United Nations, in order to contribute to the maintenance of peace and security, undertake to make available to the Security Council, on its call and in accordance with a special agreement or agreements, armed forces, assistance and facilities, including rights of passage, necessary to the maintenance of peace and security international.
(2) the agreement or agreements shall govern the numbers and nature of these forces, their degree of readiness and general location, and the nature of the facilities and the assistance to be provided.
(3) the agreement or agreements shall be negotiated as soon as possible, on the initiative of the Security Council. They shall be concluded between the Security Council and members of the Organization, or between the Security Council and groups of members of the Organization, and will have to be ratified by signatory States according to their respective constitutional rules.

Art. 44. when the Security Council has decided to use force it shall, before calling upon a member not represented in the Council to provide armed forces in fulfillment of the obligations under art. 43, invite that Member, if it so desires, to participate in the decisions of the Security Council affecting employment of contingents of that Member's armed forces.

Art. 45. in order to allow the United Nations to take urgent military measures, of the members of the United Nations will maintain national contingents of air forces immediately available to carry out combined international enforcement action. Within the limits provided by the special agreement or agreements referred to in art. 43, the Security Council, with the assistance of the military staff Committee, sets the importance and the degree of readiness of these contingents and plans for their combined action.

Art. 46. the plans for the use of armed force are established by the Security Council with the assistance of the military staff Committee.

Art. 47. (1) there is established a military staff Committee to advise and assist the Security Council for what concerns the military means for the Council to maintain peace and international security, employment and command of forces placed at its disposal, the regulation of armaments and eventual disarmament.
(2) the military staff Committee is composed of the chiefs of staff of the permanent members of the Security Council or of their representatives. He invites any member of the United Nations which is not represented on the Committee on a permanent basis to join him, when the participation of that Member in its work is necessary for the performance of its task.
(3) the military staff Committee is responsible, under the authority of the Security Council for the strategic direction of any armed forces placed at the disposal of the Council. Issues relating to the command of these forces will be resolved later.
(4) regional sub-committees of the military staff Committee may be established by him with the approval of the Security Council and after consultation with appropriate regional agencies.

Art. 48. (1) the measures necessary for the execution of the decisions of the Security Council for the maintenance of peace and security international are taken by all members of the United Nations or by some of them, according to the discretion of the Board.
(2) these decisions are carried out by the members of the United Nations directly and through their action in the appropriate international agencies of which they are part.

Art. 49 members of the United Nations work together to help each other in the implementation of the measures adopted by the Security Council.

Art. 50. If a State is the object of preventive or enforcement measures taken by the Security Council, any other State, whether a member or not of the United Nations, if it is in the presence of special economic problems due to the execution of these measures, has the right to consult the Security Council concerning the solution of these difficulties.

Art. 51. no provision of this Charter violates the natural right of self-defence, individual or collective, in case a member of the United Nations is the object of an armed, attack until the Security Council has taken the necessary measures to maintain peace and security international. Measures taken by members in the exercise of this right of self-defence are immediately brought to the attention of the Security Council and do not affect any power and responsibility the Council under the present Charter to take at any time as it deems necessary to maintain or restore peace and security international.

Chapter VIII agreements regional art. 52 (1) no provision of this Charter is opposed to the existence of agreements or regional organizations intended to address cases that, relating to the maintenance of peace and international security, lend themselves to regional action, provided that these agreements or these agencies and their activities are compatible with the purposes and principles of the United Nations.

(2) the UN Member that these agreements or are these agencies must make every effort to resolve in a peaceful way, by means of such agreements or agencies, disputes local, before submitting them to the Security Council.
(3) the Security Council encourages the development of Pacific settlement of local disputes by means of these agreements or such regional agencies either on the initiative of the States concerned or by reference from the Security Council.
(4) this section does not affect the application of art. 34 and 35.

Art. 53 (1) the Security Council uses, if there is place, the agreements or regional bodies for the application of the coercive measures taken under his authority. However, no enforcement action will be taken under regional arrangements or by regional agencies without the authorization of the Security Council; are excepted measures against any enemy State within the meaning of the definition given in the by. 2 of this article, provided for pursuant to art. 107 or in regional arrangements directed against resumption, by such a State, a policy of aggression, to the moment where the organization may, at the request of the Governments concerned, be charged with the responsibility to prevent any new aggression on the part of such a State.
(2) the term 'Enemy State', used in the by. 1 of this section, applies to any State which during the second world war, has been the enemy of any signatory of the present Charter.

Art. 54. the Security Council must at all times be kept fully informed of any action taken or envisaged under regional arrangements or by regional agencies for the maintenance of peace and security international.

Chapter IX Cooperation economic and social international art. 55. in order to create the conditions of stability and well-being necessary to ensure between nations of peaceful relations and friendly based on respect for the principle of the equal rights of peoples and their right to self-determination, the United Nations will promote a. higher standards of living, full employment, and conditions of progress and development in the economic order and social; b. the solution of international economic issues social, public health and other related problems, and international cooperation in the areas of intellectual culture and education; c. respect universal and effective the rights of man and fundamental freedoms for all, without distinction of race, sex, language or religion.

Art. 56. members commit to achieve the goals set out in art. 55, to act, both jointly than separately, in cooperation with the organization.

Art. 57. (1) the various specialized agencies created by intergovernmental agreements and provided, according to their statutes, to international responsibilities extended in economic, social, intellectual culture and education, public health and other related fields are related to the Organization in accordance with the provisions of art. 63. (2) the institutions thus related to the Organization are referred to below as the term "specialized agencies".

Art. 58. the Organization made recommendations to coordinate the programs and activities of the specialized agencies.

Art. 59. the United Nations causes, when there is one, negotiations between the States concerned for the creation of all new specialized agencies required to achieve the goals set out in art. 55 art. 60. the General Assembly, and, under his authority, the economic and social Council, which has powers granted him under the terms of chapter X, are responsible to perform the functions of the Organization set out in this chapter.

Chapter X economic and social art. 61 composition (1) the economic and social Council consists of 54 members of the Organization of the United Nations elected by the General Assembly.
(2) subject to the provisions of the by. 3, eighteen members of the economic and social Council shall be elected each year for a period of three years. The outgoing members are immediately eligible for re-election.
(3) in the first election that will take place once the number of members of the economic and social Council will be increased from twenty-seven to fifty-four, twenty-seven members will be elected in addition to those who have been elected in replacement of the nine members whose term will expire at the end of the year. The terms of nine of these twenty-seven additional members will expire at the end of one year and nine others after two years, according to the arrangements made by the General Assembly.
(4) each Member of the economic and social Council has a representative on the Board.

Art. 62 functions and powers (1) the economic and social Council may make or cause studies and reports on international issues in the economic, social, intellectual culture and education, public health and other related areas and can make recommendations on these questions to the General Assembly, to the members of the Organization and the specialized agencies concerned.
(2) may make recommendations to ensure the effective respect of the rights of man and fundamental freedoms for all.
(3) he may, on questions of jurisdiction, prepare draft convention for submission to the General Assembly.
(4) it may convene, in accordance with the rules set by the Organization, international conferences on questions of jurisdiction.

Art. 63 (1) the economic and social Council may enter into with any institution referred to in art. 57, agreements establishing the conditions in which this institution will be linked to the organization. These agreements are subject to the approval of the General Assembly.
(2) it may coordinate the activities of the specialized agencies in to working together with them, addressing recommendations, as well as by addressing recommendations to the General Assembly and to the members of the United Nations.

Art. 64 (1) the economic and social Council may take all necessary measures to receive regular reports from the specialized agencies. It may make arrangements with members of the United Nations and with the specialized agencies in order to receive reports on the measures taken in implementation of its own recommendations and the recommendations of the General Assembly on objects within the competence of the Council.
(2) it may communicate its observations on these reports to the General Assembly.

Art. 65. the economic and social Council can provide information to the Security Council and assist if requested.

Art. 66 (1) the economic and social Council, in the execution of the recommendations of the Assembly General, undertakes all the functions that fall within its jurisdiction.
(2) it may, with the approval of the General Assembly, perform services that would be required by members of the organization or by specialized agencies.
(3) he fulfils other functions that are assigned in other parts of the present Charter or which may be granted to him by the General Assembly.

Art. 67 vote (1) each Member of the economic and social Council have one vote.
(2) the economic and social Council decisions are taken by a majority of the members present and voting.

Art. 68 procedure the economic and social Council established commissions for economic and social issues and the progress of human rights as well as all other committees necessary for the exercise of its functions.

Art. 69. the economic and social Council, when considering a matter that concerns a member of the Organization, particularly invites him to participate, without vote, in its deliberations.

Art. 70. the economic and social Council can make all arrangements for representatives of the specialized agencies participate, without the right to vote, in its deliberations and those commissions instituted by him, and for its representatives to participate in the deliberations of the specialized agencies.

Art. 71. the economic and social Council may take all useful measures to consult non-governmental organizations concerned with matters within its jurisdiction. These provisions can be applied to international organizations and, if it is necessary, to national organizations after consultation with the interested Member of the organization.

Art. 72 (1) the economic and social Council shall adopt its rules of procedure, in which it sets the mode of nomination of its President.
(2) it shall meet as required, in accordance with its rules; It will include provisions for the convening of the Council on the request of a majority of its members.

Chapter XI. Declaration on the territories art. 73


The members of the United Nations who have or who are responsible for administering territories whose populations not to administer yet completely themselves recognize the principle of the primacy of the interests of the inhabitants of these territories. They accept as a sacred trust the obligation to promote to the extent possible their prosperity, under the system of peace and international security established by the present Charter, and, to this end: a. to ensure, within the culture of the populations in question, their political, economic and social progress, as well as the development of their statement, treat them with fairness and to protect them from abuse; b. develop their ability to manage themselves consider the political aspirations of the populations and to assist them in the progressive development of their free political institutions, to the extent appropriate to the conditions of each territory and its peoples and their degrees of development variables; c. to strengthen international peace and security; d. to promote constructive measures of development, to encourage research to cooperate with each other and, when the circumstances are right, with specialized international organizations, to achieve actually scientific, social and economic goals set out in the present article; e. to communicate regularly to the Secretary-General for information purposes, subject to the requirements of security and considerations of constitutional, of statistical and other information of a technical nature relating to economic conditions social and education in the territories for which they are respectively responsible, other than those to which Chapters XII and XIII apply.

Art. 74. the members of the organization also acknowledge that their policy must be based, as in the territories covered by the present chapter in their metropolitan territories, on the general principle of good neighbourliness in the social, economic and commercial area, given the interests and prosperity of the rest of the world.

Chapter XII international trusteeship article system 75. the United Nations will establish under its authority an international trusteeship system for the administration and monitoring of the territories that can be placed under this regime under subsequent individual agreements. These territories are referred to below as "trust territories.

Art. 76 according to the goals of the United Nations, set out in art. 1 of the Charter, the essential purpose of the Trusteeship System are as follows: a. strengthen peace and international security; b. promote the political, economic and social progress of the peoples of the territories under trusteeship and the development of their education; promote also their evolutionary development toward the ability to administer themselves or independence, given the conditions of each territory and its peoples, aspirations freely expressed the populations concerned and the provisions which may be provided for in each Trusteeship Agreement; c. encourage respect for the rights of man and fundamental freedoms for all, without distinction of race sex, language or religion, and develop a sense of the interdependence of the peoples of the world; d. ensure equality of treatment in the social, economic, and commercial field to all members of the United Nations and their nationals; ensure similarly to them equal treatment in the administration of justice, without prejudice to the achievement of the purposes set out above, and subject to the provisions of art. 80 art. 77. (1) the Trusteeship System apply to territories in the categories below and who would come to be placed under the system of trusteeship agreements: a. territories now under mandate; b. territories which may be detached from enemy States as a result of World War II; c. territories voluntarily placed under the system by States responsible for their administration.

(2) a later agreement will determine which territories, entering into the above categories will be placed under the regime of guardianship, and under what conditions.

Art. 78. the Trusteeship System will not apply to the countries become members of the United Nations, relations which must be based on respect for the principle of sovereign equality.

Art. 79. the terms of the Trusteeship System, for each territory to be placed under this regime, as well as the changes and amendments that may be made, will be the subject of an agreement between the States directly concerned, including the mandatory power in the case of territories under the mandate of a United Nations Member, and will be approved in accordance with the art. 83 and 85.

Art. 80 (1) with the exception of what can be agreed upon in individual Trusteeship agreements according to the art. 77, 79 and 81 and placing each territory under the regime of guardianship, and until such agreements have been concluded, nothing in this chapter will be interpreted as modifying rights directly or indirectly in any way any of any State or of any people or the provisions of international instruments in force at which members of the organization may be parties.
(2) by. 1 of this article should not be interpreted as motivating a delay or an adjournment of negotiation and the conclusion of agreements intended to be placed under the Trusteeship of the territories under mandate system or other territories as provided for in art. 77 art. 81. the Trusteeship Agreement includes, in each case, the conditions in which the trust territory will be administered and designate the authority which will ensure the administration. This authority, designated hereinafter by the term "authority" responsible for the administration, may be formed by one or more States or the Organization itself.

Art. 82. a Trusteeship Agreement may designate one or several strategic areas which may include all or part of the territory under control to which the agreement applies, without prejudice to any special agreement or all special agreements pursuant to art. 43 art. 83 (1) with respect to strategic areas, all the functions in the Organization, including the approval of the terms of any agreement of guardianship as well as the amendment or the amendment thereof, are carried out by the Security Council.
(2) the essential purpose set out in art. 76 worth for the people of each strategic area.
(3) the Security Council, in view of the provisions of the agreements of guardianship and subject to the requirements of security, will use the assistance of the Trusteeship Council in the exercise of the functions performed by the Organization, in respect of the Trusteeship System, in political, economic and social, and educational, in strategic areas.

Art. 84. the authority of the administration has the duty to ensure that the trust territory is contributing to the maintenance of peace and international security. To this end, she can use contingents of volunteers, facilities, and assistance from the trust territory to fulfil the obligations it has undertaken in this regard to the Security Council, as well as for local defense and the maintenance of order within the trust territory.

Art. 85. (1) in regard to trusteeship agreements for all areas which are not designated as strategic areas, the functions of the Organization, including the approval of the terms of the agreements of guardianship and their modification or amendment, shall be exercised by the General Assembly.
(2) the Council of guardianship, acting under the authority of the General Assembly, assist it in the accomplishment of these tasks.

Chapter XIII art. Trusteeship Council 86 composition (1) the Council of guardianship consists of the following members of the United Nations: a. members responsible for the administration of trust territories; b. those members named to art. 23 who do not trust territories; administer c. as many other members elected for three years by the General Assembly, it will be necessary to ensure that the total number of members of the Trusteeship Council is shared equally among members of the United Nations which administer Territories under trusteeship and those who do not administer in.

(2) each Member of the Trusteeship Council designates a particularly qualified to represent them on the Council.

Art. 87 functions and powers the General Assembly and, under his authority, the Trusteeship Council, in the exercise of their functions, may: a. examine the reports submitted by the authority responsible for the administration; b. receive petitions and examine them in consultation with the said authority; c. conduct periodic visits in the territories administered by the authority, on dates agreed with her; d. take these provisions and all others under the terms of the Trusteeship agreements.

Art. 88


The Trusteeship Council establishes a questionnaire on the progress of the inhabitants of each trust territory in the political, economic and social fields and in the statement; the authority responsible for the administration of each trust territory within the jurisdiction of the General Assembly addressed to it an annual report based on the above questionnaire.

Art. 89 vote (1) each Member of the Trusteeship Council have one vote.
(2) decisions of the Trusteeship Council are taken by a majority of the members present and voting.

Art. 90 procedure (1) the Council of guardianship shall adopt its rules of procedure, in which it sets the mode of nomination of its President.
(2) it shall meet as required, in accordance with its rules; It includes provisions for the convening of the Council at the request of a majority of its members.

Art. 91. the Trusteeship Council uses, when it takes place, the assistance of the economic and social Council and the specialized agencies, to the issues that fall within their respective competences.

Chapter XIV the International Court of justice art. 92. the International Court of Justice is the principal judicial organ of the United Nations. It works according to a statute established on the basis of the Statute of the Permanent Court of International Justice and appended to the present Charter, of which it is an integral part.

SR 0.193.501 art. 93. (1) all members of the United Nations are ipso facto parties to the Statute of the International Court of Justice.
(2) the conditions in which States that are not members of the organization may become parties to the Statute of the International Court of Justice are determined in each case by the General Assembly on the recommendation of the Security Council.

SR 0.193.501 art. 94. (1) each Member of the United Nations undertakes to comply with the decision of the International Court of Justice in any case to which it is party.
(2) If a party to a dispute does not meet the obligations imposed under a judgment given by the Court, the other party may have recourse to the Security Council and, if it deems it necessary, shall make recommendations, or decide on the measures to be taken to enforce the judgment.

Art. 95. no provision of this Charter prevents members of the Organization to entrust the solution of their differences to other tribunals under existing agreements or which may be concluded in the future.

Art. 96. (1) the General Assembly or the Security Council may request the International Court of Justice an advisory opinion on any legal question.
(2) all other United Nations bodies and specialized agencies that may, at any time, receive General Assembly authorization for this purpose also have the right to apply to the Court for advisory opinions on legal questions that arise in the context of their activity.

Chapter XV the Secretariat art. 97. the Secretariat consists of a Secretary general and staff as may be required of the organization. The Secretary-General is appointed by the General Assembly on the recommendation of the Security Council. He is the highest official of the organization.

Art. 98. the Secretary-General is in that capacity in all meetings of the General Assembly, the Security Council, the economic and social Council and the Trusteeship Council. It fills all other functions for which it is responsible by these bodies. It presents to the General Assembly an annual report on the work of the organization.

Art. 99. the Secretary-General may draw the attention of the Security Council on any matter which, in his view, likely to endanger the maintenance of peace and international security.

Art. 100. (1) in the performance of their duties, the Secretary-General and the staff will not seek nor will not accept instructions from any Government or from any authority outside the organization. They will refrain from any action incompatible with international officials are responsible only to the organization.
(2) each Member of the Organization undertakes to respect the exclusively international character of the functions of the Secretary-General and the staff and not to seek to influence them in the performance of their tasks.

Art. 101. (1) the staff is appointed by the Secretary-General in accordance with the rules laid down by the General Assembly.
(2) a special staff is assigned on a permanent basis to the economic and social Council, to the Trusteeship Council and, if it is necessary to other organs of the organization. This staff is part of the Secretariat.
(3) the dominant consideration in recruitment and the establishment of the conditions of employment of staff must be the need to provide people with the highest standards of work, skill and integrity to the organization. Will be duly taken into account the importance of a recruitment on a geographical basis as possible.

Chapter XVI provisions various art. 102. (1) any treaty or international agreement concluded by a member of the United Nations after the entry into force of this Charter will, as soon as possible, registered at the Secretariat and published by it.
(2) no party to a treaty or international agreement which has not been registered in accordance with the provisions of the by. 1 of this article may invoke that Treaty or agreement before a body of the organization.

Art. 103. in the event of a conflict between the obligations of the members of the United Nations under the present Charter and their obligations under any other international agreement, the former will prevail.

Art. 104. the United Nations has, in the territory of each of its members, the legal capacity, which is necessary to perform its functions and achieve its goals.

Art. 105 (1) the organization enjoys on the territory of each of its members, privileges and immunities that are necessary to achieve its goals.
(2) the representatives of the members of the United Nations and officials of the Organization enjoy also the privileges and immunities that are necessary for their functions in complete independence in relation to the organization.
(3) the General Assembly may make recommendations to determine the details of application of by. 1 and 2 of the present article or propose to the members of the United Nations conventions to that effect.

Chapter XVII transitional provisions of security art. 106. pending the entry into force of such special agreements referred to in art. 43, which, in the opinion of the Security Council, will allow him to begin to assume the responsibilities pursuant to art. 42, the parties to the Declaration of the four Nations signed at Moscow October 30, 1943 and the France will consult each other and, if it is necessary, with other members of the Organization, in accordance with the provisions of the by. 5 of this Declaration, to undertake in common, on behalf of the United Nations, any action that may be necessary to maintain international peace and security.

Art. 107. no provision of the Charter does not affect or not forbidden, to a State which, during the second world war, was the enemy of one any of the signatories of this Charter, authorized, or firm action as a consequence of this war, by Governments that are responsible for this action.

Chapter XVIII amendments art. 108. the amendments to the present Charter will take effect for all members of the United Nations when they have been adopted by a majority of two thirds of the members of the General Assembly and ratified, in accordance with their respective constitutional rules, by two thirds of the members of the Organization, including all the permanent members of the Security Council.

Art. 109 (1) a general conference of the members of the United Nations for the purpose of reviewing the present Charter may be held at a place and date to be fixed by a vote of the General Assembly by a majority of two-thirds, and by a vote of nine any of the members of the Security Council. Each member organization shall have one vote in the conference.
(2) amendments to the present Charter recommended by the conference by a majority of two-thirds will take effect once it has been ratified in accordance with their respective constitutional rules, by two thirds of the UN members, including all the permanent members of the Security Council.
(3) If this conference was not held before the tenth annual session of the General Assembly following the coming into force of this Charter, a proposal to call will be placed on the agenda of this session, and the conference will be convened, if it is so decided by a majority vote of the General Assembly and by a vote of seven any of the members of the Security Council.

Chapter XIX Ratification and signature art. 110. (1) this Charter will be ratified by the signatory States in accordance with their respective constitutional rules.
(2) the ratifications will be deposited with the Government of the United States of America, who will notify each deposit all signatory States as well as to the Secretary-General of the organization when he has been appointed.

(3) the present Charter comes into force after the deposit of ratifications by the Republic of China, the France, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America and by the majority of the other signatory States. A record of deposit of ratifications will be then drawn up by the Government of United States of America, that copy will be communicated to all the signatory States.
(4) the signatory States of the present Charter which ratify her after its entry into force will become original members of the United Nations on the date of the deposit of their respective ratifications.

Art. 111 the present Charter, of which the Chinese, french, Russian, English, and Spanish texts will also be faith, will be deposited in the archives of the Government of the United States of America. Duly certified copies and will be handed by him to the Governments of the other signatory States.
In faith whereof, the representatives of the Governments of the United Nations have signed the present Charter.
Made in San Francisco June twenty-six thousand nine hundred forty-five.
(Follow signatures)

Scope on 23 June 2015 States parties Ratification entry into force Afghanistan November 19, 1946 South Africa November 7, 1945 7 November 1945 Albania 14 December 1955 Algeria October 8, 1962 Germany September 18, 1973 Andorra 28 July 1993 Angola December 1, 1976 Antigua - and - Barbuda 11 November 1981 Saudi Arabia 18 October 1945 24 October 1945 Argentina 24 September 1945 24 October 1945 Armenia 2 March 1992 Australia November 1, 1945 November 1, 1945 Austria Azerbaijan 14 December 1955

March 2, 1992 Bahamas September 18, 1973 Bahrain September 21, 1971 Bangladesh 17 September 1974 Barbados 9 December 1966 Belarus 24 October 1945 24 October 1945 Belgium 27 December 1945 27 December 1945 Belize September 25, 1981 Benin 20 September 1960 Bhutan 21 September 1971 Bolivia 14 November 1945 November 14, 1945 Bosnia and Herzegovina 22 May 1992 Botswana 17 October 1966 Brazil 21 September 1945 24 October 1945 Brunei 21 September 1984 Bulgaria Burkina Faso 20 December 14, 1955 September 1960 Burundi 18 September 1962 Cambodia Cameroon 20 September 1960 Canada November 9, 1945 14 December 1955 9 November 1945 Cape - Verde September 16, 1975 October 11, 1945 Chile 24 October 1945 China 28 September 1945 24 October 1945 Cyprus 20 September 1960 Colombia November 5, 1945 November 5, 1945, Comoros 12 November 1975 Congo (Brazzaville) c 20 September 1960 Congo (Kinshasa) 20 September 1960 Korea (North) Korea September 17, 1991 (South) 17 September 1991 Costa Rica 2 November 1945

November 2, 1945 Ivory Coast 20 September 1960 Croatia 22 May 1992 Cuba 15 October 1945 24 October 1945 Denmark 9 October 1945 24 October 1945 Djibouti September 20, 1977 Dominique 18 December 1978 Egypt 22 October 1945 24 October 1945 El El Salvador 26 September 1945-24 October 1945 UAE United 9 December 1971 Ecuador December 21, 1945 December 21, 1945 Eritrea 28 May 1993 Spain December 14, 1955 Estonia 17 September 1991 United States 8 August 1945 24 October

1945 Ethiopia November 13, 1945 November 13, 1945 Fiji 13 October 1970 Finland 14 December 1955 France 31 August 1945 24 October 1945 Gabon 20 September 1960 Gambia 21 September 1965 Georgia 31 July 1992 Ghana 8 March 1957 Greece 25 October 1945 October 25, 1945 Grenade 17 September 1974 Guatemala 21 November 1945 21 November 1945 Guinea 12 December 1958 Guinea Equatorial 12 November 1968 Guinea - Bissau 17 September 1974 Guyana 20 September 1966 Haiti September 27, 1945 24 October

1945 Honduras 17 December 1945 December 17, 1945 Hungary December 14, 1955 Marshall Islands 17 September 1991 Solomon Islands 19 September 1978 India October 30, 1945 October 30, 1945 Indonesia September 28, 1950 Iran October 16, 1945 24 October 1945 Iraq 21 December 1945 December 21, 1945 Ireland 14 December 1955 Iceland November 19, 1946 Israel 11 May 1949 Italy December 14, 1955 Jamaica 18 September 1962 Japan 18 December 1956 Jordan December 14, 1955 Kazakhstan Kenya 2 March 1992

December 16, 1963 Kyrgyzstan 2 March 1992 Kiribati 14 September 1999 Kuwait 14 May 1963 Laos December 14, 1955 Lesotho 17 October 1966 Latvia 17 September 1991 Lebanon October 15, 1945 24 October 1945 Liberia 2 November 1945 November 2, 1945 Libya December 14, 1955 Liechtenstein September 18, 1990 Lithuania, on September 17, 1991 Luxembourg 17 October 1945 24 October 1945 Macedonia 8 April 1993 Madagascar 20 September 1960 Malaysia 17 September 1957 Malawi 1 December 1964 Maldives 21 September 1965

Mali September 28, 1960 Malta 1 December 1964 Morocco 12 November 1956 Maurice 24 April 1968 Mauritania October 27, 1961 Mexico 7 November 1945 November 7, 1945 Micronesia 17 September 1991 Moldova 2 March 1992 Monaco 28 May 1993 Mongolia October 27, 1961 Montenegro 28 June 2006 Mozambique 16 September 1975 Myanmar April 19, 1948 Namibia 23 April 1990 Nauru September 14, 1999 Nepal 14 December 1955 Nicaragua September 6, 1945 24 October 1945 Niger Nigeria 7 September 20, 1960 October 1960 Norway November 27, 1945 November 27, 1945 New Zealand 19 September 1945 24 October 1945 Oman 7 October 1971 Uganda 25 October 1962 Uzbekistan 2 March 1992 Pakistan 30 September 1947 Palau 15 December 1994 Panama 13 November 1945 November 13, 1945 Papua New Guinea 10 October 1975 Paraguay 12 October 1945 24 October 1945 Netherlands 10 December 1945 December 10, 1945 Peru October 31, 1945 31 October 1945 Philippines October 11, 1945 24 October 1945 Poland 24 October 24, 1945 October 1945 Portugal 14 December 1955 Qatar 21 September 1971 Republic Central African 20 September 1960 Dominican Republic September 4, 1945 October 24, 1945 Czech Republic 19 January 1993 Romania December 14, 1955 United Kingdom 20 October 1945 24 October 1945 Russia 24 October 1945 24 October 1945 Rwanda 18 September 1962 Sainte - Lucie September 18, 1979 Saint - Kitts - and - Nevis September 23, 1983 San - Marino 2 March 1992 Saint - Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa Sao Tome - December 15, 1976 16 September 1980 and - principle 16 September 1975 Senegal September 28, 1960

Serbia 1 November 2000 Seychelles September 21, 1976 Sierra Leone September 27, 1961 Singapore 21 September 1965 Slovakia 19 January 1993 Slovenia 22 May 1992 Somalia 20 September 1960 Sudan November 12, 1956 South Sudan July 14, 2011 Sri Lanka December 14, 1955 Sweden 19 November 1946 Switzerland * 10 September 2002 Suriname 4 December 1975 Swaziland September 24, 1968 Syria 19 October 1945 24 October 1945 Tajikistan 2 March 1992 Tanzania December 14, 1961 Chad Thailand 20 September 1960

16 December 1946 Timor - Leste 27 September 2002 20 September 1960 Tonga 14 September 1999 Trinidad and Tobago Togo Tunisia 18 September 1962 November 12, 1956 Turkmenistan March 2, 1992 Turkey 28 September 1945 24 October 1945 Tuvalu 5 September 2000 Ukraine 24 October 1945 24 October 1945 Uruguay 18 December 1945 18 December 1945 Vanuatu 15 September 1981 Venezuela 15 November 1945 November 15, 1945 Viet Nam 20 September 1977 Yemen 30 September 1947 Zambia 1 December 1964 Zimbabwe 25 August 1980 * request membership of the Switzerland and statement on neutrality, see below.
Member admitted in accordance with art. 4 of the Charter (entered into force according to provisional rules of procedure of the General Assembly, either on the date of the deposit of the instrument of accession).
An original member of the United Nations according to art. 3 of the Charter.
Member admitted in accordance with art. 4 of the Charter.
Until its dismemberment, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was one of the members from the United Nations according to art. 3 of the Charter (ratification: 19.10.1945/entree implementation: 24.10.1945).
The 20.01.1965, the Indonesia announced its decision to withdraw from the United Nations. The 28.09.1966, the General Assembly took note of the decision of the Indonesia of the 19.09.1966 to resume its participation in the activities of the Organization and invited its representatives to sit in the Assembly.
Until its dissolution the 31.12.1992, Czechoslovakia was one of the members from the United Nations according to art. 3 of the Charter (ratification: 19.10.1945/entree implementation: 24.10.1945).

The 16.09.1963, the Singapore, Sabah (North Borneo) and Sarawak joined the Federation of Malaysia (Malaysia). Singapore became an independent State 09.08.1965 application for membership of the Switzerland, including a statement of neutrality we have the honour to request the admission of the Swiss Confederation to membership in the United Nations. By vote of March 3, 2002, the people and the cantons of Switzerland authorized the federal Council to address this request. We'd have to pass it to the Security Council and the General Assembly.

Under the Federal Constitution, the Swiss Confederation has for goals to protect the freedom and the rights of the people, to ensure the independence and security of the country, as well as commit to a just and peaceful international order. The Federal Assembly and the federal Council are responsible for taking steps to preserve the neutrality of the country. The Switzerland is a neutral State whose status is enshrined in international law. For the United Nations, the neutrality of a Member State is compatible with the obligations arising from the Charter and contributes to the achievement of the goals of the United Nations.
As a member of the United Nations, the Switzerland will remain neutral.
We based on the foregoing, we have the honour, on behalf of the Swiss Confederation, to declare that the Swiss Confederation accepts the obligations set out in the Charter of the United Nations and undertakes to fulfil.

2003 866 RO; FF 2001 1170 RO 2002 885 RO 2003 866, 2006 4201, 2015 2431. A version of the update scope is published on the web site of the FDFA (www.eda.admin.ch/eda/f/home/foreign/intagr/dabase.html).

State June 23, 2015

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