Rs 0.457 European Convention Of 18 March 1986 On The Protection Of Vertebrate Animals Used For Experimental Purposes Or For Other Scientific Purposes (With Annexes)

Original Language Title: RS 0.457 Convention européenne du 18 mars 1986 sur la protection des animaux vertébrés utilisés à des fins expérimentales ou à d’autres fins scientifiques (avec annexes)

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0.457 text original Convention European on the protection of vertebrate animals used for experimental purposes or other purposes scientists concluded in Strasbourg on March 18, 1986, approved by the Federal Assembly on 17 June 1993, Instrument of ratification deposited by the Switzerland on 3 November 1993 entry into force for the Switzerland on 1 June 1994 (State April 11, 2013) preamble the Member States of the Council of Europe signatories of the Convention, recalling that the aim of the Council of Europe is to achieve greater unity between its members, and that he wishes to cooperate with other States in the protection of animals used for experimental or other scientific purposes;
Recognizing that man has a moral obligation to respect all animals and take into account their ability to suffer and to remember;
Recognizing, however, that the man, in his quest for knowledge, health and safety, need to use animals where there is reasonable hope that it will advance the knowledge, or will produce useful results in General for human or animal, as he uses the animals for food, clothing and as beasts of burden;
resolved to limit the use of animals for experimental purposes or for other scientific purposes, with intended to replace this use anywhere where this is possible, including by seeking alternative methods and encouraging the use of these alternative methods;
wishing to adopt common provisions, to protect animals used in procedures likely to cause lasting damage, pain, suffering or distress and to ensure that, when they are unavoidable, are reduced to the minimum, have agreed to the following: title I principles General art. 1-1. The present Convention applies to any animal used or intended for use in any experimental or other scientific procedure that could cause lasting damage, pain, suffering and anguish. It does not apply to the agricultural practices or non-experimental veterinary clinics.
2. within the meaning of this Convention, means: a. '' animal '': without another qualifier, vertebrate living non-human, including the larval forms independent and/or capable of reproduction, but excluding other foetal or embryonic; b. "intended to be used": high or held for sale, transfer or use in an experience or other scientific procedure; c. 'procedure '. : any experimental or other scientific use of an animal likely to cause this animal of lasting damage, pain, suffering or anxiety, including any intervention resulting or likely to result in the birth of an animal in such conditions, the least painful methods accepted in modern practice (i.e. 'humanitarian' methods) for the sacrifice and the marking of animals are however excluded. A procedure starts when an animal is prepared for the first time to for use and ends when no comments should no longer be made for the procedure in question. Deleting lasting damage, pain, suffering or anxiety due to the effective use of anaesthesia or analgesia or other methods on an animal place not the use of an animal outside the scope of this definition; (d) 'competent person': any person regarded as competent in its territory to perform the appropriate function described in this agreement; e party. 'responsible authority '. : on the territory of the party concerned, any authority, any body or any person appointed for the end considered; f. 'establishment': any fixed or mobile, any building, group of buildings or other premises, as well as a place not fully enclosed or covered; g. 'breeding establishment': any establishment in which animals are bred with a view to their use in procedures; h. "facility provider. : any institution, other than a breeding establishment, which provides animals with a view to their use in procedures; i. 'user establishment': any establishment where animals are used in procedures; j. 'humanitarian method for the sacrifice': the sacrifice of an animal with a minimum of physical and mental suffering, in view of the present case.

Art. 2 a procedure may be performed for one or more of the following goals and subject to the restrictions under this agreement: a. i) prevention of disease, ill health or other anomalies or their effects on human, vertebrate and invertebrate animals or plants, including quality tests, effectiveness and safety of drugs substances or products and their production;
(ii) the diagnosis or treatment of diseases or other anomalies or their effects, in man, vertebrate or invertebrate animals or plants;
b. detection, assessment, control, or changes in physiological conditions in man, vertebrate and invertebrate animals and plants; c. the protection of the environment; d. scientific research e. education and the training; f. forensic investigations.

Art. 3. each party agrees to take as soon as possible and, in any case, within five years following the date of entry into force of this Convention in its regard, all necessary measures to give effect to the provisions of the present Convention and to ensure an effective system of control and surveillance.

Art. 4. no provision of this agreement does affect the ability of the Parties to adopt more strict rules to ensure the protection of animals used in procedures as well as to control and limit the use of animals in procedures.

Title II care and accommodation of animals art. 5-1. Any animal used or intended to be used in a procedure has a housing, an environment, at least some freedom of movement, food, water and care appropriate to their health and well-being. Any restriction on its ability to satisfy its physiological and Ethological needs is limited as much as possible. For the implementation of this provision, should draw on guidelines for the accommodation and care of animals set out in Annex A to this agreement.
2. the environmental conditions in which an animal is raised, held or used are a daily control.
3. the well-being and State of health of animals are observed with enough care and frequency to prevent any lasting damage, all pain, unnecessary suffering or angst.
4 each Party shall take the necessary measures to ensure the elimination of any defect or suffering seen in the shortest.

Title III conduct of proceedings art. 6-1. It is not made of procedure for any of the purposes set out in art. 2 if it can be used reasonably and practically another scientifically acceptable method not involving the use of an animal.
2. each party should encourage scientific research to develop methods that would provide the same information as that obtained in procedures.

Art. 7. when it is necessary to perform a procedure, the choice of species is being carefully examined and, if required, his motivation is exposed to the responsible authority; When choosing between procedures, should be selected those which use the minimum number of animals, causing the less lasting damage, pain, suffering and anguish and which are likely to give the best results.

Art. 8 methods of anesthesia General or local analgesic methods or other methods designed to eliminate as much as possible lasting damage, pain, suffering, or anxiety are applied in any proceedings and during its duration, unless: a. the pain caused by the procedure is less than the impairment of the well-being of the animal caused by anesthesia or analgesia , or Frenchie. the use of anaesthesia or analgesia is incompatible with the purpose of the procedure. In this case, appropriate legislative and/or administrative measures must be taken to ensure that such a procedure is carried out unnecessarily.

Art. 9-1. When it is planned to subject an animal to a procedure in which he will suffer or may experience considerable pain likely to extend, this procedure is expressly declared and justified to the responsible authority or expressly authorized by it.
2. legislative measures ' and/or administrative appropriate are taken so that such a procedure is carried out unnecessarily.
Such measures include:

-either the authorization by the responsible authority; - either the express statement of the procedure with the responsible authority and the legal action brought by this authority or administrative decision by it, if it is not satisfied that the procedure is sufficiently important for the essential needs of man or animal, including the solution of scientific problems.

Art. 10. in the course of a proceeding, any animal used continues to meet the provisions of art. 5, unless these provisions are incompatible with the objective of the procedure.

Art. 11-1. At the end of any procedure, it is decided whether the animal shall be kept alive or sacrificed by a humane method. An animal is not kept alive if, even though even his State of health would be back to normal in all other respects, it is likely that he continues to suffer pain or anguish permanent.
2. the decisions referred to the by. 1 of this article shall be taken by a competent person, including a veterinarian, or the person who, in accordance with art. 13, is responsible for the procedure, or which led her.
3. where, at the end of a procedure: a. an animal is to be kept alive, he receives the care necessitated by his condition, he is placed under the supervision of a veterinarian or another competent person, and it is kept in conditions consistent with the provisions of art. 5. it may however be derogated from the conditions laid down in this paragraph, when in the opinion of a veterinarian animal would suffer the consequences of such a derogation no; (b) an animal is not to be kept alive or cannot benefit from the provisions of art. 5 for its well-being, it is sacrificed by a humane method as soon as possible.

4. no animal used in a procedure that caused him pain or suffering intense or lasting, that anesthesia or analgesia was employed, cannot be used in a new procedure unless his State of health and well-being won't be back to normal, and provided that: a. during the duration of this new procedure the animal is submitted to general anesthesia that will be maintained until sacrifice; or Frenchie. the new procedure involves only minor procedures.

Art. 12. Notwithstanding the other provisions of this Convention, when the legitimate goals of the procedure required, the responsible authority may authorize the release of the animal concerned provided that it be ensured is that care as much as possible were made to safeguard the well-being of it. Procedures with release of the animal are not allowed for the sole purpose of teaching or training.

Title IV authorization art. 13. a procedure for the purposes referred to in art. 2 shall be carried out only by authorized persons, or under the direct responsibility of an authorized person, or if the project experimental or other scientific project concerned is authorized in accordance with the provisions of national legislation. This permission is granted only to those deemed competent by the responsible authority.

Title V breeding institutions or institutions providers art. 14 breeding institutions and providers institutions are registered with the authority, subject to an exemption under the terms of art. 21 or 22. Such registered institutions meet the conditions set out in art. 5 art. 15. the registration provided for in art. 14 mentions the person responsible for the establishment, which is competent to administer or administer appropriate care to the animals of the species high or detained in the facility.

Art. 16-1. Arrangements are made in breeding schools registered for the holding of a register in which shall be entered all the animals that are high, and indicated the number and species of animals coming out of school, their release date and the name and address of the recipient.
2. provisions are made in establishments registered suppliers for the keeping of a register in which are shown the number and species of animals that arrive in school and out, dates made movements, the provider of the animals concerned, and the name and address of the recipient.
3. the responsible authority prescribes the nature of the records that must be kept and made available by the person responsible for the facilities there referred to the by. 1 and 2 of this article. These records are kept for a minimum period of three years from the date of the last entry.

Art. 17-1. In all establishment, every dog and cat, before his withdrawal, made into an individual and permanent marking, practiced in the least painful way possible.
2 when a dog or a cat not marked for the first time in an institution after its withdrawal, it is marked as soon as possible.
3. when a dog or cat not weaned and that it was not possible to mark prior is transferred from one institution to another, a registration containing complete information document, including specifying the identity of his mother, is held up to its marking.
4. the characteristics of the identity and origin of each dog or cat must appear on the records of the institution.

Title VI institutions users art. 18. institutions users are registered with the authority responsible for or approved otherwise by it and meet the conditions set out in art. 5 art. 19 provisions are made for users institutions have facilities and equipment adapted to the species and the procedures used and their design, construction and operation are used to driving as efficiently as possible procedures, for object, to get consistent results with fewer animals and least in lasting damage pain, suffering, or distress.

Art. 20. in institutions users: a. the person or persons who are responsible for administratively care given to the animals and the functioning of the equipment are identified; b. a qualified personnel is available in sufficient numbers; c. adequate provisions are made for consultation and a veterinary treatment; (d) a veterinarian or another competent person is responsible for giving advice on the welfare of the animals.

Art. 21-1. The animals of species listed below which are intended to be used in the procedures are acquired directly from breeding establishments registered or come from such institutions, unless a waiver General or special has been obtained according to the provisions to take by the part: mouse Mus musculus rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus Rat Rattus norvegicus dog Canis familiaris Guinea pig Cavia porcellus cat Felis catus Hamster Golden Mesocricetus auratus quail Coturnix coturnix 2. Each party undertakes to extend the provisions of paragraph 1 of the present article to other species, in particular of the Primate order, once appears a reasonable prospect to have an adequate supply of animals of the species concerned and raised for this purpose. 3. Stray animals of domestic species are not used in procedures. The scheduled General waiver to the by. 1 of this article may not be extended to dogs and stray cats.

Art. 22 in institutions users, only animals from institutions registered breeding or institutions registered providers are used, unless a general or special exemption has been obtained under arrangements by the party.

Art. 23. when authorized by the responsible authority, procedures may be conducted outside user establishments.

Art. 24 provisions are taken to ensure schools users registers required and present to any request of the responsible authority. These records include meet the requirements of art. 27 and indicate in addition for all animals acquired the number, species, the supplier and the date of arrival.

Title VII teaching and training art. 25 1. Procedures carried out for the purpose of teaching, training or recycling for the exercise of a profession or other activities, including the care of animals used or intended to be used, are notified to the responsible authority and carried out by a person or under his supervision, the person having the responsibility to ensure that the procedures comply with national legislation within the meaning of this Convention.
2. the procedures envisaged for the purpose of teaching, training or retraining in purposes other than those referred to in the by. 1 above are not allowed.
3. the procedures referred to in paragraph 1 of this article are limited to those strictly necessary for the purposes of education or training concerned and are allowed only if their objective cannot be reached by audiovisual of comparable value methods or by any other appropriate means.

Art. 26


People doing procedures or taking part, as well as the people providing care to animals used in procedures, including the control, must have received appropriate training and education.

Title VIII information statistics art. 27 1. Each party brings together statistical data on the use of animals in procedures; These data are communicated to the public when this communication is lawful.
2. data are collected concerning: a. the number and kinds of animals used in procedures; b. number of animals in selected categories used in procedures having direct medical purposes and for education and training; c. the number of animals in selected categories used in procedures for the protection of man and his environment; (d) the number of animals in selected categories used in procedures required by the legislation.

Art. 28 1. Subject to the provisions of national legislation on secrecy and confidentiality, each Party shall report annually to the Secretary General of the Council of Europe of the data regarding the points mentioned in the by. 2 of art. 27, presented in the form set out in Annex B to the Convention.
2. the Secretary General of the Council of Europe publishes statistical information received from the Parties with respect to the points mentioned in the by. 2 of art. 27 3. Each party is invited to communicate to the Secretary General of the Council of Europe the address of its authority more complete national with which information on national statistics can be obtained on request.
These addresses will be included in the publications of statistics prepared by the Secretary General of the Council of Europe.

Title IX recognition of procedures carried out in the territory of an another part of the art. 29 1. To avoid unnecessary repetition of procedures required by health and safety legislation, each party acknowledges, when possible, the results of procedures carried out in the territory of another party.
2A this end, the Parties undertake to agree other mutual assistance, particularly by providing information on their right and on their practice regarding the requirements of the procedures required to support applications for registration of products, as well as factual information concerning the procedures carried out on their territory and the permissions or any other administrative details concerning such procedures.

Title X Consultations multilateral art. 30. the Parties, acting in the five years following the entry into force of the present Convention and thereafter every five years, or more often if the majority of the Parties asks, multilateral consultations within the Council of Europe to examine the application of this Convention, as well as the opportunity of its revision or of an enlargement of some of its provisions. Consultations take place at meetings convened by the Secretary General of the Council of Europe. The Parties shall communicate to the Secretary General of the Council of Europe, two months at least before the meeting, the name of their representative.

Title XI provisions final art. 31. the present Convention is open for signature by the Member States of the Council of Europe and the European communities. It will be subject to ratification, acceptance or approval. The instruments of ratification, acceptance or approval shall be deposited with the Secretary General of the Council of Europe.

Art. 32 1. This Convention will enter into force the first day of the month following the expiration of a period of six months after the date on which four Member States of the Council of Europe have expressed their consent to be bound by the Convention in accordance with the provisions of art. 31 2. For any signatory which subsequently expresses its consent to be bound by the Convention, it will enter into force the first day of the month following the expiration of a period of six months after the date of the deposit of the instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval.

Art. 33-1. After the entry into force of the Convention, the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe may invite any non-Member State of the Council to accede to this Convention, by a decision taken by the expected majority to art. 20.d of the Statute of the Council of Europe, and the unanimity of the representatives of the Contracting States entitled to sit on the Committee.
2. for any acceding State, the Convention will be effective the first day of the month following the expiration of a period of six months after the date of the deposit of the instrument of accession by the Secretary General of the Council of Europe.

SR 0.192.030 art. 34 1. Any signatory may, time of signature or of the deposit of its instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession, make one or more reservations; However, no reservation may be made about the art. 1 to 14 and 18 to 20.
2. any party which has made a reservation under the preceding paragraph may withdraw it in whole or partly by notice to the Secretary General of the Council of Europe. The withdrawal is to take effect on the date of receipt of the notification by the Secretary General.
3 a party which has made a reservation in respect of a provision of this agreement may not claim the application of that provision by any other party; However, it can, if the reservation is partial or conditional, claim the application of that provision insofar as it accepted it.

Art. 35 1. Any signer can, time of signature or of the deposit of its instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession, designate any territories to which apply this Convention.
2 any party may, at any time thereafter, by a declaration addressed to the Secretary General of the Council of Europe, extend the application of this Convention to any other territory designated in the statement. The Convention will enter into force with respect to that territory on the first day of the month following the expiration of a period of six months after the date of receipt of the declaration by the Secretary General.
3. any declaration made under the two preceding paragraphs may be withdrawn, with respect to any territory referred to in this declaration by notification to the Secretary General. The withdrawal will take effect the first day of the month following the expiration of a period of six months after the date of receipt of the notification by the Secretary General.

Art. 36 1. Any party may, at any time, denounce this agreement by notice to the Secretary General of the Council of Europe.
2. the denunciation shall take effect on the first day of the month following the expiration of a period of six months after the date of receipt of the notification by the Secretary General.

Art. 37. the Secretary General of the Council of Europe shall notify the Member States of the Council of Europe, the European communities and any State which has acceded to this Convention: a. any signature, b. the deposit of any instrument of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession, c. any date of entry into force of this Convention in accordance with its art. 32, 33 and 35; d. any other Act, notification or communication relating to this Convention.

In faith of what, the undersigned, duly authorized to that effect, have signed this Convention.
Done at Strasbourg, 18 March 1986, in french and English, both texts being equally authentic, in a single copy which shall be deposited in the archives of the Council of Europe. The Secretary General of the Council of Europe will be communicated certified copy to each of the Member States of the Council of Europe and the European communities, as well as to any State invited to accede to this Convention.
(Follow signatures)

Appendix A guidelines for accommodation and care of animals (art. 5 of the Convention) Introduction 1. The Member States of the Council of Europe decided that they wanted to protect animals used for experimental purposes and for other scientists, to ensure that lasting damage, pain, suffering, or the anguish they suffer as a result of procedures done on them are limited to the strict minimum.
2. it is true that some procedures are carried out in the field with wild animals living in the wild and ensure their own subsistence, but they are however very limited. The vast majority of animals used in procedures should, for practical reasons, be kept under physical control any in facilities ranging from outdoor Park to the cages for small animals from a pet store of laboratory. In this situation, many interests are in conflict. On one side there is the animal whose needs of movement, social relationships and other manifestations of life must be restricted, on the other hand, the experimenter and his assistants, who demand full control of the animal and its environment. In this conflict of interest, it can sometimes be lent only a secondary interest in the animal.

3. that is why, the European Convention on the protection of vertebrate animals used for experimental purposes or for other scientific purposes provided in his art. 5 that: "any animal used or intended to be used in a procedure has a housing, an environment, at the less than a certain freedom of movement, food, water and care appropriate to their health and well-being. "Any restriction on its ability to satisfy its physiological and Ethological needs is limited as much as possible."
4. the present annex contains a number of guidelines based on the knowledge and practice current relating to accommodation and care of animals. She explained and complete the basic principles adopted in the art. 5. the aim is to help the authorities, institutions and individuals in their pursuit of the objectives of the Council of Europe.
5. the word 'care', used in connection with the animals used or to be used in procedures, covers all aspects of the relationship between the animal and man. It covers all the material and other resources mobilized by man to obtain and maintain an animal in a physical and mental state where he suffers the least possible and support the better procedures. Care lasts from the moment where the animal is chosen to be used in the proceedings to him where he is sacrificed by a method humanitarian or waived in any other way by the establishment, at the end of the procedure, in accordance with the provisions of art. 11 of the Convention.
6. Annex is intended to provide advice on the structure of the premises for the animals. However, there are several methods of breeding and keeping laboratory animals that essentially differ by the degree of control of the microbiological environment. Keep in mind that the concerned staff must sometimes be able to judge the nature and conditions of animals when the recommended space standards could prove insufficient, for example with particularly aggressive animals. The application of the guidelines of this annex should take into account the requirements of these different situations. In addition, please clarify the status of these guidelines. In contrast to the provisions of the Convention, they are not binding: it's discretionary use recommendations to serve as a guide in practices and standards to which everyone should strive in conscience to achieve. It is for this reason that the word 'will have to (in) t' had to be used throughout the text, even when the word "must (have to)" would have seemed more appropriate. It is obvious, for example, that food and water must be provided (see 3.7.2 and 3.8).
7. Finally, for practical and financial reasons, existing animal facilities should not be replaced until they are in good condition or that they did not become useless in another way. Pending replacement by facilities in line with the suggested guidelines, these should as much as possible be observed by adapting the number and the size of the animals in the cages and enclosures of existing.

Definitions as defined in Appendix A, in addition to the definitions contained in art. 1.2 the Convention, means: a. local accommodation: rooms where animals are normally housed for breeding and farming, either during the conduct of proceedings; b cage: fixed or mobile space enclosed by solid walls and a wall at least consists of bars or wire mesh or, if necessary, nets and in which one or several animals are kept or transported; based on the rate of settlement and the dimensions of the cage, the freedom of movement of the animals is more or less restricted; c. enclosure (box): surface surrounded by walls, bars or metal mesh in which one or more animals are kept; that function of the dimensions of the enclosure and the rate of settlement, freedom of movement of the animals is usually less restricted than in a cage; d. outdoor enclosure : surface surrounded by for example of a fence, walls, bars or wire mesh metal and frequently located outside a fixed construction, in which animals kept in a cage or pen can move freely during certain periods of time according to their physiological and Ethological needs, for example to take exercise; e. stall: small Bay on three sides normally provided with a manger and separations side and where one or two animals can be kept attached.

1 facilities 1.1. Functions and general design 1.1.1. Any facility should be designed to ensure an environment appropriate to the species that are housed there. It should also be designed to prevent access by unauthorized persons.
Facilities which are incorporated into a larger building should also be protected by adequate building standards and provisions limiting the number of entries and preventing the movement of unauthorized people.
1.1.2. it is recommended to have a facilities maintenance program to prevent any failure of the hardware.
1.2. premises accommodation 1.2.1. All necessary measures should be taken to ensure a quick and effective local cleaning and maintaining standards of hygiene satisfying. The ceilings and the walls should be resistant and offer a smooth, waterproof and easily washable surface. It should be paid special attention to the joints of the doors, pipes, hoses and cables. The doors and, if necessary, windows, should also be constructed or protected so as to prevent the access of unwanted animals. If it turns out to be necessary, an oculus can be converted in the door. The floor should be smooth, waterproof, with a surface slippery and easy to wash, can the lockers and the other heavy weight without damage. When there are mouths of evacuation, these should be properly covered and equipped with a grid in order to prevent the penetration of animals.
1.2.2. the premises where animals can move freely should have walls and floors covered with a coating particularly resistant to withstand the wear caused by the animals and the cleaning. This coating should not be detrimental to the health of animals, designed to keep them from getting hurt. Evacuation hydrants are desirable in such facilities. There should be protection for the equipment or fixtures so that they cannot be damaged by the animals or hurt the animals themselves. As there are external enclosures, should take steps, as appropriate, to prevent the access of the public and animals.
1.2.3. the premises intended to house farm animals (cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, poultry, etc.) should at least meet the standards established in the European Convention on the protection of animals in farms and veterinary and other authorities.
1.2.4. the majority of the premises for animals is usually designed to host rodents. Very often these premises can also be used to House larger species. Care should be taken not to do live together incompatible species.
1.2.5. the premises where animals are housed should be equipped with facilities to allow, as appropriate, the realization of minor procedures and manipulations.
1.3 laboratories and General and special procedure 1.3.1 rooms. In establishments breeding or suppliers, adequate facilities for the preparation of shipments of animals ready to be shipped should be available.
1.3.2. all institutions should also have a minimum laboratory facilities to diagnose simple to perform post-mortem examinations, and/or to collect samples for laboratory tests more extensive that will be done elsewhere.
1.3.3. arrangements should be made for the reception of the animals so that they, on their arrival, endanger not already present animals in the installation, for example by quarantining. General and special procedure rooms should be available for cases where it is not desirable to perform procedures or observations in the room where the animals are housed.
1.3.4. There should be facilities appropriate to allow sick animals or injured to be hosted separately.
1.3.5 as appropriate, it should also have one or several operating rooms separated, equipped to allow to perform surgical procedures under aseptic conditions. Should have space to allow the animals to recover after an operation when this is necessary.
1.4. service rooms

1.4.1. the space used to store food should be fresh, dry, protected from vermin and insects and those used for the bedding should be dry and protected from vermin and insects. Other materials which may be contaminated or may present a risk should be kept separately.
1.4.2. it should have space to store clean cages, instruments and other equipment.
1.4.3. the cleaning and washing facilities should be spacious enough to contain equipment decontamination and cleaning of the equipment used. Cleaning circuit should be organized so as to separate the passage of material dirty and clean to avoid contamination of the equipment that has just been cleaned. The walls and the floor should be covered with a coating of an appropriate resistance and ventilation system powerful enough to evacuate all excessive heat and moisture.
1.4.4. arrangements should be made for storage in satisfactory conditions of hygiene and disposal of carcasses and animal waste. If on-site incineration is not possible or desirable, should take appropriate steps to ensure the elimination of these substances in accordance with local laws and regulations. Special precautions should prevail with highly toxic or radioactive waste.
1.4.5. the design and construction of traffic areas should correspond to the standards of accommodation of the animals. The corridors should be wide enough to allow easy movement of rolling stock.

2. environment in accommodation and its control 2.1. Ventilation 2.1.1. Accommodation of pets should have a ventilation system appropriate to the requirements of species hosted. The ventilation system aims to provide clean air and reduce odors, toxic gases, dust and the agents of infection of any kind. Another objective is to contribute to the elimination of heat and excessive moisture.
2.1.2. air in the premises should be renewed frequently. A ventilation rate of 15 to 20 air changes per hour is usually sufficient. However, in some circumstances, when the population density is low, a ventilation rate of 8 to 10 air changes per hour may be sufficient and a mechanical ventilation may be superfluous. In other cases, it may be necessary to have a more frequent renewal. In any case, the recirculation of untreated air should be avoided. It should be noted however that even the most efficient system cannot compensate for bad cleaning habits or neglect.
2.1.3. the ventilation systems should be designed so as to avoid harmful draughts.
2.1.4. There should be no smoking in premises where there are animals.
2.2 temperature 2.2.1. Table 1 gives the range in which it is recommended to maintain the temperature. It should also be noted that the figures apply to adults and normal animals. Newborns and young people often need a much higher temperature. The setting of the temperature of the premises should take into account the possible modifications of the thermo-regulation of animals due to specific physiological conditions or the effects of the procedures.
2.2.2. in the climatic conditions prevailing in Europe, it may be necessary to provide a ventilation system equipped with devices for both the heating and cooling of the air.
2.2.3. in user facilities, accommodation of the animals should be controlled precisely. Indeed, the room temperature is a physical factor having a significant effect on the metabolism of all animals.
2.3 moisture extreme variations in relative humidity (HR) have a detrimental effect on the health and well-being of the animals. It is recommended therefore that the level of HR in the premises is appropriate to hosted species and is normally maintained at 55% +/-10%. Values below 40% or greater than 70% should be avoided for a long time.
2.4 lighting premises devoid of windows, it is necessary to provide artificial light controlled for, both, to satisfy the biological requirements of animals and provide a satisfactory working environment. It is also necessary to control the light intensity and the cycle light-dark. When we raise albino animals, it should be taken into account their sensitivity to light (see also 2.6.).
2.5 noise the noise can be an important factor of disorder in the premises for the animals. Accommodation and rooms of procedure should be insulated against noise sources high in the range of audible sounds and the high frequency sounds, in order to avoid problems of behaviour and the physiology of animals. Sudden noises can lead to considerable changes of the organic functions but, since some noises are often inevitable, it may be appropriate in some circumstances to provide accommodation and rooms of experiences a continuous background of moderate intensity, such as soft music.
2.6. alarm system a facility housing a large number of animals is vulnerable. Accordingly, it is recommended to properly protect facilities by providing systems to detect fire and the entrance of people not authorized. Technical defects or breakdowns of the ventilation system are another danger that could lead to disturbances and even death of animals by suffocation or excessive heat or, in less serious cases, which may have on a procedure of the negative effects that make it fail and force them to do it again. So should install adequate monitoring devices in connection with the heating and ventilation system to allow staff to follow its operation in general. If there is, it would be desirable to install an emergency generator to ensure the functioning of devices ensuring the survival of animals and the lighting failure or interruption of electricity supply. Clear instructions regarding the steps to be taken in an emergency should be displayed prominently. It is recommended to provide an alarm system in fish ponds to fish in case of failure of the water supply system. Should ensure the functioning of the alarm system interferes as little as possible the animals.

3. care 3.1. Health 3.1.1. The person in charge of the establishment should ensure that regular inspection of the animals and control the conditions in which they are accommodated and cared for are provided by a veterinarian or another competent person.
3.1.2. because of the potential risk they represent for the animals, health and hygiene of the staff should be the subject of special attention.
3.2 capture wild animals or from strays should be captured only by humanitarian methods and by experienced people who have a thorough knowledge of the habits and habitats of animals to capture. Whether to use in the capture operation an anesthetic or a any drug, it should be administered by a veterinarian or by another competent person. Any injured animal should be submitted as soon as possible to a veterinarian for treatment purposes. If, in the opinion of the veterinarian, the animal can survive only with suffering and pain, it should be immediately sacrificed by a humane method. In the absence of a veterinarian, animal seriously injured should be immediately sacrificed by a humane method.
3.3. packing and transportation conditions

All transport is definitely for animals a difficult it would to mitigate to the extent possible. Animals should be in good health to be carried and the sender has the duty to control as they are. Sick animals or in bad condition should never be transported, except for therapeutic or diagnostic reasons. To give special care to the females in a State of advanced pregnancy. Females at risk of giving birth along the way or those having given birth during the previous 48 hours, as well as their offspring, should not be transported. The shipper and the carrier should take precautions during the packing, loading and transit, in order to avoid the unnecessary suffering caused by inadequate ventilation, exposure to extreme temperatures, lack of food and water, long delays, etc. The recipient should be properly informed of the details of transport and the characteristics of the transport documents to ensure fast handling and delivery destination. Even in the case of States not parties to the European Convention on the protection of animals during international transport, it is recommended to strictly respect the provisions thereof. It is also recommended to strictly respect the national laws and regulations, as well as the regulations for live animals of the International Association of air transport and of the Association for the air transport of animals (Animal Air Transport Association).
3.4 reception and unpacking the package containing animals should be recovered and unpacked without unnecessary delay. After inspection, the animals should be transferred into cages or clean pens where they will be given food and water in an appropriate manner. Sick animals or in poor physical condition should be placed under medical observation and kept away from other animals. They should be examined as soon as possible by a veterinarian or another competent person and treated as appropriate. The animals had no chance of healing should be immediately sacrificed by a humane method. Finally, all animals received must be registered and marked in accordance with the provisions of the art. 16, 17 and 24 of the Convention. The boxes used to transport should be destroyed immediately if there are no decontamination facilities.
3.5 quarantine, isolation and acclimatization 3.5.1. The goals of the quarantine are: a. to protect the institution's other animal; b. to protect man against zoonotic infections; etc. to develop a good scientific practice.

Unless, of course, the State of health of the animals introduced into a facility is satisfactory, it is recommended to put them in quarantine. In some cases, for example that of rabies, the duration can to be fixed by the national legislation of the party. In other cases, it will vary and should be determined according to the circumstances, by a competent person, normally the veterinarian hired by the establishment (see also table 2).
Animals may be used for procedures during the quarantine period to the extent where they acclimated to their new environment and where they pose no risk to other animals or to humans.
3.5.2. it is recommended to provide premises to isolate animals who show signs of poor health or who are suspected of being in poor health and that could present a risk to humans or other animals.
3.5.3. even if it is found that the animals are in good health, it is good practice zootechnical to undergo a period of acclimatization before using it in a procedure. The time required depends on several factors, such the stress suffered by the animal that is itself a function of factors such as the duration of the transport and the age of the animal. The duration of this period will be decided by the competent person.
3.6 3.6.1 cage layout. We can distinguish two major systems for the accommodation of the animals. It is in the first place the system existing in schools breeding, suppliers and users of bio-medical and intended for the accommodation of animals, such as rodents, rabbits, carnivores, birds and nonhuman primates, sometimes also ruminants, pigs, and horses. Guidelines suggested for the cages, enclosures (boxes), outdoor pens and stalls suitable for these facilities are in tables 3 to 13. Additional guidance on minimum surfaces to the floor of the cages are given in diagrams 1 to 7. In addition, corresponding indications for the evaluation of the density of breeding in cages are provided in charts 8 to 12.
It comes, in the second place, the system that exists in institutions performing procedures only with animals farm or similar size. Resources existing in such facilities should not be less than those recommended by current veterinary standards.
3.6.2. the cages and pens should not be made of a material that is detrimental to the health of the animals; they should be designed to prevent animals from getting hurt and, unless they are disposable, be constructed in a resistant material suitable for cleaning and decontamination techniques. Special attention should be given to the design of floors of cages and enclosures that should vary according to the species and age of the animal and be designed to facilitate the evacuation of feces.
3.6.3. the outdoor pens should be designed for the well-being of the species. They should allow the satisfaction of certain Ethological needs (possibility to climb, isolate themselves or shelter temporarily for example). They should also allow effective cleaning and avoid contact with other animals.
3.7 3.7.1 power. In the selection, production and food preparation, precautions should be taken to avoid any chemical, physical and microbiological contamination. They should be packed, as appropriate, in closed bags sealed with the indication of the date of manufacture. Packaging, transport and storage should be designed so as to avoid contamination, deterioration or destruction. Used for storing premises should be cool, dark, dry, protected from vermin and insects. Perishable foods like green forage, vegetables, fruit, meat, fish, etc., should be kept in cold rooms, refrigerators or freezers.
All hoppers, all troughs or other utensils used for feeding animals should be cleaned and, if necessary, sterilized regularly. If using wet food or food are easily contaminated by water, urine, etc., a daily cleaning is necessary.
3.7.2. the presentation of food varies depending on the species, but it should be such that it can satisfy the physiological needs of the animal. In addition, should make the necessary arrangements so that each animal has access to food.
3.8 3.8.1 water. All animals must maintain uncontaminated drinking water. During transport, it is recognized that water is supplied as part of a moist diet. However, water is a vehicle of microorganisms, and that's why she should be provided so that risks are minimized. Two methods are commonly used, bottles and Automatic watering systems.
3.8.2. for small animals such as rodents and rabbits, used bottles. Where such containers are used, they should be made of a translucent material, to allow the control of the content. The neck should be wide enough to permit easy and effective cleaning and, if the bottle is plastic, it should be non-migratable. The capsules, caps and pipes should also be able to be sterilized and be easy to clean. All bottles and all the accessories should be disassembled, cleaned and sterilized at appropriate, regular intervals. It would be preferable to replace bottles by bottles clean and sterilized rather than fill them again in accommodation of the animals every time.
3.8.3. the automatic waterers should be regularly checked and maintained and should regularly control the operation to avoid accidents and the development of infections. If the cages to compact floor are used, care should be taken to minimize the risk of flooding. It is also recommended to proceed regularly a bacteriological examination of the system to control the quality of water.

3.8.4. water from the public network has a few microorganisms considered generally safe, unless you work with microbiologically defined animals. In such cases, the water should be treated. Water from the public water system is usually chloridic to limit the development of microorganisms. This chlorination does not always limit the growth of certain potential pathogens, as for example pseudomonas. An extra precaution may be to increase the level of chlorine in the water or to acidify the water to get the desired effect.
3.8.5. the fish, amphibians and reptiles have one tolerance varies from species to species with respect to acidity, chlorine and other chemicals. This is why measures should be taken to adapt the supply of water in aquariums and ponds to the needs and tolerances of individual species.
3.9 litters litter should be dry, absorbent, dust free, non toxic, free of any agent of infection or vermin or any other form of contamination. Especially should avoid the use of sawdust or bedding materials derived from chemically treated wood. You can also use certain by-products or industrial waste (such as shredded paper).
3.10 exercise and handling 3.10.1. We should seize every opportunity to allow the animals to take exercise.
3.10.2. the behavior of the animal in the course of a procedure depends very much on his trust in man, trust it takes to develop. The wild or from a stray animal will probably never the ideal animal for the experiments. This is not the case of the domestic animal born and raised in contact with the man. However, the trust should be preserved. It is recommended to maintain frequent contacts, so that animals become familiar with the presence and activity of humans. If so, should spend some time to talk to the animals, care and cleaning. Staff should show kindness, sweetness and firmness when it takes care of the animals.
3.11 cleaning 3.11.1. The quality of a facility reserved for animals depends on a lot of his good hygiene. Clear instructions should be given for the renewal of the litter in the cages and the pen.
3.11.2. There should be a program of rules appropriate for the cleaning, washing, decontamination and if necessary the sterilization of cages and accessories, bottles and the rest of the material. It should also maintain a high level of cleanliness and order in the premises reserved for animals as well as in washing and storage premises.
3.11.3. should carry out regular cleaning and replacement, as appropriate, of materials covering the ground in cages, pens and pen outside so that they do not become a source of infection and infestation by parasites.
3.12 humanitarian 3.12.1 animal sacrifice. Any humane method of animal sacrifice requires knowledge that can be acquired only by appropriate training.
3.12.2. a deeply unconscious animal can be bled, but drugs which paralyse muscles before loss of consciousness, those having the effects of curare, and electrocution without passage of current through the brain, should not be used without prior anaesthesia.
The removal of the body should not intervene before the onset of rigor.

Tables and diagrams related to annex of the Convention European on the protection of vertebrate animals used for experimental purposes or for other scientific purposes (guidelines for accommodation and care of animals) table 1 guidelines for the temperature of the premises (animals kept in cages or inner enclosure) species or groups of species range in ° C of the new world Primates not humans 20-28 Mouse Rat 20-24 20-24 Syrian Hamster gerbil 20 20-24-24 Guinea pig 20-24

Primates of the non-human old world quail 20-24 20-24 15-21 15-21 15 dog cat rabbit-21 ferret 15-21 poultry 15-21 Pigeon 15-21 pork 10-24 goat 10-24 sheep 10-24 cattle 10-24 horse 10-24 Note: in special cases, for example when accommodated very young or hairless, animals temperatures of higher than specified accommodation may be required.
Table 2 guidelines to local quarantine periods Introductory Note: for imported animals, all quarantine periods should be determined by the national regulations of the Parties. With respect to local quarantine periods, the period should be determined according to the circumstances, by a competent person, normally by a veterinarian appointed by the institution.

Species days mouse 5-15 Rat 5-15 gerbil 5-15 Guinea pig 5-15 5-15 rabbit 20 Syrian Hamster-30 cat 20-30 dog 20-30 non-human Primates 40-60 table 3 guidelines for caging small rodents and rabbits (storage and procedures) species Surface to the ground minimum cage height minimum cage cm mouse 180 12 Rat 350 14 Hamster Syrian 180 12 Guinea pig 600 18 Rabbit 1 1400 30 2 kg 2000 30 and 3 kg kg

2500 35 4 kg 3000 40 and 5 kg 3600 40 Note: by 'the cage height', means the vertical distance between the floor of the cage and the upper horizontal part of the lid or cage.
When planning procedures, should be considered potential growth of animals to ensure adequate space according to this table during all phases of the proceedings.
See also the diagrams 1 to 5 and 8 to 12.
Table 4 guidelines for caging small rodents in breeding species Surface to the ground minimum of the cage for a mother and its scope cm minimum height of the cage cm mouse 200 12 Rat 800 14 Hamster Syrian 650 12 Guinea pig 1200 18 Guinea pig in harems 1000 per adult 18 Note: for the definition of the "height of the cage. see the note to table 3.
Table 5 guidelines for caging of rabbits breeding weight of the DOE kg Surface to the ground minimum of the cage for a DOE and its scope m minimum height of cm minimum area of the m 1 nest cage 0.30 30 0.10 0.35 2 30 0.10 3 0,40 35 0.12 4 0.45 40 0.12 5 0.50 40 0.14 Note : For the definition of the 'height of the cage', see the note to table 3.
The minimum floor area of the cage for a DOE and its scope includes the surface on the ground of the nest box.
See also the diagram 6.
Table 6 guidelines for accommodation of cats (procedures and reproduction) weight of the cat kg Surface minimum floor of the cage by CAT m minimum height of the cage cm Surface to the ground minimum of the cage by pussy and scope m Surface to the ground minimum of the enclosure by pussy and scope m 0,5- 1 0.2 1-50-3 0.3 50 0.58 2 3 - 4 0.4 50 0.58 2 4 - 5 0.6 50 0.58 2 Note : Hosting of cats in cages should be strictly limited. Thus confined cats should be able to exercise at least once a day when this does not impede the proceedings. Pens for cats should always be equipped with trays to feces, a surface of rest and objects allowing them to climb with their claws.
By 'the cage height', means the vertical distance between the highest point of the floor of the cage and the lowest of the top of the cage.
For the calculation of the minimum surface of the ground, we can include the surface of the platters of rest. The minimum floor space for a cat and its scope includes the surface of 0.18 m 2 of the box of kittens.
Also see diagram 7.
Table 7 guidelines for the accommodation of dogs in cages (procedures) size of the dog in minimum height of shoulder cm Surface on the floor of the cage by dog m minimum height of the cage 30 cm 0.75 60 40 1.00 80 70 1.75 140 Note: dogs should not be housed in cages for a longer period it is absolutely necessary for the purpose of the procedure. Dogs in cages should be able to exercise at least once a day, unless this is incompatible with the purpose of the procedure. A time limit should be set beyond which an animal should not be confined without daily exercise. The surfaces of exercise should be large enough to allow the animals to move freely. We shouldn't use floor grilles in the cages for dogs only if the procedure requires it.
Given the large differences in size and the limited report between the size and weight of the different breeds of dogs, the height of the cage should be set according to the height of the body of each animal measured at shoulder height. As a general rule, the minimum height of the cage should be twice its size measured at shoulder height.
For the definition of the 'height of the cage', see notes in table 6.
Table 8 guidelines for accommodation of dogs in pens (storage, procedures and reproduction) dog weight kg Surface minimum floor of the enclosure by dog m adjacent exercise area minimum by dog kg m up to 3 dogs m


more than 3 dogs 30 m 2.0 2.0 (4.0) 1.8 (3.8) Note: figures in brackets indicate the total area per dog, i.e. the surface on the floor of the enclosure the adjacent exercise area. The dogs kept permanently in outdoor pens should have access to a sheltered place to protect themselves from bad weather conditions. When the dogs are housed on wire surfaces, a solid surface should be provided for sleeping. We shouldn't use wire soil if the procedure requires. The partitions between pens should be made so that the dogs can injure one another.
The enclosure should have a proper drainage system.
Table 9 guidelines for caging of non-human primates (storage, procedures and reproduction) Introductory Note: in view of the diversity of sizes and characteristics of primates, it is particularly important to align the size, interior equipment and dimensions of the cages with their specific needs. The total volume of the cage is just as important to the primates than the minimum floor area. Generally, the height of the cage, at least for the monkeys anthropoid and other Simian, should be its largest dimension. At a minimum, the cages should be high enough to allow the animals to stand up. The minimum height of the cage for the brachiateurs should allow these animals to swing in full extension of the ceiling, and without their feet touch the floor of the cage. As appropriate, perches should be installed to allow the animals to use the upper part of the cage.
It is possible to host two primates who get along in a cage. When primates cannot be hosted by two, the cages should be placed so that the primates can see but, if necessary, it should also be possible to stop them to see.
Subject to these observations, the following table is a general guideline aimed more particularly at caging of groups of species most commonly used (superfamilies of the ceboides and the old world monkeys).

Weight of the primate kg Surface minimum floor of the cage for one or two animals m minimum height of 150 cm cage 2.5 2.5 1.4 sheep 2400 1800 1200 1000 60 15 quail 120 - 140 350 250 200 15 4 Note: 'surface' means the product of the length and the width of the cage measured from inside and horizontally NOT the product of the length and the width of the floor of the cage.
For the definition of the 'height of the cage', see note in table 6.
The mesh openings in wire ground should not exceed 10 x 10 mm for chicks and 25 x 25 mm for young birds and adults. The wire diameter should be at least 2 mm. The inclination of the ground should not exceed 14% (8 °). Waterers should be the same length as the feeders. Where troughs to nipple or cuts are used, each bird should have access to two troughs to nipple or two cups. Cages should be fitted with perches and allow birds in separate cages to see.

RS 0.454 RS 0.452 State April 11, 2013 diagram 1 mouse (storage and procedures) Surface to the ground minimum cage because of the weight of a mouse, the line full, EU-USA, gives the minimum area which the mouse should have.

On April 11, 2013 state diagram 2 Rats (storage and procedures) Surface to the ground minimum of the cage because of the weight of a rat, full, EU-EU line, gives the minimum area that the rat should have.

On April 11, 2013 state diagram 3 Hamsters in Syria (storage and procedures) Surface to the ground minimum of the cage because of the weight of a hamster in Syria, the line full, EU-USA, gives the minimum area that the hamster in Syria should have.

On April 11, 2013 state diagram 4 guinea pigs (storage and procedures) Surface to the ground minimum of the cage because of the weight of a Guinea pig, full, EU-EU line, gives the minimum area that the Guinea pig should have.

On April 11, 2013 state diagram 5 rabbits (storage and procedures) Surface to the ground minimum of the cage because of the weight of a rabbit, the full, EU-EU line, gives the minimum area that the rabbit should have.

On April 11, 2013 diagram 6 rabbits (breeding) Surface minimum floor of the cage for a Bunny with its scope not starved because of the weight of a rabbit, the solid line, EU-EU, gives the minimum area which the lapine should have.

On April 11, 2013 state diagram 7 cats (storage and procedures) Surface to the ground minimum cage because of the weight of a cat, the full, EU-EU line, gives the minimum area that the cat should have.

State April 11, 2013 diagram 8 directions for the preparation of the report between the number of mice per cage and surface on the floor of the cage (storage and procedures) the lines represent the middleweight and correspond to the EU-EU line diagram 1.

State April 11, 2013 diagram 9 instructions for the preparation of the report between the number of rats by cage and surface on the floor of the cage (storage and procedures) the lines represent the middleweight and correspond to the diagram 2 EU-EU line.

State April 11, 2013 diagram 10 instructions for the preparation of the report between the number of hamsters with cage and surface on the floor of the cage (storage and procedures) the lines represent the middleweight and correspond to the diagram 3 EU-EU line.

State April 11, 2013 diagram 11 directions for the preparation of the report between the number of Guinea pigs by cage and surface on the floor of the cage (storage and procedures) the lines represent the middleweight and correspond to the diagram 4 EU-EU line.

State April 11, 2013 diagram 12 guidance for the preparation of the report between the number of rabbits by cage and surface on the floor of the cage (storage and procedures) the lines represent the middleweight and correspond to the diagram 5 EU-EU line.

State on April 11, 2013 Appendix B statistical tables and explanatory notes on how to complete them in application of the provisions of the art. 27 and 28 of the Convention Introduction under arts. 27 and 28 of the Convention, each party brings together statistical data relating to certain aspects of the procedures covered by the Convention, and shall communicate this information to the Secretary General of the Council of Europe, which publishes them.
It is for each party to choose the method used to collect the data and is nothing, of course, to the collection of additional statistics for national purposes. In order to facilitate the task of the Secretary General, however, there that the data communicated are comparable and that they match the attached. The data are collected by calendar year.

General animals as are those who are intended to be used in a manner likely to cause lasting damage, pain, suffering or distress (see art. 1.2.c of the Convention). Counting takes place when animals are used in a procedure. Each animal is counted only once in the same table. Animals that are not subject to procedures of the kind defined in art. 1.2.c are not counted for the purpose of collating statistical information under this agreement.
Because of the nature of biological research, it is inevitable that there are cases where it is difficult to determine which column of a table should be placed an animal that is used in a procedure. There is no right or wrong way to solve the problem. It is a matter of personal choice. Subject to the direction that the competent authorities can give, it belongs to the scientist to determine under what heading it should be her pet.
However, it is essential to ensure that no animal is counted twice in the same table.
Table 1 number and kinds of animals used in procedures in this table, the total number of animals used in procedures is mentioned, this total is broken down by types or classes of animals.
Table 2 number of animals used in procedures for selected purposes this table is designed to show the number of animals used in the following main areas: basic research, development of new products, safety tests, diagnoses of diseases, teaching and training. In column 1, the word "medical" includes veterinary medicine.
Table 3 number of animals used in procedures for purposes selected for protection of human, animal and their environment through Toxicology tests or other safety tests this table is intended to give a more detailed presentation procedures performed for the General protection of human, animal and the environment, other than medical purposes. Column 6 includes the harmful radiation.
Table 4: number of animals used in procedures relating to diseases or disorders

This table is intended to indicate the number of animals used for medical purposes, including veterinary medicine, especially by reference to three areas of human diseases that concern the public.
Table 5 number of animals used in procedures required by the legislation the "Only party" column is filled only when the procedure is required by the legislation of the party where the procedure is performed, including international obligations to which this part is subjected (for example as a party to the Convention on the elaboration of a pharmacopoeia European or as a Member State of the communities European).
The column "Other Parties" only is met if the procedure is specifically designed to meet the requirements of countries other than the part, including the requirements of trade and those of conventions, to which she is not a party.
The heading "Both" is used when the procedure is intended to meet the requirements of both groups; in this case, no entry is made in the other two columns.
Table 1 number and kinds of animals used in procedures in... (year) in... (Part)

Mouse (Mus musculus) Rats (Rattus norvegicus) guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) other rodents (Rodentia altri) rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) apes (Hominoidea) other Simians (Cercopithecoidea e Ceboidea) Prosimians (Prosimia) dogs (Canis Familiaris), cat (Felis Catus) other carnivores (Carnivora altri) horses, donkeys and crosses (Equidae) pigs (Sus) sheep and goats (Capra e Ovis) cattle (Bos) other mammals (other Mammalia) birds (Aves), Reptiles (Reptilia) amphibians (Amphibia), fish (Pisces) Total table 2 number of animals used in procedures for selected purposes in... (year) in... (Part)

All species selected rodents and rabbits dogs and cats Primates 1 biological (including medical) studies of fundamental nature 2 discovery, development and quality (including safety tests) control products or devices in human and veterinary medicine 3 disease diagnosis 4 Protection of human, animal and environmental toxicology or other safety 5 tests tests training table 3 number of animals used in procedures for selected purposes for the protection of human, animal and the environment through Toxicology tests or other safety tests carried out in... (year) in... (Part)

Detailed classification of point 4 of table 2 all species species selected rodents and rabbits dogs and cats Primates 1 Substances used or intended to be used mainly in agriculture 2 Substances used or intended to be used mainly in industry 3 Substances used or intended to be used mainly as cosmetics or hygiene products body 4 Substances used or intended to be used mainly as cosmetics or products of personal hygiene 5 Substances used or intended to be used as food additives for use by human consumption 6 potential actual contaminants in the general environment table 4 number of animals used in procedures relating to diseases or disorders in... (year) in... (Part)

All species selected rodents and rabbits dogs and cats Primates 1 2 3 4 other nervous and mental disorders cardiovascular disease Cancer (excluding testing of carcinogenic risk) human and animal diseases Note: when a procedure covers cancer under all headings of 2 to 4, the cancer classification should be applied preferably.
Table 5 number of animals used in procedures required by law to... (year) in... (Part)

All species selected rodents and rabbits dogs and cats Primates party concerned only other Parties only the two RS 0.812.21 State April 11, 2013 scope on April 11, 2013, States parties Ratification entry into force Germany * 19 April 1991 1 November 1991 Belgium 20 December 1991 1 July 1992 Bulgaria July 20, 2004 February 1, 2005 Cyprus 9 December 1993 1 July 1994 Denmark * September 8, 2000 April 1, 2001 Spain September 12, 1989 1 January 1991

Finland 14 June 1990 1 January 1991 France * June 5, 2000 December 1, 2000 Greece 27 May 1992 1 December 1992 Latvia October 5, 2010 may 1, 2011 Lithuania June 14, 2007 1 January 2008 Macedonia * January 22, 2004 August 1, 2004 Norway July 9, 1986 1 January 1991 Netherlands * January 21, 1997 1 August 1997 Czech Republic * March 20, 2003 October 1, 2003 Romania November 16, 2006 1 June 2007 United Kingdom * 17 December 1999 1 July 2000 Serbia 2 December 2010 1 July 2011 Slovenia 15 December 2006 1 July 2007 Sweden 15 September 1988 1 January 1991 Switzerland 3 November 1993 1 June 1994 European Union * April 30, 1998 November 1, 1998 * reservations and declarations.
Reservations and declarations are not published to the RO. Texts in french and English can be found at the address of the Council of Europe website: http://conventions.coe.int or obtained in the Direction of public international law (FDFA), the international treaties Section, 3003 Bern.

For the Kingdom in Europe.

1994 930 RO; FF 1992 V 953 see also art. 30 to 38 amended by art. 1 to 3 of the prot. am. June 22, 1998, in force for Switzerland since Dec. 2. 2005 (RS 0.457.1).
Art. 1 al. let 1. b of the AF of 17 June 1993 (RO 1994 918).
RO 1994 981, 2004 5001, 2010 3255, 2013 1241. A version of the update scope is published on the web site of the FDFA (www.dfae.admin.ch/traites).

State on April 11, 2013

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