Rs 0.747.363.321 The 20 October 1972 Convention On The International Regulations Of 1972 For Prevention Of Collision At Sea (With Regulations And Annexes)

Original Language Title: RS 0.747.363.321 Convention du 20 octobre 1972 sur le règlement international de 1972 pour prévenir les abordages en mer (avec règlement et annexes)

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0.747.363.321 original text Convention on the international regulations of 1972 for prevention of collision at sea concluded at London on 20 October 1972 approved by the Federal Assembly on 24 September 1975, Instrument of ratification deposited by the Switzerland on December 30, 1975, entered into force for Switzerland on 15 July 1977 (status on 20 March 2014) the parties to this Convention wishing to maintain a high level of safety at sea, conscious of the need to review and update international rules for prevention of collision at sea, annexed to the final act of the International Conference of 1960 for safety of life at sea, having considered these rules in the light of developments since their approval , have agreed to the following: art. I General Obligations the Parties to this Convention undertake to give effect to the rules and other Annexes constituting the 1972 international regulations for preventing collisions at sea (hereinafter referred to as 'the regulation'), attached to this agreement.

Art. II Signature, ratification, acceptance, approval and accession 1. This Convention is open for signature until June 1, 1973 and then remains open to accession.
((2. States members of the Organization of the United Nations, of one any of its specialized agencies or of the International Energy Agency Atomic, or party to the Statute of the International Court of Justice may become parties to this Convention by: a) signature without reservation as to ratification, acceptance or approval; b) signature subject to ratification, acceptance or approval followed by ratification, acceptance or approval; OUC) membership.

3. ratification, acceptance, approval or accession are made by the deposit of an instrument with the consultative intergovernmental organization of maritime navigation (hereinafter referred to as "the Organization"). It informed the Governments of the States which have signed this Convention or acceded the deposit of each instrument and the date of such deposit.

Art. III territorial Application 1. The Organization of the United Nations, where she is responsible for the administration of a territory, or any Contracting Party which is responsible for relations of a territory may at any time extend the application of this Convention to that territory, by a written notification addressed to the Secretary general of the Organization (hereinafter referred to as "the Secretary-General").
2. the application of the present Convention is extended to the territory designated in the notice from the date of receipt thereof, or such other date that would be appropriate.
3. any notification in application of the by. 1 of this article may be withdrawn in respect of any of the Territories mentioned in the notification. the extension of the application of this Convention to that territory shall end with the expiry of a period of one year or any longer period specified at the time of withdrawal of the notification.
4. the Secretary-General shall inform all Contracting Parties of the notification of any extension or withdrawal of any extension made under this section.

Art. IV. entry into force 1. a) the present Convention comes into force twelve months after the date on which at least 15 States, including the merchant fleets represent a total at least 65% either in number of ship either in terms of tonnage of the fleet of ships of 100 GRT or more have become parties to this Convention, one of the two conditions that will be filled the first being taken into consideration.b) Notwithstanding the provisions of para. (a) of this paragraph, this agreement does not come into force before January 1, 1976.

2. the date of entry into force for States which ratify, accept, approve the Convention or y member in accordance with art. II after the conditions prescribed in para. (a) by. 1 have been met and before the Convention comes into force, is that of the entry into force of the Convention.
3. for States which ratify, accept, approve the Convention or there member after the date of its entry into force, the Convention will enter into force on the date of the deposit of an instrument referred to in article. II. 4. After the date of entry into force of an amendment to this Convention, in accordance with the by. 4 of art. VI, any ratification, acceptance, approval or accession is applied to the text changed the Convention.
5. on the date of the entry into force of this agreement, the regulation replaces and repeals the 1960 international rules for prevention of collision at sea.
6. the Secretary-General shall inform the Governments of the States which have signed this Convention or acceded of the date of its entry into force.

[RO 1965 698]

Art. V Conference on the revision of the texts 1. The organization may convene a conference for the purpose of revising this Convention, or the regulations, or the Convention and the regulations.
2 at the request of one third of the Contracting Parties, the Organization shall convene a conference of the Contracting Parties for the purpose of revising this Convention, or the regulations, or the Convention and the regulations.

Art. VI. amendments to rules 1. Any amendment to the regulations proposed by a Contracting Party is examined within the Organization at the request of the party.
2. If it is adopted by the majority of two thirds of the members present and voting of the Organization's maritime safety Committee, the amendment shall be communicated to all Contracting Parties and all members of the Organization six months at least before being reviewed by the Assembly of the organization. Any Contracting Party which is not a member of the Organization has the right to participate in the review of the amendment by the Assembly.
3. If adopted by a majority of two thirds of the members present and voting in the Assembly, the amendment shall be communicated by the Secretary-General to all the Contracting Parties for approval.
4. this amendment comes into force on a date that is set by the Assembly at the time of its adoption, unless, at an earlier date set by the Assembly at the time of adoption, more than one third of the Contracting Parties have notified the Organization their objection to the amendment. The decision of the Assembly relating to the dates mentioned in this paragraph is taken by a majority of two thirds of the members present and voting.
5. when it comes into force, any amendment replaces and makes obsolete, for all the Contracting Parties who have not raised objection to this amendment, any previous provision to which it applies.
6. the Secretary-General shall inform all Contracting Parties and all members of the Organization of any request, and of any communication received in pursuance of this article, as well as of the date of entry into force of any amendment.

Art. VII denunciation 1. This Convention may be denounced by a Contracting Party at any time after the expiration of a period of five years from the date on which the Convention entered into force with respect to that part.
2. the denunciation is made by the deposit of an instrument with the organization. The Secretary-General shall inform all the other Contracting Parties of the receipt of the instrument of denunciation and the date of its filing.
3. a denunciation shall take effect one year after the date of the deposit of the instrument, or any longer period specified in the instrument.

Art. VIII filing and record 1. The present Convention and the regulations are filed with the Organization and the Secretary-General shall send certified copies to all the Governments of the States which have signed this Convention or acceded.
2. on the entry into force of the Convention, the Secretary-General shall forward the text to the Secretariat of the United Nations for registration and publication, in accordance with art. 102 of the Charter of the United Nations.

RS 0.120 art. IX. languages this Convention and the regulations are established in a single copy in the French language and English, both texts being equally authentic. It is established in the official translations in Russian and Spanish which are filed with the coated original signatures.
In faith of what, the undersigned, duly authorized for this purpose by their Governments, have signed this agreement.
Done at London, this 20 October one thousand nine hundred and seventy-two.
(Follow signatures)

International regulations of 1972 for prevention of collision at sea part has general rule 1 scope of application


(a) these rules apply to all ships on the high seas and in all accessible to ships of mer.b adjacent waters) Nothing in these rules cannot interfere with application of special requirements laid down by the competent authority about the navigation in the harbors, ports, rivers, lakes or inland navigation channels adjacent to the high seas and accessible to sea vessels. However, these special requirements shall conform as closely as possible to the present Regles.c) Nothing in these rules cannot interfere with the application of the special conditions laid down by the Government of a State to increase the number of lights, signal lights, brands or signals to the whistle to be used by warships and ships in convoy, or to increase the number of the position lights , light signals or brands to use by vessels engaged in fishing and constituting a fishing fleet. These lights of position, light signals, brands or additional to the whistle signals shall, to the extent possible, be such that it is impossible to confuse with any other lights, brands or signal authorized elsewhere in the present Regles.d) the organization may adopt features of traffic separation for the purposes of the present Regles.e) whenever a Government considers that a vessel of special construction or assigned to special operations cannot comply with all provisions one any of the rules regarding the number, location, scope or sector visibility of lights and shapes, as well as implantation and sound signalling devices characteristics, this ship must comply with such other provisions related to the number, location, the scope or the sector of visibility of the lights or marks as well as for implantation and characteristics of sound signalling devices, which, in the opinion of the Government concerned, allow in these cases to conform as closely as possible to these rules.

New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981 in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
New content according to amendments from nov 19. in force since 19 nov 1987. 1989 (1989 1763 RO).

(Rule 2 responsibility (a) Nothing in these rules cannot exonerate or a ship, or its owner, Captain or crew of the consequences of negligence as to the application of these rules or as to precautions that control the ordinary experience of the seafarer or the circumstances in which is located the navire.b) in interpreting and applying the rules We must take due account of all dangers of navigation and collision risk, as well as any special circumstances, including the operating limitations of the vessels involved, which may require to depart these rules to avoid immediate danger.

General rule 3 Definitions for the purposes of these rules, except as otherwise provided as a result of the context: has) "ship" means any gear or any device of any kind whatsoever, including gear without draught and seaplanes, used or capable of being used as a means of transportation on the eau.b) "power-driven vessel" means any vessel driven by a machine.c) "sailing ship" means any vessel sailing-walking (((, even if it has a propulsive machine, to provided, however, that it is not utilisee.d) "fishing vessel" means any ship that fishing with nets, lines, trawls or other fishing gear reducing its ability to maneuver, but does not apply to vessels fishing with dragging lines or other fishing gear reducing not their ability to manoeuvre.e) "aircraft" means any aircraft designed to manoeuvre on the eau.f) expression "ship that." is not the master of his manoeuvre"means a ship which, due to exceptional circumstances, is not able to operate in accordance with these rules and cannot therefore depart from the road to other navire.g)"ability to manoeuvre ship"means any vessel whose ability to maneuver in accordance with these rules is limited by the nature of its work , and which therefore cannot be out of the way of another ship. 'Limited ability to manoeuvre ships' include, without this list being restrictive: i) ships laying or identify a buoy, cable, or a submarine pipeline or maintain; ii) ships performing operations of dredging, hydrographic or oceanographic, or underwater work; iii) vessels conducting a refueling or tranship people (((, provisions or cargo and making road; iv) ships performing operations of take-off or landing of aircraft recovery; v) ships currently conducting demining operations; vi) ships performing a towing operation which makes it difficult to the tug ship and its trailer to alter their route.

(h) the expression 'Ship disabled by her draught' means any ship to mechanical propulsion which, because of its draft of water and the depth and the width available to navigable waters, can hardly change its route.i) the expression "road" apply to any ship which is anchored, or docked in Earth, nor echoue.j) the words "length" and "breadth" of a vessel mean its length out of everything and his greatest largeur.k) two ships are considered as being in view of the other when one of them can be observed visually by the autre.l) the term 'reduced visibility' means any situation where visibility is reduced as a result of mist, drizzle, snow, strong grain of rain or storms of sand, or any other similar causes.

New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1987, in force since 19 nov. 1989 (1989 1763 RO).

Part B rules bar and Road Section 1 conduct of vessels in any condition of visibility rule 4 field of application the rules in this section apply in any condition of visibility.

Rule 5 Eve all ship must always ensure visual and auditory intelligence appropriate, using also all available means which are adapted to the circumstances and conditions so as to make a full appraisal of the situation and of the risk of collision.

Rule 6-safe speed every vessel must permanently maintain a safe speed such that it can take appropriate and effective action to avoid a collision and stop over a distance that is adapted to the circumstances and conditions.
The following factors must be taken into account to determine the speed of security: a) by all vessels: i) visibility; ii) traffic density and including concentrations of fishing or any other ships ships; iii) the ability to maneuver the ship and more particularly its stopping distance and its qualities of gyration in the existing conditions, iv) night ((, the presence of a bright background such as that created by coastal lights or a diffusion of the light of the own fires of the ship; v) the State of wind, sea and current and the proximity of navigational hazards; vi) the draught according to the depth of water available.

((b) in addition, the ships that use a radar: i) the characteristics, efficiency and limits of use of the radar equipment; ii) the limitations resulting from the used on the radar range scale; iii) the effect of the State of the sea, the weather and other sources of interference on the radar detection and iv) the fact that the small buildings ((, ice and other floating objects may not be detected by the radar at a sufficient distance; v) the number, the position and movement of vessels detected by radar; vi) the fact that it is possible to appreciate more precisely the visibility when radar is used to determine the distance of ships and other objects in the vicinity.

Rule 7 risk of collision (a) every vessel shall use all available means which are adapted to the circumstances and conditions to determine if there is a risk of collision. If there is doubt as to the risk of collision, one must consider that this risk exists.
(b) if there is on board a serviceable radar equipment, we need use it appropriately by using, in particular, for long-range scanning to identify in advance a risk of collision, as well as to the 'plotting' radar or any other equivalent systematic observation of detected objects.
(c) do not draw conclusions from insufficient information, including insufficient radar information.
(d) an assessment of a risk of collision must take into account the following considerations:

(i) there is risk of collision if the compass bearing of a ship approaching does not appreciably change; ii) such risk may sometimes exist even if there is a significant recovery variation, particularly when one approaches a very large ship, a train of trailer or a ship which is in short distance.

Rule 8 maneuver to avoid collision (a) any maneuver to avoid collision shall, if the circumstances permit, be executed frankly, widely in time and in accordance with good shipping practice.
(b) any change of course or speed, or both at the same time, to avoid a collision shall, if the circumstances permit, be important enough to be immediately perceived by any vessel which is observed visually or by radar; a succession of little changes of course or speed, or both at once, is to be avoided.
(c) if the ship has enough room, alteration of course alone may be the most effective action to avoid being in close-quarters situation provided that this is made good time, it is substantial and does not result in another close-quarters situation.
(d) manoeuvres to avoid a collision with another vessel shall be such that they allow to pass at a safe distance. The effectiveness of the manoeuvres must be carefully checked until the other vessel is finally clear and ready.
(e) if necessary to avoid collision or allow more time to assess the situation, a vessel must reduce speed or break his momentum by stopping its propulsion machinery or by beating back through this unit.
(f) (i) a vessel which, under one any present rules, is required not to impede the passage of another vessel or allow his free passage shall, when the circumstances so require, maneuver without delay in order to leave enough space to the other ship to allow its free passage.ii) a ship that is required not to impede the passage of another vessel or allow its safe passage is not exempted from this obligation if he comes the other ship in such a way that there is a risk of collision and he must, when he performs his maneuver, take due account of maneuvers that may be required under the rules of the present partie.iii) a ship whose passage should not be embarrassed rest fully held to comply with the rules of this part when two ships are approaching one another so that there is a risk of collision.

Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1987, in force since 19 nov. 1989 (1989 1763 RO).

Rule 9 narrow channels (a) vessels proceeding in a narrow channel or an access road must, when this can be done without danger, navigate as close as possible to the right outer limit of the channel or of the access road.
(b) ships of less than 20 metres in length and sailing ships should not impede the passage of vessels which can safely navigate only within a narrow channel or an access road.
(c) vessels engaged in fishing should not hinder the passage of other vessels navigating within a narrow channel or an access road.
(d) a ship shall not cross a narrow channel or an access if, in doing so, it hinders the passage of vessels which can safely navigate only within this channel or this access road; These last vessels can use the sound signal prescribed in rule 34 d) if they doubt the intentions of the ship that crosses the channel or the access road.
((e) (i) in a narrow channel or an access road, where an overrun cannot be carried out if the ship caught up manoeuvre to enable the other ship to pass safely, the vessel intending to overtake must make known its intention by issuing the appropriate sound signal prescribed by rule 34 c) i). The caught up ship must, if it is okay, make the appropriate signal prescribed in rule 34 c) ii) and maneuver to allow an overflow safely. If in doubt, it can emit sound signals prescribed by rule 34 d); ii) this rule cannot provide the vessel that catches of the obligation to comply with the provisions of rule 13.

(f) a vessel approaching a bend or a place located in a narrow channel or an access road where other vessels may be hidden by the presence of obstacles must navigate in this area with particular caution and vigilance and hear the appropriate signal prescribed in rule 34 e).
(g) any vessel shall, if the circumstances permit, to get wet in a narrow channel.

Rule 10 traffic separation schemes (a) this rule applies to traffic separation schemes adopted by the Organization and cannot provide any ship of its obligations under any any other rules.
((b) ships that sail within a traffic separation scheme shall: i) follow the traffic lane appropriate in the general direction of traffic for this track; ii) depart the extent possible of the line or the area of traffic separation; iii) generally speaking, engage in a traffic lane or out to one of the ends , but when they engage in or out laterally, perform this maneuver as low as possible compared to the traffic branch angle.

(c) vessels must avoid as far as possible to cut traffic but, if they have, they should do a heading that is as much as possible perpendicular to the traffic branch.
(d) i) vessels should not use a coastal navigation box when they can safely use the appropriate circulation of the adjacent traffic separation scheme. However, vessels of less than 20 meters, sailing ships and vessels engaged in fishing may use the area of coastal navigation; ii) Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph d) i) ships can use an area of coastal navigation when they win or leave a port, a facility or structure offshore, a pilot station or any other place inside the zone of coastal navigation or to avoid a danger immediate.

((e) one vessel other than a vessel which cuts a device or a ship that engages in a lane of traffic or coming out will not normally enter a separation zone or cross a separation line except: i) in the case of an emergency, to avoid immediate danger; ii) for fishing in a zone of separation.

(f) vessels operating in areas close to the ends of a traffic separation scheme must do so with special vigilance.
(g) vessels must avoid, to the extent possible, wet inside a separation scheme of traffic or in areas near its ends.
(h) vessels not using a traffic separation scheme must depart as widely as possible.
(i) ships engaged in fishing should not impede the passage of ships following a traffic lane.
(j) ships of less than 20 metres in length or sailing ships should not hinder the passage of power-driven vessels following a traffic lane.
(k) a ship which has a capacity of manoeuvre restricted when it performs an operation for the maintenance of safety of navigation in a traffic separation scheme is exempted from meeting this rule to the extent necessary to perform the operation.
(l) a ship which has a capacity of manoeuvre restricted when it performs an operation to ask, to repair or to raise a submarine cable, within a traffic separation scheme, is exempted from meeting this rule to the extent necessary to perform the operation.

New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1987, in force since 19 nov. 1989 (1989 1763 RO).
New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1987, in force since 19 nov. 1989 (1989 1763 RO).
New content according to amendments of 19 October. 1989, in force since April 19, 1991 (RO 1991 1346).
New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Section II conduct of vessels in sight with each of the other rule 11 scope the rules in this section apply to ships that are in sight of each other.

Rule 12 sailing vessels (a) when two sailing ships approaching one another so as to fear a collision, one of them shall keep out of the way of the other as follows:

(((i) when each has the wind on a different side, the vessel which has the wind on its port shall depart from the way of the other; ii) when the two ships have the wind on the same side, which is wind shall deviate from the road of one who is under the wind; iii) If a vessel which has the wind on the port side sees another ship the Windward and cannot determine with certainty whether the other vessel receives port or starboard, the first wind must deviate from the road on the other.

(b) for the purposes of this rule, the side whence the wind should be considered as being of the opposite edge at the edge of brewing the mainsail or, in the case of a ship square headlights, the opposite side at the edge of the largest Auric (or triangular) sail brewing.

Rule 13 ship that overtaking another a) Notwithstanding any provision of the rules of sections I and II of part B, any ship that overtaking another must deviate from the road of the latter.
(b) shall be considered as in overtaking another a ship approaching another vessel from a direction more than 22.5 degrees abaft of the latter through, i.e. who is in a such position, compared to the ship caught up, that night, he could see only the taillight of this ship, without seeing any of its side lights.
(c) when a vessel cannot determine with certainty she is overtaking another, she shall assume like a ship that overtaking another and maneuver accordingly.
(d) no subsequent change in the bearing between the two vessels cannot make consider the ship that catches the other as crossing the road to the meaning of these rules or free it from the obligation to depart from the road of the vessel caught up until it is quite clear and ready.

New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Rule 14 ships which are directly opposite roads (a) when two power-driven vessels do the head-on or roughly opposite so that there is a risk of collision, each of them must come to starboard to pass through port of the other.
(b) it must be noted that such a situation exists when a ship sees another ahead or almost in front of him, so that at night, he would see lights in the other ship, the other morning or almost and/or its two side lights and that day, he would see the other ship a corresponding angle.
(c) when a vessel is unable to determine with certainty if such a situation exists, it must consider that it is actually and maneuver accordingly.

Rule 15 ships which the roads intersect when two ships, to mechanical propulsion are roads that intersect so that there is a risk of collision, the ship who sees the other vessel on starboard must deviate from the road of it and, if circumstances permit, avoid cross his path on the front.

Rule 16 maneuver on non vessel any vessel which is to keep out of the way of another vessel should, as much as possible, maneuver early and frankly so as to deviate widely.

Rule 17 on vessel Manoeuvre has) i) when a ship is required, to depart from the road of another ship, the other shall keep her course and his vitesse.ii) Nevertheless, the latter can maneuver, in order to avoid collision by her manoeuvre alone, as soon as it was obvious that the ship that is required to deviate from his path does not have appropriate maneuver prescribed by these rules.

(b) when, for a cause, the ship who is required to keep her course and speed is so close on the other that the collision cannot be avoided by only manoeuvring the ship who must leave the road clear, he must do the maneuver that is the best way to help avoid the collision.
(c) a ship with mechanical propulsion maneuver to avoid a collision with another ship on mechanical propulsion which the road crosses his in accordance with para. (a) ii) of this rule don't must not, if circumstances permit, down to port when the other ship's port side to him.
(d) this rule does not provide the ship who must leave the road clear of the obligation to depart from the road to the other ship.

Reciprocal rule 18 responsibilities of ships unless otherwise stipulated by the rules 9, 10 and 13: a) a mechanical-powered vessel underway must deviate from the road: i) a ship that is not the master of his manoeuvre; ii) of a ship to ability to manoeuvre; iii) of a vessel fishing; iv) of a sailing ship.

((b) a sailing ship under way must deviate from the road: i) of a ship that is not the master of his manoeuvre; ii) of a ship to ability of manoeuvre; iii) of a ship engaged in fishing.

c) a vessel engaged in fishing and making road must, to the extent possible, deviate from the road: i) of a ship that is not the master of his manoeuvre; ii) of a ship to maneuver restreinte.d capability) i) any vessel other than a vessel which is not master of his maneuver or a ship with limited ability to manoeuvre shall, if the circumstances (, avoid disturbing the safe passage of a vessel constrained by her draught, which shows the signals provided in rule 28.ii) a vessel constrained by her draught shall navigate with particular caution, taking due account of its special situation.

(e) a seaplane landed must, as a general rule, largely stand clear of all vessels and avoid disturbing their navigation. However, when there is risk of collision, this aircraft must conform to the rules of this part.

Section III-conduct of vessels in restricted visibility rule 19 conduct of vessels in reduced visibility (a) this rule applies to ships that are not in sight of each other and which navigate inside or near areas of reduced visibility.
(b) every ship shall navigate at a safe speed adapted to the prevailing circumstances and conditions of reduced visibility. Power-driven vessels must keep their machines ready to operate immediately.
(c) any ship, when it applies the rules of section I of this part, must take due account of the prevailing circumstances and conditions of reduced visibility.
(d) a vessel which detects only the presence of a radar another vessel shall determine if a close-quarters situation is developing and/or if there is a risk of collision. In this case, it must take measures widely in time to avoid this situation; However, if these measures include a change of course, it should be to avoid, to the extent possible, the following manoeuvres: ii) a shift in the direction of a ship coming abeam or abaft through; i) a change of course to port in the case of a ship which is on forward of the beam, except if this ship is currently being overtaken.

(e) except where it has been established that there is no risk of collision, every vessel which hears, in a direction that seemed to be on forward of the beam, the fog of another ship signal, or which cannot avoid a situation very closely with another ship on the front of through, must reduce her speed to the minimum necessary to maintain its course. He must, if necessary, break its momentum, and in all circumstances, navigate with extreme caution until the danger of collision is over.

Part C lights and shapes rule 20 scope has) the rules of this part must be observed by all the time.
(b) the rules concerning the fires must be kept from sunset to Sunrise the Sun. During this interval, you must show no other fires that can be confused with the lights prescribed by these rules and that restrict visibility or distinctive character thereof or which may exercise a satisfying sleep.
(c) the lights prescribed by these rules, where they exist, must also be displayed from sunrise to the sunset in reduced visibility and can be shown in any other circumstances where such action is considered necessary.
(d) the rules concerning the marks must be observed day.
(e) the lights and marks prescribed by these rules shall comply with the provisions of annex I to these rules.

Rule 21 Definitions (a) "masthead light" means a white light placed above the centerline of the ship, projecting an unbroken light on the entire course of an arc of the horizon of 225 degrees and placed so as to project this light from the front up to 22.5 degrees abaft each edge through.
(b) the expression "fire side" means a green light placed on the starboard side and a red light placed on the port side, projecting each a continuous light on all the course of an arc of the horizon of 112.5 degrees and arranged so as to project this light from the front up to 22.5 degrees abaft through their respective side. On vessels of less than 20 metres in length, fires aside can be combined into a single Lantern placed in the longitudinal axis of the vessel.

(c) "stern light" means a white light placed as close as possible to the stern, throwing an unbroken light on the entire course of an arc of the horizon of 135 degrees and placed so as to project this light on an area of 67.5 degrees from each edge to the rear.
(d) "towing light" means a light yellow with the same characteristics as the stern light set to the by. (c) of this rule.
(e) the term 'light visible all-round' means a light projecting an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of 360 degrees.
(f) 'fire flashing' refers to a fire on regular shards whose rate is of 120 flashes or more per minute.

Rule 22 range of the lights the lights prescribed by these rules must have the intensity specified in section 8 of annex I to this regulation, so as to be visible at the following minimum distances: has) for ships of length equal to or greater than 50 meters:-mast-head light: 6 miles - fire side: 3 miles - fire Stern (: 3 miles - fire towing: 3 miles - light white, red, green or yellow visible on the horizon: 3 miles b) for ships of length equal to or greater than 12 metres, but less than 50 metres:-mast-head light: 5 miles; If the length of the ship is less to 20 meters: 3 miles - fire side: 2 miles - fire Stern: 2 miles - fire towing: 2 miles - light white, red, green or yellow visible on the horizon: 2 miles c) for ships of less than 12 metres in length:-fire of mast-head: 2 miles - fire side: 1 thousand - stern light : 2 miles - fire towing: 2 miles - light white, red, green or yellow visible on the horizon: 2 miles.

(d) for the vessels or towed objects that are partially submerged and hard to see:-all-round white light: 3 miles.

Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Rule 23 ships power-driven road) has a mechanical-powered vessel underway must show: i) a masthead light forward fire; ii) a second fire of mast-head to the back of the first and higher than this one. (However, vessels of less than 50 metres in length are not required to show that fire, but can do so; iii) sidelights; iv) a stern light.

(b) a hovercraft operated without draught must, in addition to the lights prescribed in the by. (a) of this rule, show a yellow light flashing visible on the horizon.
c) (i) a vessel for mechanical propulsion of less than 12 metres in length may, instead of the lights prescribed in the by. ((a) of this rule, showing a white light visible on the horizon and the side lights; ii) a ship for mechanical propulsion of less than 7 metres in length whose maximum speed does not exceed 7 knots may, instead of prescribed fires to the by. (a) of this rule, showing a white light visible on the horizon. He must, if possible, show also the side lights; iii) the masthead light or the all-round white light on the horizon on a ship power-driven of less than 12 metres in length may not be located in the centreline of the vessel if it is not possible to install it on this axis on condition that fires aside are combined into a single lantern which is located in the centreline of the vessel or located as close as possible to the longitudinal axis on which is located the masthead light or the all-round white light.

New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Rule 24 towing and pushing a) a powered vessel mechanical being towed must show: i) instead of the light prescribed by rule 23A) i) or by rule 23A) ii), two masthead lights bunk. When the length of the train of trailer measured from the back of ship towing at the rear end of the train of trailer exceeds 200 metres, he must show three of these fires bunk; ii) sidelights; iii) a sternlight; iv) a fire of towing placed vertically above the stern light; v) at the most visible place When the length of the train of trailer exceeds 200 m, a biconical brand.

(b) a ship trying to push and a pushed vessel forward linked by a connecting rigid so as to form a composite unit must be regarded as a power-driven vessel and show the lights prescribed in rule 23.
c) a powered vessel mechanical push forward or tow to couple must, unless it is a composite unit, show: i) instead of the light prescribed by rule 23A) i), at the front, two masthead lights bunk; ii) side lights; iii) a stern light.

(d) a ship with mechanical propulsion in which the provisions of by. ((a) or (c) of this rule shall apply, must also comply with the provisions of rule 23 a) ii).
((e) a vessel or object towed other than those mentioned in paragraph g) of this rule must show: i) side lights; ii) a fire Stern; iii) in the most conspicuous place, where the length of the train of trailer exceeds 200 m, a biconical brand.

((f) heard that the lights of a number being any ships towed alongside or pushed in a group must match those of a single ship, i) a ship pushed forward, not doing not part of a composite unit, must show its end before side lights; ii) a vessel being towed alongside must show a stern light and , at its forward end, side lights.

(g) a vessel or towed object that is partially submerged and difficult to see, or a set of these ships or towed objects, must show: i) when its width is less than 25 metres, a white light visible all-round at the front end or close it and another at the end near, with the exception of the dracones or back ((((, who are not required to show a fire at their end before or near it; ii) when its width is equal to or greater than 25 metres, two additional white lights visible on the horizon at the ends or near to its width; iii) when its length is greater than 100 meters, visible white lights on all the additional horizon between the lights prescribed in paragraphs) i and ii) so that the distance between the lights does not exceed 100 m; iv) a biconical at the end brand back or close to the end back to the last vessel or object towed and, when the length of the train of trailer is greater than 200 meters, an extra in the most conspicuous place biconical mark and as forward as possible.

(h) If, for a reason, the vessel or object towed is unable to show the lights or the marks prescribed in the by. ((e) or (g) of this rule, all possible measures are taken to light the vessel or object towed or at least to indicate the presence of such vessel or object.
(i) If, for a reason, a ship that does not normally perform towing operations is unable to show the prescribed fires to the by. (a) or c) of this rule, this ship is not required to show these lights when towing another vessel in distress or in need of assistance for other reasons. All possible measures must be taken to indicate in the manner authorized by rule 36, including illuminating the towing cable, the relationship between the tug ship and the towed vessel.

New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
New term according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Formerly paragraph g). New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Rule 25 making sailing ships and ships at rowing a) a sailing ship which made road must show: i) side lights; ii) a stern light.

(b) on Board of a sailing ship of less than 20 meters, the lights prescribed in paragraph (a) of this rule can be combined into a single Lantern placed at the top or at the top of the mast, in the most visible place.
(c) in addition to the lights prescribed in the by. (a) of this rule, a sailing ship under way can show at the top or at the top of the mast, to where they are most apparent, two all-round lights in the horizon, the top light being red and the lower green. However, these lights shall not be shown at the same time as the authorized beacon by the by. (b) of this rule.

d) (i) a ship to sail of less than 7 metres in length must, if possible, show the lights prescribed in the by. ((a) or (b) of this rule, but if he does not, he must be ready to show immediately, to prevent collision, an electric lamp or a lantern lit up on fire blanc.ii) a rowing ship can show the lights prescribed in this rule for the ships to sail but, if he does not, he must be ready to show immediately to prevent collision, an electric torch or a lantern lit with white light.

(e) a ship which made road simultaneously sail and by means of a propulsion machinery shall show at the front, the most conspicuous place, a brand of conical shape, the tip down.

New figure according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Rule 26 fishing vessels (a) a vessel engaged in fishing shall, when he made a road or when at anchor, show that the lights and shapes prescribed in this rule.
(b) a ship trying to trawl, i.e. to draw in water a trawl or other fishing gear, should show: i) two all-round lights in all-round, the upper being green and the lower white, or a mark consisting of two superimposed cones gathered by the tip. ... ii) a masthead light placed at a height greater than the green light visible on the horizon and on the back of it. Vessels of less than 50 metres in length are not required to show that fire, but may do so; iii) when making way, in addition to the lights prescribed in this paragraph, fires aside and a stern light.

c) a vessel engaged in fishing, other than a ship trying to trawl, must show: i) two all-round lights in all-round, the upper being red and the lower white, or a mark consisting of two superimposed cones gathered by the tip. (ii) if its fishing gear is deployed on a horizontal distance greater than 150 meters from the vessel, an all-round white light on the horizon or a cone, the tip above, in alignment with the machine; iii) when making way, in addition to the lights prescribed in this paragraph, fires aside and a stern light.

(d) the additional signals described in annex II of this Regulation apply to a vessel engaged in fishing at very short distance from other vessels engaged in fishing.
(e) a vessel which is not engaged in fishing should not show the lights or marks prescribed by this rule, but only those who are prescribed for a vessel of her length.

Words deleted by amendment Nov. 4. 1993, with effect for Switzerland to Nov. 4. 1995 (2012 6273 RO).
Words deleted by amendment Nov. 4. 1993, with effect for Switzerland to Nov. 4. 1995 (2012 6273 RO).
New content according to Amendment Nov. 4. 1993, in force for Switzerland since Nov. 4. 1995 (2012 6273 RO).

Rule 27 who are not masters of their manoeuvring and ships to ability to manoeuvre a) a ship that is not the master of his maneuver must show: i) at the most visible place, two all-round lights in red on the horizon; ii) at the most visible place, two balls or similar brands superimposed; iii) when making way In addition to the lights prescribed in this paragraph, side lights and a stern light.

((b) a ship maneuvering capability restricted, other that a ship carrying out demining operations, is to show: i) at the most visible place, three all-round lights on the horizon, the upper and lower lights being red and fire the white middle; ii) at the most visible place, three overlapping brands, the upper and lower marks being balls (((, the Middle a bicone; iii) when making way, in addition to the lights prescribed in paragraph i), fire or fires masthead, side lights and a stern light; iv) when at anchor, in addition to the lights or marks prescribed in paras. (i) and (ii), the lights or marks prescribed by rule 30.

(c) a ship power-driven performing a towing operation was making difficult to the tug ship and its trailer to change their route has, in addition to the lights or marks prescribed by rule 24), show the lights or marks prescribed in the by. (b) (i) and b) (ii) of this rule.
(d) a ship with limited ability to manoeuvre, flirting or underwater operations, must show the lights and shapes prescribed in paras. (i), (ii) and (iii) by. ((b) of this rule and, where there is an obstruction, must show in addition: i) two red lights visible on the horizon or two balls bunk to indicate the side where the obstruction; ii) two green lights visible on the horizon or two bicones bunk to indicate the side on which another vessel can spend; iii) when at anchor instead of the lights or the brand prescribed by rule 30, the lights or marks prescribed in this paragraph.

(e) a vessel involved in diving operations which cannot, due to its size, show all the lights and shapes prescribed in the by. ((d) of this rule, must show: i) at the most visible place, three lights bunk, visible on the horizon, the upper and lower lights being red and the fire of the white middle; ii) a rigid replica of at least one meter in height, the 'A' of the international Code of signals flag. He must take measures so that this reproduction is visible on the horizon.

(f) a vessel engaged in mine clearance operations must show, in addition to the lights required for ships to mechanical propulsion rule 23 brand prescribed for ships at anchor in rule 30 as appropriate, three green lights visible on the horizon or lights or three balls. He must show one of these lights or marks near the foremast head and one of these lights or marks at each end of the foresail yard. These lights or marks indicate that it is dangerous for another vessel to approach within 1000 metres of the ship which performs demining.
(g) vessels of less than 12 metres, with the exception of vessels involved in diving operations, are not required to show the lights and shapes prescribed in this rule.
(h) the signals prescribed in this rule are not signals of vessels in distress and seeking assistance. The signals of the latter category are the subject of annex IV of this regulation.

New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
New amendments reference from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Formerly paragraph iv. New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Rule 28 ships disabled by their draught a vessel constrained by her draught may, in addition to the prescribed lights for mechanical propulsion rule 23 ships, showing the most conspicuous place three all-round red lights on the horizon or a cylindrical brand.

Rule 29 pilot boat) has a pilot boat in pilotage service must show: i) the masthead or nearby thereof, two all-round lights on the horizon, the upper being white and the lower red; ii) in addition, when it is road, side lights and stern; iii) at anchor, fire in addition to the lights prescribed in paragraph i) fire, fires, or the mark prescribed in rule 30 for vessels at anchor.

(b) a pilot boat that is not in pilotage service must show the lights or marks prescribed for a vessel of her length.

New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Rule 30 ships at anchor and stranded ships a) a vessel at anchor must show in the most conspicuous place: i) at the front, a white light visible on the horizon or a ball; ii) on the back or near the back, lower than the fire prescribed in para. (i), an all-round white light.

(b) a vessel at anchor of less than 50 metres in length can show, in the most visible place, a white light visible all-round, instead of the lights prescribed in the by. (a) of this rule.
(c) Furthermore, a vessel at anchor may use its available or equivalent lights working lights to illuminate her decks. This provision is mandatory for vessels of length equal to or greater than 100 meters.
(d) a wrecked ship must show the prescribed fires to the by. (a) or (b) of this rule and, more, in the most conspicuous place: i) two all-round red lights on the horizon; ii) three superimposed balls.


(e) ships of less than 7 metres in length, when at anchor, are not required to show the lights or the mark prescribed in the by. (a) and (b) of this rule, unless they are at anchor or stranded in a narrow channel, a path or an anchor, near these places, or on roads normally frequented by other ships.
(f) ships of less than 12 metres in length, when they are stranded, are not required to show the lights or marks prescribed in paras. ((i) and (ii) by. (d) of this rule.

New content according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Rule 31 seaplanes seaplane that is unable to show the lights and shapes the characteristics and located at the locations prescribed by the rules of this part, must show of lights and shapes is as close as possible to those prescribed by these rules.

Part D sound signals and bright rule 32 Definitions (a) "whistle" means any device sound signals capable of emitting the sounds of prescribed and in accordance with the specifications of annex III to this regulation.
(b) "his brief" refers to a sound for a period of approximately one second.
(c) "his prolonged" refers to a sound of a duration of four to six seconds.

Rule 33 sound signalling equipment (a) vessels of length equal to or greater than 12 metres must be equipped with a whistle and a Bell and vessels of length equal to or greater than 100 meters must be additionally provided with a gong whose sound and timbre should not be confused with those of the Bell. The whistle, Bell and gong shall meet the specifications of annex III to this regulation. The Bell or gong, or both, can be replaced by another material respectively with the same sound characteristics, provided that it is always possible to manually operate the prescribed signals.
(b) ships of less than 12 metres in length are not required to carry the sound signalling appliances prescribed in the by. (a) of this rule, but in the absence of such devices, they must have a way of effective sound signal.

Rule 34 signals and warning signals (a) when vessels are in sight from the other, a mechanical-powered vessel underway must, when conducting maneuvers permitted or required by these rules, indicate these manoeuvres by the following signals, issued to the whistle:-his brief to say: 'I come to starboard'; - two short blasts to mean : 'I come to port'; - three short blasts to mean: "I fight back."

(b) all ships may supplement the whistle signals prescribed in the by. ((a) of this rule by light signals, repeated as needed, for the duration of the manoeuvre: i) these light signals have the following meaning:-a shine for say: 'I come to starboard'; - two chips to say: 'I come to port'; - three splinters to say: 'I fight back. "

(ii) each glow should last about a second, the interval between bursts must be about one second and the interval between successive signals must be of at least ten seconds; iii) the light used for this signal shall, if there is, be one all-round white light on the horizon at a distance of at least five miles and must be consistent with the provisions of annex I to this regulation.

c) when they view one another in a narrow channel or an access road: i) a vessel intending to catch another must, in accordance with the provisions of rule 9 d) i), indicate his intention by issuing the following signals to the whistle:-two prolonged sounds followed his brief to say: "I intend to catch you up on the starboard side"; - two prolonged sounds followed two blasts to say : "I intend to catch you up on the port side;

(ii) the ship that is about to be overtaken shall, by operating in accordance with the provisions of rule 9 e) i), indicate his agreement by issuing the whistle the next signal:-of the channel, a short sound, the channel and its brief, issued in that order.

(d) where two vessels in view of the other approaching from the other and that, for some reason, one of them does not include the intentions or maneuvers of the other, or wondered if the other ship takes sufficient measures to avoid the collision, the ship who has doubts expressed them immediately by issuing a quick series of at least five short blasts to the whistle. This signal may be supplemented by a light signal of at least five short and rapid shards.
(e) a vessel approaching a bend or a part of a channel or an access road where other vessels may be hidden by an obstacle must be heard of the channel. Every ship coming toward him who hears the signal across the elbow or behind the obstacle shall respond to this signal by making a prolonged sound.
(f) if whistles are installed on board a ship at a distance of more than 100 meters from each other, you must use a single whistle to emit the signals and warning signals.

Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Rule 35 sound signals in both reduced visibility day or night, indoors or near an area where visibility is reduced, the signals prescribed in this rule shall be used as follows: has) a power-driven vessel having of the wanders hear the channel at intervals not exceeding two minutes.
(b) a ship powered mechanical way, but quit and not having any momentum, must be heard at intervals not exceeding two minutes two prolonged sounds separated by an interval of two seconds approximately.
(c) a ship that is not the master of his maneuver, a ship to ability to manoeuvre, a vessel constrained by her draught, a sailing a ship engaged in fishing ship, and a ship that is in tow or pushing another should issue, instead of the signals prescribed in the by. (a) or (b) of this rule, three sounds consecutive, namely an extended its follow-up of two short sounds, at intervals of not more than two minutes.
(d) a vessel fishing, when at anchor, and a vessel with ability to manoeuvre conducting its work at anchor should issue, instead of the signals prescribed in the by. (g) of this rule, the signal prescribed in the by. (c) of this rule.
(e) a towed vessel or, if he in is towed more than one, the last ship of the convoy shall, if he has a crew on board, make sounds, at intervals not exceeding two minutes, four consecutive, namely an extended its follow-up of three short blasts. Where possible, this signal should be issued immediately after the signal of the tug vessel.
(f) a vessel trying to push and a pushed vessel forward linked by a connecting rigid so as to form a composite unit must be regarded as a power-driven vessel and must hear the signals prescribed in the by. (a) or (b) of this rule.
(g) a vessel at anchor must ring the Bell rapidly for about five seconds at intervals not exceeding one minute. A ship length equal to or greater than 100 metres, you must ring the Bell on the front part of the ship and, immediately after, quickly ringing the gong for five seconds on the rear. A vessel at anchor may also make three consecutive, namely his brief followed by a prolonged sound and a short sound, to report its position and the possibility of a collision with a ship approaching sounds.
(h) a wrecked ship must ring the Bell and, if necessary, hear the gong, as it is prescribed in the by. (g) of this rule. In addition, it must be heard three separate and distinct strokes of the Bell immediately before and after having heard the rapid ringing of the Bell. In addition, a wrecked ship can put an appropriate signal to the whistle.
(i) a vessel of less than 12 metres in length is not required to hear the signals mentioned above, but when it does not, it must be heard another efficient sound signal at intervals of not more than two minutes.
(j) a pilot boat in pilotage service can, in addition to the signals prescribed in the by. ((a), (b) or (g) of this rule, be heard a signal of identification consisting of four short blasts.

Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Formerly letter d).
Formerly letter e).
Formerly letter f).
Formerly letter g).
New amendments reference from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Formerly letter h).
Formerly letter i) new benchmark according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Rule 36 signals intended to draw the attention


Any vessel may, if he deems it necessary to draw the attention of another vessel, light or sound signals that cannot be mistaken for any signal authorized by one any of these rules, or else direct the beam of his projector in the direction of the danger threatening a ship such as this beam cannot interfere with other ships. All fire designed to attract the attention of another vessel should not be confused with a navigation aid. For the purposes of this rule the use of high intensity, such as the gyro lights intermittent or rotating lights, should be avoided.

Last two sentences introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Rule 37 distress signals a ship that is in distress and request assistance must use or show the signals described in annex IV to this regulation.

New Word according to amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876) part E Exemptions rule 38 Exemptions all vessel (or class of vessels) which meets the requirements of the international rules of 1960 for the prevention of collision at sea and which the keel is laid, or which is at a stage of equivalent construction, prior to the entry into force of this regulation ((, may benefit from the following exemptions that apply Regulation: a) Installation of lights which light is prescribed by rule 22: four years from the date of entry into force of this Regulation: b) Installations of lights whose colors are prescribed in section 7 of annex I of this Regulation: four years from the date of entry into force of this regulation.
(c) changing the location of fires resulting from British to metric measures and the rounding of the measures: permanent exemption.
((d) (i) change of the location of the lights of masthead on ships of less than 150 metres in length, resulting from the prescriptions of section 3 a) of annex I of this Regulation: exemption permanente.ii) changing the location of fires of masthead on ships of length equal to or greater than 150 meters, resulting from the prescriptions of section 3 a) of annex I of this regulation : nine years from the date of entry into force of this regulation.

(e) changing the location of the lights resulting from the prescriptions of section 2(b) masthead) of annex I of this Regulation: nine years from the date of entry into force of this regulation.
(f) change of the location of the lights side resulting from the prescriptions of sections 2(g) and 3(b)) of annex I of this Regulation: nine years from the date of entry into force of this regulation.
(g) the hardware specification of sound signal prescribed by Annex III to this Regulation: nine years from the date of entry into force of this regulation.
(h) changing the location of visible lights, all-round resulting from the prescriptions of section 9 b) of annex I of this Regulation: permanent exemption.

[RO 1965 698]
Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, dupuis implemented June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).
Introduced by amendments from nov 19. 1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876).

Appendix I location and technical characteristics of fires and trademarks 1. Definition expression 'height above the gunwale' means the height above the highest continuous deck. This height shall be measured from the location under fire to the portrait of it.

2. location and spacing of the lights on the vertical plane) on board ships to mechanical propulsion, of length equal or greater than 20 meters masthead lights shall be placed as follows: i) the fire of masthead before or, where appropriate, the unique fire, must be located at a height of 6 meters at least above the gunwale and (if the width of the vessel exceeds 6 metres, at a height above the gunwale at least equal to that width, although it is however necessary that this height exceeds 12 metres; ii) when there are two masthead lights, taillight must be at least 4.5 metres higher than the fire front.

(b) the vertical distance between the lights of power-driven vessels masthead must be such that the rear light can always be seen distinctly above the fire front, at a distance of 1000 m from the front of the ship at the level of the sea, in all normal conditions of plate.
(c) the fire of the masthead of a ship to mechanical propulsion of length equal or greater than 12 metres but less than 20 metres, or be at a height of 2.5 metres at least above the gunwale.
(d) a vessel for mechanical propulsion of less than 12 metres in length may have its highest fire at a height of less than 2.5 metres above the gunwale. (However, when there is a fire of masthead in addition to the side lights and stern light, or else the light visible all-round prescribed in rule 23 c) i) in addition to the sidelights, this masthead light or the light visible all-round must be 1 metre at least above the side lights.
(e) one of the two or three lights masthead prescribed for a vessel to mechanical propulsion that trailer or pushing another vessel must be in the same location as the front or rear mast-head light, being understood that, if the lower of rear mast-head light is located on the rear mast, it must be at least 4.5 metres higher than the fire before masthead.
(f) i) heat or mast-head lights prescribed by rule 23 a) should be placed above and away from the other lights and obstructions except for those described in para. ((ii) invite) when it is not possible to place below the masthead lights, fires visible all-round prescribed by rule 27 b) i) or by rule 28, these lights may be placed over the fire or the masthead lights rear or on a vertical plane between fire and fire or front mast-head lights, rear mast-head lights provided that , in the latter case, it is complying with the requirements of the by. (c) of section 3 of this annex.

(g) the lights out of a power-driven vessel must be at a height above the gunwale of not more than three-fourths of the height of the front mast-head light. They should not be placed too low to not to be confused with the bridge lights.
(h) when they met in a lantern combined and carried by a ship for mechanical propulsion of less than 20 metres in length, fires aside must be 1 metre at least below the masthead light.
(i) when the rules prescribe two or three bunk lights, these should be spaced as follows: i) on board a ship of length equal to or more than 20 meters, these lights shall be spaced 2 meters at least. the lower light must be at a height of 4 metres at least above the gunwale, unless the ship is required to carry a towing light; ii) iii) when three lights are worn, they must be placed at regular intervals.

(j) the fire lower of the two all-round lights prescribed for vessels engaged in fishing shall be at a height above the sidelights at least equal to twice the distance between the two vertical lights.
(k) when the vessel carries two anchor lights, fire front anchorage prescribed by rule 30 (a) i) must be 4.5 meters at least higher than the fire back. A ship length equal to or greater than 50 meters, the anchor before you must light to be at a height of 6 meters at least above the gunwale.

3. location and spacing of the lights on the horizontal plane) when two masthead lights are prescribed for a vessel at mechanical propulsion, the horizontal distance between them must be at least equal to half the length of the ship without however it is necessary that this distance exceeds 100 metres. The fire before should not be located over the front of the ship, at a distance greater than one quarter of the length of the ship.
(b) edge of a power-driven vessel, length equal or greater than 20 meters lights side may not be located on the front of the front mast-head lights. They must be on the side of the ship or near it.
c) when the lights prescribed by rule 27 b i) or rule 28 are placed on a vertical plane, between the fire or before masthead lights and fire or rear mast-head lights, these lights visible on the horizon must be at a horizontal distance of 2 meters at the centreline of the ship from side to side.

(d) when a single mast-head light is prescribed for a vessel to mechanical propulsion, this fire must be in front of the half length of the ship, except that a vessel of less than 20 m long failed to place this fire in front of the half length of the ship but has also put forward that it is possible in practice.

((4 details concerning the location of the range lights for fishing vessels, dredgers and vessels doing underwater work a) fire management of the craft deployed a vessel engaged in fishing, according to rule 26 c) ii), must be located at a horizontal distance of at least 2 meters and 6 meters at most two red and white lights visible on the horizon. (This light shall be placed at a height which is not higher than the all-round white light prescribed by rule all-round 26 c) i), or lower than the sidelights.
((b) the horizontal distance between the lights and markings on a ship hitting or underwater work the obstructed side and/or the side on which you can spend without danger, such as prescribed in rule 27 d)) i and ii) and the lights and marks prescribed in rule 27 b) i) and ii) , must be as large as possible and, in any case, at least 2 metres. The highest of these lights or marks must in no case be higher than the lower or lower brand as part of the series of three fires or marks prescribed by rule 27 b)) i and ii).

5 screens of lights side lights out ships of length equal to or greater than 20 metres must be fitted on the side of the ship of screens painted in black with a flat paint and conform to the requirements of section 9 of this annex. On vessels of less than 20 meters, the sidelights, if necessary to meet the requirements of section 9 of this annex, must be fitted on the side of the ship, Matt Black color screens. In the case of a combined lantern that uses a single vertical filament and a very narrow wall between the Green and Red sector, it is not necessary to provide external screens.

6. marks a) the marks must be black and have the following dimensions: i) a ball must be at least 0.6 metre in diameter; ii) a cone shall have a diameter of at least 0.6 meter base and a height equal to its diameter; iii) a cylindrical brand must have a diameter of at least 0.6 metre and a height double its diameter; iv) a bicone consists of two cones set out in paragraph ii) above having a common base.

(b) the vertical distance between the marks must be at least 1.5 metres.
(c) at the edge of a vessel of less than 20 metres in length, brands can have dimensions below, but in relation to the size of the ship and the distance that separates them may be reduced accordingly.

7. color of lights the chromaticity of all navigation lights shall conform to the following standards, which lie within the limits specified by the International Commission on illumination (CIE) chromaticity diagram.
The limits of the area of the different colours are given by the coordinates of the vertices of the angles, which are as follows: i) White x 0.525 0.525 0.452 0.310 0.310 0.443 y 0.382 0.440 0.440 0.348 0.283 0.382 ii) Green x 0.028 0.009 0.300 0.203 y 0.385 0.723 0.511 0.356 iii) red x 0.680 0.660 0.735 0.721 y 0.320 0.320 0.265 0.259 iv) yellow x 0.612 0.618 0.575 0.575 y 0.382 0.382 0.425 0.406 8. Intensity of lights) a minimum of light intensity must be calculated using the formula: I = 3.34 × 10 × T × D × K or I = luminous intensity in candelas in the terms of serviceT = threshold of illuminance 2 × 10-7 luxD = Distance of visibility (luminous range) of fire in miles marinsK = Coefficient of atmospheric transmission. For prescribed fires, K is equal to 0.8, which corresponds to a meteorological visibility of approximately 13 nautical miles b) the following table shows some values obtained using this formula: Distance of visibility (luminous range) of fire expressed in miles D luminous intensity of fire expressed in candelas for K = 0.8 I 1 0.9 2 4.3 3 12 4 27 5 52 6 94 Note : The maximum luminous intensity of navigation lights should be limited so as to avoid distracting reflections. This limitation of light intensity should not be achieved by a control variable.

9. horizontal sectors of visibility has) i) fires aside should, once installed on board, have forward the minimum required intensities. The intensities must decrease until it becomes virtually nil between 1 and 3 degrees outside the prescrits.ii sectors) for stern lights and masthead lights as well as for fires at the limit of the area of visibility located at 22.5 degrees on the back of the travers, the minimum required intensities must be kept on the arc of horizon of the areas prescribed by rule 21 , up to 5 degrees within these sectors. From 5 degrees within the prescribed sectors the intensity may decrease to 50 per cent to the limits of the sectors prescribed; (then she must decrease constantly until becoming practically zero to 5 degrees at most outside the prescrits.b sectors) i) except for the anchor lights prescribed in rule 30 that it is not necessary to place too high above the gunwale, visible all-round lights shall be placed so as to not be hidden by Poles hune poles or other structures on angular areas above 6 degres.ii) if it is impossible in practice to comply with para. «b) (i) of this section by placing a single light visible on all the horizon, two lights visible on the horizon to be used and properly placed or hidden so as to be seen, to the extent possible, as a unique to one fire distance of a thousand.»

10. vertical visibility a) verticals visibility once installed electrical fires, with the exception of the lights installed on board sailing ships under way must be such as to maintain: i) less than the minimum intensity required 5 degrees above horizontal to 5 degrees below this plan; ii) at least 60% of the minimum intensity required 7.5 degrees above the horizontal to 7.5 degrees below this plane.

((b) in the case of ships in sail making road, once installed vertical visibility of electrical fires sectors must be such as to maintain: i) at least the minimum intensity required 5 degrees above horizontal to 5 degrees below this plan; ii) at least 50% of the minimum intensity required 25 degrees above to 25 degrees below this plane horizontally.

(c) for other than electrical fires, these specifications must be observed as closely as possible.

11. intensity of non-electric lights non-electric must have as much as possible the minimum intensities, as specified in table of section 8 of this annex.

((12 manoeuvring lights notwithstanding the provisions of section 2 f) of this annex, the manoeuvre described fire to rule 34 b) must be located in the same axial plane vertical 2 meter at least above the front mast-head light the fire or fires head of mast and, when possible, to a distance provided they be worn at a vertical distance of at least 2 meters above or below the rear mast head light. If there wasn't that one of masthead fire, the fire of manoeuvre, if it exists, must be installed in the most visible place at a vertical distance of at least two metres from the mast-head light.

13 gears at high speed the fire of mast-head of high speed vehicles of which the length/width ratio is less than 3.0 may be placed at a height that in relation to the width of the machine, is lower than that prescribed in the by. 2 a) (i) of this annex, provided that the angle at the base of the isosceles triangle formed by the fire of masthead and the sidelights, seen from the front, is not less than 27 °.

14. approval the construction of lights and marks and the installation of lights on board must be considered satisfactory by the competent authority of the State of which the ship is permitted to fly the flag.

Updated by amendments from nov 19. 1981(RO 1983 876), from 19 nov. 1987 (RO 1989 1763) and Nov. 4. 1993, in force for Switzerland since Nov. 4. 1995 (2012 6273 RO).
Not applicable in the french text State March 20, 2014 annex II additional signals for fishing vessels fishing nearby each other 1. General fires mentioned in this annex shall, if they are shown under the provisions of rule 26 d), be placed in the most visible place at 0.9 m at least with each other and lower than the lights prescribed by rule 26 b) i) and c) i). They must be visible on the horizon at a distance of a thousand at least, but this distance must be less than the range of the lights prescribed by these rules for fishing vessels.

2. signals for trawlers


((a) vessels of a length equal or greater than 20 m, which are trying to trawl through a trawl or other submerged appliance must show: i) when they cast their nets: two white lights bunk; ii) when they halent their nets: a white light placed vertically over a red light; iii) when their nets are retained by an obstacle : two all-round red lights.

((b) all vessels of a length equal or greater than 20 m, which are trying to trawl two must show: i) at night, a projector directed forward and in the direction of the other ship part of the team of trawling for two; ii) when they throw or halent their nets or when their nets are still held back by an obstacle, fires prescribed by section 2A) above.

(c) a vessel of less than 20 m, who are trying to trawl through a trawl or other submerged appliance, or trying to trawl two, can show the prescribed fires to the by. ((a) or (b) of this section, as the case may be.

3. signals for vessels fishing the big seine vessels fishing in the big seine can show two all-round lights in yellow. They illuminate alternately every second, with equal periods of light and darkness. They can be shown only when the vessel is hampered by its fishing gear.

Update according to Amendment Nov. 4. 1993, in force for Switzerland since Nov. 4. 1995 (2012 6273 RO).

On 20 March 2014 State annex III technical characteristics of the sound signalling equipment 1. Whistles (a) frequency and sound carried the fundamental frequency of the signal must be between 70 and 700 Hz.
The sound of a whistle signal range is determined by the frequencies, which may include the fundamental frequency, one or more higher, frequencies between 180 and 700 Hz (±1%) and providing the sound pressure levels specified in section 1 c) below.
((b) limits of the frequencies that is fundamental in order to ensure a wide variety in the characteristics of the whistles, the fundamental frequency of a whistle shall be between the following limits: i) between 70 and 200 Hz on a ship of length equal or superior to 200 metres; ii) between 130 and 350 Hz on a ship of length equal to or greater than 75 meters (, but less than 200 metres; iii) between 250 and 700 Hz on a ship of less than 75 metres in length.

(c) the signal strength and range sound a whistle installed on board a vessel must ensure a level of acoustic pressure at least equal to the value in the direction of its maximum intensity at a distance of 1 meter and at least a strip of a third octave located in the range of frequencies 180-700 Hz (±1%), appropriate in the following table.

Length of ship in metres to a decibel meter sound pressure level, reference of 2 × 10 N/m (a third octave bands) range sound in nautical miles 200 or more 143 2 75 and more but less than 200 138 1.5 20 or more but less than 75 130 1 less 20 120 0.5 sound range has been indicated in this table for information. It is approximately the distance at which a whistle may be heard on its front axle with a probability of 90 per cent in calm air, on board a ship where the level of background noise to the listening stations is way (68 dB in the octave band centred on the frequency 250 Hz and 63 dB in the octave centred on 500 Hz band).
In practice, the distance at which a whistle may be heard is very variable and depends a lot on the weather. The values given can be considered as features but, in case of strong wind or when the the noise level at the listening posts is high, sound scope can be very reduced.
(d) directional characteristics in all directions of the horizontal plane included in a sector of ±45 degrees compared to the axis, the level of acoustic pressure of a directional whistle shall not be less than 4 dB to the sound pressure level on the axis. In any direction in the horizontal plane, the sound pressure level should not be less than 10 dB sound pressure level prescribed on the axis, so that the scope in any direction is equal to the half of the scope on the axis. The sound pressure level must be measured in the strip of a third octave which produces the sound range.
(e) location of whistles when a directional whistle is used as unique whistle on a vessel, it must be installed in order to produce its maximum intensity toward the front of the ship.
Whistles should be placed as high as possible on board the ship to reduce the interception, by obstacles, emitted sounds and to reduce as much as possible the risk of disorders of hearing in the crew. The level of acoustic pressure of the own ship signal must not exceed 110 dB (A) at the listening posts and should not, as much as possible, exceed 100 dB (A).
(f) Installation of several whistles if whistles are installed at more than 100 meters from each other, they must be mounted so as to not be operated simultaneously.
(g) a set of whistles if, due to the presence of obstacles, the acoustic field of a single whistle or one of the whistles referred to the by. (f) above may be an area where the sound level of the signal is substantially reduced, it is recommended to use a set of whistles installed so as to avoid the reduction of the sound level. For the purposes of the rules, a set of whistles is considered to be a unique whistle. Such a whistles together should not be located more than 100 meters from each other and must be mounted so that it can be operated simultaneously. Their frequencies must be different from the other at least 10 Hz.

2. Bell or gong) intensity of signal a Bell, a gong or any other device with similar acoustic characteristics must ensure a level of sound pressure of at least 110 dB at a distance of 1 metre from this material.
(b) construction bells and gongs must be built into a corrosion-resistant material and designed to make a clear sound. The diameter of the opening of the Bell should not be less than 300 millimetres on ships of length equal or greater than 20 meters and 200 millimetres on ships of length equal to or greater than 12 metres but less than 20 metres. When possible, it is recommended to install a leaf of Bell to mechanical control so as to ensure a constant force of impact, but it must be possible to operate it by hand. The mass of the leaf should not be less than 3 percent of that of the Bell.

3. approval the construction and the operation of the equipment of signalling sound as well as its installation on board the ship must be considered satisfactory by the competent authority of the State of which the ship is permitted to fly the flag.

Amended by amendments of the 19 nov.1981, in force since June 1, 1983 (RO 1983 876) State on March 20, 2014 annex IV distress signals 1. The following signals, used or shown separately, or together reflect the distress and the need for relief:) a time gun or other explosive signal fired at intervals of one minute; continuous b) sound produced by a device any for fog signals; c) rockets or bombs, throwing red stars fired one at a time at short intervals; d) a signal made by radiotelegraphy or by any other signalling system ((((, consisting of the Morse code; e code (S.O.S.) - Group) radiotelephone signal which consists of the word "Mayday"; f) distress signal N. C. international code of signals; g) signal of a square flag having above or below, a ball or similar object; h) flames on the vessel (as it can be produced by burning a barrel of tar (, a barrel of oil, etc.); ((i) rocket parachute or fire hand producing a red light; j) smoke signal produces an orange colored smoke; k) slowly and repeated up and down the arms extended on each side; l) radiotelegraphic alarm signal; m) radiotelephone alarm signal; n) signals transmitted by the location of the sinistres.o ELTs) approved signals transmitted by radiocommunication systems including transponders, radar of the boats or liferafts.

2 is banned one any signals above, except to indicate a case of distress or a need for relief, as well as the use of other signals likely to be confused with one of the signs above.
((3 should be paying attention to the relevant sections of the international Code of signals, the search and rescue manual for use by commercial vessels and the following signals:) a piece of Orange cloth with a square and a circle of black color with another symbol (for tracking air); b) dye.

Update according to amendments from nov 19. 1987 (RO 1989 1763) and Nov. 4. 1993, in force for Switzerland since Nov. 4. 1995 (2012 6273 RO).

State on March 20, 2014 scope March 20, 2014 States parties Ratification, accession (A) Declaration of succession (S)

Signature without reservation of ratification (if) entry into force December 20, 1976 South Africa 15 July 1977 Albania April 15, 2004 A 15 April 2004 Algeria 4 October 1976 has 15 July 1977 Germany * 14 July 1976 July 15, 1977 Angola 3 October 1991 has 3 October 1991 Antigua - and - Barbuda 29 January 1988 29 January 1988 Saudi Arabia July 3, 1978 has 3 July 1978 Argentina * may 11, 1977 was July 15, 1977 Australia 29 February 1980

February 29, 1980 Austria 8 June 1977 July 15, 1977 Azerbaijan, on July 1, 1997 was 1 July 1997 Bahamas 22 July 1976 July 15, 1977 Bahrain October 21, 1985 21 October 1985 Bangladesh 10 May 1978 was May 10, 1978 Barbados 12 January 1983 has 12 January 1983 Belarus 7 January 1994 7 January 1994 Belgium December 22, 1975 July 15, 1977 Belize 9 April 1991 to 9 April 1991 Benin 1 November 1985 was 1 November 1985 Bolivia 4 June 1999 A June 4, 1999 Brazil November 26, 1974 July 15, 1977 5 February 1987 Brunei has 5 February 1987 Bulgaria April 29, 1975 July 15, 1977 Cambodia 28 November 1994 November 28, 1994 Cameroon May 14, 1984 has 14 May 1984 Canada * 7 March 1975 15 July 1977 Cape - Verde 28 April 1977 was July 15, 1977 Chile August 2, 1977 was August 2, 1977 China * January 7, 1980 7 January 1980 Hong Kong June 5, 1997 1 July 1997 Macao December 11, 1999 December 20, 1999 Cyprus 4 November 1980 A November 4, 1980 Colombia 27 July 1981 A 27 July 1981 Comoros 22 November 2000 November 22, 2000 Congo (Brazzaville) 7 January 1993 has 7 January 1993 Congo (Kinshasa) February 10, 1977 was July 15, 1977 (North) Korea 1 May 1985 may 1, 1985 (South) Korea July 29, 1977 July 29, 1977 5 October 1987 Ivory Coast has 5 October 1987 Croatia July 27, 1992 of 8 October 1991 Cuba November 7, 1983 to November 7, 1983 Denmark 24 January 1974 July 15, 1977 Djibouti 1 March 1984 1 March 1984 Dominique 21 June 2000 has 21 June 2000 Egypt 19 February 1987 February 19, 1987 El El Salvador 17 June 1997 has 17 June 1997 United Arab Emirates United 15 December 1983 15 December 1983 Ecuador 8 December 1977 has 8 December 1977 Eritrea April 22, 1996 At 22 April 1996 Spain 31 May 1974 at 15 July 1977 Estonia 16 December 1991 has 16 December 1991 United States c 23 November 1976 15 July 1977 Guam April 1, 1977 at July 15, 1977 Palmyra Island, on April 1, 1977 July 15, 1977 Islands Howland, Baker, Jarvis and Navassa April 1, 1977 July 15, 1977 Islands Midway, Wake , Johnston April 1, 1977 July 15, 1977 United States Virgin Islands, on April 1, 1977 was July 15, 1977 Puerto Rico 1 April 1977 has 15 July 1977 Kingman Reef April 1, 1977 July 15, 1977 American Samoa, on April 1, 1977 was 15 July 1977 territories under control of the islands of the Pacific 1 April 1977 July 15, 1977 Ethiopia 18 July 1985 18 July 1985 Fiji 4 March 1983 has 4 March 1983 Finland 16 February 1977 15 July 1977 France 10 May 1974 July 15, 1977 Gabon 21 January 1982 21 January 1982 Gambia 1 November 1991 was November 1, 1991 Georgia 19 April 1994 April 19, 1994 Ghana 7 December 1973 15 July 1977 Greece 17 December 1974 July 15, 1977 Granada, on June 28, 2004 has 20 June 2004 Guatemala 15 December 1993 to 15 December 1993 Guinea 19 January 1981 19 January 1981 Equatorial Guinea 24 April 1996 has 24 April 1996

Guyana 10 December 1997 December 10, 1997 Honduras 24 September 1985 has 24 September 1985 Hungary 15 December 1976 July 15, 1977 Cook Islands 21 December 2001 December 21, 2001 Marshall Islands 26 April 1988 was 26 April 1988 Solomon Islands 12 March 1982 S July 7, 1978 India 30 May 1973 if July 15, 1977 Indonesia November 13, 1979 November 13, 1979 Iran 17 January 1989 January 17, 1989 Ireland 19 December 1977 19 December

1977 Iceland 21 April 1975 July 15, 1977 Israel, on June 24, 1977 was July 15, 1977 Italy January 11, 1979 January 11, 1979 Jamaica 30 March 1979 to March 30, 1979 Japan June 21, 1977 July 15, 1977 Jordan 5 October 2000 has October 5, 2000 Kazakhstan 7 March 1994 March 7, 1994 Kenya December 15, 1992 to December 15, 1992 Kiribati 5 February 2007 has February 5, 2007 Kuwait 4 June 1979 Latvia 20 June 4, 1979 May 1992 to May 20, 1992 Lebanon 10 November 2008 has 10 November 2008 Liberia 28 December 1973 July 15, 1977 Libya 28 April 2005 April 28, 2005 Lithuania 4 December 1991 has 4 December 1991 Luxembourg 14 February 1991 to February 14, 1991 Malaysia December 23, 1980 December 23, 1980 Maldives 14 January 1981 has 14 January 1981 Malta 20 March 1989 20 March 1989 Morocco April 27, 1977 has 15 July 1977 Maurice 26 May 1989 26 May 1989 Mauritania 17 November 1995 has 17 November 1995 Mexico 8 April 1976 15 July 1977 Moldova October 11, 2005 October 11, 2005 Monaco 18 January 1977 has 15 July 1977 Mongolia June 26 2002 26 June 2002 Montenegro 3 June 2006 S 3 June 2006 Mozambique 30 October 1991 has 30 October 1991 Myanmar 11 November 1987 has 11 November 1987 Namibia 27 November 2000 November 27, 2000 Nicaragua 2 December 1999 December 2, 1999 Nigeria 17 January 1974 has 15 July 1977 Niue 18 may 2012 to May 18, 2012 Norway August 13, 1974 July 15, 1977 New Zealand November 26, 1976 July 15, 1977 Oman April 25, 1985 was April 25, 1985 Pakistan 14 December 1977 has 14 December 1977 Palau September 29, 2011 September 29, 2011 Panama March 14, 1979 has 14 March 1979 Papua New Guinea 18 May 1976 to July 15, 1977 Netherlands 4 February 1976 At July 15, 1977 Aruban 24 December 1995 1 January 1986 Curaçao may 24, 1984 at 1 July 1984 part Caribbean (Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba), 24 May 1984 was July 1, 1984 Sint Maarten 24 May 1984 July 1, 1984 Peru January 9, 1980 at 9 January 1980 Philippines June 10, 2013 A June 10, 2013 Poland 14 December 1976 15 July 1977 Portugal * October 17, 1978 October 17, 1978 Qatar 31 January 1980 has January 31, 1980

Dominican Republic 15 March 1978 has 15 March 1978 Czech Republic October 19, 1993 1 January 1993 Romania 27 March 1975 was July 15, 1977, United Kingdom * * 28 June 1974 15 July 1977 Bermuda 8 August 1977 was July 15, 1977 Gibraltar, on August 8, 1977 July 15, 1977 Guernsey 15 July 1977 has 15 July 1977 Isle of Man July 15, 1977 July 15, 1977 Cayman Islands 8 August 1977 was July 15, 1977, Falkland Islands and dependencies) South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands) 8 August 1977 has 15 July 1977 Islands Pitcairn (Henderson, Ducie, Oeno and Pitcairn) 8 August 1977 15 July 1977 Turks and Caicos Islands 8 August 1977 was July 15, 1977 British Virgin Islands 8 August 1977 was July 15, 1977 Jersey July 15, 1977 July 15, 1977 Montserrat, on August 8, 1977 has 15 July 1977 St. Helena and dependencies (Ascension and Tristan da Cunha) 8 August 1977 15 July

1977 Russia November 9, 1973 15 July 1977 Saint - Kitts - and - Nevis 11 June 2004 June 11, 2004 Sainte - Lucie 20 May 2004 May 20, 2004 Saint - Vincent and the Grenadines October 28, 1983 has 28 October 1983 Samoa 23 October 1979 23 October 1979 Sao Tome - and - principle October 29, 1998 October 29, 1998 Senegal October 27, 1978 was October 27, 1978 Serbia 23 March 1976 A 15 July 1977 Seychelles 22 August 1988 22 August 1988 Sierra Leone 26 July 2001 has

July 26, 2001 Singapore April 29, 1977 has 15 July 1977 Slovakia January 30, 1995 S 1 January 1993 Slovenia 12 November 1992 S 25 June 1991 Sudan 11 March 2003 11 March 2003 Sri Lanka 4 January 1978 has 4 January 1978 Sweden April 28, 1975 July 15, 1977 Switzerland, on December 30, 1975 July 15, 1977 Syria 16 February 1976 was July 15, 1977 Tanzania, on May 16, 2006 has 16 May 2006 Thailand August 6, 1979 to August 6

1979 Togo July 19, 1989 July 19, 1989 Tonga 12 April 1977 has 15 July 1977 Trinidad and Tobago 15 February 1979 to 15 February 1979 Tunisia 1 February 1978 1 February 1978 Turkmenistan 4 February 2009 February 4, 2009 Turkey may 16, 1980 has 16 May 1980 Tuvalu 22 August 1985 S 1 October 1978 Ukraine 5 March 1993 has 5 March 1993 Uruguay 15 August 1979 has 15 August 1979 Vanuatu 28 July 1982 July 28

1982 Venezuela 3 August 1983 3 August 1983 Viet Nam A 18 December 1990 18 December 1990 Yemen 6 March 1979 was March 6, 1979 * * reservations and declarations.
Objections.
Reservations, declarations and objections are not published to the RO. The texts in English can be found at the address of the Internet site of the international maritime Organization (IMO): www.imo.org or obtained in the Direction of public international law (FDFA), the international treaties Section, 3003 Bern.

July 15, 1977, to June 30, 1997, the convention was applicable to Hong Kong on the basis of a declaration of territorial expansion of the United Kingdom. Starting from July 1, 1997, Hong Kong became a special administrative Region (SAR) of the People's Republic of China. Under the Chinese declaration of 5 June 1997, the convention is also applicable to the RAS Hong Kong from July 1, 1997.


March 22, 1999 to Dec. 19. 1999, the conv. was applicable in Macao on the basis of a declaration of territorial extension of the Portugal. From Dec. 20. 1999, Macao became a special administrative Region (SAR) of the People's Republic of China. Under the declaration Chinese Dec. 11. 1999, the conv. is also applicable to the Macao SAR from 20 dec. 1999 territorial extension according to art. III of the convention.

The process of handover by steps in the area of the Canal of Panama agreed in 1977 between the United States and the Panama ended Dec. 31. 1999. from that date, the Panama exercises full sovereignty over the area of the channel and the channel itself.

RO 1977 1084 art. let 1. a sept 24 AF. 1975 (RO 1977 1074) [RO 1965 698] RO 1977 1084 1887, 1979 1526, 1981-952, 1982-1555, 1984-275, 1985-230, 1986-835, 1987 1156, 1989-840, 1990 1836, 1991-2274, 2005 1311, 2008 3977, 2010 941, 2014 761. A version of the update scope is published on the web site of the FDFA (www.dfae.admin.ch/traites).

State on March 20, 2014

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