Order On Hf Program Organized As Single Subject Courses For Adults

Original Language Title: Bekendtgørelse om hf-uddannelsen tilrettelagt som enkeltfagsundervisning for voksne

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Overview (table of contents)

Chapter 1

The Aim


Chapter 2

Length of training


Chapter 3

Curriculum etc.


Chapter 4

Instructions and retention


Chapter 5

The program's management


Chapter 6

Teaching planning and implementation


Chapter 7

Internal evaluation


Chapter 8

Education descriptions and certificates for completed training


Chapter 9

Special education and other special educational assistance


Chapter 10

Sick Education


Chapter 11

Even Students


Chapter 12

Complaints


Chapter 13

Deviations from the Order


Chapter 14

Entry into force and transitional rules


Appendix 1

Summary of the Order contents and list of annexes - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Appendix 2

Student The university preparatory writing skills - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Appendix 3

The examination project - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Appendix 4

Laboratory Courses - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Appendix 5

Tutor Scheme and study journal - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Appendix 6

Workshop Education - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Appendix 7

Biology C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Appendix 8

Danish C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Appendix 9

English C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Annex 10

Geography C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Annex 11

History B - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Annex 12

Chemistry C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Annex 13

Mathematics B - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Annex 14

Religion C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


Annex 15

Social C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013


The full text
notice hf program organized as single subject courses for adults
Pursuant to § 11 paragraph. 2, § 14 paragraph. 4, § 15 paragraph. 2, § 16 paragraph. 4, § 17, § 25, § 35 paragraph. 1, § 36 paragraph. 3, § 37 paragraph. 3 and § 38 paragraph. 2 of the Law on Higher Preparatory Exam (hf-Act). Act no. 862 of 5 July 2010, as amended by Act no. 613 of 12 June 2013, § 8 paragraph. 3 of the Law on Institutions of general secondary education and general adult education, etc., see. Legislative Decree no. 880 of 8 August 2011, states:

Chapter 1

The Aim

§ 1. The program for the higher preparatory examination organized as single subject courses for adults (single subject hf) is targeted to adults with an interest in knowledge, depth, perspective and abstraction. The program is offered as training in single and in groups. The individual subjects and professional groups concluded with tests according to national standards and can be pieced together into a comprehensive single exam, see. § 23 of the Law on Higher Preparatory Exam (hf Act). Higher preparatory examination is at level 4 in the Danish Qualifications Framework for lifelong learning.

PCS. 2. Single subject hf aims that adult participants achieve a general education, knowledge and skills that form the basis for further education or increasing labor market opportunities. Instruction is theoretical and application-oriented, see. § 27 paragraph. 2, and flexible organization so that it forces the adult's desire and interest to continue to acquire new knowledge and insight.

PCS. 3. The participants shall, through the academic and educational progression develop insight and study competence. They should become familiar with the use of various forms of work and ability to function in a study where the requirements for independence, cooperation and sense to seek out knowledge is key.


PCS. 4. Students must also obtain prerequisites for active participation in a democratic society, and understanding of the opportunities for individual and jointly contribute to the development and change. The program will develop students' creative and innovative skills, critical thinking and their accountability, and their understanding of both the near and the European and global perspective.

Chapter 2

Of training

§ 2. Training time for each student covers the entire teacher-led student activity, ie the time the participant participates in various forms of teacher-led instruction and other activities organized by the course of realization of the subjects' goals, including academic and methodological guidance, see. § 20 paragraph. 1.

PCS. 2. Training time is measured in hours of 60 minutes each.

PCS. 3. Student's preparation for teaching, the written work, the official samples for examination, educational and vocational guidance, see. § 20 paragraph. 2, volunteer teaching, see. § 15, study groups, see. § 16, and open studio workshop, see. § 17, are not covered by the training period.

Chapter 3

Curriculum etc.

§ 3. The range of subjects includes single and groups of secondary C, B and A level, where A is the highest level. The training offered under this regulation appendix 2-15, respectively hf-Order and Order on subjects common for secondary schools. In addition, among other things, a large project, see. § 9, an exam, see. § 10, and workshop teaching, see. § 11.

PCS. 2. range of subjects may include subjects from other upper secondary education, see. Stx-notice hhx Executive Order and HTX Executive Order. Course leader says while the course is offered, after which one of those notices the subjects planned reading. The teaching is done according to the rules for the relevant subject.

PCS. 3. Training time for subjects under this order, see. Annex 7-15, is for subjects at C level 75 hours. Training time is mathematics B 250 hours and story B 150 hours. Training time for subjects etc. in accordance with hf-Executive Order on subjects common for secondary schools and in paragraph. 2, the regulations stated in the rules for that program.

PCS. 4. devoted 125 hours to be lifted from C- to B-level, apart from English, which lifted represents 135 hours and 125 hours of lifting from B- to A-level.

§ 4. range of subjects may include subjects other than those referred to in § 3, see. § 25 paragraph. 2.

§ 5. The range of subjects may include a number of subjects (core modules), which aims admission to certain higher education.

§ 6. The range of subjects may include elements of subjects.

PCS. 2. A offered subject element must be a defined unit and can include up until half of the course's training time.

PCS. 3. The course leader must for each course prepare a description of the content must be within the course's framework and objectives. Students must be made aware of the content description.

PCS. 4. Subject elements may not be offered in order that students piece together several courses in a course.

PCS. 5. Students who participate in teaching in a subject, can not simultaneously participate in teaching a course in the same subject.

Conditions for inclusion in selected subjects

§ 7. Each student should normally have followed or follow classes at the nearest underlying level before they can follow the teaching of the subject at the higher level.

PCS. 2. Course leader may depart from paragraph. 1, where the student's real academic qualifications are deemed sufficient.

§ 8. Admission to Biology A, Physics A and Chemistry A is conditional on the student follows the teaching of mathematics B or academic qualifications equivalent to mathematics B.

PCS. 2. Election of German or French as a continuation language is conditional upon the student has followed the graduation test preparatory teaching of the subject in two to four years, or otherwise have achieved equivalent qualifications.

Larger written assignment

§ 9. The students should be offered individually to develop a large project, see. Hf Order Annex 4. The task has an extent of 25 hours of training time.

Thesis

§ 10. Students must be offered individually or in groups to prepare a final project, see. Annex 3. The project has an extent of approximately 25 hours of training time.

Other educational activities in training time


§ 11. Parts of the training time should be organized and organized as a workshop teaching, see. Annex 6. The course leader decides on the extent and location of this teaching, see. § 39.

§ 12. Parts of the training time can be the course leader's decision is organized and planned as field trips, etc.

PCS. 2. All field trips must be approved by the course leader and must be included in the fulfillment of professional goals to the same extent as the education they supersede.

§ 13. Course leader may decide that the teaching is held joint events and theme days and can allow for internships.

PCS. 2. Joint Events will include more than one team and arranged the freer forms than the usual teaching.

PCS. 3. Theme days can be used for activities across teams and must be such that there can be worked professionally and pedagogically relevant at a secondary level.

PCS. 4. The internship is staying at a company, institution or the like for one or more participants. Practical training is included in a course in all subjects, their interactions or in connection with the written projects.

PCS. 5. All joint events, seminars and internships to be approved by the course leader and participate in achieving the goals of education.

§ 14. Parts of the training time can be carried out by a foreign educational institution for students who have registered for a specific system, where previously planned.

Activities outside the training time

§ 15. The course will offer students volunteer training. Course leader decides in which subjects and topics the course is offered. The teaching that can be offered participants across the team can not include trial-related technical training.

PCS. 2. Participation in voluntary training can not be made a condition for the individual student's opportunities for choice of subjects or other activities offered by the course as part of the training.

PCS. 3. The course can establish special programs for students with special needs, in accordance. Hereby § 47. These may be on trial-related technical training.

§ 16. The course offers students study groups. Study groups can be offered to groups of students across the team. Study groups can not include trial-related technical training

PCS. 2. Participation in voluntary study groups can not be made a condition for the individual student the opportunity to choose courses or other activities offered by the course as part of the skills training time.

PCS. 3. The course can establish special programs for students with special talents, see. Hereby § 47.

§ 17. The course offers students the opportunity to apply the facilities open studio workshop or the like in order to enhance the learning environment and the basis for that all participants achieve a good academic achievement.

Læreplaner

§ 18. The objectives and content of the teaching contained in the respective curricula, see. § 3 and Annex 2-15.

PCS. 2. In Annex 7-15 defines the technical content of the section. 2.2. Basic courses and sections. 2.3. Additional fabric. The core fabric covers the academic content, which is mandatory for all students who have the subject at that level. The additional substance is a freer framework within which to select course content, which elaborates and puts into perspective the core substance and expands the student's professional horizons. Both the core material and supplementary material is required to achieve the professional goals. In the selection of core material and supplementary material should students be involved.

§ 19. The language is Danish unless taught in a foreign institution. § 14. The Ministry of Education may in other cases approve the language of instruction is English, German or French.

PCS. 2. In teaching, a common grammatical terminology. Foreign language texts can be used in the teaching of all subjects and in their interactions.

PCS. 3. The teaching must regularly include training in studiemetodik.

Chapter 4

Instructions and retention

§ 20. Course leader must ensure that there be professional and methodological guidance in the individual subjects, and for students who receive instruction in core modules, also in the interaction between the subjects, as part of the training period.

PCS. 2. The educational and vocational guidance, as participants in accordance with the Order for guidance on choosing higher education and business and for guidance as part of the retention of students, trainees and students in training to be offered are beyond the training period.


PCS. 3. The manager must ensure that guidelines for the work to keep students in education, including on reducing dropout rates and procedures in connection with switches or apostasy, see. § 14 of the Law on Higher Preparatory Exam (hf Act).

§ 21. For students who receive instruction in core modules and other continuous course, the course leader among teachers appoint a number of tutors, each must follow and advise usually six to eight students throughout their courses, see. Appendix 5.

PCS. 2. For other students than referred to in paragraph. 1, the course leader among teachers appoint a number of tutors, each must follow and advise usually six to eight students throughout their courses.

§ 22. Course leader must ensure that applicants for single subject courses offered guidance, including guidance in the planning of a course program and choice of subjects. The guidance given in connection with the recording and when choosing new subjects.

Chapter 5

Program management

Creating

§ 23. The course provides the framework for the creation of teams.

PCS. 2. The course leader decides on the creation of specific subjects.

§ 24. The course leader decides on the distribution of students on each team. Course leader may decide that the teaching of practical or educational reasons in some cases can take place across the team.

PCS. 2. When the course leader decides to merge two existing teams, aggregation alerted to the affected students and teachers in time that it is possible to provide sufficient consistency between the teams' academic content and achievement of professional goals and to implement a re-planning of teaching in the combined team.

Supply and establishing disciplines

§ 25. The course decides on the curriculum in each course.

PCS. 2. After the course decision and after approval of the objectives, content, level and test requirements from the Ministry of Children and Education course can offer other subjects, see. § 4.

PCS. 3. Course tenders will be published on the course's website and in any orientation.

Kursusår and holiday

§ 26. The course decides on the course beginning of the year.

PCS. 2. The course decides on the number of days of training and placement of holidays and days off.

Chapter 6

Teaching planning and implementation

§ 27. Teaching planned and implemented so that the objectives of the individual subjects and are respected. Education shall also contribute to the achievement of the program's overall objectives.

PCS. 2. The teaching is organized practices related and applied in contexts where it is relevant for the fulfillment of professional goals in each subject area and professional groups. This involves the inclusion of authentic problems from social life, work and everyday life, which can form the basis for work on subjects objectives and content in order to explore and develop the use of professionalism in practice.

PCS. 3. If the course is offered in core modules, planned teaching so subjects support each other to the greatest possible extent.

§ 28. If the instruction in a subject or profession is organized over several kursusår take the course leader decision on distribution of lessons in individual years.

PCS. 2. The course leader decides how the training time, professional groups are allocated should be divided between the individual subjects, so the subject group særfaglige goal the greatest possible extent.

§ 29. The training should be organized taking into account students' different abilities and assumptions.

PCS. 2. Course leader can for a student with special academic and study assumptions decide that the teaching of individual subjects organized with less training time.

§ 30. Course leader may decide that instruction in a subject or profession, etc. can be handled by several teachers.

PCS. 2. When teaching by several teachers, the course leader establish a sharing of responsibility for the overall teaching, evaluation and tests.

§ 31. The course operator decides that the teachers should be included in one or more teaching team. A team of teachers may be needed function for shorter or longer.

PCS. 2. The course leader decides which tasks are added to a team of teachers with regard to teaching, planning, implementation, evaluation and development.

§ 32. Course manager shall, after discussion with the teachers a concise and clear plan (curriculum) for teaching.


PCS. 2. The curriculum must for students who follow a core module or other continuous course, ensure consistency and continuity in the individual student's education. The curriculum, which is the starting point for the teaching staff common planning, the need to provide a clear division of responsibilities between the team teachers and ensure consistency between its professional and any multi-subject courses.

PCS. 3. The curriculum must ensure that students' work load is evenly distributed over the entire course.

§ 33. The curriculum must include the teaching of all the teams and ensuring progression and variation in the use of various forms of work, including the students' written work, virtual programs, project work and field trips.

§ 34. Course leader must ensure that the students who follow a core module or other continuous course, are obvious targets for students' professional, general and personal skills as a prerequisite for academic concentration, study skills and personal development, see. § 1 of the program goal.

PCS. 2. In addition to the særfaglige goal should be the course leader ensure the development of students'

1) oral and written expression skills and communication skills,

2) basic IT skills, including ensuring that students master IT-based communication forums, and

3) awareness and ability to manage their own learning and mastery of different forms of work.

PCS. 3. For students who do not receive instruction in core modules or other continuous course, paragraphs. 1 and 2, with the exceptions justified on single students' special circumstances.

§ 35. The curriculum is continuously adjusted and should be communicated on the course's website in accordance with the provisions of the law on transparency and openness in education, etc.

§ 36. When training starts in a new profession or a new level, the students had submitted a plan for teaching or assisting in the preparation of such. For the later stages of planning students and teachers jointly work.

§ 37. Course leader must ensure that there is a coordination of teaching and writings. Coordination must make it possible to combine simultaneous teaching to different levels in the same subjects in accordance with the subject.

§ 38. Student The training time can take place as teaching that does not require the simultaneous presence of teacher and student (virtual teaching).

§ 39. The course leader decides that a maximum of seven per cent. of the students' planned training time is used for internal evaluation, workshop training, internal joint arrangements or other interdisciplinary teaching activities in accordance with the educational objectives.

PCS. 2. Course leader, taking account of the goals of instruction, how the portion allotted shall be distributed on individual subjects, disciplines and core modules, etc.

Written work

§ 40. Course leader ensures distribution of the resources available to submit written assignments and to evaluate the students' written work. Course leader may as part of this meet establishing knowledge banks for tasks and task formulations and the development and application of collective, including IT-based, appropriate methods that can be applied to groups of students.

PCS. 2. Written work may take the form of texts, reports, IT presentations, multimedia productions mm.

§ 41. The written work must be used to ensure the quality of the individual student teaching in relation to the objectives of both the program as a whole and for the individual subjects.

PCS. 2. Course leader ensures progression in the development of students' academic preparatory writing skills, see. Annex 2.

PCS. 3. The written work must be included in the ongoing internal evaluation.

PCS. 4. Course manager can require the students' presence on settlement of kursisttid for written work.

§ 42. Written work, both within individual subjects in core modules and across disciplines contribute to the students' skills by

1) develop and document students' skills and knowledge in the subject area,

2) practicing students in communicating scientific material in linguistically correct written form

3) ensure the possibility of having students conduct independent processing issues

4) practicing students in performing systematic writing, including getting the opportunity to demonstrate overview of the subject material,

5) contribute to students' immersion in special issues and

6) provide the basis for learner and teacher evaluation of student's standpoint.


§ 43. The course operator decides which tasks are added to each teacher and each team of teachers with regard to students' written work. Course leader may accommodate students with special needs.

§ 44. The extent of the written work compiled in kursisttid. Student time is the expected time, an average student at that level need to draw up a response to a specific task.

§ 45. Course manager shall, after discussion with the teacher or teachers who make each task, principles for determining student time for each task is done. Course leader distributes student time for written work.

PCS. 2. Students should be made aware in advance with the students time for each task.

§ 46. kursisttid allocated to the individual student's written work. Course leader beforehand assigns the following hours:

1) at least 110 hours to Danish A,

2) at least 160 hours of mathematics A,

3) at least 125 hours for each of the subjects Biology A, Physics A and Chemistry A,

4) at least 110 hours to other subjects at A-level with written test

5) at least 50 hours to English B,

6) at least 100 hours to mathematics B,

7) at least 40 hours for the second foreign language at the B level, but 50 hours in continuation language B-level,

8) at least 25 hours to subjects of biology, geography and chemistry that lifted from C- to B level

9) at least 30 hours Danish C

10) at least 50 hours to mathematics C and

11) at least 15 hours for each of the subjects biology C, C geography and chemistry C.

PCS. 2. In addition to in paragraph. 1 shall kursisttid can be for all subjects, including subjects with written test further deposited up to 25 hours per kursisttid. hold a student for written training, including subjects that do not have written work, but written work included in the basis for the test. Course leader decide the allocation after discussion with the teachers involved. In addition to the tasks listed in Annex 2, para. 2.2., The written work met in the following areas:

1) reporting experimental work

2) languages,

3) internally reviewed the projects, including written assignments according to § 55 paragraph. 2, and

4) other subjects, including cooperation on written work that involves multiple trades and professions.

PCS. 3. The course leader can devote several hours to the written work for students who have chosen several subjects at A level with written test.

§ 47. On each course, in addition to the students time to each student, see. § 46, leaving a pool of kursisttid that after the course leader's decision is distributed to students with special needs, in accordance. § 15 paragraph. 3 for students with special talents, see. § 16 paragraph. 3, and for students who need enhanced and evaluated by the exam training. In connection with these activities ensure the course's head professional guidance as necessary.

§ 48. The students have in connection with the written work requirements on a regular basis to get feedback on their position, including getting a deepened evaluation of opgavebesvarelsernes strengths and weaknesses.

PCS. 2. Course leader must based on knowledge of students' strengths and weaknesses as well as their academic level and in cooperation with the teacher ensure progression and distribution of the written work.

§ 49. The evaluation of the students' written work must be in the subject at A-level with pre-assigned time for written work, see. § 46 paragraph. 2, Nos. 1-4, and may be in other subjects and in disciplinary interactions using different forms of evaluation, including:

1) towards the participants' individual responses of tasks and tests

2) direction and comments on individual or group-based written work

3) comments on the partially finished written work in a process writing,

4) talks with students or student groups and

5) The combinations of the above.

PCS. 2. The course leader decides how the evaluation of the written work must be performed in each subject and in disciplinary interactions.

Chapter 7

Internal evaluation

§ 50. The internal evaluation of educational and teaching matters, follow the rules of Executive Order on quality and performance assessment in secondary education.

§ 51. Education shall be continuously evaluated for learners, teachers and course leader informed the participants' benefit from the teaching.

§ 52. The student must be constantly evaluated. The evaluation is to ensure that each student gets a clear picture of their own strengths, weaknesses and progress and provide a basis for adjusting teaching.


PCS. 2. Results of the evaluation are discussed with the participants and used to adjust the teaching progression and level in relation to the students' professional capabilities.

§ 53. Information is not final term marks (årskarakterer), but teachers give at least twice a year students an assessment of their position on the subject, see. Paragraph. 2. The subjects completed after one semester, giving teachers at least twice in the course of the subject of education students an assessment of their position, see. Paragraph. 2. The assessment will form the basis for the guidance of each student on how the student develops his academic progress, its working methods, etc.

PCS. 2. The course leader decides how the assessment of the student's academic level, see. Paragraph. 1, must be made. Course leader may choose to give the student proficiency mark in the subject to give the participant written assignments, graded with a character, or to use other evaluation methods based on concrete evidence.

PCS. 3. Students in the stx, hhx- and HTX program taught in subjects or courses under this Order are entitled proficiency marks and final term marks (årskarakterer) under the rules of the programs in question.

§ 54. Students who receive instruction in core modules or other continuous course, must prepare a study journal, see. Appendix 5.

§ 55. All major projects that students will take part, should be evaluated separately and the results of the evaluation submitted to the course leader.

§ 56. Course leader must ensure that students receive training in various sample types included in the program.

PCS. 2. Before a final written exam, the students should be offered to prepare a written assignment under exam-like conditions. The task can be judged with a character.

§ 57. Course leader ensures that at least once per. semester takes place a discussion of students' ability to pass the test at the end of the course.

Chapter 8

Education descriptions and certificates for completed training

§ 58. Each team of teachers, respectively, each teacher must at the end of a course preparing an educational description.

PCS. 2. Teaching Descriptions, prepared at the end of instruction in a subject, is included as background information for the oral tests.

PCS. 3. The teaching staff / teacher when preparing lessons description using it by the Ministry of Education drew up a template in the Ministry of prescribed format. The Ministry may require instruction descriptions submitted and may request that this be done in a specific electronic format. Education description must be available to the examiner.

PCS. 4. For students who on the basis of change of education or training or for other reasons have not followed the same training as other students in the class, prepare the teaching staff / teacher if necessary, a separate instruction description.

§ 59. A student who participated in the teaching of a course or courses without completing this or have participated in the teaching of a course, may, upon request a certificate from the course leader for completed courses; see. However paragraph. 2.

PCS. 2. It is a condition to get a certificate for completed training that the student has met the requirements of the course tuition and regulations for active participation.

PCS. 3. For students who change course before the end of the course, the teacher should help to develop an educational description. Education, drawn up in accordance with § 58.

Chapter 9

Special education and other special educational assistance

§ 60. Students who, because of disability or other difficulties that may be treated, need special support must have special education or other special educational assistance that meets their needs.

PCS. 2. Education or other assistance initiated after the course leader's specific assessment of the student's needs based on expert opinions. Education or special educational assistance shall be undertaken in cooperation with the student and his teachers.

Chapter 10

Health Education

§ 61. Students who temporarily due to illness can not follow mainstream education for longer, must be offered health education.

§ 62. In case of absence due to illness, is expected to last for a long time, the student must soon contact the course. If the participant is subject to parental inquiries can be made by the custodial parent.


PCS. 2. Course leader ensures that the necessary lessons are implemented in agreement with participant and as necessary with the student's teachers. The completed course replaces the training period, as the participant in that period have not completed.

PCS. 3. Staying participant in a hospital or another institution, take the course also heads the agreement with the institution of teaching settlement.

§ 63. If a student due to illness frequently have had short-term absence or expected to have frequent short-term absences, the student get additional training related to the student's participation in mainstream education.

PCS. 2. The course leader decides on teaching after paragraph. 1.

Chapter 11

Even Students

§ 64. Persons who are not enrolled, you can take the examination as independent students in the manner thereof. Although students are offered professional guidance given individually or in groups of independent students.

§ 65. For independent students who want to take the test in one or more of the subjects of biology, physics and chemistry at C, B and A level geography or C in Physical Geography C and B, held once a year laboratory courses in subjects referred. Annex 4. Laboratory courses include the experimental part of the teaching of these subjects is a prerequisite to be set for trial. The detailed rules on access for independent students to take the examination stated in the Order on tests and exams in general preparatory studies for youth and adults.

Chapter 12

Appeals

§ 66. A student can appeal to the course leader of decisions taken at the course in accordance with this Order.

PCS. 2. If the student is subject to custody, the complaint also made by the custodial parent.

§ 67. If the course leader does not give the student rejected a complaint in accordance with § 66, the student or the custodial parent complaint to the Ministry of Education over the course leader's decision, if the complaint concerns legal issues. The complaint must be submitted to the course leader within two weeks of the course leader has informed the participant of its decision.

PCS. 2. Course leader must issue an opinion in the matter and give the complainant the opportunity to comment on the statement. Course leader must give the complainant a one-week deadline for this. Complaints must submit any comments to the manager, which forwards the matter, including opinion and the complainant's comments, if any, to the Ministry.

PCS. 3. The Ministry may decide to reject the complaint if the conditions of paragraph. 1 are not satisfied, on the maintenance of the course leader's decision amending the decision in favor of the complainant or refer the decision to the manager's reconsideration.

Chapter 13

Deviations from the Order

§ 68. The Ministry of Education may in special cases permit deviations from the Order to promote experimentation and educational development.

PCS. 2. The Ministry of Education may approve deviations from the Order where a course offering lessons aimed at a similar international exam which gives access to higher education in Denmark.

PCS. 3. The Ministry of Education may approve deviations from the Order for a single student, where exceptional circumstances apply.

Chapter 14

Entry into force and transitional rules

§ 69. This Order shall enter into force on 1 August 2013.

PCS. 2. Order no. 307 of 11 April 2011 on the hf program organized as single subject courses for adults repealed.

Ministry for Children and Education, June 26, 2013
PMV
Lars Mortensen
/ Mads Bentzen



Appendix 1

Summary of the Order contents and list of annexes - higher preparatory single, in June 2013











Notice content








Chapter 1


The program's purpose (§ 1)



Chapter 2


Length of training (§ 2)



Chapter 3



Curriculum, etc. (§§ 3-19)



Chapter 4


Instructions and retention (§§ 20-22)



Chapter 5


The program's management (§§ 23-26)



Chapter 6


Teaching planning and implementation (§§ 27-49)



Chapter 7


Internal evaluation (§§ 50-57)



Chapter 8


Education descriptions and certificates for completed training (§§ 58-59)



Chapter 9


Special education and other special educational assistance (§ 60)



Chapter 10


Sick Teaching (§§ 61-63)



Chapter 11


Even Students (§§ 64-65)



Chapter 12


Complaints (§§ 66-68)



Chapter 13


Deviations from the Order (§ 69)



Chapter 14


Entry into force and transitional provisions (§ 70)







Notice Annex








Appendix 1


Summary of the Order contents and list of Annex



Appendix 2


Student The university preparatory writing skills



Appendix 3


The examination project



Appendix 4


Laboratory Courses



Appendix 5


Tutor Scheme and study journal



Appendix 6


Workshop Teaching



Appendix 7


Biology C



Appendix 8


Danish C



Appendix 9


English C



Annex 10


Geography C



Annex 11


History B



Annex 12



Chemistry C



Annex 13


Mathematics B



Annex 14


Religion C



Annex 15


Social C







Appendix 2

Kursist The university preparatory writing skills - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first Dimensions
1.1. Students are required to find and select relevant material, and process and writing key single and multiple academic subjects.
The participants shall, using professional knowledge, basic methods in the subject / subjects and the relevant documentation could provide a clear, coherent and nuanced writing, based on the following study preparatory writing skills:



- Genre consciousness

- Linguistic accuracy

- Conceptual

- Reasoning

- The use of quotations, figures, illustrations, etc.

- Presentation

- Relevant references, of notes and bibliography.

The university preparatory skills to be used in the preparation of the major written assignment.
Second Implementation
2.1. Course leader ensures that, as far as possible from the individual student's choice of subjects throughout the school's progression and coherence in the development of the individual student writing skills. Course leader decides how the systematic work on the development of students' writing skills organized.
2.2. As part of the development of students' academic preparatory writing skills should students,
as far as possible from the individual student's choice of subjects:



- Work on a unit of writing in the first half of the training in the art Danish, see. Hf Order Annex 9

- Individually answer a task in history, see. Annex 11, or individually answer a task in history in the context of cultural and social studies group, see. Hf Order Annex 14, and

- Individually prepare an exam, see. Annex 3.

The course leader decides which other single and multiple professional tasks that have a particular focus on achieving the goals. Course leader decides how the students' other written work included in the overall capacity building.
2.3. Course leader decides for all major assignments beyond the major written assignment, see. Hf Order Annex 4, the procedure of choice of subjects or disciplinary interactions professional field, and assignment.
2.4. The course provides guidance resources, etc. available for each student / student group.
Third Evaluation
3.1. The evaluation of the section. 2.2. mentioned tasks included both professional communications qualities and shortcomings, and to what extent the student mastered the study-related writing skills listed in section. 1.1. The evaluation shall be applied prospectively with a view to continuous progression in students' mastery of writing skills. The evaluation is performed using evaluation forms listed in § 48 paragraph. 1.
3.2. Course leader decides whether to grant the character of the individual assignment. Course leader decides how the evaluation of the individual written assignment included in the definition of any term marks.



Appendix 3

Examination project - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first The examination project
1.1. The examination project drawn up by one or more students in the community include two to three subjects and ends with an oral exam based on a synopsis. The student must prepare exam project at the highest academic level and qualifications or have followed courses.
1.2. The exam project developed within the last six weeks of the teaching.
Second Examination of the project area
2.1. Each student, respectively the students choose the courses graduation project drawn up.
2.2. Course leader appoint one of the teachers tutor / mentors for each student, respectively the students in the subjects included. The supervisor / supervisors involved in all phases projektforløbets.

2.3. The student, respectively the students choose in consultation with the supervisor / supervisors a subject where the selected subjects included. The subject must be within both master the core substance as supplementary material enclosed in such a way that the possibility of developing a problem statement, which ensures that there can be no recycling of sections from responses previously submitted and corrected.
2.4. Course leader establishes a procedure for the choice of subjects and subject.
Third Problem statement
3.1. The student, respectively the students formulate a problem formulation approved by the supervisor / supervisors. It will house multi-disciplinary requirements of the subjects involved, and it can not rely directly on the part of the subject matter that has already been entered in the student's, respectively the students', teaching. However, there is nothing to prevent the project developed in continuation of the work of the subjects involved, or relating thereto.
3.2. The student, respectively the students, prepares a synopsis containing:



- Title of the subject and indicating the subjects included

- Problem formulation

- Overview of the issues that has worked with

- Clarification of the project's conclusions

- Overview of the methods used in the work

- A conclusion, including the possible formulation of questions for further work

- A list of sources used.

3.3. At graduation project completion handing participant synopsis for the course in the required number of copies. The synopsis sent to the examiner before the exam. Course leader establishes a procedure for this.
Fourth Project participation
4.1. During the project, the student must ensure appropriate access to facilities that are appropriate for the preparation of the project.
Fifth Sample
5.1. There will be an oral exam based on a synopsis. The student brings the synopsis and any additional notes for the test. The examination time is 30 minutes per. examinee. The sample consists of the candidate's presentation and the presentation of the synopsis supplemented with additional questions from the examiner. Censor may be involved in the examination.
6th Rated
6.1. The evaluation of the examination project is based on an overall assessment of the oral presentation in relation to the academic goals of the subjects included in the project.
In evaluating the addition emphasis on:



- Treatment of the subject from the problem definition

- Structuring and presentation of the subject matter

- Involvement of relevant background material.

6.2. One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
7th Even students.
7.1. Even students can prepare a dissertation in accordance with clause. 1.1.-6.2., Except for the section. 2.3. The independent student must, if no tests have been taken in the subjects, having signed up for examination in the subjects at the next examination period.



Appendix 4

Laboratory Courses - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first Range of subjects
1.1. To be held laboratory courses in the subjects of biology, physics and chemistry at level A, B and C as well as in geography at level B and C according to the following rules.
Second Purpose
2.1. Laboratory course replaces the experimental part of the teaching in the subjects of biology, physics, chemistry and geography, see. Curriculums these subjects.
Laboratory course must therefore give the students the opportunity to acquire the necessary qualifications to meet the requirements with respect. Experimental work, as reflected in the curricula of the subjects, especially the section on the final oral examination in.
Third The course location, etc.
3.1. Laboratory courses are usually held both east and west of the Great Belt. Laboratory courses must take place in an institution providing training for baccalaureate or higher preparatory examination. The Ministry of Education appoints one institution east and one west of the Great Belt to hold the courses.
3.2. Laboratory courses in the same subject at different levels organized so that students can follow all levels successively in the same period.
3.3. There must be guaranteed training place to all who have signed up, see. Section. 4.1.
3.4. The institutions which hold laboratory courses, emits entry forms for all institutions providing higher preparatory education before 1 December along with notification of the time and place for the laboratory course are incurred.
Fourth Registration for laboratory courses
4.1. Registration for laboratory courses is through the institution where the registration for the examination in the subject in question takes place. The courses sends Bookings for the institution organizing laboratory course in one of this institution set deadline.

4.2. The institution organizing laboratory course emits course material to participants before the course starts.
Fifth The courses extent
5.1. Training time for laboratory course is:
Laboratory Course at A level: 15 hours. Participation in laboratory course in a subject at A-level require that teaching at B level in the subject is carried out or the laboratory course at B level is completed.
Laboratory course at B level: 15 hours. Participation in laboratory course in a subject at level B assumes that teaching at C-level in the subject is carried out or the laboratory course at the C-level is completed.
Laboratory Course in C-level: 15 hours.
Addition accompanying journal and report work.
5.2. As part of the basic training included guidance on report writing and review of initial reports.
6th Certification
6.1. The institution organizing laboratory course shall issue a certificate to students who have completed the course. The student submits the certificate to the institution where the exam in the subject takes place.



Appendix 5

Tutor Scheme and study journal - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
tutor
first Purpose
Tutor scheme should help to develop the individual student autonomy and self-management in relation to teaching and supporting the student's retention in the program.
Tutor program must contribute to:



- Strengthen the individual student's study skills

- Maintain focus on the individual student's learning process

- Strengthen the individual student academic motivation, total student motivation and thus retention in education

- Support the participant in the effort to develop the ability to make the study status to himself regarding:

a) level of ambition

b) Study terms of strengths and weaknesses

c) progression in teaching

d) adjustment of the learning process

e) self-evaluation.

Second Contents
The tutor is responsible for:



- Plan and conduct individual interviews with the associated participants; talks focus on the student's study and professional development, and summary of the talks entered in the study book

- Advise each student on how the student can work towards its goals, including by working with and update the study book

- As needed disseminate information about students' study-related progression to the other teachers.

Third Establishment and organization
Course leader appoints tutors so that each student has one of his teachers who tutor.
The tutor must be through an appropriate number of conversations have close contact with each student and follow the student's learning progression in collaboration with the student's other teachers for professional and methodical guidance of the student.
Central to the tutor's work is partly interviews with the participant and an improved collaboration with the student on study book focusing on progression in learning and acquisition of study skills.
The tutor must - to an extent determined by the course leader - be available for individual study purposes related inquiries from students.
'Research
first Purpose
work with the student's personal study journal aims to sharpen student's awareness of why and how to work with the professional and personal learning progression.
Study The book will serve as a tool for that student in cooperation with the tutor sets realistic goals and success criteria for further development of its academic and study-related skills and continuously evaluate the process and progression.
So shall study the book will help to maintain the student's focus throughout the school and serve as documentation of the work of the established academic goals.
Second Contents
Study The book serves as a unifying tool in the student's education and includes the following elements:



1) relevant information on the student's previous education and qualifications on the current sixth-form courses (subjects and levels, credit etc.) as well as the specific features relevant to the program, such as. purpose of the program, or any reading difficulties

2) information on the student's academic and study-related skills and the goals that the participant has set

3) information and assessments of the extent to which the goals have been achieved

4) agreements on how the student can work with his academic progress and competence

5) interview schedules and short summaries and conclusions from tutor talks.


In addition, study the book contain special pages for appointments, meetings, daily notes etc.
Para. 1 completed by the student.
Item. 2-4 completed by the students, teachers and tutors.
Item. 5 completed by the student.
Third Establishment and organization
Study The book is part of the professional and methodological guidance and maintained by each student and his teacher and tutor.
Study book is electronic.
Template to study the book's various sections designed in the individual course and made available online.
Access to the individual student study journal the student, the student's tutor and teachers and the course leader.
It is assumed that study the book does not contain sensitive personal information.



Appendix 6

Workshop Education - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first Purpose
Workshop Teaching aims to support students in developing good study skills through the development of awareness of learning processes, methods and goals. Workshop Teaching must thus help develop students' metacognitive thinking and allow time for independent study-related contemplation.
Workshop Teaching must be organized in order that students will gain knowledge of how to prepare for the individual subjects and disciplines.
Second Contents
students' work habits and study skills developed through presentation and integration of different concepts for the acquisition of academic content and professional contexts. This must be done in order to ensure the progression of the development of the course participant to the students.
In conjunction with the acquisition of the subjects from the following elements should be included with the progression of the workshop hours:



- Work with taxonomy and methodology

- Study techniques, including various forms of note-taking, reading techniques and reading strategies

- Teaching various forms of work, including project

- Continued development of the study-related IT skills

- Training in sample presentation.

In the workshop also includes an introduction to various study and work methods, including information retrieval, writing, use of IT and hedging of learning style.
Third The organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Workshop teaching is part of training time, see. § 11 and § 39.
Workshop teaching is organized on the progression of the work and independence and consistency with other lessons.
The workshop teaching can students work individually or in groups as needed, but so that they can both help and time to processing of the subject material and self-contemplation. The workshop can also provide a good framework for differentiated instruction, which can take place both by physical presence as virtual.
In the beginning of the process used some of workshop hours for an introduction to the subject, respectively subjects.
Later in the process may focus on study methods and be differentiated offers with a focus on the individual student's need for support.
Workshop Teaching can be complemented by an open, voluntary study workshop, see. § 17.



Appendix 7

Biology C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first The identity and purpose
1.1. Identity
Biology is a science subject, which studies and experiments in both the laboratory and nature creates the basis for insight into biological systems complexity and diversity.
Biology is the study of the origin and development of life processes at all levels from the molecular to the global. The course is based on science profession and dealing with living organisms interactions with their relationships with the surrounding environment and the importance of human activities, including opportunities for nature conservation and sustainable development.
The subject deals with practical application of biology and perspectives relating to, among other biotechnology development within the medical field and in biological production.
The subject contributes to man's understanding of himself as a biological being and provides the professional background in order to act biologically defensible in daily life and in relation to long-term societal issues of biological content.
1.2. Purpose
purpose of biology teaching is to stimulate students' interest in biological questions and to contribute to higher preparatory program's overall objective of professional knowledge, study skills and general knowledge.
Student 'knowledge of selected biological areas should be elaborated taking into account their experience and previous training. They should acquire insight into important biological contexts related to health, environment and biotechnology.

Students should have experience with systematic gathering, processing and dissemination of biological information, and they must develop the ability to critically and constructively to biological research and its application.
The students must acquire biological thinking and method, so they can apply it in daily life. They must also - in conjunction with other disciplinary approaches - could relate analytical and nuanced to biology, ethical and social perspectives.
Second Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:



- Collect biological information from various sources and assess the quality of the material

- Make systematic observations and collect data both in the laboratory and in the field

- Perform experimental work, taking into account general laboratory safety

- Set up simple hypotheses as a basis for biological experiments

- Identify and discuss sources of error and explain the importance of the control experiment

- Describe, analyze and explain the figures and data and relate them to the relevant explanatory models

- Process and disseminate results from experimental work

- Express themselves both verbally and in writing about the biological relationships involving relevant academic concepts

- Discuss the social and ethical perspectives related to issues with biological content.

2.2. Basic courses
core substance is:



- Selected organic compounds and their biological importance, including DNA's structure and function

- Cell structure, function and evolution as well as selected cellular processes

- General genetic concepts and contexts, including the interaction between heredity and environment

- The biological basis for biotechnology

- Selected organ systems structure and function seen in health

- Selected ecological processes and their significance.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The core material and the supplementary drug, represents a whole. The additional substance includes issues such as health, biotechnology, environment and elaborates and puts into perspective the core substance and / or incorporate new content areas in such a way that the subject's practical, societal and ethical aspects are highlighted. Parts of the adjunctive agent is chosen in cooperation with the participants.
Third The organization
3.1. Didactic principles
teaching is thematically and are based on current biological problems and students' experiences.
The experimental work integrated with the theoretical contents so that the work with scientific tools and methods stimulating students' activity and creativity. In addition, application-oriented aspects involved as far as possible.
3.2. Work methods
There exchanged between various work, so there is progression from the more conventional educational activities for independent work. In the choice of working must be taken into account to develop the students' experience with both individual and collective work, including project work.
There must be a focus on the application-oriented throughout. Outreach activities are an integral part of teaching.
The experimental work should be integrated into everyday teaching and has an extent corresponding to approximately 20 per cent. of the subject of education.
Writing in the profession include work with the subject's various written genres and is an essential part of the learning process. Writing in biology is significant as the professional knowledge thus get a clear-oriented aspect. Writing includes the following:



- Records of experimental work and field work

- Reports prepared on the basis of records

- Different types of tasks, including for the purpose of training of professional elements

- Other products, eg. presentations and posters.

The written work is organized so that there is progression in the profession of writing to ensure the development of the individual student writing skills.
3.3. It
It involvement in education, where appropriate to achieve the professional goals, using data acquisition, data processing in spreadsheets, information, written presentation, conferences and presentation.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines

Where possible, the stage is set for the subject is part of interaction with other disciplines, with the aim to further deepen and put into perspective the core substance and application aspects of the subject.
Fourth Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Kursist The learning outcomes must be evaluated regularly, so there is a basis for future guidance of each student in the work to achieve the professional goals and adjustment of teaching.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral examination based on an assignment prepared by the examiner. The assignment is based on one or more of the teaching themes. The assignment includes a headline and clarifying the issues as well as known and unknown annexes. The experimental work and projects to be included in as many tasks as possible.
Examination time is about 24 minutes. Preparation time is about 24 minutes.
Each task may be used more than twice on the same team. Annex may be used several times by the examiner.
Tasks without attachments must be known of the examinees in the sample.
4.3. Assessment criteria
rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the academic goals set out in section. 2.1.
The emphasis is on the student's ability to:



- Express themselves correctly and accurately using biological terminology

- Structure and communicate the substance

- Analyze and evaluate the results of experimental work

- Explain models describing biological relationships

- Analyze and explain the figures representing biological relationships

- Put unknown material related to known problems

- Put into perspective his biological knowledge and involvement of the social and ethical aspects.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
4.4. Even Students
An independent student must have completed the laboratory course in Biology (§ 65) with a certificate from the institution which organized the course, to be considered for the trial. If the independent student can document the implementation of experimental work to an extent corresponding to the level's experimental work from former biology teaching, for example. in the form of reports or records, the independent student set for trial without conducting laboratory course. The previously conducted experimental work included in the same way as the basis for the sample as experimental work in a regular educational context. The head of the course where the test takes place, decide on previous experimental work can constitute a sufficient basis for the self-student sample.



Appendix 8

Danish C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first The identity and purpose
1.1. Identity
subject's core is the Danish language. It focuses on how language unfolds and used in practical communication situations. In working with the Danish language and language texts in a variety of genres and media connected receptive and productive elements in the subject.
1.2. Purpose
Danish course contributes to the development of student's communication skills and the student's ability to uncover texts importance. Tuition has a practice- and application-oriented focus that aims to strengthen the student's ability to handle information, go behind the words and understand their content and shades. The mastery of a safe language expression, both orally and in writing, promotes student's opportunities to orient themselves and act in a modern, democratic, globally oriented society.
Second Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:



- With accuracy, nuanced and communication conscious both orally and in writing

- Master the written language standards for accuracy with the use of grammar and stilistikkens basic fundamentals

- Apply key oral presentation forms (including presentations and argue a point of view) with disseminating awareness

- Apply key written presentation forms (including report, explain and discuss) with disseminating awareness

- Analyze and critically print and digital texts with an eye for texts communicative importance

- Analyze and interpret literary texts.

2.2. Basic courses
The core substance falls within a range of Danish-language texts. The texts selected to ensure a genre spread where both literary and non-literary texts included. The dispersion also includes that both print and digital texts must be represented.

In working with texts integrated receptive and productive activities.
The following analysis tools are presented and used in the courses, see. Section. 3:



- Grammar and style

- Argumentationsanalyse

- Rhetorical analysis

- Communication analysis.

Third The organization
teaching is organized on the basis of progress with the following focus:



- Speaking to an audience

- To argue a point of view

- To cover an event

- To set out a case history.

3.1. Didactic principles
teaching integrates the receptive work with texts with productive work with the student's own texts. It is essential that the texts are selected in order to present the student for authentic texts and authentic communication situations.
3.2. Work methods

The written work ranging from small writing exercises, as coach partial competences and limited write operations, to assignments where students in a coherent and communication deliberate manufacture relate to a text and / or a topic. The emphasis on vocational guidance in the writing phase.

The oral work focuses on the student's oral language skills in various authentic communication situations. The students presented to the appropriate techniques and tools for the preparation and conduct of oral presentations.
3.3. It
The emphasis is on integration of ICT in education in relation to:



- Writing teaching and work with presentation supported the oral presentations

- Information retrieval

- Work with texts that are not available in printed form.

3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
The professional interaction with other disciplines met to the extent possible.
Fourth Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The completed units are evaluated regularly in order to provide teacher and student knowledge about the academic level and to define the subsequent work. Use is made of different forms of assessment, including response to smaller writing assignments, written tests and oral presentations.
4.2. Sample Forms
held a combined written and oral examination.
The written part of the exam
There is a decentralized written exam where the task developed by the student's teacher. The task given to the student within two weeks before the oral examination. The student has 24 hours to make a written reply to a level equivalent to three to four pages. A page consists of 1,300 characters or approximately 1350 characters. The assignment is based on a topic or an issue from one of the four compulsory courses and with an application-oriented focus. For the assignment hear a text material on a maximum of eight pages or maximum 10 minutes played text as well as instructions on how the candidate will be working with the material. Known and unknown texts may be included, but parts of the material to be unknown text material which is expected to be included by weight in the answer. Texts are allowed to be recycled in a team if the associated instructions are not identical.
Before the oral part of the exam, the institution of the student's written answer to the censor. Examiners discuss before the oral part of the test, on the basis of presentations by the examiner, which issues the candidate must elaborate.
The oral part of the exam
examination time is about Per 20 minutes. examinee. There is no preparation.
Candidate begins with an oral presentation of about 10 minutes about the product at the written part of the exam. The examination forms itself forward as a professional conversation about the written product with the use of nuclear substance analysis tools. In the interview into perspective for the reading material.
4.3. Assessment criteria
rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
A combined character from an overall assessment of the provisions of the written and oral presentation.
In the evaluation, emphasis is on the student's proficiency in:



- Written and oral presentation, including the dissemination of consciousness

- To answer the assignment

- Appropriate use of Danish professional knowledge and method.



Appendix 9

English C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first The identity and purpose
1.1. Identity

English is a færdighedsfag, a vidensfag and cultural skills. The course deals with English language, English-language cultures and global issues. The course includes the use of English in speech and writing and knowledge of the subject material.
1.2. Purpose
It is the purpose of teaching that students in the subject English acquire the ability to understand and use the English language, so that they can orient themselves and act in a globalized world. The aim is that students acquire knowledge about British, American and other English-speaking countries' social conditions and cultures and their understanding of their own cultural background thus developed. The course provides an opportunity for the students to communicate across cultural boundaries. The teaching of the subject's different disciplines helps develop students' linguistic, cultural and aesthetic knowledge and awareness and thus their general study skills.
Second Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:



- Understand spoken and written English about general topics

- Read English texts understandable up

- Master a vocabulary that makes it possible to participate in a conversation in English

- Provide a coherent oral and written presentation in English of a known issue

- Could explain the content and views in different types of English language and English language media material, including film

- Explain the given material's position in relation to the larger context

- Formulate their own views and arguments in English

- Use professional reference books and other aids.

2.2. Basic courses
core substance is:



- The English language basic grammar, spelling and punctuation

- Pronunciation and vocabulary

- Communication strategies, standard language and variation

- The English language as a global language of communication

- Different types of newer literary texts, non-literary texts and media material, including film

- Textual analysis basic concepts

- Significant economic conditions in the UK and USA

- Current situations in other parts of the English-speaking world.

Literary texts, non-literary texts and media substance present in the core substance, must be primary and authentic English.
2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The supplementary material elaborates and puts into perspective the core substance and expands students' professional horizons.
In the supplementary material includes texts and other expressions from recent times. It also includes material from other fields and other parts of the world than the English language.
The additional substance must be written in or translated into English.
Third The organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Education shall be based on an academic level equivalent to students' level from elementary school. The teaching is organized so that alternate between inductive and deductive organized courses.
Work on language, text and culture are integrated so that students experience a clear correlation between the expression, substance and communication situation.
We must work on listening, reading and communication strategies and strategies for foreign language acquisition. The student's own language production in speech and writing is a priority. Education in text analysis and foreign language acquisition must be adapted to the academic progression. The working language is predominantly English.
The program's application-oriented profile implies that the teaching of the subject's linguistic dimension organized with emphasis on the use of language and includes language structure as a means of promoting communication and mediation skills. The substantive part of the teaching is geared towards the action-by considering art as a tool for solving problems and by involving subjects as far as possible are current and relevant to the student group's general education and life practice.
3.2. Work methods
work on the subject organized preferably in subjects. The report must include at least three issues that must be based on the subject's core substance and in the adjunctive agent.

Education and Work, which is preferably teacher-led, should gradually be replaced by teaching and study methods that give students greater independence and responsibility. Work methods and techniques must fit into the professional goals, and the written and oral work should be varied, so students will develop their communications skills both orally and in writing. Working with the written side must be organized, so it includes support for text and topic work and support for language learning.
If a course has assigned kursisttid be the written work plan, creating progression and, where possible, consistency with the written work in other subjects.
3.3. IT and electronic media
IT and electronic media used with the overall aim to promote students' learning process and learning results. Integration of electronic media in education gives students the opportunity to experience the language of varied, authentic and current contexts. It is used as a tool to support text work and for work on the skill-related side of language acquisition. The practical application of IT to strengthen students' ability to search and select relevant academic material.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the stage is set for the subject interact with other subjects. The application-oriented side of the oral and written proficiency must here be strengthened by the students to acquire and convey parts of the subject material in English.
Fourth Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
At the beginning of the course and during the year shall be carried out evaluation in the form of screening or other individual tests to determine the individual student level and progression. For that students can get a tool to assess their own knowledge-style growth, must also be made self-value rendering test.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral exam.
Based on an unknown, raw material that is thematically related to a topic studied, tested in presentation, conversation, text understanding and perspective. The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance. The sample material shall consist of one or more texts with a total extent of one to three pages. The scope should take into account the material difficulty and ensure that the academic objectives can be evaluated. Media Material in electronic form can be involved and replacing printed text material to an extent corresponding to a maximum of 20 per cent. of one to three pages, which constitute a sample material.
Examination time is about 24 minutes. Preparation time is about 48 minutes. During the preparation time, the student use any aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet is not allowed, see. However, § 15 paragraph. 2, in the general examination order.
The same unknown sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team.
A page of prose 1,300 letters, corresponding to approximately 1,350 characters for poetry and drama 30 lines. Using electronic media sources is three to six minutes of play for one standard page.
4.3. Assessment criteria
rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
It is emphasized that the student in English can present and put into perspective the unknown sample material and apply the knowledge gained in working with the studied subject.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.



Annex 10

Geography C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first The identity and purpose
1.1. Identity
Geography deals with natural processes and conditions on Earth and their impact on people's living conditions in a timely and societal perspective.
Geography makes use of scientific methods in which knowledge and conceptual understanding developed through interaction between on the one hand observations and experiments on the other hand, theory and modeling. The course deals with both local, regional and global patterns and differences and their explanation. The subject forms the basis of understanding and awareness of the phenomena of nature and the understanding of the interaction between man and his surroundings.
The course has a practical dimension and involve geographical knowledge to create a coherent insight into the problems with science content.
Course provides geofaglig basis for assessing current societal problems in science content.
1.2. Purpose

The purpose of geography is to stimulate students' ability to engage in geo-technical phenomena, patterns and current problems and to contribute to higher preparatory program's overall objective of being educative and give students skills that can form the basis for further education.
The students get through teaching knowledge of geo-technical work methods and disciplines and improve their knowledge of relevant nuclear material from geography. In addition, students will develop the ability to combine scientific theory and practice in a reflective manner and ability to see the whole and contexts in geo-technical areas.
Students are required to understand and work with cycles in nature and gain insight into sustainable development as a principle. Based on geo-technical skills get students prepared to enter in the democratic debate and develop respect for others' views, cultures and lifestyles.
Second Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:



- Observe, describe, structure and classify geo spatial patterns, data and results

- Perform simple forms of geofagligt experimental work, including field work and data collection

- Processing and use of geo-technical data and results

- Develop simple problem formulations from a geofaglig approach

- Understand the difference between a theoretical model and the observed reality

- Identify, select, and process geo-technical variables

- Analyze geo-technical problems using jargon and appropriate professional analysis tools

- Put local natural and social conditions into a regional or global context and understand global processes local consequences

- Based on geofaglig knowledge reflect on the natural sciences and technology's role in the current development of society

- Understand and evaluate geofagligt material from magazines, media etc.

- Express themselves both orally and in writing on geo-technical subjects with academic precision to different audiences.

2.2. Basic courses
core substance is selected geo-technical areas of:



- Weather and climate

- Energy flows and cycles in nature

- Natural resources, production and technology

- Demographic and business conditions.

We work with core substance from a contemporary perspective and a spatial dimension.
2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The core material and supplementary material, represents a whole. The supplementary material includes natural, social and cultural professional issues related to the core areas. This additional ingredient selected in cooperation between students and teacher, and the aim is that it gives students the opportunity to work on issues that relate to different parts of the world.
Third The organization
3.1. Didactic principles
teaching is organized in large items like across the core subject areas. Similarly, the instruction is emphasized that the experimental work linked to the theoretical substance in order as much integration as possible. In this way, the applied aspects integrated into daily lessons.
The teaching in order that students can develop an understanding of entities and relationships.
3.2. Work methods
Education shall generally organized by subject or project-oriented work.
Education shall be organized with variation and progression from topic reading to projects based on a problem statement, prepared by the students. During the course period must therefore be a progression in work and professional requirements as well as requirements for the students' autonomy in the work process and ability to problem formulation. Students must be involved in the planning process and in the choice of work. In the choice of work must also be taken to develop the students' experience of individual and collective work.
There must be a focus on the application-oriented through the entire course.
Writing in the profession include work with the subject's different genres and is an essential part of the learning process. Writing includes the following:



- Records of experimental work and field work

- Reports prepared on the basis of records

- Different types of tasks including for the purpose of training of professional elements


- Other products such as presentations, posters and project report.

The written work is organized so that there is progression in the profession of writing and context for written work in other subjects in the development of the individual student writing skills.
3.3. It
It must be used in class for the following purposes:



- Use of the Internet to gain access to training materials, other geofagligt material and data

- Visualization and analysis of data

- Communication and dissemination.

3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the stage is set for the subject interact with other subjects in order to further deepen and put into perspective the core substance and application aspects of geography.
Fourth Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
subject's academic goals and content are the basis for ongoing evaluation.
The individual evaluation is based on the student's effort and professional level in everyday teaching and in their written work. Here evaluated student's current position, work and group work, and to what extent there is a need for changes to the student's working and effort.
The collective evaluation is based on the daily teaching among others in connection with the completion of a topic. Here assesses teacher and learners in the community, the need for adjustments and changes in working mm, so that the academic objectives are met.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral examination based on an assignment prepared by the examiner. The assignment includes a headline and sub-questions with progression and known and unknown material. Tasks may be used no more than three times on the same team. The sample material is sent to the examiner before the exam.
Examination time is about 24 minutes. Is given about 24 minutes of preparation time.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
4.3. Assessment criteria
rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
It is emphasized that the student can:



- Express themselves orally on geo-technical subjects in a proper academic language

- Describe and structure the geo-technical information and issues from the given exam questions including Annex

- Explain the difference between a theoretical model and the observed reality

- Analyze geo-technical issues using professional tools

- Reflect on scientific issues in the current debate

- Assess local natural and social conditions in a regional or global context and understand the consequences.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
4.4. Even Students
An independent student must have completed the laboratory course in geography (§ 65) with a certificate from the institution which organized the course, to be considered for the trial. If the independent student can document the implementation of experimental work to an extent corresponding to the level's experimental work from previous geography lessons, for example. in the form of reports or records, the independent student set for trial without conducting laboratory course. The previously conducted experimental work included in the same way as the basis for the sample as experimental work in a regular educational context. The head of detkursus where the test takes place, decide whether earlier experimental work can constitute a sufficient basis for the self-student sample.



Annex 11

History B - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first The identity and purpose
1.1. Identity
history dealing with events, trends and relationships from antiquity to the present. The subject's core is human interaction and how this in the course of time have developed cultures and societies in an interaction with nature. Central to the course is the interpretation of the historical process and the traces it has left and how interpretations of history being used. History is both a humanistic and social science subjects.
1.2. Purpose

History teaching task is to develop students' awareness of the history and identity, thus stimulating their interest in and ability to ask questions to the past, to reach new recognition of their contemporaries. Insight into the historical and cultural development in other communities to strengthen students' ability to meet other cultures in a world characterized by rapid change and increased interaction across cultures. Education shall develop the students' ability to structure and evaluate different types of historical materials and various forms of communication history.
Knowledge of history strengthens students' ability to reflect on and apply knowledge and insight with respect to the current problems.
Second Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
The student must be able to:



- To identify the key trends and events in Denmark's history, European history and world history

- Gain insight into the interaction between nature, individual and society in a historical perspective

- Explain the connections and contradictions between contemporary and historical societies

- Reflect on the man as history made and history-making

- Draw up and present historical issues both orally and in writing

- Implement and disseminate a study of a historical subject

- Apply an analytical / methodical approach to diverse historical materials

- Critically and documenting examples of the use and abuse of history.

2.2. Basic courses
core substance is:



- Danish history and identity

- The thrust of European history from antiquity to the present day

- Nature, technology and production in historical and contemporary perspective

- Key cultural meetings in European history

- Governance historical and contemporary perspective

- Ideologies struggle in the 20th century

- New borders and conflicts.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. In the adjunctive agent working with themes of time and space, which puts into perspective and reflect different approaches to history.
Third The organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The teaching in coherent sequence. All courses must be either related to, or based in the present.
Work with at least six courses where the main purpose of some courses is to provide an overview, while for others it is the immersion. Both perspectives must be included in all scenarios. Gradient based in Denmark's history to have a comparative view to the history of Europe and / or world history, like process based on the history of Europe and / or world history is organized with insight into the history of Denmark.
In teaching the following aspects be represented:



- The use and abuse of history

- The small and big story

- Myth and reality in history.

Teaching is organized so that there is a clear progression in:



- Choice of issues

- Methodological requirements, including requirements for different types of material

- Requirements for application of academic concepts

- Requirements for the students' ability for precise and nuanced written and oral communication.

The participants must be involved in the selection of issues and work.
3.2. Work methods
The instruction must be used varied and learner activating work forms, so that students will have good opportunities to identify, document, communicate and discuss academic contexts and views.
In order to ensure versatility of work, it is important that some process is based on the principle of inductive, while the other is based on the deductive principle.
External activities must be represented in teaching.
The instruction provides for a history assignment, see. Section. 2.2. in Annex 2.
must in the entire process implemented at least one project where an academic issue should be treated with the use of the subject method. The project work can be interdisciplinary. The written work must be organized so that students try various written work to support students' academic learning. Furthermore, students' proficiency - in view of a larger written material to formulate issues and transactions in the form of keywords integrated into educational programs included. The completed products to be used as a basis for oral communication.
3.3. IT and media

IT and media must be involved in teaching and applied with the overall aim to promote students' learning process. It is used as a search tool for information and studies on the history of academic subjects via the Internet and other databases. The emphasis is on the development of creativity and systematics in the search, autonomy and critical approach method. ICT and media should be involved in both written and oral communication and presentation tasks.
3.4. Cooperation with other subjects
instruction can load up to interaction with other disciplines, with the aim to further deepen and put into perspective the core substance.
Fourth Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Through individual professional guidance and use of testing and feedback on written work should be teaching and student throughout the course imparted a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level, including strengths and weaknesses.
4.2. Sample Forms
There will be an oral exam. Course leader chooses for each team one of the following two methods of evaluation:

Examination form a)

There will be an oral exam on the basis of an unknown sample of 10-15 standard pages extent that a standard page corresponds to 1300 characters or approximately 1350 characters. The unknown sample material must be related to one of the at least six areas examined. The kit will cover all areas. The total sample sets composed by the examiner. Each sample must contain diverse types of materials. A sample material can be used no more than three times on the same team.
The unknown sample is drawn by the student the day before the test, and provides about 24 hours of preparation time, but not less than 24 hours to prepare a synopsis. The examination takes place individually with an examination time of about 30 minutes.
The examinees can choose to prepare for the test in groups.
Based on the extracted sample and the studied range from teaching the examinee must formulate, analyze and discuss one or more academic problems. The examination basis is the unknown sample material and the studied area.
The candidate presents for the first about 10 minutes (s) historical problem (s) and relationship to the studied area from the synopsis. After progressing examination as a dialogue between the candidate and the examiner.

Sample Form b)

There will be an oral exam on the basis of an unknown sample of 8 to 12 standard pages extent that a standard page corresponds to 1300 characters or approximately 1350 characters. The unknown sample material must be related to one of the at least six areas examined. The kit will cover all areas. The total sample sets composed by the examiner. Each sample must contain diverse types of materials. A sample material can be used no more than three times on the same team.
The unknown sample is drawn by the student before the test and provides about three hours of preparation time, but not less than three hours to prepare a synopsis. The examination takes place individually with an examination time of about 30 minutes.
The examinees can choose to prepare for the test in groups.
Based on the extracted sample and the studied range from teaching the examinee must formulate, analyze and discuss one or more academic problems. The examination basis is the unknown sample material and the studied area.
The candidate presents for the first about 10 minutes (s) historical problem (s) and relationship to the studied area from the synopsis. After progressing examination as a dialogue between the candidate and the examiner.
4.3. Assessment criteria
In the evaluation, emphasis is placed on the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.



Annex 12

Chemistry C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first The identity and purpose
1.1. Identity
Chemistry is about the properties of substances and the conditions under which they respond. All living things and our material world is based on the fact that all substances are composed of atoms, and that the substances may undergo changes in chemical reactions. Chemistry deals with investigating and developing materials, products and processes, and chemical research is of great importance for the individual's life and for society technological and economic development. As science subject contributes chemistry in interaction with other disciplines to the development of the modern world.

Chemical knowledge and conceptual understanding developed through interaction between on the one hand observations and experiments on the other hand, theory and modeling.
1.2. Purpose
Chemistry is contributing to the program's overall objectives by having students gain insight into the subject methods, concepts, laws and applications of chemistry in everyday life. Students gain knowledge of relevant substances and their properties based on knowledge and understanding that all matter is composed of atoms.
The students also get insight into the chemistry importance to the outside world, technology and production, as well as currently in historical perspective. The work of the course gives students an understanding of the chemical knowledge applied for the benefit of people and nature, and that inappropriate use can affect health and the environment.
The students are introduced to scientific thinking and method, which puts the individual in a position to relate reflection and responsibility for the current problems of science content and to understand sustainability as a principle.
Second Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:



- Use the chemical jargon

- Describe substances structure and simple chemical reactions

- Relate observations, model performances and symbolic representations to each other

- Perform simple chemical calculations

- Perform chemical experiments with simple laboratory equipment

- Dealing with chemicals safely

- Record and process data and observations from experiments

- Describe the experiments and present results both in writing and orally

- Obtain and use chemical information from various sources

- Communicate and relate the resulting chemical knowledge

- Identify and relate to simple chemical problems from everyday life and from the current debate.

2.2. Basic courses
core substance are:
Stoffers building



- The elements period system

- Selected organic and inorganic substances structure, naming, mode shapes and mixability.

Quantity calculations



- Quantity calculations in relation to the reaction schemes, including the amount of substance concentration.

Chemical reactions



- Simple redox reactions, including combustion reactions

- Acid-base reactions and pH concept.
Experimental work




- Simple qualitative and quantitative analysis and methods, chemicals and safety.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The core material and the supplementary drug, represents a whole. The supplementary material elaborates and puts into perspective the core substance and involve new professional areas. The selected so that students get the opportunity, among other things to work on issues that relate to their everyday lives.
Parts of the adjunctive agent is chosen in cooperation with the participants.
Third The organization
3.1. Didactic principles
teaching is organized preferably in thematic sessions, which can involve both the core substance as supplementary material. Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on the experimental work linked to the theoretical substance for the purpose of maximum integration. In addition, application-oriented aspects involved as far as possible.
3.2. Work methods
program is organized to variation and progression. There must be progression in both work and academic requirements as the requirements for the students' independence. The progression should be evident in the work of both theoretical and experimental problems. In the choice of working must be taken into account that the students brought into an active learning role, and that their experience with individual and collective work developed.
Students' own experimental work in the laboratory is at least 20 per cent. of the subject of education.
Outreach activities may be part of education as an element in the effort to put into perspective the teaching and make the present for students.
The training must ensure that students train the oral expression skills and develop the ability to discuss and disseminate chemical topics. Student The chemical jargon expanded by varying between different oral genres in teaching.
Writing in the profession include work with the subject's various written genres and is part of the learning process. Writing in Chemistry is significant as the professional knowledge thus get a clear-oriented aspect. Writing includes the following:




- Records of experimental work

- Reports prepared on the basis of records

- Different types of tasks, including for the purpose of training of professional elements

- Other products, eg. presentations and posters.

The written work in chemistry to give students the opportunity to immerse themselves in chemical problems and strengthen the acquisition of chemical knowledge and working methods. The written work is organized so that there is progression in the profession of writing to ensure the development of the individual student writing skills.
3.3. It
It is an integral part of the teaching, for example. for communication, data acquisition, data processing, modeling, visualization and information retrieval. Students are introduced to the use of relevant IT tools, for example. in the context of post-processing and reporting of the experimental work.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the stage is set for the subject interact with other subjects in order to further deepen and put into perspective the core substance and application aspects of chemistry.
Fourth Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Kursist The benefits of teaching evaluated regularly, so there will be a basis for future guidance of each student in the work to achieve the professional goals and adjustment of teaching.
4.2. Sample Forms
There will be an oral exam. Course leader chooses for each team one of the following two forms of testing. For both types of examination, the following applies: The tasks set by the examiner and shall collectively cover tuition description wide, each task must be used more than twice on the same team, and any attachments may be used several times by the examiner.

Examination form a)

Oral examination on the basis of a task, covering both theoretical material and experimental work in the same field, which may contain a voucher. The tasks as a whole should be known by the examinees in the sample.
Examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. Is given about 24 minutes of preparation time during which the student, to the extent practicable, have access to relevant equipment and relevant chemicals.
During the examination, the relevant equipment and relevant chemicals be available. Experimental equipment must be involved in the examination. In special cases, apparatus and chemicals omitted at the examination.

Sample Form b)

Oral examination on the basis of a task that includes a known experimental and theoretical subtask. The sample is split and settled by up to 10 per examinees. day. The experiment and the theoretical subtask is to be combined, so that the properties of different areas. The assignments must be known of the examinees in the sample. The combination of experiment and theory subtask may not be familiar examinees. Prior to the experimental part of the test is provided only about the experiment, while the theoretical subtask disclosed just before preparing for the theoretical part of the exam.
Examination time is about one and a half hour for up to five examinees for the experimental part and about Per 20 minutes. candidate for the theoretical part. Is given about 20 minutes of preparation. examinee to the theoretical part of the exam.
The first part of the experimental sample, wherein the up to five examinees at a time individually perform a known experiment within about hour and a half. Examiners conversations with each candidate on the specific experiment and the associated theory. The second part carried out immediately after the first.
4.3. Assessment criteria
rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.I assessment is emphasized that the student:



- Express themselves clearly, precisely and comprehensibly using the terminology

- Understands and can explain simple relationships between theory and practice

- Involves relevant methods respectively, results from experimental work

- Demonstrates professional overview, including may involve relevant chemical issues in the professional conversation.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
4.4. even Students

Even Students must present an oral examination after examination form a). An independent student must have completed the laboratory course in chemistry (§ 65) with a certificate from the institution which organized the course, to be considered for the trial. If the independent student can document the implementation of experimental work to an extent corresponding to the level's experimental work from previous chemistry teaching, for example. in the form of reports or records, the independent student set for trial without conducting laboratory course. The previously conducted experimental work included in the same way as the basis for the sample as experimental work in a regular educational context. The head of the course where the test takes place, decide on previous experimental work can constitute a sufficient basis for the self-student sample.



Annex 13

Mathematics B - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first The identity and purpose
1.1. Identity
Mathematics based on abstraction and logical thinking and include a variety of methods of modeling and problem solving. Mathematics is indispensable in many occupations in science and technology, medicine and ecology, economics and social sciences and as a basis for political decision-making. Mathematics is also important in daily life. The widespread use of mathematics is rooted in the abstract nature and reflects the experience that many different phenomena behave uniformly. When hypotheses and theories formulated in the language of mathematics, won often hereby new insight. Mathematics has accompanied the development of culture from the earliest civilizations and mankind's first consideration of the number and shape. Science Mathematics as a subject has evolved in a continuous interaction between applications and building theory.
1.2. Purpose
Through the training, the students should gain insight into how mathematics can help to understand, formulate and address problems in various disciplines, as well as insight into mathematical reasoning. Thus, the students should be able to better relate to others' use of mathematics as well as achieve sufficient mathematical skills to complete higher education in which mathematics is used. Furthermore, they gain knowledge of important aspects of mathematics interaction with culture, science and technology.
Second Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:



- Handle simple formulas, including translating from symbolholdigt language to natural language and vice versa, could account for this symbolic descriptions of variable contexts and apply symbolholdigt languages ​​to solve simple problems with mathematical content

- Provide a statistical treatment of the figures, complete hypothesis testing and communicate conclusions in clear language

- Use simple function expression in modeling the given data, carry out simulations and projections from models and discuss the scope of such models

- Use derivative and indefinite integral for simple functions and interpret different representations of them

- Explain this geometric models and solve geometric problems

- Carry out simple mathematical reasoning and evidence

- Disseminate knowledge of mathematics applied in selected areas

- IT tools for solving given math problems, including the handling of more complex formulas and determination of derivative and indefinite integral for more complex function expressions.

2.2. Basic courses
core substance is:



- Expense species hierarchy, the enhanced potency term equation solution with analytical and graphical methods and the use of IT tools

- Formal expression to describe straight forward and inverse and linear relationships, polynomial contexts exponential contexts and power relationships between variables

- Definition of f (x), the characteristics of the following basic features: linear functions, polynomials, exponential, power and logarithmic functions, and characteristics of such functions graphic processes, the use of regression on the data to

- Definition and interpretation of derivative, including growth rate and marginal considerations derived function for the elementary functions and differentiation of f + g, f - g and k × f

- Monotony conditions extrema and optimization and the relationship between these concepts and derivative


- Primitive for the elementary functions, the use of integral calculus to the area calculation of excise amounts limited by graphs of non-negative functions

- Ratio calculations of similar triangles and trigonometric calculations in arbitrary triangles

- Principal features of mathematical models, modeling.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance in the subject of mathematics fills about 50 hours of training time. It must be put into perspective and deepen the core substance and in general expand professional horizons, so students can meet all academic goals.
Therefore, the adjunctive agent in particular include continuous course:



- With emphasis on reasoning and evidence on selected subjects

- With mathematical modeling

- Statistical analysis of a set hypothesis, discussion of a power sample representativeness, the use of two types of statistical or probabilistic models.

Third The organization
3.1. Didactic principles
program is organized so that each student when the academic objectives. Student The independent handling of mathematical problems and tasks should be the focus of teaching.
Through an experimental approach to mathematical topics, issues and tasks, students' mathematical concepts and innovative skills developed. This is done by organizing some courses inductively, so generalizations arising from concrete examples.
The experimental element in mathematics can not stand alone. Therefore, the selected topic courses organized so that students get a clear understanding of certificate importance in mathematical theory.
Each student must in teaching actively use the mathematical language to convey his knowledge.
Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on mathematics applications, and students need to see how the same mathematical methods can be applied to different phenomena.
Program is organized to progression in working methods and subject content, while basic skills and general knowledge is retained by being regularly reviewed.
CAS tools must not only be used to perform the more complex symbolic bills, but also support skill learning and mathematical concept formation.
3.2. Work methods
A significant part of the teaching of core material and the additional material is organized as project progress or larger theme tasks. For each major process formulated professional goals, deciding on the workflow and the participants prepare a written product that will document the academic results. After each course of or in connection with a repetition demonstrates how the subject content can be translated into exam questions.
Part of the course is organized as a group in order that students will develop their mathematical concepts through their mutual professional discussion.
Student self-learning and dissemination of given mathematical texts are part of the work on the oral dimension.
In teaching, considerable emphasis on problem solving as an essential support for the appropriation of concepts, methods and skills. Solving tasks done both in class and as homework. A number of project processes and tasks theme concludes with the students to prepare a report.
3.3. It
teaching is organized as calculators, computing and mathematics programs constituting significant aids in the students 'work with' learning and problem solving. The organization includes training in using these devices to perform calculations for symbolic manipulation of formal expression for handling statistical data material to obtain an overview of graphs, the equation solving and symbolic differentiation and integration. Furthermore, use calculators, computing and mathematics programs in the experimental approach to issues and problem solving.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the stage is set for the subject interact with other disciplines with the aim of organizing professional courses, which contains a more extensive use of mathematics within other subject areas, students will have knowledge to.
Fourth Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Both teaching and students' academic achievement which is continuously evaluated, among other prospective evaluation conversations.
For each major project or topic process must clearly show how participants' benefits from training will be evaluated.

After each major project or topic course implement teacher and students an evaluation of the teaching work and progress towards the fulfillment of professional goals.
Sequence of major topics in the core substance rounded normally with a test to evaluate the professional milestones.
Students submit regular written assignments and reports. The responses are corrected and commented on by the teacher.
4.2. Sample Forms
There will be a centrally asked written examination and an oral examination.
The written test
for the written test will be four hours. The written examination assignment consists of assignments given within the core substance and to evaluate the corresponding professional goals. The sample is two-fold. First test to be answered without the use of aids. After the end of the first test returned answering them. During the second part of the test the examinee use all aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet is not allowed, see. However, § 15 paragraph. 2, in the general examination order. The questions for this part of the sample prepared based on the premise that the student has a CAS tool that can perform symbol manipulation, see. Section. 3.3.
The oral examination
The oral examination must include completed project sequence and theme tasks. The final questions for the oral examination should be published well in advance of the test and shall collectively cover the academic and professional content. A significant part of the examination questions must be designed so that it is possible to withdraw the project progress and themed tasks with associated student reports. The questions and a list of reports and teaching sent to the examiner prior to the examination.
Each question must be designed with a headline indicating the overall topic for examination and specific sub-questions.
Examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Is given about 30 minutes preparation time.
The sample is two-fold.
The first part of the test consists of the candidate's presentation of its response to the extracted matter supplemented with detailed questions.
The second part takes the form of a conversation based on the overall subject.
4.3. Assessment criteria
rating is an overall assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the relevant professional objectives as specified in section. 2.1.
The emphasis is on whether the examinee:



1) have basic math skills, including:

- Can handle mathematical symbol language and mathematical concepts

- Have knowledge of mathematical methods and to apply them correctly

- Skill in using IT tools appropriate.

2) can apply mathematics to present problems, including:

- Can choose appropriate methods to solve problems submitted

- Can present a mathematical topic or a method of solving a mathematical problem in a clear and understandable manner

- Can explain this mathematical models and discuss their reach.

3) have an overview and can be put into perspective mathematics, including:

- Has insight into mathematical theory and can independently explain mathematical reasoning and evidence

- Have knowledge of mathematics application in another field

- Can move between the subject's theoretical and practical aspects of the problem modeling and treatment.

In an exam situation involved the categories that are relevant to the exam questions.
The oral exam includes any report not in the assessment. Taking into account only the oral presentation.
In both the written and the oral test will be one character from an overall assessment.



Annex 14

Religion C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first The identity and purpose
1.1. Identity
Faget religion deals mainly with world religions, and of these, Christianity mandatory. The course combines dissemination of tradition and a contemporary, global perspective.
Based on an open and neutral position and in a religion scientific basis treated religions and central religious phenomena past and present, with emphasis on the present.
The approach to religion combines characterizing, analyzing, interpreting and critical perspectives that lets both religions own worlds of imagination as modern, including the secular points of view have their say. The subject is not tied to any faith.
The starting point for employment with the religions are texts and other documentary material.
1.2. Purpose

Throughout the course religion should students acquire knowledge and understanding of religions and religious phenomena. The aim is that students gain insight into the relationships and tensions within individual religions and between religions, and that they get knowledge about religions significance for the individual, for groups and for society. The course will also provide insight into the relationship between religions and non-religious perceptions of reality.
Education shall develop the students' self and environment awareness and thereby create a professional basis for independent assessment of and active participation in a modern, multicultural and democratic society.
Second Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:



- Present an oral presentation of a religion subject material and apply elementary religious terminology

- Analyze, interpret and put into perspective the documentary material, including assessing whether a given material views a religion from inside or outside, ie from a participant's point of view or an external, possibly religion critical viewpoint

- Implement and communicate a less empirical study of a religion academic subject or a religion-disciplinary fieldwork

- Explain important aspects of Christianity in its contemporary, historical and formative figure with emphasis on the present

- Explain important aspects of a further two to three religions, one of which must be Islam

- Explain central religious phenomena

- Put the religions and their historical impact in relation to selected aspects of European culture and thinking

- Demonstrate a reflective understanding of religions and livsanskuelsers impact on human society and culture

- Formulate opinions about religious ethical issues

- On a professional basis engage in a debate on own and others' cultural values ​​and thus qualify for the global community.

2.2. Basic courses
core substance is:



- Christianity, particularly in view of its European and Danish manifestations. The work includes contemporary texts, individual texts from the history of Christianity as well as texts from the Old and New Testament

- Islam, including both contemporary texts as texts from the Koran, with the involvement of a European and Danish context

- Religionsfænomenologiske concepts as myth (cosmogony, eschatology), ritual, religious specialists, cult and axis mundi, and knowledge about religions organization.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The supplementary material should generally perspective and deepen the core substance and in general expand professional horizons, so that students can meet the targets. In addition to Christianity and Islam must read important aspects of further one to two religions see. Section. 2.1.
May also read one or two items. It may be a well-defined religion academic subject or a religion of their choice.
Third The organization
3.1. Didactic principles
religions regarded both as a unique cultural and historical formations, each with their specific identity and problems, and from a comparative perspective using religionsfænomenologiske categories.
By the subject of education, about 30 per cent. on Christianity.
The main approach to the themes of the subject is intensive work with texts and other documentary material. The material includes both classic as representative texts, audio and video recordings as well as internet sites. Moreover involved other material, including religious objects, music, interviews, observations from field work and field trips, etc.
approach to texts and other material combines characterizing, analyzing, interpreting and critical perspectives that lets both religions own worlds of imagination as secular viewpoints have their say .
The necessary background knowledge is ensured by including secondary representations such as textbook material, newspaper articles, reference books and information from the Internet.
3.2. Work methods
Emphasis progression into the process so that participants gradually trained in self-learning and dissemination of the material. At the beginning of the course the emphasis is on an alternation between teacher-led classroom and various forms of group work. Towards the end increased the participants' more independent work with the material.
To increase participants' understanding of the religions current manifestations included outreach activities in the classroom in the form of field trips or field work for exploration of places of worship and religious environments.

The emphasis is on strengthening students' rhetorical skills as the ability to provide a clear and structured presentation of a substance.
3.3. It
It is a natural working of religious profession. It is used for:



- Information retrieval

- The study of religious practice

- Training of withholding critical competence

- Dissemination of academic subjects and issues.

3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the religion interact with other subjects. Through interaction promoted students' understanding of religions effect history and religions, social, political and cultural significance.
Fourth Evaluation
4.1 Continuous evaluation
Through individual professional guidance, the trainee must be given a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level, including strengths and weaknesses. At least once in each semester must be an evaluation of the student's performance, active participation and involvement in education.
4.2. Sample Forms
There will be an oral exam. Course leader chooses for each team one of the following two methods of evaluation:

Examination form a)

Oral examination on the basis of an unknown text material and any other material amounting to a maximum of four pages a 1,300 letters, corresponding to approximately 1,350 characters chosen by the examiner. Examination Texts may be used more than twice on the same team.
Examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. Is given about 48 minutes of preparation time. Candidate begins with an oral presentation of about 7-10 minutes. The examination forms itself forward as a professional conversation about the drawn exam questions.

Sample Form b)

Oral examination on the basis of an unknown text material and any other material amounting to a maximum of two pages a 1,300 letters, corresponding to approximately 1,350 characters chosen by the examiner. Examination Texts may be used more than twice on the same team.
Examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. Is given about 24 minutes of preparation time.
Candidate begins with an oral presentation of about 7-10 minutes. The examination forms itself forward as a professional conversation about the drawn exam questions.
4.3. Assessment criteria
rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1. Emphasis is also placed on the candidate's ability to produce a facts in a clear and concise manner and to structure and organize the exam.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.



Annex 15

Social C - higher preparatory single, in June 2013
first The identity and purpose
1.1. Identity
Social is about Danish and international society. The course provides an empirical and theoretical basis of knowledge and understanding of the modern, globalized society dynamics and complexity by linking the current social development, sociological, economic and political concepts in order to qualify own views and options.
1.2. Purpose
Social Studies to promote students' desire and ability to relate to and participate in the democratic debate and through teaching content and working to involve them in matters of importance for democracy and social development. Furthermore, the teaching foster students' independence and confidence to be able to consider social issues in a qualified level. The teaching should provide knowledge and understanding of particular Danish society and the dynamics that influence the development of modern society. Students will strengthen their study skills through working with empirical issues, and using concepts and methods from the social science disciplines.
Second Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students are required to:



- Apply and combine knowledge of sociology, economics and policy to account for current social problems and their solutions

- Examine the relationships between relevant background variables and social and cultural patterns

- Examining concrete policy making

- Examine specific priority problems in the welfare state

- Demonstrate in concrete examples the importance of the EU and global conditions for the policy options

- Formulate social science questions and seek, use and critically evaluate information to document simple academic contexts

- Disseminate academic contexts in simple models, tables and charts


- Disseminate knowledge about professional contexts using academic concepts

- Disseminate and analyze the subject's taxonomic levels using the terminology

- On a professional basis to argue for their own positions, engage in a professional dialogue and discuss academic issues.

2.2. Basic courses
core substance are:
Policy



- Political ideologies, including conservatism, liberalism and socialism

- Democracy and human rights, including the importance of the judicial system

- Policy decisions in Denmark, including political participation opportunities.

Sociology



- Identity formation and socialization

- Social and cultural differences.

Economy



- Economic circuits and instruments

- Welfare and distribution.

Method



- Central social science information channels.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The academic goals are met by nuclear substance concepts and relationships used in a study of the supplementary material. The additional substance is the typical examples of the current social debate in the form of texts, statistics and clips from electronic media used to further concretise and put into perspective academic contexts, including the importance of global and European conditions for development in Denmark.
Third Teaching organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Education shall be organized thematically, typically on the basis of students' curiosity and curiosity regarding current social issues. Through the entire process there must be a greater involvement of students in the choice of theme and work. In the treatment of substance an overall perspective, so that at least one theme addressed across disciplines. In teaching, emphasis should be placed on the inductive principle, ie specific issues should be the starting point, and to be of decisive importance that each student will have opportunities on a professional basis to advance the views, arguments and assessments.
Organized teaching in shorter periods deductively, has to be done a use of the subject material to concrete examples. Such shorter training periods can be used to highlight the similarities and differences between the social disciplines.
Teaching is organized so that it is versatile in the choice of perspectives, concepts and methods.
3.2. Work methods
The instruction must be used varied and learner activating work forms, so that students will have good opportunities to identify, document, communicate and debate academic contexts and views. External activities must be integrated into teaching. There must in the entire process carried out at least one smaller project where an academic issue should be handled with the use of methodologies from disciplines.
Writing of increasing difficulty helps to cultivate understanding, deepening and dissemination of academic contexts and in support of oral presentations. It's written planned so that there is progression and consistency of writing in other subjects. In cooperation with other subjects for written contributes social studies with professional communication on the subject taxonomic levels and the use of concepts, empirical and methodology in a precise and nuanced language.
3.3. It
Information Technology tools used in the classroom to support and complement the academic and the educational process.
Information Technology used:



- Information retrieval

- Processing and dissemination

- Knowledge sharing.

Advice on key social science websites included in each course. Use of electronic conferencing is integrated into teaching.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the stage is set for the subject interact with other subjects in order to further deepen and put into perspective the core substance.
Part civics in a module, carried out at least one interdisciplinary course.
Fourth Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation

Through forward-looking and individual instruction, the use of testing and feedback on professional activities must be student during the course get a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level, including involvement activities that stimulate reflection on the benefits of education. The basis of the evaluation must be the academic objectives. Furthermore, at least once every semester necessary to evaluate performance, active participation and engagement in the classroom. In doing so, there will be a joint evaluation of teaching.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral exam on the basis of a sample with a known theme and an unknown annexes with different types of materials on the scale of two to three pages a 1,300 letters, corresponding to approximately 1350 characters. Using electronic media material as part of the documents corresponding four to seven minutes of play on a standard page. In connection with the theme made focused the questions that follow the taxonomic levels. A prøvemateriales tea are known to the examinees, since it is similar to a tea gradient. A sample material must not be used on three examinations. The examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. Is given about 48 minutes of preparation time.
The examination takes the form of an academic conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
4.3. Assessment criteria
rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.

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