Order On Subjects Common For Secondary Schools (Elective Order)

Original Language Title: Bekendtgørelse om valgfag fælles for de gymnasiale uddannelser (valgfagsbekendtgørelsen)

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Read the untranslated law here: https://www.retsinformation.dk/Forms/R0710.aspx?id=132670

Overview (table of contents)

Appendix 1
Appendix 2
Appendix 3
Appendix 4
Appendix 5
Appendix 6
Appendix 7
Appendix 8
Appendix 9
Annex 10
Annex 11
Annex 12
Annex 13
Annex 14
Annex 15
Annex 16
Annex 17
Annex 18
Annex 19
Annex 20
Annex 21
Annex 22
Annex 23
Annex 24
Annex 25
Annex 26
Annex 27
Annex 28
Annex 29
Annex 30
Annex 31
Annex 32
Annex 33
Annex 34
Annex 35
Annex 36
Annex 37
Annex 38
Annex 39
Annex 40
Annex 41
Annex 42
Annex 43
Annex 44
Annex 45
The full text
Order on subjects common for secondary schools (elective Order)
Pursuant to § 15 paragraph. 3 of the Act on Upper Secondary Schools (STX) (secondary Act). Act no. 791 of 24 July 2008, § 14 paragraph. 2 of the Act on education to higher commercial examination (HHX) and the higher technical examination (HTX), see. Legislative Decree no. 871 of 27 August 2008, § 10 paragraph. 4 and § 11 paragraph. 2 of the Law on Higher Preparatory Exam (hf-Act). Act no. 445 of 8 May 2007:
§ 1. Offering, the organization and the organization etc. of electives under this Order is subject to the rules, which also provided for the training where the course is offered, including the limitations set for the offering of courses in that program.
§ 2. Individual institutions are under this notice provided. However, § 1, offer courses listed in Annex 1
§ 3. The content and the educational objectives contained in the respective curricula as described in Annex 2-45.
PCS. 2. learning plans set. Paragraphs. 1, covering the term 'students' both learners and the term 'school' both school and course.
§ 4. The Order comes into force on 1 August 2010 and applies to students who start secondary education or follow a secondary education organized as single August 1, 2010 or later, see. However paragraph. 3.
PCS. 2. At the same time, Executive Order no. 744 of 30 June 2008 on subjects common for secondary schools (elective Order). The Order is still effective for students who have started upper secondary education before 1 August 2010.
PCS. 3. The headteacher may decide that classes or teams of students covered by paragraph. 2, taught by the teaching plans set out in the Annex to this notice.

Ministry of Education, June 23, 2010
PMV
Jarl Damgaard

Head of Department / Mads Bentzen

Annex 1
Overview of the curriculum - electives June 2010







Appendix 2


Arabic A



Appendix 3


Arabic B



Appendix 4


Astronomy C



Appendix 5


Dance B



Appendix 6


Computer Science C



Appendix 7


Design B



Appendix 8


Economics C



Appendix 9


Philosophy B



Annex 10


Philosophy C



Annex 11


Financing C



Annex 12


French beginner's B




Annex 13


French at C



Annex 14


Greek C



Annex 15


Sports B



Annex 16


Information C



Annex 17


Innovation B



Annex 18


Innovation C



Annex 19


International technology and culture C



Annex 20


Italian B



Annex 21


Japanese A



Annex 22


Japanese B



Annex 23


Chinese A



Annex 24


Chinese B



Annex 25


Kulturforståelse B



Annex 26


Kulturforståelse C



Annex 27


Latin C



Annex 28


Marketing Communications C



Annex 29


Materials C



Annex 30


Multimedia C



Annex 31


Organisation C



Annex 32


Programming C



Annex 33


Psychology B



Annex 34


Psychology C



Annex 35


Religion B



Annex 36


Rhetoric C



Annex 37


Russian B



Annex 38


Spanish B



Annex 39


Statics and Strength C



Annex 40


Statistics C



Annex 41


Technology C




Annex 42


Turkish A



Annex 43


Turkish B



Annex 44


German beginner's language B



Annex 45


German at C





Appendix 2
Arabic A - elective, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Arabic is one færdighedsfag, vidensfag and cultural skills. Its target area is the Arabic language and by extension, knowledge and understanding of history, culture and society in the Arab world and other regions Arabic-speaking populations.
1.2. purpose
Through work with the Arabic language develops students' ability to communicate in Arabic. The study of Arabic language and culture provides knowledge and insight that brings the student and understanding of Arab society and Arab culture as increasing environment awareness and intercultural awareness. Arabic A provides knowledge of a culture that plays a significant role in the globalized world, and sharpens students' aesthetic awareness. Finally, the Arabic A students able through cultural meeting to reflect on their own culture in comparison with Arabic culture.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the main points when talking about standard Arabic known as well as general topics disseminated through various media
- Participate in conversation and discussion on a coherent and fairly correct standard Arabic for known as well as general topics as well as understand and use general terms in one of the important dialects
- Read and understand simple modern texts, fiction and non-fiction
- Orally present and explain a known problem in a coherent and fairly clear Arabic
- Express themselves in writing on a single and coherent Arabic on a given issue and be able to translate a simple text from Danish into Arabic
- Analyze and interpret texts of various genres and put the individual text into the cultural, historical and social contexts
- Apply the acquired knowledge of Arab culture, history and social conversation in Arabic and in working with the studied topics and be able to put into perspective with other cultural and social
- Practice knowledge about how to learn a foreign language, in the daily work with Arabic
- Use of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries and Arabic grammar and should be familiar with the use of IT in Arabic.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Pronunciation, intonation and reading
- Listening and speaking skills, including the ability to engage in dialogue and to self-presentation and presentation of texts or topics in Arabic
- Audio and visual media such as support for listening and reading comprehension as well as speaking and writing
- Literary and non-literary texts of different size, which illuminates the Arab world's cultural and social development, with emphasis on the 20th and 21st century
- Key subject aids, including IT
- Arab history, culture and society, which are relevant for the subjects studied, as well as key social conditions in the Arab world and among Arab minority cultures in the West.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional fabric consists of various historical, cultural and social expressions that are grounded in the Arab world. It should deepen and put into perspective the core substance and expand professional horizons, so that students meet the academic goals.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Disciplines to be experienced as a whole, in accordance with the academic objectives focus primarily on being useful. The teaching will give students the opportunity to acquire the knowledge of languages ​​required to develop communication skills.

Central to the lab, students could own language production and expression in relation to the professional goals. Interconnecting language priority over linguistic precision.
Listening, reading and communication strategies to give students the tools to initiate and maintain communication despite language barriers. Teaching grammar, vocabulary, text analysis and foreign language acquisition involved when appropriate and taking into account the academic progression.
Teaching is the greatest possible extent in Arabic.
3.2. Work methods
Central to the lab, the academic progression.
Beginner classes include literacy and conversation exercises, giving students an elementary communicative competence, fleshed out in freer dialogues and conversation. It also includes regular listening, reading and writing as well as targeted and systematic work on vocabulary.
After starting classes organized work mainly through six to eight subjects, and ensuring that the academic objectives integrated into this work.
Work methods and techniques varied and continuously adapted to the professional goals, working towards in that topic. The teaching is organized with progression in the choice of work, so that students acquire study skills and independence in the work. It focuses on work that develops both the students' communication skills as the ability to read and understand texts. Language comprehension is ensured by the students hear spoken Arabic disseminated through various media.
Written work accounted for in everyday teaching and as support discipline for the oral dimension, partly as a discipline where students both the opportunity to train and demonstrate their linguistic knowledge and skills and to develop the ability to explain the contents of a single writing Arabic. The written work is planned so that there is progression and so there is consistency with the written work in other subjects.
Work on Arabic culture, history and social continuously integrated in the work of the subjects.
3.3. it
It is an integral part of Arabic course and taken into account in all disciplines from the first alphabet learning. It is used as a tool to support text work and for work on the skill issues underlying language acquisition and use relevant programs for interactive exercises and workouts to strengthen language acquisition, and the receptive as productive.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Arabic A covered by the general requirement for subject interaction. In STX program included the subject in general study preparation and general language understanding in accordance with the rules governing these processes.
When Arabic A is part of a study, it must interact with other disciplines on topics of linguistic, cultural, inter-cultural and historical art. Parts of the core substance and the additional agent is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area.
When Arabic A acts as electives included it in interaction with other language subjects in order to develop a general linguistic awareness and knowledge of how to learn foreign languages.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
There is an ongoing individual assessment interviews between teacher and student. Major completed courses or subjects evaluated targeted and forward-looking of the teacher and students together. The evaluation is wide compared to the academic objectives. The evaluation should be forward looking.
Students carrying out tests for self-assessment in relation to the professional goals.
4.2. Sample Forms
There will be a written and an oral examination.
The written test
There will be a centrally asked written examination of five hours.
Sample main ingredient is a task of written expression skills in Arabic, based on a contemporary Arabic language text material of between 2/3 and one normal side, possibly supplemented by imagery.
The student must use all tools. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet and translation programs, ie software or web-based programs that can translate whole sentences and whole texts from one language to another is not allowed.
The oral examination
The test consists of three parts.


1) Text Understanding the basis of an unknown primary in Arabic prose text of a magnitude of between 2.3 and one standard page. The text must be provided with a brief introduction on the Danish and the only real comments and special words stated. The text referenced in outline in Danish.

2) Conversation in Arabic starting in an unfamiliar imagery on general topics.
3) Presentation in Arabic of an unknown primary Arabic language text material with a scale of three to four pages. The text material which glosseres compared to the level and severity, should be related to one of the subjects studied. The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance. The topic studied involved in the presentation, which is followed by a detailed conversation. The text material handed out the day before the test, and provides about 24 hours of preparation time, but not less than 24 hours. All Aid.

For 2) and 3) provide a total preparation time of about 30 minutes. The examination time is about 30 minutes. The student must use all tools. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet is not allowed.
A page of prose 1,300 letters, of poetry 30 verse lines. In normal side calculation of an Arabic text included short vowels, even if these are not marked in the text.
The same unknown sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
In both the written and the oral examination assessed the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The written examination is emphasized that the student can extract the essence of the distributed text material, express themselves in writing in a simple and understandable Arabic, structure and produce a content, as well as to the student demonstrates proficiency in the appropriate morphology and syntax and master a general vocabulary and idiom.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
The oral exam is emphasized that the student in Arabic can present and put into perspective the unknown text material and incorporate relevant elements of Arab culture, history and society from the studied subject. Furthermore, the emphasis is on conversation skills and reading comprehension skills. Interconnecting language is more important than correctness in detail. The Arabic-language part of the examination shall be predominant.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Appendix 3
Arabic B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Arabic is one færdighedsfag, vidensfag and cultural skills. Its target area is the Arabic language and by extension, knowledge and understanding of history, culture and society in the Arab world and other regions Arabic-speaking populations.
1.2. purpose
Through work with the Arabic language develops students' ability to communicate in Arabic. The study of Arabic language and culture provides knowledge and insight that brings the student and understanding of Arab society and Arab culture as increasing environment awareness and intercultural awareness. Arabic B provides knowledge of a culture that plays a significant role in the globalized world, and sharpens students' aesthetic awareness. Finally, the Arabic B students able through cultural meeting to reflect on their own culture in comparison with Arabic culture.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the main points when talking about standard Arabic known as well as general topics disseminated through various media
- Participate in conversation and discussion in a simple and understandable Standard Arabic for known as well as general topics as well as understand and use general terms in one of the important dialects
- Read and understand simple modern texts, fiction and non-fiction
- Orally present and explain a known problem in a simple and understandable Arabic
- Express themselves in writing on a single Arabic on a given issue
- Apply the acquired knowledge of Arab culture, history and social conversation in Arabic and in working with the studied topics and be able to put into perspective with other cultural and social
- Apply knowledge of how to learn foreign languages ​​in their daily work with Arabic
- Use of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries and Arabic grammar and should be familiar with the use of IT in Arabic.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Literacy, pronunciation, intonation and reading
- Listening and speaking skills, including the ability to engage in simple dialogue and self-presentation and presentation of texts or topics in Arabic
- Audio and visual media such as support for listening and reading comprehension as well as speaking and writing

- Literary and non-literary texts of different size, which illuminates the Arab world's cultural and social development, with emphasis on the 20th and 21st centuries.
- Key subject aids, including IT
- Arab history, culture and society, which are relevant for the subjects studied, as well as key social conditions in the Arab world and among Arab minority cultures in the West.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional fabric consists of various historical, cultural and social expressions that are grounded in the Arab world. It should deepen and put into perspective the core substance and expand professional horizons, so that students meet the academic goals.
3. Organization
3.1 Didactic principles
Disciplines to be experienced as a whole, in accordance with the academic objectives focus primarily on being useful. The teaching will give students the opportunity to acquire the knowledge of languages ​​required to develop communication skills.
Central to the lab, students could own language production and expression in relation to the professional goals. Interconnecting language priority over linguistic precision.
Listening, reading and communication strategies to give students the tools to initiate and maintain communication despite language barriers. Teaching grammar, vocabulary, text analysis and foreign language acquisition involved when appropriate and taking into account the academic progression.
3.2. Work methods
Central to the lab, the academic progression.
Beginner classes include literacy and conversation exercises, giving students an elementary communicative competence, fleshed out in freer dialogues and conversation. It also includes regular listening, reading and writing as well as targeted and systematic work on vocabulary.
After starting classes organized work mainly through three to five topics and ensure that the academic objectives integrated into this work.
Work methods and techniques varied and continuously adapted to the professional goals, working towards in that topic. The teaching is organized with progression in the choice of work, so that students acquire study skills and independence in the work. It focuses on work that develops both the students' communication skills as the ability to read and understand texts. Language comprehension is ensured by the students hear spoken Arabic disseminated through various media.
Written work accounted for in everyday teaching support discipline for the oral dimension.
Work on Arabic culture, history and social continuously integrated in the work of the subjects.
3.3. it
It is an integral part of Arabic course and taken into account in all disciplines from the first alphabet learning. It is used as a tool to support text work and for work on the skill issues underlying language acquisition and use relevant programs for interactive exercises and workouts to strengthen language acquisition, and the receptive as productive.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Arabic B is subject to the general requirement for subject interaction. In STX program included the subject in general study preparation and general language understanding in accordance with the rules governing these processes.
When Arabic B acts as electives included it in interaction with other language subjects in order to develop a general linguistic awareness and knowledge of how to learn foreign languages.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
There is an ongoing individual assessment interviews between teacher and student. Major completed courses or subjects evaluated targeted and forward-looking of the teacher and students together. The evaluation is wide compared to the academic objectives. The evaluation should be forward looking.
Students carrying out tests for self-assessment in relation to the professional goals.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral exam. The test consists of two parts:


1) Conversation in Arabic starting in an unfamiliar imagery or in an unfamiliar sound material of two to three minutes in length.

2) Statement and in-depth interview in Arabic and text comprehension based on an unknown Arabic-language prose amounting to 2/3 standard page. The text must be provided with a brief introduction in Arabic, and the only real comments and special words stated. The text has thematic link with a studied subject that involved in the conversation in Arabic. The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance.

A combined preparation time of about 48 minutes. The examination time is about 24 minutes. The student must use all tools. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet is not allowed.
A page of prose 1,300 letters, of poetry 30 verse lines. In normal side calculation of an Arabic text included short vowels, even if these are not marked in the text.
The same unknown sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
At the oral examination assessed the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
In the evaluation, emphasis is on the examinee in Arabic can present and put into perspective the unknown text material and incorporate relevant elements of Arab culture, history and society from the studied subject. Furthermore, the emphasis is on conversation skills and reading comprehension skills. Interconnecting language is more important than correctness in detail. The Arabic-language part of the examination shall be predominant.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Appendix 4
Astronomy C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Astronomy represents a central science contributions to man's realization of its own position in time and space. Based on observations and theories about the universe and its various astronomical structures establish the profession a connection between past and present conceptions of the world, characterized by curiosity and fascination. Teaching The course illustrates through its connection to current astronomical research center, general human issues, which opens the involvement of several disciplines and can stimulate interest in professional concentration in science.
1.2. purpose
The subject astronomy C contributes to the program's overall objective of focusing on the general formation by students through working with astronomical observations, data, theories and models get insight into scientific work and ways of thinking. The astronomical worldview that is in constant change, occupies a central place in the classroom, and students should become acquainted with the significant shift in the realization of man's place in the universe of all time.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should:


- Could orient themselves at the starry sky and identify planets and selected constellations
- Be able to explain basic astronomical phenomena, including day and night, lunar phases, eclipses and seasons change
- Be able to account for significant changes in the astronomical world
- Collect, process and interpret astronomical data
- Have insight into the use of models for qualitative and quantitative description of astronomical phenomena and processes
- Demonstrate knowledge of the subject's identity and methods
- To process an elementary astronomical text and explain the technical concepts used and the scientific reasoning
- Be able to search for information about an astronomical topic from different sources and assess the reliability
- Communicate astronomical topics for a selected audience.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is the following:
Man's place in the universe


- Basic characteristics of the terrestrial planets, including their internal structure, surface and atmosphere
- The solar system's structure and dynamics, including the Sun's effect on different objects in the solar system
- Galactic system structure and especially solar location
- The cosmic zoom, including methods to determine distances in the universe.

Universe and dynamics


- Big Bang model focused on cosmological redshift, age of the universe, the cosmic background radiation and the formation of the light elements
- Stellar formation, development, and finally, including elemental synthesis
- Planetary formation and conditions of life.

2.3. additional substance

Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance that fills about 40 per cent. of study, to be chosen so that it puts into perspective and deepens the core substance, while it supports the aims of education. Students should have a significant influence on the choice of additional substance. In selecting the substance must especially be given to consider both current astronomical topics such as opportunities to involve students other subjects in the work.
3. Teaching organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The teaching is organized in the form of courses, which aim to address one or more of the professional goals. The academic content of the individual modes can be both the core substance of both professional areas as supplementary material. The programs should be seen as a whole meet all academic goals.
The teaching is based on a general natural scientific basis and mathematics C, but must also be adapted to students' actual academic requirements. It is not intended that the formal mathematical reasoning must play a significant role in the astronomical problems.
The inclusion of current astronomical phenomena and relevant new results from the astronomical research is an essential principle for the organization of teaching, even if it means that you have to deviate from the pre-plan, provided that all objectives met.
Observations and experiments play an important role in the art. Students should the teaching make independent observations, where the first hand can familiarize themselves with relevant instruments and methods for processing the collected data. Education shall be organized so that the interaction between theories, models and astronomical data is clearly for students.
3.2. Work methods
Education shall be organized so that there is variation in the applied work. If possible, we will work with multidisciplinary topics.
The astronomical portfolio
Each pupil must be under the teacher's guidance build its own portfolio, which is part of the ongoing evaluation of the student's standpoint and as part of the basis for the oral examination in the subject. The astronomical portfolio made up by the student's own choosing:


- Materials that are handed out by the teacher or have become associated with teaching
- Materials that are the result of the student's own information retrieval and processing thereof
- Material attached to the pupil observations and other experimental work
- The student's written products in the profession, including project reports and reports of sightings and other experimental work
- Products associated with the pupil dissemination of the subject.

writing
The goal of the written dimension of astronomy is to ensure students' immersion in the subject with emphasis on the experimental work and the dissemination of professional knowledge. The written dimension include:


- Reporting and post-processing of observations and other experimental work
- Dissemination of professional knowledge in the form of texts, presentations and the like to a specific audience or as a result of the project.

In addition, may include calculations and explanations based on simple models.
If the course has been conferred apprenticeship, the written work is planned so that there is progression and coherence of written work in other subjects. The progression includes both absorption rate as the requirements for students' independent efforts and, together with the link to the written work, especially in mathematics and other science subjects contribute to the development of the individual student's writing skills.
Experimental work
The goal of the experimental work in astronomy is to ensure students familiarity with scientific methodologies and give them insight into the interplay between theory and experiment. The experimental work includes:


- Own observations of, among other things the night sky with or without the aid
- Treatment of their own or others data
- Digital imaging
- Analysis and interpretation of processed data
- Virtual experiments.

3.3. it
Students will study the collection and processing of information from various sources, including the Internet, and in this context discussed how to assess information reliability.

IT-based equipment to collect astronomical data and subsequent treatment naturally in teaching. Data processing includes both numerical calculations as electronic processing of image information.
Use of the planetarium software and other simulation programs included in the teaching of school related observations, the theoretical treatment of the subjects and virtual experiments.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
When astronomy C is part of a study, the share of nuclear material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area. There must be organized courses where interaction with joint classes or study subjects play an important role in the illumination of historical or current astronomical topics.
Astronomy C are subject to the general requirement for subject interaction. In upper secondary schools included the subject in general study preparation for the rules that apply to this process.
The teaching of astronomy C requires that students have a general nature professional basis. The organization of astronomy C as an elective course included students' knowledge and skills from other disciplines, fostering the perspective of subjects and lighting of the subject educative pages.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Education shall be organized so that each student regularly given the opportunity to assess its benefits and participate in evaluating and adjusting teaching. The student's overall effort in the subject, including both the oral communication as the astronomical portfolio and the written products, the evaluation of the student's standpoint. The evaluation should clarify how far the pupil has come in achieving the course goals and devise ways to improve standpoint.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral examination based on a broad mission within the areas the team has worked with. The tasks should collectively cover tuition description wide.
The examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. Is given about 24 minutes of preparation time.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner. The student's astronomical portfolio must generally be included in the examination.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on:


- Professional overview, including whether the examinee may involve relevant and important astronomical tools for professional conversation
- Secure knowledge of the concepts, models and methods so that the student can make a professional analysis, including explain the scientific reasoning
- The ability to connect observations, data and models as a basis for academic reflection with the involvement of the subject's perspective.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the oral presentation.
Annex 5
Dan B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
The course deals with dance as bodily and cultural phenomenon and thus includes artistic, popular as well as popular dance forms. The course has both a theoretical and practical dimension, based on a European cultural heritage and its global relationships. The course builds on the current dance science, which opens for interaction with other disciplines.
1.2. purpose
Faget dance B contributes to the program's overall objective, by students acquire basic skills in dancing and improvising, choreograph and analyze dance. Students acquire the ability to combine theory and dance practice in a reflective manner.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Create, execute and analyze different forms of dance
- Perform dance steps and movements and analyze them formally
- Explain important dance forms in Europe and see them in a cultural perspective
- Apply key concepts from the most widespread dance technical and Theory terminologies
- Analyze a dance, dance genre or dance culture from a cultural perspective
- Reflect on the sensory learned and describe the bodily, physical and aesthetic expression.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- A broad historical overview of dance in Europe
- Two dance historical periods: one before and one after 1950
- Practical and analytical work with theatrical and social dance forms

- Key concepts from the most widespread dance technical and dancing theoretical terminologies
- Dance improvisation and choreography with focus on development and realization of an idea
- Basic concepts and ideas from the art and culture science.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance in the course dance should be put into perspective and deepen the core substance and in general expand professional horizons, so that students can meet the academic goals.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on the disciplines experienced as a whole. The theoretical work is done with ever view of the practical and the practical work done with the continued involvement of the theoretical in the quest for expansion of students' awareness of dance as cultural skills. In this way, the students' level of reflection.
Because of the essential role of sensuous orientation plays in the subject, the bodily expression and reflection of this will be in focus. For the purpose of the subject's purpose organized teaching, so there are good opportunities to develop the relevant sensory skills.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching themes and projects where several elements of the course are included. Project and subject teaching alternate with training periods where work systematically with the necessary basic knowledge in the individual disciplines. Students should approximately 50 per cent. of the subject of education work physically with the performance of dance: solo, couples and group dances as well as basic improvisation and composition.
In the project work the students should work in groups and make a choreography, including formulating an idea and realize it for a defined target group. In this phase, the teacher's role constructively critical adviser and commentator.
In connection with project students must prepare a report explaining and arguing for the project idea, explain the theories and techniques that are selected reflect on and assess the process and product.
Company visits and visits by guest teachers should be part of the subject's activity forms.
3.3. it
It must be included in the subject's theoretical and practical dimensions, with the students here get acquainted with modern dansenotationsprogrammer, computer technology as part of the performance, video as a tool and the like.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
The teaching of dance B organized so that students get the opportunity to use skills and relevant knowledge that they achieve in other subjects or groups, as they contribute to the perspective of the substance and lighting of dance 'educative pages.
With its project-oriented and practice-based learning can dance B relatively easily integrated into multidisciplinary design process with all other subjects, including science. The cultural subjects put more up for the study of cultural studies or to outright performance in a co-production with other arts, and language courses sets the stage for ethnic cultural studies or practice of linguistic patterns.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The academic goals are the basis for the ongoing evaluation of students' standpoint in particular and education in general. These goals must always be the foundation for the ongoing oral and written evaluation. The fundamental and recurring question is: How are the students' position in relation to the academic objectives and targets? For the evaluation can be sufficiently differentiated, the research group at each school based on the academic preparation milestones and present them to students at semester start.
4.2. Sample Form
The sample is split and has a total length of approx Per 35 minutes. examinee.
The first part of the exam consists of a presentation of the group dance project. The group has a size of between two and eight examinees. The presentation should last at least a half minutes per. examinee, however, the whole presentation of maximum 15 minutes. There is no examination during this part of the test.
In presenting the group can use a limited number of helpers, whose efforts must be clear to examiners. Helpers will not be evaluated in the test.
The second part of the test takes about 30 minutes and give a preparation time of about 30 minutes therefor. In the first about five minutes of this portion of the sample carried a conversation between examinee and examiner for the presentation that the student participated in the first part of the test.

In the remaining time examined student in materials that are not thoroughly prepared and analyzed in class. The sample material can be up to several parts and can be pictures, small text and / or up to three minutes of video quotes. The material chosen by the examiner and, in so far as is known, provided with data such. construction place and year as well as title and possibly author. By fragments may be accompanied by a brief summary.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
In the first part of the test emphasizes the following factors:


- Dance technical execution of the choreography
- The candidate's insight and awareness of the entire project
- The candidate's ability to dialogue with internal and external examiners to include comparisons between their own choreography and dance knowledge
- The candidate's ability to dialogue with internal and external examiners to develop new ideas related to their own choreography.

In the second part of the test emphasizes the following factors:


- Material difficulty
- The student's ability to independently dispose his presentation
- Examinee detailed description and analysis of the material
- The candidate's ability to identify and abstract
- The candidate's ability to draw lines to the relevant theories and reviewed drug
- The candidate's ability to apply the methods and terminology
- The candidate's ability to engage in dialogue with examiners
- The candidate's ability to communicate precise, balanced and predict in detail.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Appendix 6
Computer Science C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Computer Science deals with the methods and concepts that are the foundation for current manifestations of information technology. The core subject areas are information, structure, process and model. These concepts appears in many professional contexts, and in computer science develops and is focusing on the general approaches to the understanding of the concepts.
1.2. purpose
The acquisition of the profession trained ability to understand and model the reality that data. There is obtained a knowledge of the technical possibilities and constraints that form a basis for qualified position to and discussion of information technology and its applications.
Working with constructive projects increase abstraction ability and stimulates creativity. At the same time practiced a form of work, where theory and application of this combined.
Through the discipline of work acquired and trained independence, cooperation and competence to seek knowledge.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Structuring and representing information as data
- Apply algorithms
- Describe complex systems composed of virtual levels
- Describe complex systems composed of communicating components
- Describe the protocols and interfaces between systems, including the system and users
- Develop, test and document the smaller systems
- Independently seek out, acquire and disseminate technical information
- Identifying which computer science used in their surroundings.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Representation and structuring of data
- Algorithm concept
- Interfaces and protocols
- Programming and testing
- Networking, communications and security
- Architectures of complex systems.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional material shall:


- Contribute to the achievement of the academic
- Ensure that the issues / problem areas are illuminated from several angles
- Support the use of computer science in multidisciplinary contexts
- Show the current trends in the art.

3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Teaching is organized around one or more themes / problem areas, where in each of these brought several points of view, so it's going to be a whole.
Tuition is based on project work where students through a creative process reach the project goals.

In the project emphasizes the interaction between the student's own production of relevant information and knowledge acquisition and application of this. The student's creativity and joy of creation must be a driving force in education.
3.2. Work methods
In teaching problem solving with the project form prominent. The organization takes the form of a series of projects that needed exchanged between projects based on a given task, a given subject area and a participant specific goal.
Working with the themes can take place both in groups and individually. Work continuously documented in an e-space, ie a web-based collaboration tool. Any written work compiled in the form of reports on selected parts of the projects.
If the course has been conferred apprenticeship, the written work is organized so that there is progression in the profession of writing and context for written work in other subjects in the development of the individual student's writing skills.
3.3. it
Teaching makes extensive use of IT tools. The project work is supported through electronic communication and knowledge, which also allows for differentiated teaching. When preparing reports using word processing and presentation tools. The various technological themes using their specific collection of IT tools. By problem solving used the Internet extensively to search by, among other technical information.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Computer Science C has a natural interaction with most other subjects at four different levels:


- Subject-specific IT tools can be used in projects
- Other fags data may be the subject area for projects
- Aspects of computer science can be studied in other subject itself
- Methods from other disciplines can be used as tools.

These opportunities must be exploited to an extent, so that students feel that computer science is part of a larger whole.
In the three-year upper secondary schools selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The ongoing documentation of the different projects be subject to evaluation. Furthermore form any written work basis for an assessment of students' academic level and knowledge of computer science working.
4.2. Sample Forms
The school selects for each team one of the following two forms of testing.
Examination form a)
Oral examination on the basis of a task, the purpose of developing a system or part of a larger system.
The examination time is about 24 minutes. Is given about three hours of preparation time, where the student individually or in a group of up to three persons for drafting task. In the preparation of the solution, all devices used.
The draft task performance form the basis for the individual oral examination which takes the form of both a presentation of the solution, partly a subsequent conversation between the candidate and the examiner, where also professional elements of education, beyond what is included in tackling the tasks involved. In the conversation can task performance also be related to the candidate's own productions.
There are produced so many tasks that all technical elements of education are represented in these. Tasks can be used three times.
Sample Form b)
Oral examination on the basis of a task, the purpose of developing a system or part of a larger system.
The examination time is about 24 minutes. Is given about 24 hours of preparation time, but not less than 24 hours, where the student individually or in a group of up to three people establish a draft assignments. Time-consuming parts of system development is carried out only in outline form with respect to consideration of final and complete development of the system.
The examination papers without attachments must be examinees know before the test, but only after trial plan's publication.
There are produced so many tasks that all technical elements of education are represented in these. Tasks can be used three times.
The assignment is issued by lot the day before the test.
The examination is individual and based on the assignment. It takes the form of both a presentation of the solution, partly a subsequent conversation between the candidate and the examiner, where details and unfinished elements of the assignment involved. In the conversation can task performance also be related to the academic elements of teaching as well as to the candidate's own productions.
4.3. assessment criteria

The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student meets the academic goals that they are specified in section. 2.1.
Only performance in the oral test is included as basis for assessment.
The evaluation focuses on whether the examinee:


- Are able to independently account for the preparation of data structures and application of algorithms
- Can describe the system in relation to the virtual levels
- Can describe the system's internal communications as well as interfaces and communication with associated systems and users
- Demonstrates competence in applying technical information, which is found in the preparation of presentations to the oral test
- Describe how the testing of the system can take place
- Can relate the system to similar systems from the outside world.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 7
Design B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Designs subject area is product design, communication design and design of the physical environment, which is seen as an interaction between form, function and communication in the society, aesthetics and innovation.
The subject is defined as a process-oriented, deliberate problem solving, seen in historical and social context.
Design Analysis is the element that establish a connection between the subject's practical and theoretical side.
With analysis during the practical design process qualify an understanding of the professional design process and result, as analysis of professional design sharpens an awareness of the design process in practice.
In secondary schools based design education projects that integrate theoretical and practical dimensions.
1.2. purpose
Students should acquire the basic design skills that are essential for the practical implementation of a design process and enables them to analyze and evaluate the designed environment.
The subject must with its structuring of a problem-solving workflow give students a method by which they can transfer to the solution of problems in other subjects in secondary education and in higher education.
Education shall provide awareness of the role of design in a globalized world, as part of an international communication and as a method for solving locally related issues.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:
General


- Analyze and discuss design as a process and as a result
- Reflect on a design process and design solutions using the methods and terminology and communicate a design process and design solutions visually and verbally
- Reflect on selected design historical periods characteristics based on design and architecture and analytical comparison of design examples from different periods.

Design Process


- Identify a design problem and formulate, plan and implement an uncluttered design project, based on an overall concept or concept
- Use different methods to generate design ideas and concept
- Examine a design issue on the basis of various parameters and by means of various methods as mentioned in the core substance
- Combine the results of idea generation, concept development and various studies on a specific design project
- Perform, document and justify the choice of a design process
- Detail how a design project or a major element of a design project
- Select temporary solutions and later open up new solutions in a design project
- Present a design project
- Moving deliberately between practice and theory, the abstract and the concrete, between whole and detail, between the known and the yet unknown.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is the following:
Subject Field


- Product design, including industrial design
- Communication design
- Design of the physical environment, including architecture.

Design Theory


- Design elements of the process on a reflective level
- Design history, historical focus on design produced in the period from modernism to the present.

Visualization Methods


- 2D and 3D sketching, including sketching in scale
- Model building
- Desktop publishing and photo processing.

Research Methods



- Different methods (observation, survey, interview or similar) to the study of various stakeholders including the user and the client
- Sketching studies
- Form, product and process analysis
- Information search in literature and on websites.

Design parameters


A) The parameters form, function, aesthetics and communication. These are general and should be seen in context with each other and with the parameters listed below design parameters b).
b) The following parameters are at a descriptive level: space, materials, construction, technology, environment, culture, community, production, economics, history and ethics.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. Selection of additional substance is dependent on disciplinary interactions in fields of study interaction in general, and students' individual projects.
Additional fabrics are:


- At least one of the parameters listed below design parameters b) involved at the level of the design parameters a)
- Selected examples of literature, law, regulations or legislation (eg. On occupational health), local plans or other policy documents, business plans, product testing or product reviews are involved in education as a result of disciplinary interactions or the selected projects
- Other areas such as design, made before modernism and design that is outside the western design tradition, involved in education as a result of disciplinary interactions and the selected projects.

3.1. Didactic principles
The primary teaching method is inductive, so that the academic practical and theoretical skills acquired on the basis of the project work. Students acquire skills through experience with own projects and through employment with professionally executed design.
Projects must be organized so that students are increasingly able to show independent initiative in the identification of a design problem and formulating and solving it.
The teacher acts as a sparring partner and advisor in this process.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching consists of project periods and short courses that creates tool capability to implement a design process.
The student's work, progression and self-evaluation held in a portfolio.
The results from each project cycle gather in the portfolio. Eleven edit this, so theoretical and practical research materials and completed tasks clearly apparent.
Students work individually and in groups. For group work, each student must provide an individual documentation in his workbook of his work in the project.
It includes external activities in the form of visits to design studios, companies, exhibitions or equivalent.
3.3. it
It is a fundamental tool in the design process phases. Students use ICT in connection with research, testing of ideas, visualization and communication.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Design B is subject to the general requirement for subject interaction.
If design B is included as study subjects, toned core material and supplementary material such that the interaction between the subjects may be optimal.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
In design projects include ongoing evaluation as a natural part of the process. Partly going on evaluations in the form of conversations underway, involving the whole team, part of the team or the individual student, and partly will be an evaluation during the final presentation of each project.
Based on the portfolio assessed student work ongoing in relation to the tasks assigned.
4.2. Sample Forms
The school selects for each team one of the following two methods of evaluation:
Examination form a)
Oral examination on the basis of a presentation task set by the examiner. The assignment is based on the student's portfolio, see. Section. 3.2. The assignment is made on a topic selected by the student and approved by the examiner. The subject must be chosen so that the student may withdraw examples across the portfolio and across the disciplines of product design, communication design and design of the physical environment.
In an examination team, the same task used three times.
The examination time is about 30 minutes. Is given about 48 hours of preparation time, but not less than 48 hours. During the preparation time selecting the candidate materials from the portfolio and prepare on that basis a presentation on the basis of the assignment.

Exam is based on the student's presentation. The examination is shaped to fit an in-depth interview. The student presentation accounts for up to half of the exam.
Sample Form b)
Oral examination on the basis of an assignment which is based on the student's portfolio. The assignment formulated by the examiner. The assignment formulated so that the student may withdraw examples across the portfolio and across the disciplines of product design, communication design and design of the physical environment.
In an examination team, the same task used three times.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Is given about 60 minutes preparation time.
Examination Task answered using examples from the student's portfolio, see. Section. 3.2. The examples are partly made by the student, partly photographs or reproductions of examples produced by others.
The student explains the task based on the portfolio content. The statement elaborated in a subsequent conversation.
The entire portfolio can be involved in the examination.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which students' performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
If the sample form a) is selected, evaluated additionally:


- Presentation structuring
- Presentation quality in communication terms.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 8
Operations C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Economics is a social science subject that includes knowledge of strategy, finance, organization and marketing. The course provides knowledge about the conditions and opportunities to establish and develop a business in an international and market-oriented society.
1.2. purpose
Through the teaching of economics, pupils develop the ability to relate reflective to the establishment and development, its value and its basic marketing, organizational and financial options. Furthermore, students through teaching promote the ability to relate reflective of the company and its impact on social development. Finally, pupils develop the ability to work with basic economic problems through the application of the theory in a realistic and international context.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Explain the company's interaction with the outside world
- Apply knowledge of the company's industry and market conditions to discuss and evaluate the company's strategic options
- Explain issues related to the establishment of a business
- Use knowledge of a company's organizational issues to discuss and evaluate the company's development
- Use knowledge of a company's marketing conditions to discuss and evaluate the parameter setting
- Apply knowledge about the company's financial position to discuss and evaluate the company's goal achievement.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- The company and its environment
- Industry analysis, including market and competitive
- The company's idea, goals and strategy
- The company's business plan
- The organizational structures and management
- The company's parameter mix
- Financial management, including accounting understanding and budgeting.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance is currently business economic substance perspectives and deepen the professional goals on the company's establishment and development.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
In economics C work with current and realistic problems as concrete companies analyzed from a holistic point of view. Commercial Economic theory involved to create structure and understanding.
An inductive and case-based teaching principle is central to the organization of teaching. Through the inductive and case-based teaching promoted students' ability to structure and formulate a professional reasoning.
3.2. Work methods
Education shall be organized with variation and progression in the choice of work.

The training includes work with exercises based on specific and limited economic problems so that students gain skills in working with business economic models.
Teaching includes a project. The course is organized with a high degree of authenticity, so that students' ability to discuss and evaluate economic problems with the application of the theory in a realistic and international context developed.
3.3. it
The teaching is organized taking into account that it is an academic and educational tool. In connection with case work and project organized teaching, taking into account that students must have access to electronic communication platforms and the Internet.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Parts of the core substance and the additional agent is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area. When the subject is part of a study course in stx must be in the organization of teaching emphasis on the opportunities for interaction with social science subjects related to business economic and business policy issues as well as with science in the context of innovation, development of business and cost-benefit considerations.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The basis for the ongoing evaluation are the professional goals. Through individual counseling and evaluation achieves the students during the course of the entire process a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level. It involved activities that stimulate the individual and collective reflection on the benefits of education.
4.2. Sample Forms
The school selects for each team one of the following two methods of evaluation:
Examination form a)
Oral examination on the basis of an unknown text material and a number of questions. The examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. Is given about 48 minutes of preparation time.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
A sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team. The entire sample material to cover the academic wide.
Sample Form b)
Oral examination based on the student's project process from the teaching and an unknown text material with a number of questions. The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Is given about 30 minutes preparation time. The examination is twofold.
One part consists of the candidate's presentation of a chosen topic from the project, supplemented by questions from the examiner.
The second part is based on the unknown text material and takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
The examination time is evenly distributed between the two parts.
A sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team. The entire sample material to cover the academic wide.
4.3. Assessment criteria
In the evaluation assesses the degree to which the student is able to meet course goals, as indicated in section. 2.1.
The candidate must be able to:


- Structure and communicate academic material
- Formulate a professional reasoning
- Demonstrate skills
- Discuss and evaluate economic problems with the application of the theory in a realistic and international context.

Released single character from an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 9
Philosophy B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
The course philosophy dealing with philosophical problems and philosophical argument. Philosophy deals with questions that are fundamental for human life and for all subjects and sciences. It is the philosophy of being, across the academic and scientific boundaries to make still deeper questions and to reflect critically on possible answers and arguments. The subject brings both a systematic as a history of ideas and actualizing perspective on its problems.
1.2. Purpose

Students should acquire knowledge and skills to recognize, treat and discuss philosophical issues and theories that have been and are fundamental to our culture. Philosophy course presents bearing performances and key techniques in the basic human and scientific approaches to the world. The subject thus promotes understanding how philosophical human and perceptions of reality involved in the humanities and social and natural sciences. Students are put in a position to analyze and relate to different kinds of knowledge and values ​​in the global knowledge society. Through sharpened the individual student's abilities to independent critical reasoning as a thinking, informed and authoritative man.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Recognize and explain the philosophical issues
- To demonstrate overview of and relate to an unfolded philosophical argument in one longer text (text excerpt)
- Demonstrate knowledge of philosophical issues and theories regarding fundamental notions of human, society and nature in both a practical and theoretical philosophy
- Demonstrate knowledge of philosophical problems, concepts and theories philosophical and systematic coherence and development
- Illustrate important traditional solutions to given philosophical problems
- Examine and discuss a philosophical problem illustrated by material from the latest time (last 20 years)
- Demonstrate ability to handle conceptual definitions and distinctions
- Demonstrate basic knowledge of argumentation theory and logic
- Engage in an academically based discussion on a treated philosophical issue of classical or mundane nature
- Explain and evaluate the ethical aspects of personal, social or scientific issues
- Distinguish between different forms of knowledge and knowledge standards, as they exist across and within the different disciplines and fields of science
- Formulate and communicate the result of an immersion in a philosophical issue in connection with a project.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is below philosophical disciplines and their main issues:


- Epistemology
- Human, social and natural sciences science
- Natural sciences philosophy
- Metaphysics
- Ethics
- Society philosophy
- Philosophy of life
- Argumentation theory and logic.

The training must ensure an elementary philosophy and history of ideas overview of the different periods: ancient, medieval, Renaissance, Enlightenment, modern and newest time.
2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance in philosophy B must, among other things, in interaction with other subjects, perspective and deepen the core substance and in general expand professional horizons, so that students can meet the targets.
The implementation will take into account the location, the course has in the given context. Take into account whether the subject appears in a study course or as an elective, and the aims of the upper secondary education, the subject is a part.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
By using different teaching methods teaching is planned in such a way that students acquire the skills described in the academic objectives. To be used both deductive as inductive teaching principles. The progression will be ensured through the selection of different teaching methods and materials.
The work is based mainly on reading:


A) primary philosophical texts
b) secondary literature.

There also read:


C) inventory literature as necessary
d) other materials (texts / movies / shows / artwork) with philosophical content.

3.2. Work methods
The teaching with three to six Thematic Study, which together accommodate the in point. 2.2. mentioned philosophical disciplines. At least one subject course must deal with texts from recent times. Under each of emneforløbene must be examples of a textual review of philosophical primary texts. During the training, read one long philosophical text (20-40 pages, depending on the nature of the text).

There will also be examples of a treatment based on students' own reading of philosophical texts or other philosophical material. Students should be introduced to at least one example of another material with philosophical content, see. Section. 3.1., D).
Carrying out a project where pupils to illustrate one of the reviewed topic course on their own find, analyze and discuss additional philosophical texts or other material with philosophical content. The project chosen by the student, can be single disciplinary or interdisciplinary. The work, organized individually or in groups, completed with a project report (three to five pages per minute. Participant).
If the course has been conferred apprenticeship, the written work is planned so that there is progression and coherence of written work in other subjects.
3.3. it
It is integrated to the extent that it is necessary and appropriate for the academic progression. Electronic communication and knowledge sharing must be part of the teaching.
In connection with the teaching, the Internet and other electronic media are used, both for information and in discussion groups.
A critical approach to the use of IT and dealing with knowledge on the Internet must support students' development of the general IT skills.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Students should be presented for examples that illustrate how other disciplines can deliver fabrics that inspire philosophical analysis and consideration. Conversely, the pupils presented for examples that illustrate how philosophy can be put into perspective and inspire other subjects:


- For STX and HF is true that the teaching-election team must be examples of interaction with both the humanities and the social and natural sciences
- For hhx true that the teaching-election team must be examples of interaction with other disciplines within the humanities, economic and social sciences
- For STX and hhx, if the subject is study subjects, parts of core material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area
- For stx applies that philosophy B is subject to the general requirement for interaction between the subjects and included in the general study preparation.

4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The student must during the process at least once every semester imparted a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level. In a follow-up instructions will be given specific instructions on how improvements in the academic level can be achieved. The instructions shall include considerations about the student's work, including the professional performance in project work, group and by individual student presentations.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral exam on the basis of one to three texts totaling a maximum of four pages a 1300 letter, chosen by the examiner, at least two pages must be unfamiliar philosophical texts, see. Definition in section. 3.1.
The examination consists of the presentation and discussion of the unknown philosophical text with the involvement of the well-known text, where available.
Tasks may be used twice on the same examination team.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Is given about 60 minutes preparation time.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
4.3. Assessment criteria
In the evaluation, emphasis is placed on the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
Emphasis is also placed on the candidate's ability to present a philosophical issue in a clear and concise manner and to structure and organize the exam.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 10
Philosophy C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
The course philosophy dealing with philosophical problems and philosophical argument. Philosophy deals with questions that are fundamental for human life and for all subjects and sciences. It is the philosophy of being, across the academic and scientific boundaries to make still deeper questions and to reflect critically on possible answers and arguments. The subject brings both a systematic as a history of ideas and actualizing perspective on its problems.
1.2. Purpose

Students should acquire knowledge and skills to recognize, treat and discuss philosophical issues and theories that have been and are fundamental to our culture. Philosophy course presents bearing performances and key techniques in the basic human and scientific approaches to the world. The subject thus promotes understanding how philosophical human and perceptions of reality involved in the humanities and social and natural sciences. Students are put in a position to analyze and relate to different kinds of knowledge and values ​​in the global knowledge society. Through sharpened the individual student's abilities to independent critical reasoning as a thinking, informed and authoritative man.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Recognize and explain the philosophical issues
- Demonstrate knowledge of philosophical issues and theories regarding fundamental notions of human, society and nature in both a practical and theoretical philosophy
- Demonstrate a basic knowledge of philosophical problems, concepts and theories philosophical and systematic coherence and development
- Illustrate important traditional solutions to given philosophical problems
- Demonstrate ability to handle conceptual definitions and distinctions
- Demonstrate basic knowledge of argumentation theory
- Engage in an academically based discussion on a treated philosophical issue of classical or mundane nature
- Recognize and account for and evaluate ethical issues
- Distinguish between different forms of knowledge, such as they exist across and within the different disciplines and research areas.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Essential issues in theoretical philosophy
- Significant problems in practical philosophy
- Elementary argumentation theory
- An elementary philosophy and history of ideas overview of major periods: antiquity, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment and modern times.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance in philosophy C must, among other things, in interaction with other subjects, perspective and deepen the core substance and in general expand professional horizons, so that students can meet the targets.
The implementation will take into account the location, the course has in the given context. Take into account whether the subject appears in a study course or as an elective, and the aims of the upper secondary education, the subject is a part.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
By using different teaching methods teaching is planned in such a way that students acquire the skills described in the academic objectives. To be used both deductive as inductive teaching principles. The progression will be ensured through the selection of different teaching methods and materials.
The work is based mainly on reading:


A) primary philosophical texts
b) secondary literature.

There also read:


C) inventory literature as necessary
d) other materials (texts / movies / shows / artwork) with philosophical content.

3.2. Work methods
The teaching of two to five topic courses, which together accommodate both the humanities, social sciences and the scientific field. Under each of emneforløbene must be examples of a textual review of philosophical primary texts. There will also be examples of a treatment based on students' own reading of philosophical texts or other philosophical material.
Students should be introduced to at least one example of another material with philosophical content, see. Section. 3.1., D).
In connection with at least one of emneforløbene requires students to illustrate the topic on their own find, analyze and discuss additional philosophical texts or other material with philosophical content. The work that takes place in groups, ends with the groups present for the rest of the team.
3.3. it
It is integrated to the extent that it is necessary and appropriate for the academic progression. Electronic communication and knowledge sharing must be part of the teaching.
A critical approach to the use of IT and dealing with knowledge on the Internet must support students' development of the general IT skills.

3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Students should be presented for examples that illustrate how other disciplines can deliver fabrics that inspire philosophical analysis and consideration. Conversely, the pupils presented for examples that illustrate how philosophy can be put into perspective and inspire other subjects:


- For STX and HF is true that the teaching-election team must be examples of interaction with both the humanities and the social and natural sciences main areas
- For hhx true that the teaching-election team must be examples of interaction with other disciplines within the humanities, the economic and the social sciences.
- For STX and hhx, if the subject is study subjects, parts of core material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area.
- For stx applies that philosophy C are subject to the general requirement for interaction between the subjects and included in the general study preparation.

4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The student must during the process at least once every semester imparted a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level. In a follow-up instructions will be given specific instructions as to how improvements in the academic level can be achieved. The instructions shall include considerations about the student's work, including technical work in group and by individual student presentations.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral exam on the basis of one to three texts totaling a maximum of four pages a 1300 letter, chosen by the examiner, at least two pages to be known philosophical texts, see. Definition in section. 3.1.
Where both known and unknown text, the emphasis is on the well-known text, while the unknown material alone is of perspectival art.
Tasks may be used twice.
The examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. Is given about 48 minutes of preparation time.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on the student's ability to present a philosophical issue in a clear and concise manner and to structure and organize the exam.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 11
Financing C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Financing is a social science subjects include knowledge of financial institutions and financial markets as well as knowledge about the company's capital raising and use of capital. The course provides knowledge on the ability of firms to obtain and use the capital as possible in view of the price formation taking place in the international financial markets.
1.2. purpose
Through the teaching of finance C students must develop the ability to relate reflective of corporate financial situation and opportunities in the international financial market. Students should develop the ability to independently identify and work with financial problems through the application of financial theory in a realistic and international context.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Account for financial institutions and enterprises
- Apply knowledge of international financial markets to discuss the pricing of financial products
- Analyze and evaluate the company's balance sheet structure
- Apply knowledge of financial investment products to discuss and assess the company's financial transactions
- Formulate and communicate information about the company's cost of capital
- Apply knowledge of financing with equity and debt capital to discuss and evaluate the company's capital raising.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Financial institutions and enterprises
- Financial markets
- Financial investments
- The company's balance sheet structure
- Financing with equity
- Debt financing.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance is currently financially substance into perspective and deepens the academic objectives around capital procurement and use of capital.

3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
In finance, work with current and realistic problems as the specific financial problems are analyzed from a holistic point of view. Financial theory involved to create structure and understanding.
An inductive and case-based teaching principle is central to the organization of teaching. Through the inductive and case-based teaching promoted students' ability to structure and formulate a professional reasoning.
3.2. Work methods
Education shall be organized with variation and progression in the choice of work.
The training includes work with exercises based on specific and limited financial problems, so that students acquire skills in working with financial models.
3.3. it
The teaching is organized taking into account that it is an academic and educational tool. In connection with case work organized teaching, taking into account that students must have access to electronic communication platforms and the Internet.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Parts of the core substance and the additional agent is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area. When the subject is part of a study course, must be in the organization of teaching emphasis on the opportunities for interaction with the international economy on international issues and mathematics in financial models.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The basis for the ongoing evaluation are the professional goals. Through individual counseling and evaluation achieves the students during the course of the entire process a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level. It involved activities that stimulate the individual and collective reflection on the benefits of education.
4.2. Sample Forms
The school selects for each team one of the following two methods of evaluation:
Examination form a)
Oral examination on the basis of an unknown text material and a number of questions. The examination time is about Per 20 minutes. examinee. Is given about 40 minutes preparation time.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner. A sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team. The entire sample material to cover the academic wide.
Sample Form b)
Oral examination based on part one of the candidate chosen topic, partly an unknown text material with a number of questions.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Is given about 30 minutes preparation time.
The examination is twofold.
One part consists of the candidate's presentation of a selected topic from classes supplemented with additional questions from the examiner.
The second part is based on the unknown text material and takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
The examination time is evenly distributed between the two parts.
A sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team. The entire sample material to cover the academic wide.
4.3 Evaluation Criteria
In the evaluation assesses the degree to which the student is able to meet course goals, as indicated in section. 2.1.
The candidate must be able to:


- Structure and communicate academic material
- Formulate a professional reasoning
- Discuss and evaluate financial issues with the application of the theory in a realistic and international context.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 12
French beginner's B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
French is a færdighedsfag, a vidensfag and cultural skills. The subject's central work is the French language, partly as a general means of communication in European and other international contexts, partly as a means of knowledge and as a shortcut to understanding of other Romance languages ​​and cultures. Furthermore, the subject culture, history and society in France and other French-speaking countries.
1.2. Purpose

Through work with the French language, pupils develop their ability to communicate in French. The study of francophone culture and literature provides knowledge and insight that brings students and understanding of Francophone communities and cultures as increasing environment awareness and intercultural awareness. The course develops students 'understanding of French culture's position in the European mainstream as well as students' sense of the aesthetic dimension of the subject's expressions. Finally, the French art students able through cultural meeting to reflect on their own culture in comparison with the French-language cultures.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the main points when spoken a single French on known as well as general topics disseminated through various media
- Participate in the conversation on a single and coherent French on known as well as general topics
- Read and understand in outline unwrought French fiction and nonfiction, including media texts in simple language
- Orally explain a known issue on a single and coherent French
- Express themselves in writing of the famous as well as general topics on a single and coherent French
- Apply the acquired knowledge of French and Francophone culture and society in conversation in French and in the work they studied topics
- Relate the acquired knowledge of French and Francophone culture and society to other cultural and social
- Use the knowledge of how to learn foreign languages ​​in their daily work.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- The basic principles of language structure and use, both in conversations and texts structure and on the required syntax and morphology that are relevant for language soundtrack
- A basic vocabulary and idiom that students need in conversations both on general issues and on the studied topics
- The fundamentals of French pronunciation and intonation, receptive as well as productive
- Contemporary oral and written literary and non-literary expressions from France and one of the other Francophone countries
- Historical, cultural and intercultural relations that are relevant for the subjects studied
- Current situations in French-speaking countries with emphasis on France. The report must include French-language material from both print and electronic media
- Key social issues in France.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional fabric consists of various cultural, literary, historical and social expressions that are grounded in the Francophone world, and are not necessarily part of the topic of reading. It should deepen and put into perspective the core substance and expand professional horizons, so that students meet the academic goals. The additional material shall also contribute to strengthen the interaction with other subjects.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Disciplines to be experienced as a whole, in accordance with the academic objectives focus primarily on being useful. Students should acquire the knowledge of languages ​​required to develop communication skills, and central lab, the students opportunities own language production and expression in relation to the professional goals. Knowledge of languages ​​is not an end in itself, and fluency priority over linguistic precision. Some knowledge of listening, reading and communication strategies to give students the tools to initiate and maintain communication.
Grammar, text analysis and foreign language acquisition involved when appropriate and taking into account the academic progression. Students are trained to use bilingual dictionaries and an elementary French grammar.
Teaching is the greatest possible extent in French.
3.2. Work methods
Central to the lab, the academic progression. After starting classes organized work through three to five different issues and ensure that the academic objectives incorporated herein. Working methods dictated by the variation and progression, and preferably interactive working for the development of students' communicative competence. Understanding spoken French is ensured by the students hear the language disseminated through various media.
Work on culture, literature and / or social conditions in France and other French-speaking countries integrated into the work of all subjects.

Written work involved to a limited extent as a supporting discipline to the oral dimension. The written work is planned so that there is progression and work both process and product oriented.
3.3. IT and media
IT and electronic media used with the overall aim to promote students' learning process and learning results. Integration of IT and electronic media in the classroom allows students to experience language in varied, authentic and current contexts. Thus contributes ICT and media use to secure and deepen students' language and content dividends.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the French language begins B in interaction with other disciplines on topics of linguistic, cultural, inter-cultural and historical art. Faget interact with other language subjects in order to develop a general linguistic awareness and knowledge of how to learn foreign languages. When the subject is part of the three-year upper secondary education, selected and processed parts of the core material and the additional material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Through individual counseling and the use of testing, screening and self-assessment, students get underway in the entire process a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level. It involved activities that stimulate the individual and collective reflection on the benefits of education. The basis of the evaluation must be the academic objectives.
The evaluation should be forward looking.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral examination consisting of two parts with a total examination time of about 30 minutes:


1) Accounting and detailed conversation in French and text comprehension based on an unknown primary French-language prose text with a size of about one standard page. The text provided with a brief introduction in French, and only real comments and special words stated. The text related to one of the studied subjects involved in the conversation in French. The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance.
2) Interview in French on the basis of an unknown imagery on general topics.

For 1) and 2) provides a total preparation time of about one hour.
The student must use all tools. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet is not allowed.
A page of prose 1,300 letters, of poetry 30 verse lines.
The same unknown sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
For the test evaluated the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on the examinee in French can account for the unknown text material and incorporate relevant elements of French and Francophone culture, literature and society from the studied subject. Furthermore, the emphasis is on conversation skills on general topics and text comprehension. Interconnecting language is more important than correctness in detail.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 13
French at C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
French is a færdighedsfag, a vidensfag and cultural skills. The subject's central work is the French language, partly as a general means of communication in European and other international contexts, partly as a means of knowledge and as a shortcut to understanding of other Romance languages ​​and cultures. Furthermore, the subject culture, history and society in France and other French-speaking countries.
1.2. purpose
Through work with the French language, pupils develop their ability to communicate in French. The study of francophone culture and literature provides knowledge and insight that brings students and understanding of Francophone communities and cultures as increasing environment awareness and intercultural awareness. The course develops students 'understanding of French culture's position in the European mainstream and students' sense of the aesthetic dimension of the subject's expressions. Finally, the French art students able through cultural meeting to reflect on their own culture in comparison with the French-language cultures.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the main points when spoken a single French on known as well as general topics disseminated through various media
- Participate in the conversation on a single and coherent French on known as well as general topics

- Read and understand in outline unwrought French fiction and nonfiction, including media texts in simple language
- Orally explain a known issue on a single and coherent French
- Express themselves in writing of the famous as well as general topics on a single and coherent French
- Apply the acquired knowledge of French and Francophone culture and society in conversation in French and in the work they studied topics
- Relate the acquired knowledge of French and Francophone culture and society to other cultural and social
- Use the knowledge of how to learn foreign languages ​​in their daily work.

2.2 The core substance
The core fabric is:


- The basic principles of language structure and use, both in conversations and texts structure and on the required syntax and morphology that are relevant for language soundtrack
- A basic vocabulary and idiom that students need in conversations both on general issues and on the studied topics
- The fundamentals of French pronunciation and intonation, receptive as well as productive
- Contemporary oral and written literary and non-literary expressions from France and one of the other Francophone countries
- Historical, cultural and intercultural relations that are relevant for the subjects studied
- Current situations in French-speaking countries with emphasis on France. The report must include French-language material from both print and electronic media
- Key social issues in France.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional fabric consists of various cultural, literary, historical and social expressions that are grounded in the Francophone world, and are not necessarily part of the topic of reading. It should deepen and put into perspective the core substance and expand professional horizons, so that students meet the academic goals. The additional material shall also contribute to strengthen the interaction with other subjects.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Disciplines to be experienced as a whole, in accordance with the academic objectives focus primarily on being useful. Students should acquire the knowledge of languages ​​required to develop communication skills, and central lab, the students opportunities own language production and expression in relation to the professional goals. Knowledge of languages ​​is not an end in itself, and fluency priority over linguistic precision. Some knowledge of listening, reading and communication strategies to give students the tools to initiate and maintain communication.
Grammar, text analysis and foreign language acquisition involved when appropriate and taking into account the academic progression. Students are trained to use bilingual dictionaries and an elementary French grammar.
Teaching is the greatest possible extent in French.
3.2. Work methods
Central to the lab, the academic progression. The work is organized through three to five different issues and ensure that the academic objectives incorporated herein.
Working methods dictated by the variation and progression, and preferably interactive working for the development of students' communicative competence. Understanding spoken French is ensured by the students hear the language disseminated through various media.
Work on culture, literature and / or social conditions in France and other French-speaking countries integrated into the work of all subjects.
Writing involved to a limited extent as a supporting discipline to the oral dimension.
3.3. IT and media
IT and electronic media used with the overall aim to promote students' learning process and learning results. Integration of IT and electronic media in the classroom allows students to experience language in varied, authentic and current contexts. Thus contributes ICT and media use to secure and deepen students' language and content dividends.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines

Where possible, the French language continues C in interaction with other disciplines on topics of linguistic, cultural, inter-cultural and historical art. Faget interact with other language subjects in order to develop a general linguistic awareness and knowledge of how to learn foreign languages. When the subject is part of the three-year upper secondary education, selected and processed parts of the core material and the additional material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Through individual counseling and the use of testing, screening and self-assessment, students get underway in the entire process a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level. It involved activities that stimulate the individual and collective reflection on the benefits of education. The basis of the evaluation must be the academic objectives.
The evaluation should be forward looking.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral exam. The test consists of two parts with a total examination time of about 30 minutes:


1) Accounting and detailed conversation in French and text comprehension based on an unknown primary French-language prose text with a size of about one standard page. The text provided with a brief introduction in French, and only real comments and special words stated. The text related to one of the studied subjects involved in the conversation in French. The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance.
2) Interview in French on the basis of an unknown imagery on general topics.

For 1) and 2) An overall preparation time of about one hour.
The student must use all tools. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet is not allowed.
A page of prose 1,300 letters, of poetry 30 verse lines.
The same unknown sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
For the test evaluated the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on the examinee in French can account for the unknown text material and incorporate relevant elements of French and Francophone culture, literature and society from the studied subject. Furthermore, the emphasis is on conversation skills on general topics and text comprehension. Interconnecting language is more important than correctness in detail.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 14
Greek C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Greek is a language and culture that deals with antiquity as the basis of European culture. The course deals with the original Greek texts and monuments, in which the values, concepts and idiom that became the norm for European culture reflected.
1.2. purpose
Through working with key Greek texts and monuments from ancient texts and monuments that can put them in perspective, give students insight into the Greek language and culture with an emphasis on the ability to see long lines and connections in European culture. The course enables pupils to analyze and interpret texts and monuments of historical context and gives them the concepts to understand and reflect on their own and other cultures.
The linguistic knowledge and cultural understanding achieved in Greek C, enhances students study competence by giving them conditions for and method to understand the general linguistic and humanistic questions and issues.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Will speak and translate easy Greek texts into Danish, using the subject's resources: dictionary, grammar and parallel translation
- Put texts into their historical, social and cultural context and relate to their importance in European culture
- Justify the translation of a syntactic analysis
- Use morphological knowledge to recognize the most common forms of Attic Greek
- Identify key words and concepts in the Greek texts and recognize them as foreign words, loanwords and oversættelseslån in other languages, including science languages ​​
- Apply knowledge of the Greek language to discuss similarities and differences between the Greek and Danish.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Easier original Greek texts, supplemented with easily machined Greek texts from classical and Hellenistic period
- Greek morphology and syntax to the extent that the text provides for the

- Basic Greek vocabulary
- Greek words and concepts in modern European languages ​​
- New Greek history and culture in classical times.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional ingredient in Greek C elaborates they read Greek texts and put them into a larger perspective.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on the disciplines experienced as a whole. There is read at least three authors or genres. After possible start phase read texts holistically, which is sufficient to provide a representative view of the work, genre or author. The report must include primary text in class. Text reading forms the basis for the work of Greek culture and its importance in our culture. In the linguistic work is emphasized that students acquire a method that they can use to understand and translate a Greek text.
3.2. Work methods
The instruction includes throughout the process varied work. While the emphasis in the beginning phase is on language learning, involvement of the cultural fabric from the beginning, and it utilized both in the work culture substance and learning of grammar.
3.3. it
Students should familiarize themselves with the resources of the classic subjects on the Internet and need to learn how to use Web-based tools for text reading and to find and assess additional material.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
When Greek C are part of a two- or three-year upper secondary education, profession covered by the general requirement for interaction between industry and is part of STX in general study preparation and general language understanding in accordance with the rules governing these processes.
When Greek C is the study subjects, selected portions of the core material and supplementary material, so it contributes to the professional interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Tuition and student achievement which evaluated. The evaluation must increasingly apply consistency and a whole than real substance.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral exam on the basis of a piece of text on a maximum of 1/3 of a normal page chosen by the examiner. A page is 1300 characters if the text is prose, verse 30, if the text is poetry. The tasks may not be provided with guiding questions or headlines and withdrawn representative nationwide among the read Greek texts. The same sample material must be used twice on an examination team. The sample material is sent to the examiner prior to the examination.
The examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. Is given about 24 minutes of preparation time.
During the examination, only the notes by the examinee during preparation, allowed. As notes counted translation of words and some phrases, but no translation of the exam text or parts thereof. In the examination, use a clean copy of the text.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner. The examination covers reading, translation, linguistic analysis, and content understanding. The entire exam text translated. For content understanding hear both a review of the play text content and a relevant perspective. The examiner ensures that all four disciplines involved.
4.3. Assessment criteria
In the evaluation, emphasis is placed on the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
In the assessment attention to the examinee:


- Has gained such a familiarity with the Greek typeface that text without major difficulties can be read
- Can translate independently into a text closely, but idiomatic Danish
- To recognize and identify common simple forms based on its morphological knowledge and indicate entry forms
- Can use morphological knowledge of the syntactic analysis
- Justify the translation in linguistic analysis
- Can account for text site content
- Can give examples of text instead of how Greek has contributed to European ordskat
- Can put text into an appropriate perspective.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 15
Sports B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. Identity

The centerpiece of physical education, physical activity, supported by knowledge from the natural and health sciences and the humanities and social sciences. Through the acquisition of sporting skills obtained motion joy, knowledge and experience of the body and its movement possibilities. Through physical activity, training of sporting skills and their involvement theory course provides hand insight into the physical activity influence health, partly understanding of sport cultural values.
1.2. purpose
Through this course, achieving pupils good physical capacity, a significant degree of sporting skills, knowledge of the body's movement possibilities and understanding of sport science areas. Students develop the ability to combine practical experience with theoretical knowledge in relation to training and health and be able to critically analyze and assess factors that affect physical activity influence on the body. Students acquire knowledge about the importance of and the prerequisite for being in good physical training mode and gain a broad understanding of sport's contribution to the development of personal identity and social skills. Students should through versatile sports education experience the joy of movement, so that they are motivated to continue physical activity.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students need the following:
Focus area physical activity


- Through comprehensive education and training to achieve good physical capacity
- Master the versatile and basic sporting skills and few activities at a higher level
- Master selected sports disciplines and activities that accommodate skill areas:





a)


ballgame



b)


music and movement



c)


classic and new boules








- Develop body awareness
- Enter into various types of cooperation.

Focus area theory understanding


- Have a basic knowledge of central labor physiological and functional anatomical substance
- Have a basic knowledge of selected areas of the humanities and social sciences Physical Education with emphasis on Danish conditions in sport history and sport sociology
- Analyze and assess physical activity in a fitness and health perspective
- Be able to analyze and reflect on sport cultural values ​​
- Demonstrate knowledge of the subject's identity and methods

Focus range training


- Perform work physiological tests as well as organizing and carrying out targeted grundtrænings- and heating programs
- Draw up, implement and evaluate their own physical training
- Achieve good training mode through the selected physical training.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Activities that promote the physical capacity
- Versatile sports disciplines and activities that accommodate body control and ball mastery
- Sports disciplines and activities and training that accommodate immersion, involving theories areas
- Science and health as well as humanities and social science theories about exercise, lifestyle and exercise habits
- Boules, focusing on cooperation and ethics and promotes self-esteem
- The teaching of relevant scientific methods.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. In addition to the core substance included additional substance which, in interaction with the other subjects in the foundation program into perspective the core substance. That way expanded students' academic horizons and made aware of the subject's possibilities.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on the subject's practical disciplines integrated with theory on physical activity, fitness and health. The versatility of discipline elections accommodated by skill areas of a), b) and c) referred to. Section. 2.1., Focus physical activity every year included at least 20 per cent. of teaching time.

In teaching introductory phase (approximately 150 hours in stx and about 75 hours hf) is the core of this course the physical activity, the training aspect, together with the relevant connection to the natural and health sciences as well as humanities and social sciences is an awareness element of practical training. Work with physical test during the process, and the students tutored individually or in small groups about how they can improve their physical capacity.
Then teaching organized so that theory and practice are equally weighted. The teaching is organized in a number of courses of at least 15 hours that accommodate the professional immersion. In at least two of these courses must have a thematic link between theory and practice. In the other lessons can be isolated theory and / or practice course, but it should as far as possible to link theory directly to the practical teaching. Work with students' ability for critical analysis and reflection, their independence and ability to cooperate.
Education shall take into account the progression, variation, security as well as to the physiological gender. Teaching is both gender-differentiated and gender-integrated.
3.2. Work methods
The theoretical material is considered both as classroom training and practical experimental teaching.
Students should work both independently and in groups, and the establishment of a number of written reports during the school year, involving several of the subject areas of science.
The written dimension in sport is essential to achieve the professional goals and must:


- Cultivate students' ability to link theory to the practice
- Practicing the subject methods
- Strengthen students' ability to communicate sports professional information accurately.

The written work includes:


- Reports of data collection and experimental work - including training project
- Tasks of various kinds to strengthen the learning process.

Each intern organized so that in the majority of the hours are a minimum of 20 minutes where each student experience to be physically loaded.
Students work in periods of projects in connection with which aimed to provide various kinds of products for presentation. In 3g / 2.hf, an individual or group-based training, training project of 8 to 10 weeks. At the end of the project is handed an individual report in which the student must:


- Demonstrate the ability to develop, implement and evaluate an appropriate personal training program
- Able to link theoretical knowledge to his personal training program
- Demonstrate the correct use of technical terms.

The sections (see. Section. 3.1.) To give students a comprehensive experience of the subject options and pathways to ensure that both genders are motivated to continue physical activity. The training must be directed at both the self and unorganized and organized and commercial sports offerings.
3.3. it
In connection with the teaching of sport B, students should use electronic communication and knowledge, and they must collect, process and evaluate information from different sources. In connection with the training project use relevant IT tools, for instance. data processing and information retrieval.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Sports B is subject to the general requirement for interaction between industry and is part of STX in general study preparation in accordance with the rules applicable to this process. In the three-year upper secondary schools selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area.
Sports B's theoretical breadth and depth allows for interaction within and across both the natural and health sciences, the humanities and social sciences as the artistic and creative discipline. This interaction ensures that students are made aware of the further perspectives of physical activity and exercise in relation to lifestyle, body ideals and general education.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The academic objectives provided. Section. 2.1., Is the basis for the ongoing evaluation of the subject. Based on a comprehensive, gender-integrated and gender-differentiated instruction is given an overall assessment of the students' standpoint. In the overall assessment includes students' ability to work with the coupling between the subject's practical and theoretical areas.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be a practical / oral exam in the subject of some 45 minutes per. examinee.

The practical part of the exam lasts about 21 minutes. Preparation time is about 48 minutes for the oral examination lasting about 24 minutes.
In the practical part of the test examined the students in sporting skills which have concluded in two of the team's course. The two processes to cover two of the skill areas of a), b) and c) referred to. Section. 2.1. The examination takes - depending on the content of the two processes - individually or in groups.
As part of the sample material shall prepare each student a script in the two processes. The script is the student plan for the content of the practical part of the exam. Turning books submitted to the examiner so that they can be sent to the censor with the rest of the sample (case assignments and schedule for the exam).
To the extent you want to use helpers for the exam, are those among the other students in the class.
In the oral examination the candidate draws an individual task to be formulated as a case that allows critical reflection with the examinee and show his ability to use his versatile theoretical knowledge in a practical problem. Exam is based on the student's independent analysis of case assignment and forms subsequently as a conversation between the candidate and the examiner, the examiner has the opportunity to ask clarifying questions. Even Students examined by drawing on exam day in two of the three skill areas, see. Section. 2.1.
The annexes in each case assignment must be as well known as unknown.
The individual tasks may be used twice.
In the time between the last lesson and test teacher meets with students one to two times to maintain the sporting skills for group performance.
4.3. Assessment criteria
On the basis of the academic, see. Section. 2.1., Evaluated the student in the practical part of the exam on his mastery of sporting skills and the oral part of its potential through analysis and assessment of a case assignment to demonstrate understanding of sport practice and science areas.
One mark is given for an overall assessment of the student's practical and oral presentation.
Annex 16
Information Technology C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Information technology is central to modern society with pivot of technologies to search, use, processing and dissemination of data and information.
The subject deals with the interaction between information technology and the technological development and the use of information technology in education, business and society. The course provides theoretical insight and practical skills in the use of these technologies.
1.2. purpose
The course contributes to the technologically-educative and university preparatory aims at giving students an orientation tool in the globalized world and an IT preparedness in professional and interdisciplinary contexts.
The course enhances students 'ability to relate to the individual, education, industries' and society's use and misuse of information through the theoretical insight and practical work with information technology.
The course contributes to students' understanding of information technology position in the other disciplines and forms a qualified technological-educative basis for the choice of higher education.
The course includes practical, experimental and innovative elements that make students able to handle it as a technology still under development.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Explain the basic functions of IT components (hardware and software) and their interaction
- Explain the fundamental interaction between IT components and user
- Describe different security needs and risk factors using a given IT system
- Use it as an interactive medium for documentation and communication
- Presenting and disseminating data and information with the use of IT tools
- Explain standard rules for the use of IT
- Work with systematic search strategies for collecting information and examine and evaluate information critically
- Select and use IT components as a tool for solving a problem related to the student, education and community use.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- IT components and their interactions with each other and with the physical environment
- IT components and their impact on human activity
- IT security and protection
- IT rules, ethics and legislation

- IT tools for dissemination, knowledge search, documentation, calculation and communication.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance shall be equivalent to 20 per cent. of the total training time and must be selected so as to:


- Helping to achieve the professional goals
- Supports the use of IT in interdisciplinary contexts
- Shows the current trends in the art.

3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The teaching of the subject to encourage student curiosity and desire to learn through a creative and experimental approach to the subject matters. There alternated overview creative process, experiments, exercises and projects that focus on both the process and product. Work with different documentation types such as log book, website, CD-ROM, multimedia and video. The teaching method differentiated so that all students develop in the course.
Students should have a say in the choice of project assignments. The results of the project tasks should be included as a part of teaching, through the presentation and presentation in class.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching is organized on the basis of the competencies acquired in the subject through the use of IT for the remaining subjects and in interdisciplinary contexts.
Learning Plan academic goals reached via an interaction between course-based, thematic and project-based teaching. The project organized training must ensure that the candidate will be working with the methods and tools in interdisciplinary and technological contexts.
The project organized training must include progression with regard to:


- Academic breadth
- Professional depth
- independent.

The working method must extent possible be based on experiments and experiments in which IT components are tested, tested and deployed.
There must be handed responses to tasks rehearse the individual professional goals and project assignments including a final project, which includes elements of the subject in a professional and multi-disciplinary context. The project has an extent of 20 hours of training time. The project consists of a product and a report. The report shall describe the development of the finished product. The report must not have a scope of 15 pages.
The project developed within the framework of the project proposal submitted by the school. The student will prepare a project to be approved by the school when the description is sufficiently academically broad and level terms applicable.
Along with the project submits a synopsis, briefly describing the product and documentation. The final project must be included in the basis for årskarakteren in the subject and should, where appropriate, could form the basis for the oral test.
If the course has been conferred apprenticeship, the written work is organized so that there is progression in the profession of writing and context for written work in other subjects in the development of the individual student's writing skills.
3.3. it
When the subject area is information technology, teaching can only be achieved with extensive use of IT tools for experiments, testing and preparation of documentation.
Internet is used as a search tool for information, instructions, examples, software components and library modules in compliance with copyright rules and documentation requirements.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Some of the subject competencies to be achieved in cooperation with the remaining subjects. The cooperation also implies that the subject gives the student skills that can be recovered in the remaining subjects.
In the three-year upper secondary schools selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Students should be given regular feedback on their professional level compared to the targets. The evaluation is based on the student's daily work. This is done on the basis of:


- Project assignments
- Oral exercises and logbooks
- Defense of project tasks
- Oral presentation.

4.2. Sample Form
Oral examination on the basis of the student's final project, see. Section. 3.2.

Before the test sends the school a copy of the synopsis to censor. Examiners discuss the sample, after which problems the student must elaborate. The project report is before the sample is not addressed and commented on by the teacher.
The examination time is about 24 minutes. There is no preparation.
Exam is based on the student's presentation and the presentation of the project, supplemented by one or more pre-prepared questions from the examiner. The examination is shaped to fit an in-depth interview between the candidate and the examiner, which may include topics throughout the entire profession core material and supplementary material.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on:


- Analysis and description of the project's problems
- Problem solving and choice of solutions
- The quality of the practical product
- Presentation and defense of the project
- Answering detailed and supplementary questions.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the student's oral presentation.
Annex 17
Innovation B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Innovation is a social science subject that includes knowledge in group invention, innovation and diffusion. Innovation dealing with innovative processes, project management, project plan and business plans. The course provides knowledge of processes from idea generation to commercialization, both in private and public companies which profit and nonprofit organizations. Additionally acting profession on innovation impact both at company and community level.
1.2. purpose
The purpose of the course is to promote students' ability to work systematically and creatively with ideas development in both new and existing businesses as well as public and private organizations. Furthermore, the objective is for students to develop commercial drive and ability to manage the risks using methods for implementing innovative projects. The focus is on starting new businesses, developing new business areas in existing companies and on social entrepreneurship in public and private organizations. Finally, the objective that students in the team develops the ability to work with innovative processes on realistic issues.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Explain innovation concepts and innovationsaktiviteters importance to the development of society and explain how community conditions affect innovation activities
- Use and discuss different methods to systematically create, develop and evaluate business ideas
- Discuss the importance of business model and innovation strategy for business competitiveness and organizational development
- Analyze and discuss the phases of the innovation process in relation to start-up business and existing companies and organizations as well as assess the strategic approaches to entrepreneurship and product development
- Explain and discuss the factors that affect the diffusion of innovations
- Apply and combine knowledge of the organizations' structure, culture and processes to explain how people and organizations can promote and inhibit innovative activities.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Interaction between innovation and society
- Approaches and methods for the creation, development and assessment of ideas
- Innovation, business competitiveness and organizational development
- Business and innovation process
- Diffusion
- People and organization.

2.3. additional substance

Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The supplementary material should be selected so that together with the core substance contributes to the development of the academic objectives. The supplementary material should also be selected to support students' perception of that work on innovative processes require application of knowledge and methods from different disciplines. The supplementary material includes topical drug, often newspaper articles, TV shows or information from company websites that put into perspective and deepen the professional goals around innovation and society and the company's innovative processes. Finally, the supplemental material perspective areas of core substance and expand the academic objectives acquired from here.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Innovation B based on the interaction between on the one hand the theory and methodology and on the other hand, current and realistic problems. Teaching includes systematic work with creativity and new ideas as the basis for innovation. The teaching is organized problem and team oriented with the inclusion of case studies to illustrate the theory. In connection with the case instruction includes external partners.
There must in the organization of teaching emphasis on idea generation and evaluation of the submitted ideas as the basis for business start-up and development of new business areas in existing companies. Development of the student's commercial vigor and risk-taking must be met when planning lessons.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching is organized with varying forms of work, including critical reflection on the choice of methods and work is a combination of individual work and group work. Selection of work will take into account the development of students' creativity so that different and innovative work and teaching methods prioritized.
The teaching is organized with two long continuous course. In one course, students work in groups with systematic methods for idea generation as the basis for innovation in companies and / or organizations. In the second course, students work with either a business plan for a start up business, a nonprofit organization or a plan for starting up a new business in an existing company.
3.3. it
The teaching is organized taking into account that it is included as a tool. In connection with case work and longer continuous course students should have access to electronic communication platforms and the Internet.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
When the subject is included as study subjects, it has interaction with social science, science and technology graduates to develop business models and business plans. Innovation B have interaction with all subjects around the creative processes and idea generation. When the subject is the study subjects, parts of core material and additional selected and treated to contribute to the strengthening of professional interactions in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Through individual counseling and evaluation achieves the students during the course of the entire process a clear view of the level and development of their professional position. It involved activities that stimulate both the individual and the common reflection on the benefits of education. The basis for evaluation is the professional goals.
4.2. Sample Form
The school selects for each team one of the following two methods of evaluation:
Examination form a)
Oral examination on the basis of a known core subject matter of a text material, not previously used in teaching. The exam question must be provided with a header that indicates the known core substance and scope of the documents must be proportionate preparation periods. The sample material submitted with an overview of the continuous course for examiners prior to the examination. The student prepares the basis of material a synopsis of some Two sides. In the synopsis describes the candidate for the problems of the appendix in relation to the core subject area and perspectives on at least one of the contiguous class period.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. The text material handed out the day before the test, and provides about 24 hours of preparation time for preparation of a synopsis, but not less than 24 hours.
Examinees going to try individually and assessed solely on the oral presentation.
A sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team.

The examination begins with the candidate's presentation and the presentation of the synopsis and lasts around 10 minutes. Then, the examiner detailed questions to the candidate's presentation.
Sample Form b)
Oral examination on the basis of a text material of approximately two to three pages that have not previously been used in teaching, with three to four questions and the student's work in one of the continuous course. The sample material submitted with an overview of the coherent process to censor and approved by them prior to the exam.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. student, and given some 30 minutes preparation. Examinees going to try individually and assessed solely on the oral presentation.
The sample is split and order of the two parts is optional.
A sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team.
The first part of the test consists of the candidate's presentation and the presentation of his work in one of the continuous course and lasts around five to seven minutes. Then, the examiner detailed questions to the candidate's presentation.
The second part takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner on the basis of the unknown text material and the associated issues.
One mark is awarded based on the student's oral presentation, and the two parts carry the same weight.
4.3. Assessment criteria:
The assessment expresses the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
Emphasis addition, important that the candidate can:


- Explain the methods and procedures
- Analyze with reasoned choice of theory and models of innovation profession
- Structure and communicate knowledge about innovation with the use of an academic concepts in a presentation
- Discuss and speculate on innovation issues with the use of the terminology, theory and methodology in a professional dialogue.

An overall character based on an overall assessment of the student's performance on both types of exams.
Annex 18
Innovation C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Innovation is a social science subject that includes knowledge in group invention, innovation and diffusion. Innovation dealing with innovative processes, project management, project plan and business plans. The course provides knowledge of processes from idea generation to commercialization, both in private and public companies which profit and nonprofit organizations. Additionally acting profession on innovation impact both at company and community level.
1.2. purpose
The purpose of the course is to promote students' ability to work systematically and creatively with development of ideas as a foundation for both start-up business as a nonprofit organization. Furthermore, the objective is for students to develop commercial drive and ability to manage the risks using methods for implementing innovative projects and start-ups. Finally, the objective that students in the team develops the ability to work with the knowledge of innovative processes at realistic issues.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Explain basic innovation concepts and describe innovation activities at country and sector level and its consequences
- Explain and apply creative techniques for the development of ideas and methods for assessing business ideas
- Explain business models as a basis for businesses and nonprofit organizations establishment and survival
- Use business as a management tool by start-up business
- Explain the diffusion of innovations
- Use and combine basic knowledge of the team and team members' roles in start-up business.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Innovation in society
- Basic methods of creation, development and assessment of ideas
- Entrepreneurship and business models
- Business
- Diffusion
- Team and team roles.

2.3. additional substance

Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The supplementary material should be selected so that together with the core substance contributes to the development of the academic objectives. The supplementary material should also be selected to support students' understanding of the work on innovative processes require application of knowledge and methods from different disciplines. The supplementary material includes topical drug, often newspaper articles, TV shows or information from company websites that put into perspective and deepen the professional goals around innovation and society and the company's innovative processes. Finally, the supplemental material perspective areas of core substance and expand the academic objectives acquired from here.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Innovation C is based on interaction between on the one hand the theory and methodology and on the other hand, current and realistic problems. The teaching is organized problem and team oriented with the inclusion of case studies to illustrate the theory. In connection with the case instruction includes external partners.
There must in the organization of teaching emphasis on idea generation and evaluation of the submitted ideas as a basis for starting a new business or nonprofit organization. Furthermore, the development of the student's commercial vigor and willingness to take risks are catered for in the planning of teaching.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching is organized with varying forms of work, including critical reflection on the choice of methods and work is a combination of individual work and group work. Selection of work will take into account the development of students' creativity so that different and innovative work and teaching methods prioritized.
The teaching is organized with a longer continuous course where students work in groups with generating ideas and start their own business or establishment of the nonprofit organization. Students work with major academic areas in both the core substance as supplementary material. The process will end with the preparation of a business plan, which is the test basis in the oral test.
3.3. it
The teaching is organized, taking into account that it forms a natural tool. In connection with case work and longer continuous course students should have access to electronic communication platforms and the Internet.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
When the subject is included as study subjects, it has interaction with social science, science and technology graduates in the development of business models and business plans. Innovation C has interaction with all subjects around the creative processes and idea generation. When the subject is the study subjects, parts of core material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Through individual counseling and evaluation achieves the students during the course of the entire process a clear view of the level and development of their professional position. It involved activities that stimulate both the individual and the common reflection on the benefits of education. The basis for evaluation is the professional goals.
4.2. Sample Form
Oral examination on the basis of a business plan. Before the test, sent the business plans for the external examiner for review.
The examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. There is no preparation.
Exam is based on the student's presentation of his group's business plan. The presentation lasts approximately eight minutes. Then put further questions to both the business plan as other related material.
It is only the oral presentation, which is assessed.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student is able to meet course goals, as indicated in section. 2.1. The candidate must be able to:


- Explain and discuss innovation issues with the use of the terminology, methods and models in a realistic context
- Formulate academic argumentation
- Demonstrate skills
- Select, organize and communicate academic material from the business plan in a presentation.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 19
International technology and culture C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. Identity

The subject field is technology's international dimensions and intercultural addiction. International technology and culture is a subject of humanities, social science and technology professional elements. The focus is on international organizations, international cooperation and Denmark's participation therein. There is also emphasis on forms of production and business structures and their relationship with society, living conditions and culture.
1.2. purpose
The aim is that students will learn the technology's international character and the intercultural issues that are of importance to the national and international technological development. Furthermore, the aim that students achieve a background for understanding and preparing simple field studies with an emphasis on the interaction between international cooperation, technology and culture.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:
International cooperation


- Account for essential international organizations importance of international cooperation
- Explain the evolution of trade on international cooperation both in historical and contemporary perspective.

technology


- Explain and compare the technological development in industries across countries and assess causes of the observed development
- Looking at the found technological developments affecting nationally and internationally.

culture


- Analyze causes of cultural differences and conflicts in specific areas and explain the consequences of such.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- International cooperation, including international production, competition, division of labor and trade
- Technology and technology analysis, including education, the environment and working
- Culture and region-specific cultural theory, including cultural constitution, culture, cultural facilities, cultural conflicts and influence.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance is selected in order to put into perspective the international cooperation from a historic and an organizational dimension. The emphasis is on technology trends and technology relationship with culture and social structure.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
In teaching applied field studies involving relevant neighboring disciplines. Work from both inductive and deductive teaching principles with emphasis on the inductive.
3.2. Work methods
Based on field studies selected themes focusing on the core fabric so that the focus is on the interaction between technological development and cultural circumstances and needs.
Teaching is conducted with a combination of presentations and project, which concluded with a report. Project processes carried out field studies focusing on the core substance. Each area of ​​study completed with a project report. One of area studies is optional.
The written work can take the form of electronic presentations. Draw up a final assignment made by the school and which is the basis for the oral test. The assignment is written in groups of up to three students. The assignment is submitted no later than one week before the examination period began.
3.3. it
It shall be associated with information retrieval with emphasis on sources that illuminate areas' current development.
The emphasis is on the development of creativity and methodology in the search, independence, critical thinking and basic source of critical methodology, compliance with copyright regulations and documentation requirements in the use of sources.
It is also used in reporting and communication through writing, sound and visualization.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
The course can interact with a variety of other subjects in which the subject especially complements the international dimension. Nearby fields are technology, language and social studies.
When the subject is included as study subjects are selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The emphasis is on a thorough evaluation of the written reports, so that the student has the opportunity to qualify the reports and examination process.
4.2. sample Form

Oral examination on the basis of the student's final assignment, which is made locally, see. Section. 3.2. A list of task formulations of eksaminandernes final assignments sent to the examiner prior to the examination. The final task is before the sample is not corrected and annotated by the teacher / examiner.
The examination time is about 24 minutes. There is no preparation.
Exam is based on the student's presentation and disclosure of his final assignment supplemented with one or more pre-prepared questions from the examiner. The examination is shaped to fit an in-depth interview between the candidate and the examiner on the basis of the subject.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on the student's ability to:


- To explain and argue the report's problem, methods and results
- To put into perspective within the subject area, including the ability to use different technical approaches.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the student's oral presentation.
Annex 20
Italian B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Italian is a færdighedsfag, a vidensfag and cultural skills. The subject's central work is the Italian language as communication and means of knowledge. Furthermore, the subject culture, history and society in Italy. Italian is also a window to the other Romance languages ​​and cultures.
1.2. purpose
Through work with the Italian language, pupils develop their ability to communicate in Italian. The study of Italian culture and literature provides knowledge and insight that brings students and understanding of Italian society and culture as increasing environment awareness and intercultural awareness. Italian B provides knowledge of a culture that plays a significant role in Europe's cultural development and sharpens students' aesthetic awareness. Finally, the Italian art students able through cultural meeting to reflect on their own culture in comparison with the Italian culture.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the main points when spoken a single Italian on known as well as general topics disseminated through various media
- Participate in the conversation on a single and consistent Italian of known as well as general topics
- Read and understand in outline unwrought Italian fiction and non-fiction in simple language
- Orally explain a known issue on a single and coherent Italian
- Express themselves in writing of the famous as well as general topics on a single and coherent Italian
- Apply the acquired knowledge of Italian culture and society conversation in Italian and in the work they studied topics
- Relate the acquired knowledge of Italian culture and society to other cultural and social
- Use the knowledge of how to learn foreign languages ​​in the work of Italian.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- The basic principles of language structure and use, both in conversations and texts structure and on the required syntax and morphology
- A basic vocabulary and idiom that students need in conversations both on general issues and on the studied topics
- The fundamentals of Italian pronunciation and intonation, receptive as well as productive
- Contemporary oral and written literary and non-literary expressions from Italy
- Historical, cultural and intercultural relations that are relevant for the subjects studied
- Current conditions in Italy. There must be included Italian language material from both print and electronic media
- Key social issues in Italy.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional fabric consists of various cultural, literary, historical and social expression, that is based in Italy. It should deepen and put into perspective the core substance and expand professional horizons, so that students meet the academic goals.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Disciplines to be experienced as a whole, in accordance with the academic objectives focus primarily on being useful.

The teaching will give students the opportunity to acquire the knowledge of languages ​​required to develop communication skills.
Central to the lab, students could own language production and expression in relation to the professional goals. Interconnecting language priority over linguistic precision.
Listening, reading and communication strategies to give students the tools to initiate and maintain communication despite language barriers.
Teaching grammar, vocabulary, text analysis and foreign language acquisition involved when appropriate and taking into account the academic progression. Students should be trained to use bilingual dictionaries and an elementary Italian grammar.
Teaching is the greatest possible extent in Italian.
3.2. Work methods
Central to the lab, the academic progression.
After starting classes organized work mainly through three to five different issues and ensure that the academic objectives integrated into this work.
Work methods and techniques varied and continuously adapted to the professional goals, working towards in that topic.
The teaching is organized with progression in the choice of work, so that students acquire study skills and independence in the work.
It focuses on work that develops students' communication skills. Language comprehension is ensured by the students hear spoken Italian disseminated through various media.
The work of Italian culture and Italian society continuously integrated in the work of the subjects.
Written work involved to a limited extent as a supporting discipline to the oral dimension.
3.3. IT and media
IT and media used with the overall aim to promote students' learning process and learning results. Integration of ICT and media in education allows students to experience language in varied authentic and current contexts. Thus contributes ICT and media use to secure and deepen students' language and content dividends.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the Italian B in interaction with other disciplines on topics of linguistic, cultural, inter-cultural and historical art. Faget interact with other language subjects in order to develop a general linguistic awareness and knowledge of how to learn foreign languages.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
There is an ongoing individual assessment interviews between teacher and student. The evaluation is wide compared to the academic objectives. The evaluation should be forward looking.
Students carrying out tests for self-assessment in relation to the professional goals.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral exam. The test consists of two parts with a total examination time of about 30 minutes:


1) Accounting and depth interview on Italian and text comprehension based on an unknown, unprepared Italian language prose text with a size of about one standard page of a 1300 case. The text is supplied with a short introduction in Italian, and the only real comments and special words stated. The text must be related to one of the subjects studied. The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance. The topic studied involved in the presentation, which is followed by a detailed conversation.
2) Conversation in Italian starting from an unknown imagery on general topics.

For 1) and 2) An overall preparation time of about one hour.
During the preparation time, the student use any aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet and translation programs, ie software or web-based programs that can translate whole sentences and whole texts from one language to another is not allowed.
The same unknown sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
For the test evaluated the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on the examinee in Italian can account for the unknown text material and incorporate relevant elements of Italian culture, literature and society from the studied subject. Furthermore, the emphasis is on conversation skills on general topics and text comprehension. Interconnecting language is more important than correctness in detail.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 21
Japanese A - elective, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. Identity

Japanese is a færdighedsfag, vidensfag and cultural skills. Its target area is the Japanese language and by extension, knowledge and understanding of culture and society in Japan.
1.2. purpose
Japanese must at A level give students insight into the Japanese language and the Japanese world. Through linguistic insight achieves the students communicative competence, verbally or in writing, reading competence and awareness of the Japanese language. Through insight into the Japanese world give students knowledge and understanding of Japanese culture and society and acquire intercultural competence, beyond the well-known Northwest European world.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the main points of straightforward speaking standard Japanese
- Pronunciation standard Japanese understandable and natural
- Read and understand simple modern texts, fiction and non-fiction
- Use a vocabulary that enables them to communicate in Japanese on everyday matters and on studied topics and texts
- Use the central form learn and phrase building in a simple, but coherent and fairly correct Japanese spoken
- Make an independent presentation of a text or a topic in Japanese, enter into a dialogue about it and argue for own perception
- Perspective studied texts and topics to Japanese culture and society and show basal intercultural competence
- Write essentially correct Japanese in various communication situations
- Use the subject relevant tools
- Demonstrate knowledge of the subject's identity and methods.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Pronunciation, intonation and reading
- Texts of different types and scale that illustrate key aspects of Japanese culture and society
- Audio and visual media such as support for listening and reading comprehension as well as speaking and writing
- A general vocabulary and idiom for use in oral and written communication, especially on the subjects studied
- Japanese writing systems, including about 500 kanji
- The central parts of Japanese grammar
- Key subject aids
- Japanese society and Japanese culture.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance into perspective and expands core substance, to further develop students' linguistic knowledge and awareness and their capacity for language acquisition, including principles for text analysis and text interpretation. The additional material can also be material (film, Danish and Japanese language texts) that are not naturally included in the read items, but that promote professional interaction with other disciplines.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
In the process, there is a natural evolution from the tight teacher-led learning to the more and more student-driven learning.
The pupil must as soon as possible obtain an elementary Japanese communicative competence that motivate learning of other skills. The teacher is in this initial phase, the central linguistic role model and thus the natural link between the student and substance.
Later in the process, the student must be able to show greater independence and the teacher more likely to take the role of a consultant.
The current written work aims not only on writing skills, but support the learning of grammar, vocabulary and fluency.
Differentiated teaching is a natural didactic principle in the whole process.
3.2. Work methods
Oral
The decidedly starts training is predominantly teacher-led and includes regular listening and reading training, systematic learning of bends and grammatical structures as well as targeted and systematic work with the vocabulary.
Via controlled dialogues give students a basic communicative competence, fleshed out in freer and freer dialogues conversation on the basis of the texts studied. The conversation about the texts takes place in early teacher-led, but gradually, students should also be more able to independently account for a text or an item, and the ultimate goal is the self-presentation of the final oral examination of a text or a topic in Japanese.
A systematic effort bulletin skill, reading, translation and text comprehension.
Writing

The written dimension is introduced very early. Students should quickly start to use the Japanese writing systems, both by hand and on computer and elementary written exercises. After starting phase change written work character, since the extent and severity increases. The communicative competence remains a priority, but work is also targeted to reach all the professional goals. In this context, a focus of dictionary and manual use, and the students get used to using all IT opportunities.
The written work is planned so that there is progression and coherence of written work in other subjects.
3.3. it
It is an integral part of Japanese course and taken into account in all disciplines.
It naturally in connection with the production and presentation in the classroom as well as in interdisciplinary collaboration.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Japanese A covered by the general requirement for subject interaction. In STX program included the subject in general study preparation and general language understanding in accordance with the rules governing these processes.
In and after the basic course cooperate Japanese A natural with Danish and other languages, but also with other subjects, especially the linguistic-humanities, social sciences and artistic.
When the subject is the study subjects are selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Already begin teaching students tested regularly by the teacher and of themselves using IT-based glosetrænings- and grammar programs and teacher also tests students using small written assignments, which address specific language problems.
Major completed programs evaluated targeted and forward-looking of the teacher and students together.
The teacher's continuous assessment includes both the student's strengths and weaknesses and focuses on the areas the student is particularly to be put into.
4.2. Sample Forms
There will be an oral and written examination in the subject.
The written test
Japanese A concludes with a written test on the basis of a core made assignments. The exam lasts five hours.
The student must use all tools. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet and translation programs, ie software or web-based programs that can translate whole sentences and whole texts from one language to another is not allowed.
Based on a Japanese text material, supplemented with pictorial material, tested in reading and referencing skills, comprehension, translation from Danish to Japanese and written language proficiency.
The oral examination
There will be a three-part oral exam on the basis of a text material for presentation from one of the major texts or one of the subjects studied, any crude prose text of the extent of about one standard page from one of the major texts or one of the topics from the last half of the course that the student has not withdrawn the presentation, as well as an unseen text of approx 1/3 standard page on general topics.
The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. student, including grading. Preparation equals examination time.
The text material handed out the day before the test, and provides about 24 hours of preparation time, but not less than 24 hours. On the other material pulled at the start, give a preparation time of about 30 minutes.
During the preparation time, the student use any aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet and translation programs, ie software or web-based programs that can translate whole sentences and whole texts from one language to another is not allowed.
The first part of the exam consists of translation of ekstemporalteksten to Danish.
The second part consists of the examinee in Japanese presentation of the pre-coated stock material, or text and a conversation in Japanese on the content of the presentation.
The third part consists of the reading of a small number of lines that the examinee during preparation are themselves chosen from at the start-drawn text, and a shorter, additional interview in Japanese on the text.
The examination time is divided between the three parts so that the first part is a maximum of five minutes, the second part represents about 15 minutes and the third part about five minutes.
The same unknown sample material must not be used by two exams on the same team.
4.3. assessment criteria

During the tests evaluated the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
Vedden written test special emphasis on:


- Reading and text comprehension with the use of relevant tools
- Writing skills in various communication situations in an essentially correct Japanese
- Autonomy in relation to the model.

An overall rating based on an overall impression of the examinee.
At the oral exam special emphasis on:


- Understandable and natural pronunciation and intonation
- General and text related vocabulary, sentence construction and proficiency in a fairly correct Japanese
- Bulletin skill and understanding in the translation of unseen text
- Presentation and text comprehension
- Overview and perspective.

An overall rating based on an overall impression of the candidate's performance.
Annex 22
Japanese B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Japanese is a færdighedsfag, vidensfag and cultural skills. Its target area is the Japanese language and by extension, knowledge and understanding of culture and society in Japan.
1.2. purpose
Japanese B gives students insight into the Japanese language and the Japanese world. Through linguistic insight achieves the students communicative competence, reading competence and awareness of the Japanese language and language acquisition in general. Through insight into the Japanese world give students knowledge and basic understanding of Japanese culture and society and basic intercultural competence, beyond the well-known Northwest European world.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the main points of single talked standard Japanese
- Pronunciation single standard Japanese understandable and natural
- Read and understand adapted texts, fiction and non-fiction, and easier uadapterede texts
- Use a vocabulary that enables them to communicate in Japanese on everyday matters and on studied topics and texts
- Use the central form learn and phrase building in an understandable and coherent single Japanese spoken
- At an elementary level understand the studied subjects on the basis of knowledge of Japanese culture and society and show basal intercultural competence
- Write Japanese on the computer as well as hand and express themselves in writing in an understandable Japanese
- Use the subject relevant tools
- Apply strategies for language acquisition and understanding of other cultures.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Pronunciation, intonation and reading
- Texts of different types, which highlights key aspects of Japanese culture and society
- Audiovisual media and the Internet as support for listening and reading comprehension, speaking and writing
- A basic vocabulary and idiom that students need in conversations both about everyday topics and the subjects studied
- A basic knowledge of the Japanese writing systems, including about 250 kanji
- The most central parts of Japanese grammar
- The subject's most central aids
- Elementary knowledge of Japanese society and culture.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance into perspective and expands core substance, to further develop students' linguistic knowledge and their mastery of the most basic principles of text analysis and text interpretation and shall include material that puts into perspective the topics / themes are working with, for example. pictures, movies (clips) or Danish and Japanese language texts.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
In the process, there is a natural evolution from the tight teacher-led learning to the more and more student-driven learning.
Students should as soon as possible obtain an elementary communicative competence that motivate the acquisition of all other skills. Japanese teacher is in this initial phase, the central linguistic role model and thus the natural link between the student and substance.

At the end of the course students should be able to exercise greater independence. The teacher remains active opponent of the continuing training of communicative competence, including the linguistic correctness.
The current written work supports the learning of grammar, vocabulary and fluency.
Differentiated teaching is a natural didactic principle in the whole process.
3.2. Work methods
Oral
The decidedly starts training is predominantly teacher-led and includes systematic and targeted work on vocabulary, pronunciation and basic grammatical structures and bends.
Via controlled dialogue and conversation exercises in the beginning phase achieves the students an elementary communicative competence, fleshed out in freer and freer dialogues conversation.
After starting phase prioritized communicative competence still maximum, but dialogue and conversation is now complemented with more text-based disciplines, particularly summary and characterization. An everyday vocabulary will continue to be built and maintained.
A systematic effort bulletin skill, reading, translation, overview reading comprehension.
The conversation about the texts takes place in the beginning often teacher-led, but students must gradually acquire skills in taking some independent initiative in the conversation.
Written
The written dimension is introduced very early. Students should quickly start to use the Japanese writing systems - both in handwriting and computer - and with small written exercises to support communicative skill.
After beginning phase included written work to support discipline for the oral dimension. Work with the dictionary and manual use, and the students get used to using all subject IT opportunities.
3.3. it
It is an integral part of Japanese course and taken into account in all disciplines. Already in the beginning phase used CD-ROM or networked sites. Later, students should learn to use glosetrænings- and other language programs individually and differentiated and using it for communication and basic information retrieval.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, include Japanese B in interaction with other disciplines on topics of linguistic, cultural, inter-cultural and historical art. Faget interact with other language subjects in order to develop a general linguistic awareness and knowledge of how to learn foreign languages. If the subject is part of a study course, selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Already begin teaching students tested regularly by the teacher and of themselves using IT-based glosetræningsprogrammer and grammar programs and teacher also tests students using small written assignments, which address specific problems.
Major completed programs evaluated targeted and forward-looking of the teacher and students together.
The teacher's continuous assessment includes both students' strengths and weaknesses and focuses on the areas students mainly should be put into.
4.2. Sample Form
There is an oral examination based on a text material amounting to ¾ to one standard page from one of the major texts covered in class, and an unseen text of approx 2/3 standard page. The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance.
The examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. Preparation time is equal to two times examination time.
During the preparation time, the student use any aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet and translation programs, ie software or web-based programs that can translate whole sentences and whole texts from one language to another is not allowed.
The sample is two-fold.
The first part of the exam consists of translation into Danish of the first third of ekstemporalteksten and summary in Danish of the main features of the rest.
The second part consists in the reading of a small number of lines that the examinee during preparation are selected from the drawn text examinee short presentation in Japanese about the drawn text and an interview in Japanese on the text.
The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance.
The examination time is divided between the two parts so that the second part represents at least 2/3 of the exam.
The same unknown sample material must not be used by two exams on the same team.
4.3. assessment criteria

For the test evaluated the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
Particular emphasis is placed on:


- Intelligible pronunciation and intonation
- Plain and text related vocabulary
- Communication skills and oral expression skills in a simple and understandable Japanese spoken
- Directory assistance and translation skills in connection with ekstemporalteksten
- Reading (including knowledge of kanji), text comprehension and oversight in the well-known text.

An overall rating based on an overall impression of the candidate's performance.
Annex 23
Chinese A - elective, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Chinese is one of skills, knowledge and cultural skills. Its target area is the Chinese standard language (Putonghua), as spoken and written in the People's Republic of China. In addition, include the subject
knowledge and understanding of language, culture and society in China and other areas of Chinese-speaking populations.
1.2. purpose
It is the purpose of education that students acquire skills in Chinese spoken and written language as well as insight into Chinese culture and society.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should:


- Understand the main content of spoken Chinese disseminated as everyday communication on well-known, studied topics
- Be able to communicate in Chinese on known subjects studied by pronouncing Chinese understandable, use a basic vocabulary within the studied topics and texts and apply key syntactic and grammatical forms fairly smoothly in an uncomplicated, but understandably Chinese spoken language
- Translate read and unread texts not present particular difficulties
- Be able to write simple short texts in different communication situations with Chinese characters help of Chinese word processing and using written language basic sentence structures
- Use the subject relevant tools
- Apply strategies for language learning
- Obtain basic intercultural understanding through working with cultural and social conditions in China.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Systematic and progressive training of pronunciation and intonation through pronunciation exercises, especially the training of tones and pronunciation of the notoriously difficult sounds
- Systematic and progressive training of listening and speaking skills, including the ability to engage in dialogue and independent presentation of known, studied everyday items
- Media-based material as support for language learning, including listening comprehension, reading comprehension and fluency, as well as support for cultural and social understanding
- Systematic and progressive training of an active character supply of approximately 200 words
- Textbook texts in the form of dialogues and texts illustrating the culture and society in modern China
- The central parts of Chinese grammar
- Different types of short and simple assignments involving Chinese word
- The use of relevant key materials, including dictionaries and IT-based applications
- Introduction to Chinese culture and society to an extent that allows the student to understand the studied texts and themes.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The supplementary material elaborates and puts into perspective the core substance and expands students' academic horizons.
It includes texts and other forms of expression that is based on the Chinese-speaking world, including aesthetic expressions such as movies, pictures / art, music, dance and drama.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
In the process, there is a natural development from a teacher-directed learning to a more student-directed learning.
The goal from the beginning to give the student elementary communicative skills that motivate the recent acquisition of the other skills and competences.
The current written work aims not only on writing skills, but support the learning and development of spoken language and vocabulary.
Differentiated teaching is a natural didactic principle in the whole process.
3.2. Work methods
Oral
Central to the lab, the academic progression.

After starting classes organized work mainly through approximately four different subjects and to ensure that the academic objectives integrated into this work.
Work methods and techniques varied and continuously adapted to the professional goals, working towards in that topic.
The teaching is organized with progression in the choice of work, so that students acquire study skills and independence in the work.
It focuses on work that develops students' communication skills, including training in pronunciation. Language comprehension is ensured by the students hear spoken Chinese disseminated through various media.
Work on Chinese culture and Chinese society continuously integrated in the work of the subjects.
Written
The phonetic Pinyin system with tone marks introduced from the start, and the Chinese characters is presented slowly and systematically. Additionally teaches the student to write a limited number of characters in the hand and on the Chinese word processing.
The communicative competence a priority, but work is also targeted with shorter assignments and translation exercises. In this context weaned student to use assistive technology and IT.
3.3. it
It is an integral part of Chinese teaching and taken into account in all disciplines.
IT and electronic media used with the overall aim to promote students' learning process and learning results. Integration of electronic media in the classroom allows students to experience language in varied, authentic and current contexts. It is used as one of several tools in the work of social and cultural circumstances and in working with the skill-related side of language acquisition. The practical application of it also strengthens students' ability to search, select and disseminate relevant professional material.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Chinese A covered by the general requirement for subject interaction. In STX program included the subject in general study preparation and general language understanding in accordance with the rules governing these processes.
Where possible, parts of core material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in education.
A Chinese as an elective interact with other language subjects in order to develop a general linguistic awareness and knowledge of how to learn foreign languages.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
At the beginning of the course and during the year shall be carried out evaluation in the form of screening or other individual tests to determine the individual student level and progression. For students to get a tool to assess their own knowledge-style growth, must also be made self-value rendering test.
4.2. Sample Forms
There will be a written and an oral examination.
The written test
The basis of the written exam is a two-piece, centrally asked assignments. The entire examination paper handed out at the start.
The exam lasts five hours. During the first hour, computer or professional devices is not used. After one hour, collected all the responses to the first part of the set, and then have all facilities, including the Chinese word processing systems used to answer the second part of the problem set. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet and the use of translation programs, ie software or web-based programs that can translate whole sentences and whole texts from one language to another is not allowed.
The first test consists of testing of active vocabulary. The Chinese words are selected based on a predefined list of about 200 Chinese words.
The second test consists of:


- A translation into Danish by an unknown Chinese text about 300 characters written with characters supplemented by the transcription system pinyin
- A free assignment that is answered on the basis of a thesis statement. The answer is written in Chinese with characters.

The oral examination
There will be a two-part oral exam. The first part will be based on one of the candidate chosen topic from the course, and the second part will be based on a known text material on a scale of 150-300 characters depending on text material difficulty. In the second part of the test states known textual material both with signs and with pinyin.
The first part of the test consists of the student's presentation in Chinese of their selected topic. After the examinee enters into a conversation with the examiner on the topic of the presentation.

The second part is based on the drawn text and takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner about the content of the text in Chinese. Examinee and examiner can during the conversation to include also other texts or topics from the read process.
The familiar text material sent to the examiner prior to the examination.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Is given about one hour of preparation time.
During the preparation time, the student use any aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet and translation programs, ie software or web-based programs that can translate whole sentences and whole texts from one language to another is not allowed.
The examination time is divided between the two parts so that the first part represents about half of the exam.
The same known sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The written examination is emphasized:


- Translation into idiomatic Danish
- Writing skills in a communication situation to an understandable and reasonably grammatically correct Chinese
- True representation of characters.

The assessment of the translation prioritized the colloquial, Danish translation higher than the text close translation. The assessment of writing skills in the free assignment there is more emphasis on mastery of a varied and relevant character and vocabulary than on a linguistically more correct answer modestly, with limited syntax and vocabulary.
Additionally weighted immediate intelligibility.
An overall rating based on an overall assessment of the examinee.
The oral exam is emphasized:


- Comprehensible pronunciation with emphasis on accurate and clear pronunciation of tones
- General and subject-specific vocabulary, syntax and language proficiency in a comprehensible and fairly correct Chinese spoken language
- Presentation, text understanding and intercultural skills.

In assessing performance, emphasis is placed in a comprehensible pronunciation and relevant vocabulary. In addition, there is more emphasis on the examinee is able to speak understandable on substance than on complete linguistic correctness.
One mark is awarded on the basis of an overall assessment of the student's performance.
Annex 24
Chinese B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Chinese is one of skills, knowledge and cultural skills. Its target area is the Chinese standard language (Putonghua), as spoken and written in the People's Republic of China. In addition, include the subject
knowledge and understanding of language, culture and society in China and other areas of Chinese-speaking populations.
1.2. purpose
It is the purpose of education that students acquire skills in Chinese spoken and written language as well as insight into Chinese culture and society.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should:


- Understand the main content of spoken Chinese disseminated as everyday communication on well-known, studied topics
- Be able to communicate in Chinese on known subjects studied by pronouncing Chinese understandable and use a basic vocabulary within the studied topics and texts
- Translate read texts not present particular difficulties
- Use the subject relevant tools
- Apply strategies for language learning
- Obtain basic intercultural understanding through working with cultural and social conditions in China.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Systematic and progressive training of pronunciation and intonation through pronunciation exercises, especially the training of tones and pronunciation of the notoriously difficult sounds
- Systematic and progressive training of listening and speaking skills, including the ability to engage in dialogue and independent presentation of known, studied everyday items
- Media-based material as support for language learning, including listening comprehension, reading comprehension and fluency, as well as support for cultural and social understanding
- Systematic and progressive training of an active character supply of approximately 100 key Chinese words
- Textbook texts in the form of dialogues and texts illustrating the culture and society in modern China

- Basic parts of Chinese grammar
- The use of relevant key materials, including dictionaries and IT-based applications
- Introduction to Chinese culture and society to an extent that allows the student to understand the studied texts and themes.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The supplementary material elaborates and puts into perspective the core substance and expands students' academic horizons.
It includes texts and other forms of expression that is based on the Chinese-speaking world, including aesthetic expressions such as movies, pictures / art, music, dance and drama.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
In the process, there is a natural development from a teacher-directed learning to a more student-directed learning.
The goal from the beginning to give the student elementary communicative skills that motivate the recent acquisition of the other skills and competences.
The current written work aims not only on writing skills, but support the learning and development of spoken language and vocabulary.
Differentiated teaching is a natural didactic principle in the whole process.
3.2. Work methods
Oral
Central to the lab, the academic progression.
After starting classes organized work mainly through approximately Three different topics, and to ensure that the academic objectives integrated into this work.
Work methods and techniques varied and continuously adapted to the professional goals, working towards in that topic.
The teaching is organized with progression in the choice of work, so that students acquire study skills and independence in the work.
It focuses on work that develops students' communication skills, including training in pronunciation. Language comprehension is ensured by the students hear spoken Chinese disseminated through various media.
Work on Chinese culture and Chinese society continuously integrated in the work of the subjects.
Written
The phonetic Pinyin system with tone marks introduced from the start, and the Chinese characters is presented slowly and systematically. Additionally teaches the student to write a limited number of characters in his hand and a Chinese word processor and habituated to use dictionaries, relevant handbooks and IT-based utilities.
3.3. it
It is an integral part of Chinese teaching and taken into account in all disciplines.
IT and electronic media used with the overall aim to promote students' learning process and learning results. Integration of electronic media in the classroom allows students to experience language in varied, authentic and current contexts. It is used as one of several tools in the work of social and cultural circumstances and in working with the skill-related side of language acquisition. The practical application of it also strengthens students' ability to search, select and disseminate relevant professional material.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Chinese B is subject to the general requirement for subject interaction. In STX program included the subject in general study preparation and general language understanding in accordance with the rules governing these processes.
Where possible, parts of core material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in education.
Chinese B as electives interact with other language subjects in order to develop a general linguistic awareness and knowledge of how to learn foreign languages.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
At the beginning of the course and during the year shall be carried out evaluation in the form of screening or other individual tests to determine the individual student level and progression. For students to get a tool to assess their own knowledge-style growth, must also be made self-value rendering test.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be a two-part oral exam. The first part will be based on one of the candidate chosen topic from the course, and the second part will be based on a known text material on a scale of 100-200 characters depending on text material difficulty. In the second part of the sample states known textual material both with signs and with pinyin.
The first part of the test consists of the student's presentation in Chinese of their selected topic. After the examinee enters into a conversation with the examiner on the topic of the presentation.

The second part is based on the drawn text and takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner about the content of the text in Chinese. Examinee and examiner can during the conversation to include also other texts or topics from the read process.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Is given about one hour of preparation time.
During the preparation time, the student use any aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet and translation programs, ie software or web-based programs that can translate whole sentences and whole texts from one language to another is not allowed.
The examination time is divided between the two parts so that the first part represents about half of the exam.
The same known sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
In the evaluation, emphasis is on:


- Comprehensible pronunciation with emphasis on correct pronunciation of tones
- General and subject-specific vocabulary, syntax and language proficiency in a comprehensible and fairly correct Chinese spoken language
- Presentation, text understanding and intercultural skills
- Pronunciation and vocabulary.

In addition, there is more emphasis on the examinee is able to speak understandable on substance than on complete linguistic correctness.
An overall rating based on an overall impression of the performance.
Annex 25
Kulturforståelse B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Cultural understanding is a humanistic subjects, and the course has interfaces to the social science profession. Cultural understanding is about all people enter into relationships where they take part in cultural production of meaning. The subject of culture deals with how culture is produced and reproduced, and it uncovers the role culture plays for ourselves and for others. The course deals with cultural expression, identity as a cultural process and provides tools to meet and understand cultures.
1.2. purpose
The purpose of cultural understanding B is for students to develop their ability to communicate both within and across cultures. Through working with cultural processes are enhanced opportunities to succeed in a world characterized by cultural diversity. Finally, students should develop their knowledge and understanding of cultural change.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Describe and analyze different forms of cultural expression
- Explain issues related to communicating across cultures
- Explain the complexity of interaction between cultures
- Reflect on themselves and their own values ​​as a result of a cultural process
- Formulate their own policy options on the basis of a cultural development
- Account for different cultural theories
- Use different theories of culture in a specific context
- Make a cultural analysis within a defined problem area
- Disseminate culture analytical problems based on their own or others' material.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Cultural expression in time and space
- Culture comparison, synchronous and diachronic
- Interaction and communication across cultures
- Integration, assimilation and segregation
- The national and the global
- Majorities and minorities
- Identity as a result of a cultural and historical process
- Ethics, morality and culture
- Theories of culture and identity
- Culture analytical terminology
- Cultural analysis and cultural survey methods.

Tuition organized to work with eight courses, with emphasis in the individual modes be respectively:


- Cultural theory
- Cultural
- Non-Western culture
- Culture comparison
- Cultural development
- Cultural identity
- The national and the global
- European and non-European culture.

2.3. additional substance

Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The supplementary material should be selected so that in cooperation with the nuclear substance contributes to the fulfillment of professional goals. The supplementary material elaborates and puts into perspective the core substance. The additional substance is preferably comprised of current issues related to the profession. The supplementary material should help to strengthen the professional interaction.
3. Organization
3.1. Curriculum
Teaching in the subject shall be performed as an interaction between theory and empirical data. Organized teaching deductive, the theoretical substance is subsequently applied to realistic problems. The emphasis will be on using inductive methods, where students formulate issues, collects and processes the material and presents findings.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching is organized with the progression so that pupils are increasingly reflects on the choice of material, theory and method. Working methods need to exchange within and between the different courses. The emphasis will be on student activating work.
In one of the courses must include a cultural analysis based on self-collected material.
3.3. it
The teaching is organized taking into account that it used for information retrieval, material collection and presentation.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Kulturforståelse B interact with other humanities and social sciences on international and cross-cultural issues. When the subject is study subjects, parts of core material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The basis for the ongoing evaluation are the professional goals. After each course an evaluation so that students get a clear view of the academic level and trends. The evaluation also forms the basis for an individual and joint reflection on the benefits of education.
4.2. Sample Forms
The school selects for each team one of the following two methods of evaluation:
Examination form a)
Oral examination based on a theme and an unknown material.
The examination time is about 30 minutes. Is given about two hours preparation time.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
The sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
Sample Form b)
Oral examination on the basis of part of the examinee material collected is partly an unknown material and a number of questions.
The examination time is about 20 minutes. Is given about 40 minutes preparation time.
The examination is twofold.
The first part consists of the candidate's presentation of his collected material supplemented with additional questions from the examiner.
The second part takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner on the basis of the unknown material.
The examination time is evenly distributed between the two parts. The student assessed solely on the oral presentation.
The sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the degree to which the student is able to meet the learning objectives but that they are given in pkt.2.1.
The emphasis is on the student:


- Overview of the subject content items
- Ability to put into perspective a given problem to the profession as a whole
- Ability to use a cultural analytical approach
- Ability to organize and communicate an academic issue.

An overall character based on an overall assessment.
Annex 26
Kulturforståelse C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Cultural understanding is a humanistic disciplines that have interfaces to the social science profession. Cultural understanding is about all people enter into relationships where they take part in cultural production of meaning. The subject of culture deals with how culture is produced and reproduced, and it uncovers the role culture plays for ourselves and for others. The course deals with cultural expression, identity as a cultural process and provides tools to meet and understand cultures.
1.2. Purpose

The purpose of cultural understanding C is for students to develop their ability to communicate both within and across cultures. Through working with cultural processes are enhanced opportunities to succeed in a world characterized by cultural diversity. Finally, students should develop their knowledge and understanding of cultural change.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Identify and describe cultural expressions
- Account for different types of materials from selected cultural theories
- Reflect on their own and others' values ​​as a result of a cultural process
- Apply relevant cultural theory in order to make a cross-cultural comparison
- Introduce a culture analytical issue based on their own collected material.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Cultural expression in time and space
- Theories of culture and identity
- Culture analytical terminology
- Cultural encounters
- Culture comparison
- The national and the global
- Interaction and communication across cultures
- Cultural survey methods.

Teaching is organized in four courses, with emphasis in the individual modes be respectively:


- Cultural theory
- Cultural
- Non-Western culture
- Culture comparison.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The supplementary material should be selected so that in cooperation with the nuclear substance contributes to the fulfillment of professional goals. The additional substance is preferably comprised of current issues related to the profession. The supplementary material should help to strengthen the professional interaction.
3. Organization
3.1. Curriculum
Teaching in the subject shall be performed as an interaction between theory and empirical data. Organized teaching deductive, the theoretical substance is subsequently applied to realistic problems. The emphasis will be on using inductive methods, where students formulate issues, collects and processes the material and presents findings.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching is organized with progression in the choice of work so that pupils are increasingly reflects on the choice of material, theory and method. Working methods need to exchange within and between the different courses. The emphasis will be on student activating work.
In one of the courses must include material collected through own field studies.
3.3. it
The teaching is organized taking into account that it is part of the context of information retrieval, material collection and presentation.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Kulturforståelse C interact with other humanities and social sciences on international and cross-cultural issues. When the subject is study subjects, parts of core material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
After each course an evaluation so that students get a clear view of the academic level and trends. The evaluation also forms the basis for the individual and collective reflection on the benefits of education.
4.2. Sample Forms
The school selects for each team one of the following forms:
Examination form a)
Oral examination on the basis of an unknown material and a number of questions. The examination time is about 20 minutes. Is given about 40 minutes preparation time. The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
The sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
Sample Form b)
Oral examination on the basis of partly candidate's own field studies, partly an unknown material and a number of questions. The examination time is about 20 minutes. Is given about 40 minutes preparation time.
The examination is twofold.
The first part includes a presentation of the candidate's field studies supplemented with additional questions from the examiner.
The second part takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner on the basis of the unknown material.
The examination time is evenly distributed between the two parts. The student assessed solely on the oral presentation.
The sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
4.3. assessment criteria

The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student is able to meet course goals, as indicated in section. 2.1. The emphasis is on the student:


- Ability to demonstrate an overview of the subject content items
- Ability to put into perspective a given problem to the profession as a whole
- Ability to apply relevant academic argument
- Ability to organize and communicate an academic issue.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 27
Latin C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Latin is a language and culture. On the basis of significant Latin texts and Roman archaeological material dealing profession with Roman culture and imagination. In Latin, the ancient culture lived on from the Roman Empire to the present, and Latin have far up in the meantime been Europe's common language when communicated internationally in areas such as literature, science and religion.
Latin therefore opens for a firsthand knowledge of European culture and its basis.
1.2. purpose
Through working with major Latin texts obtained insight into Roman culture, its relationship to Greek culture and its impact on later European tradition.
Insight into the foundations of European culture helps to enable pupils to understand their own cultural identity and see themselves as part of the larger international community, both linguistically and culturally. This insight creates understanding for other cultures with a different history and other values.
The thorough work with the texts, where attention to detail all the time necessary for the understanding of the whole and vice versa, giving students good study habits and make them study competent. The teaching of Latin C strengthens the linguistic imagination and provides a systematic approach which is effective for mastery of Danish and foreign language learning.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Translate easily original Latin texts into Danish with facilities like dictionary, grammar and parallel translation
- Put texts into their historical, social and cultural context and relate to their importance in European culture
- Recognize and identify common Latin simple forms from the knowledge of tribes and endings, and use this morphological knowledge in a syntactic analysis of Latin phrases
- Exploiting linguistic observations in an understanding of the text
- Identify key words and concepts in the Latin texts and recognize them as foreign and loan words in other languages, including science languages ​​
- Use linguistic knowledge they have gained in Latin, to describe and analyze the Danish and foreign languages.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Easier original Latin texts from the period before about 150 AD
- Roman history, society and culture
- Latin morphology and syntax to the extent that the text provides for the
- Basic Latin vocabulary
- Latin in the European languages.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional fabric in Latin deepens the read Latin texts and put them into a larger perspective.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The lessons emphasize that disciplines experienced as a whole. After possible start phase read texts holistically, which is sufficient to provide a representative view of the work or author. It is read mainly texts from the period before 150 AD At least three authors should be represented. Text reading forms the basis for the work of Roman culture and its importance in our culture. In the linguistic work is emphasized that students acquire a method that they can use to translate.
3.2. Work methods
The instruction includes throughout the process varied work. While the emphasis in the beginning phase is on language learning, involvement of the cultural fabric from the beginning, and it utilized both in the work culture substance and learning of grammar.
3.3. it
Students should familiarize themselves with the resources of the classic subjects on the Internet and need to learn how to use Web-based tools for text reading and to find and assess additional material.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines

When Latin C is part of a two- or three-year upper secondary education, profession covered by the general requirement for interaction between industry and is part of STX in general study preparation and general language understanding in accordance with the rules governing these processes. When the subject is study subjects are selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Tuition and student achievement which evaluated. The evaluation must increasingly apply consistency and a whole than real substance.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral test with long preparation group of about 24 hours, but not less than 24 hours, and a short individual preparation of approximately 24 minutes. The examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. The teacher puts together groups of between one and four in consultation with students and after the examination plan is published. Each group draws for the group preparing an unknown original text of approximately one standard page selected from the authors of the texts studied. In short texts, for example. poems or letters, several texts included in the question. The texts will then be of the same author. The text's language and content must be of a purity so as to provide a suitable basis for assessment. The text must be provided with a freer translation into Danish supplemented with up to three pages of translation that sets the Latin text in its context. The text is also supplied with a brief introduction, showing the students to edit text, including the indication of the author and his work. Any other information is given on individual linguistic phenomena that students have not met, and the words that are not or only with difficulty can be found in the dictionary.
The examination takes place individually on the basis of a piece of text on a maximum of 1/3 of a normal page chosen by the examiner and taken from the text that is given to the group preparation. Text The pieces selected for examination, one to each student, distributed among group members by lot. During the short, individual preparation has examinee a clean copy of the job available and must also only use the dictionary and grammar of your choice. Only the notes by the examinee during the individual preparation, allowed during the examination.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner. The examination covers reading, translation, linguistic analysis, and content understanding. The entire exam text translated. The candidate must explain text the play's meaning and put it in context with all the set text and the relevant parts of the fabric, the team has worked on in class. The examiner shall designate the sentences to be analyzed linguistically. The examiner ensures that all four disciplines involved.
A standard page of prose is 1300 letters, one standard page of poetry are 30 verses.
4.3. Assessment criteria
In the evaluation, emphasis is placed on the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
In the assessment attention to the examinee:


- Translate independently relative to the printed translation
- Translate the whole text (all words) to correct Danish, respecting the grammatical constructions in the Latin text
- Based on its morphological knowledge can recognize and identify common single set shapes and forms lookup
- Can use morphological knowledge of the syntactic analysis
- Justify the translation in linguistic analysis
- Can give examples in the text snippet on how Latin has contributed to European ordskat
- Can explain the text play's content
- Can put the piece of text into a relevant context and in a broader cultural perspective.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 28
Marketing Communications C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Market communication is a social science subject that includes knowledge in sociology, consumer behavior, target market selection, communication and marketing strategy and planning. The course provides knowledge about its ability to communicate with customers and other stakeholders through the use of various forms of marketing communication. Market communication deals with corporate planning of communication to the outside world.
1.2. Purpose

Through the teaching of marketing communication C students must develop their abilities to deal reflected the company's marketing communication. A further object is to promote students' ability to work with marketing communication, taking into account the company's strategy and market opportunities. Finally, students should develop their ability to work with basic issues concerning marketing communications through the use of the theory in a realistic and international context.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Explain the company's communications in relation to the overall strategy
- Apply knowledge of marketing communication and business partners to discuss the company's communication strategy
- Apply knowledge of business communications platform to discuss and prepare proposals for campaigns
- Apply knowledge of media and communications to discuss the content and design of a message
- Develop and analyze media plans
- Explain the use of power measurements.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Integrated marketing communication
- Communication strategy
- Communication parameters
- Communication platform
- Communication objectives
- Creative strategy
- Advertising agents and media
- Media plan
- Impact measurement.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The supplementary material includes topical drug for marketing communication that put into perspective and deepens the academic objectives, content and design of campaigns. The supplementary material should be equivalent to about 15 per cent. of the total training time and can typically consist of newspaper articles, TV shows, information from corporate websites or examples of advertising campaigns.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The teaching is organized with basis in current and authentic problems as specific campaigns analyzed from a holistic point of view. Education shall to the extent possible involve the students experience. Theory of marketing communications involved to create structure and understanding.
An inductive and case-based teaching has a central place in the organization of teaching. This will promote students' ability to structure, formulate and communicate academic argumentation.
Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on the subject's creative part of school related work on the development of campaigns.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching is organized with variation and progression in the choice of work. The training includes work with exercises based on specific and authentic campaigns so that students acquire skills in working with marketing communication.
The teaching is organized with at least one further incident that as far as possible be organized with the involvement of an advertising or similar activities. Course is planned so that the students' ability to demonstrate professional skills in marketing communication is promoted, and thus their ability to discuss and assess problems in communication, using the theory in a realistic and international context developed.
3.3. it
The teaching is organized taking into account that it forms a natural tool. In connection with case work and longer continuous course students should have access to relevant programs for audio and video production and Internet.
3.4 Interaction with other subjects
When the subject is included as study subjects, it interacts with the humanities on international or cross-cultural issues and creative strategy. The social sciences are subject interaction in business communications platform. When the subject is the study subjects, parts of core material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Through individual counseling and evaluation achieves the students during the course of the entire process a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level, including involvement activities that stimulate the individual and collective reflection on the benefits of education. The basis for evaluation is the professional goals.
4.2. Sample Forms
The school selects for each team one of the following two methods of evaluation:
Examination form a)

Oral examination on the basis of an unknown, authentic text material amounting to approximately two or three sides by about four questions in the margins. The sample material and a description of the coherent teaching sent to the examiner prior to the examination.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Is given about 60 minutes preparation time.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner. A specimen, i.e., a number of questions on the basis of an unknown text material may not be used on three examinations on the same team.
Sample Form b)
Oral examination on the basis of both a coherent teaching, partly unknown, authentic text material on a scale of one to two pages with approximately three assignments related. The sample material and a description of the coherent teaching sent to the examiner prior to the examination.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Is given about 30 minutes preparation time.
The examination is twofold.
The first part consists of the candidate's presentation of his work with the coherent teaching and lasts around five to seven minutes. Then, the examiner detailed questions to the candidate's presentation.
The second part is based on the unknown text material with accompanying questions and takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
The examination time is evenly distributed between the two parts.
A sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student is able to meet course goals, as indicated in section. 2.1.
The candidate must be able to:


- Structure and communicate academic material
- Demonstrate the ability to apply theory in the preparation of campaign proposals
- Demonstrate an understanding of and be able to communicate professional issues
- Discuss and evaluate issues within market communication, using the theory in a realistic and international context.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 29
Materials C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Materials Technology is a technical subject that treats the choice of materials for structures and products that utilize material technology in terms of quality, economy, environment and resource conditions. The course is experimental and can interact with particular science and technology graduates.
1.2. purpose
Materials C contributes to the program's overall objective, by the student strengthens his ability to complete higher education in the technical field and can relate to materials technology solutions in the world. Another objective is that the student will learn the material technological issues, including the interaction with the scientific and technological disciplines, and experience in combining theory and practical work.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Explain the different materials and their typical properties of nano-micro-meter scale level
- Make a specific assessment of a given material's physical and chemical properties
- Make an appropriate choice of material for a given application
- To identify the appropriate manufacturing, machining and joining
- Make material testing of selected materials and explain the factors that affect the test.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Materials are metals, including light metals and ceramic materials, plastics, composites, wood, etc.
- Atomic, mole- cular, fiber and crystal structure of selected materials
- Properties relevant to the choice of material for a given task, including environmental aspects and overview above
- Manufacturing processes of selected materials
- A number of processing and joining
- Various simple materials testing methods.

2.3. additional substance

Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance to be elaborate, put into perspective and highlight new dimensions and provide a use orientation relative to the core material, has a volume of approximately 20 per cent. of the subject of education. The additional fabric gathers the course of a whole and selected so that, in cooperation with the nuclear substance contributes to the development of the academic objectives, perspectives and expand areas of core substance and supports the subject's practical dimension.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Using primarily the inductive principle of teaching students work with the theory used to solve a given problem. Teaching is an interaction between theory and students' self-experiments based on technical issues.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching is organized so used different working methods, including a case where in a case study linking all material technology. In teaching ensured progression so that students can work independently and critically with limited problems, both practical and theoretical. Emphasis is placed on students' independent experimental work.
Students work with the written dimension of the subject and oral communication in the central parts of the fabric.
In the case illustrated material properties, materials, environment and manufacturing, machining and fabrication techniques and materials testing of one or more products. The working methods used in the case study forms the basis for a final assignment.
There Written assignments with increasing progression. The final assignment forms the basis for the oral test.
The final assignment made by the school. The task has an extent of approximately 20 hours of training time. In this connection, select the student or groups of up to four students in cooperation with the teacher an object or system of objects, which are reviewed in terms of materials. It is based on the methods used in teaching. There may, in connection with the assignment, performed small experiments / tests. The assignment must be in the basis for årskarakteren in the subject and should, where appropriate, could form the basis for the oral test.
3.3. it
The instruction includes software for data acquisition, simulation and visualization in order to strengthen students and academic level as their general IT skills.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Materials C are subject to the general requirement for subject interaction. In the three-year upper secondary schools selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area.
When the subject is included as study subjects, it has a disciplinary interactions with other technical or scientific subjects specific statik- and strength elements and applications of these.
Part course as an elective in the program, selected the additional agent, so the subject of application in technical fields is illuminated.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Pupils' achievement and overall performance is regularly assessed. The assessment is an overall assessment of student's proficiency and performance.
4.2. Sample Form
Oral examination on the basis of the student's final assignment, which is made locally, see. Section. 3.2. A list of task formulations for eksaminandernes final assignments sent to the examiner prior to the examination. The final task is before the sample is not corrected and annotated by the teacher / examiner.
The examination time is about 24 minutes. There is no preparation.
Exam is based on the student's presentation and disclosure of his final assignment supplemented with one or more pre-prepared questions from the examiner. The examination is shaped to fit an in-depth interview, which may include topics throughout the entire profession core material and supplementary material.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on:


- The presentation of the academic content of the task in relation to the academic objectives
- The ability to demonstrate an overview of the subject
- Answering detailed and supplementary questions to the task in relation to the academic objectives.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the student's oral presentation.
Annex 30
Multimedia C - elective, June 2010

1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Multimedia is all forms of interactive media, ie information and communication systems involving many different digital materials, and where user interaction is central.
Multimedia often appeal to several senses, and they can run on a wide range of platforms. In the center of this course is the theory and practical application of information, communication theories and aesthetics for analysis and production of interactive media.
1.2. purpose
Students should be able to analyze and evaluate interactive media from a technical, communicative and aesthetic point of view and be able to creatively designing and manufacturing small multimedia productions aimed at different situations and audiences. Furthermore, they could participate actively and competently in the global network society.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should:


- To design and analyze interactive media from knowledge of communication, genres and audience as well as knowledge of narrative and scenography
- Apply principles of layout, fonts, colors, audio visual composition and hyper textual structuring the design and analysis of interactive media
- Be able to use a variety of tools that can be used in multimedia production
- Be familiar with the surroundings and opportunities for interaction that characterizes interactive media and especially distributed media where this includes event-driven interaction, small interaction programs and various kinds of animations
- Obtain a basic knowledge of internet architecture and the conditions that this creates for networked multimedia
- Gain knowledge of database supported content management
- To plan and implement production processes using methods for generating ideas and design, storyboard and prototyping and modeling of navigation and structure
- Carry out implementation, testing and evaluation of the interaction.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Communication models, including target groups, messages and instruments
- Interactive media history, genres and narrative
- Visual design, including layout, colors, graphics and image composition
- Auditory design, including voice, sound effects, background music and dialogue
- Interactivity, including event-driven interaction and programming of interactive response
- Hypertext and hypermedia, including structuring mechanisms rhetoric and navigation
- Infrastructure, including client-server architecture for web and storage media for distribution
- Representation and transport of data, including, formats, compression and bandwidth
- Databases and media independent data representation, style sheets.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional drug exemplifies and puts into perspective the core substance. The additional substance among other


- Contribute to the achievement of the academic
- Ensure that the issues / problem areas are illuminated from several angles
- Support the use of multimedia in multidisciplinary contexts
- Show the current trends in the art.

3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The course is organized as an interplay between theory and practice, where students' practical work on their own projects supported with the necessary theoretical basis and supplemented by analysis of existing interactive productions.
The teaching should wherever possible be centered on the students' own activities and learning through the creative process that characterizes the production of interactive media.
It is a common feature that learning takes place by the interaction of the work with practical examples and theoretical material. This includes:


- Analysis of interactive media (focusing on different elements)
- Practical design of the individual elements of the interactive media
- Design and manufacture of total production.

3.2. Work methods
Use a wide range of work. The creative project work is characteristic of the profession and must interact with other work.
The theoretical knowledge is achieved partly through the students' own activities, partly in the form of teacher reviews, student presentations and discussion of the theoretical contents.

As part of the education takes two projects. In each of these processes produce students individually or in groups, an interactive media production.
Project processes are continuously documented in an e-space, ie a web-based collaboration tool. The documentation must include job description, description of the workflow, task management, materials used. E-space is also used for communication and for reflections on the process and product. Any written work compiled in the form of reports on selected parts of the projects.
If the course has been conferred apprenticeship, the written work is organized so that there is progression in the profession of writing and context for written work in other subjects in the development of the individual student's writing skills.
3.3. it
The subject is in itself a part of information technology, and the use of IT is the basis for the subject. This includes the use of equipment and software for the production, distribution and presentation.
In connection with the documentation of its own multimedia productions to use an e-room with a minimum possibility of asynchronous text communication and file sharing.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
The subject's communicative and communicative core fabric opens for interaction with all other subjects.
The technical basis for interactive media involves a joint technical area of ​​computer science, mathematics and physics. In the three-year upper secondary schools selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
For exercises and projects made clear, the professional objectives to be achieved through the exercise / project and the evaluation is based on this.
The students' practical work and the dissemination of this is the basis for the ongoing evaluation of their understanding of the subject's theoretical content and their ability to apply this in practice.
The students' e-space-based documentation of the projects is also used in the continuous assessment.
4.2. Sample Forms
The school selects for each team one of the following two forms of testing.
Examination form a)
Oral examination on the basis of a task, the purpose of developing an interactive media production or part of one.
The examination time is about 30 minutes. Is given about 24 hours of preparation time, but not less than 24 hours, where the student individually or in a group of up to three people establish a draft assignments.
Examination papers must be examinees announced no later than five days before the test, but only after accumulation schedule publication. There are produced so many tasks that all technical elements of education are represented in these. Tasks can be used three times.
Time-consuming parts of the multimedia product development is carried out only in outline form with respect to consideration of final and complete development of the product.
The examination is individual and based on the assignment. It takes the form of both a presentation of the solution, partly a subsequent conversation where also professional elements of education, beyond what is included in tackling the tasks involved. In the conversation can task performance also be related to the candidate's other productions.
Sample Form b)
Oral examination on the basis of a task to appoint a professional theme.
The examination time is about 30 minutes. Is given about 60 minutes preparation time.
There are produced so many tasks that all technical elements of education are represented in these. Tasks can be used three times.
The examination consists of two parts:


1) A statement of and conversation about how the theme can be related to and put into perspective the student's own productions.
2) An explanation and discussion on the theme theoretical aspects, which partly can be used, eg materials from the program and also can involve new material.

4.3. Assessment criteria
Only the candidate's performance in the oral examination forms the basis for the assessment. The assessment expresses the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on the student:


- Show ability to apply and reflect on the aesthetic elements of an interactive media production
- Demonstrates the ability to analyze and realize the communicative aspects of an interactive media production
- Demonstrates the ability to structure an interactive media production

- Demonstrates an overview of the various options for materials and elements in an interactive media production and shows familiarity with the individual, selected IT tools that the student has specifically worked with
- Demonstrates general understanding and practical knowledge of the individual activities in the production of an interactive media production
- Demonstrate an ability to relate to how the user interaction can take appropriate
- Show an understanding of the various options for distribution and routing of an interactive media production.

One mark is given by an overall assessment.
Annex 31
Organisation C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Organisation is a social science subject that includes knowledge of organizational structures and processes, including management in organizations. The course provides knowledge about management and staff opportunities to adapt the organization, taking into account developments in the international community.
1.2. purpose
Through teaching organization, students should develop the ability to relate reflecting the internal organization and the organization as a dynamic entity in an interaction with the surrounding community. Students should develop the ability to independently work with organizational problems through the application of organizational theory in a realistic and international context.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Explain the organization theoretical schools in a historical perspective
- Discuss and evaluate issues of an organization's structures and processes
- Apply knowledge of internal organizational cooperate to discuss and evaluate issues of team- and project organization and team and project management
- Discuss and evaluate the competency of an organization
- Apply knowledge of well-being, motivation and leadership to discuss and assess an organization's management processes.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Organization theoretical schools
- Design of organizations
- Team organization and team management
- Project organization and project
- Competence
- Well-being, motivation and leadership.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance is currently organizational fabric that into perspective and deepens the academic objectives about the organization's structures and processes in interaction with the outside world.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The organization C work with current and realistic problems as specific organizations analyzed from a holistic point of view. Education shall to the extent possible involve the students experience. Organizational theory involved to create structure and understanding.
The inductive and case-based teaching principle is central to the organization of teaching. Through the inductive and case-based teaching promoted students' ability to structure and formulate a professional reasoning.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching is organized with variation and progression in the choice of work.
The training includes work with exercises based on specific and limited organizational issues so that students acquire skills in working with organizational models.
3.3. it
The teaching is organized taking into account that it is an academic and educational tool. In connection with case work organized teaching, taking into account that students must have access to electronic communication platforms and the Internet.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Parts of the core substance and the additional agent is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area. When the subject is included as study subjects must be in the organization of teaching emphasis on the opportunities for interaction with the social sciences or natural sciences around organizational, managerial or staffing issues.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The basis for the ongoing evaluation are the professional goals. Through individual counseling and evaluation achieves the pupil during the course of the entire process a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level, including involvement activities that stimulate the individual and collective reflection on the benefits of education.

4.2. Sample Forms
The school selects for each team one of the following two methods of evaluation:
Examination form a)
Oral examination on the basis of an unknown text material and a number of questions.
The examination time is about Per 20 minutes. examinee. Is given about 40 minutes preparation time.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
A sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team. The entire sample material to cover the academic wide.
Sample Form b)
Oral examination based on part one of the examinee topic from the program and also an unknown text material with a number of questions.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Is given about 30 minutes preparation time.
The examination is twofold.
One part consists of the candidate's presentation of a chosen topic from classes supplemented with additional questions from the examiner.
The second part is based on the unknown text material and takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
The examination time is evenly distributed between the two parts.
A sample material must not be used on three examinations on the same team. The entire sample material to cover the academic wide.
4.3. Assessment criteria
In the evaluation assesses the degree to which the student is able to meet course goals, as indicated in section. 2.1.
The candidate must be able to:


- Structure and communicate academic material
- Formulate a professional reasoning
- Discuss and assess organizational problems with the application of the theory in a realistic and international context.

Delivered one character out of an overall assessment.
Annex 32
Programming C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Programming includes the methods and techniques used to make programmable IT components to perform scheduled actions. The course has a practical dimension to the programming of simple IT components and demonstration of more complex technological systems. The course is a technical course with emphasis on experimental and innovative processes.
1.2. purpose
The course helps students study competence by developing the capacity for logical, systematic thinking and developing special IT skills that can be applied in other areas of education and training context. The course contributes to the program's overall objectives by giving students background to examine and describe simple processes and process data and information using programming.
The course supports students' ability to act in the global high-tech world.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Account for programming that scheduling a computer's activities, including interaction with the environment
- Read simple programs and explain their behavior and applications
- Formulate and adapt simple programs
- Using existing software components and library modules in the work to program a working system
- Demonstrate creativity and systematics in the programming process
- Solve a simple problem through the development of a program.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Programming
- Elements of the programming language structure such as data and control structures
- Programs rule-bound behavior from the program's individual elements
- Programs interaction with the environment
- Software components and library modules
- Workflows in the programming process
- Abstract programming descriptions and documentation.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance is 20 per cent. of training time and must be selected such that:


- Helping to achieve the professional goals
- Supports the use of programming in multidisciplinary contexts
- Shows the current trends in the art.

3. Organization
3.1. didactic considerations

Teaching centered on experimental problems of increasing difficulty. The teaching method differentiated so that all students develop in the course. Alternating between introductory and overview generating processes, experiments, exercises and projects, based on the subject's tool-related application.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching is based on student life and technology that provides programmed functions. The emphasis is on the student to describe programs function in normal language and achieve a natural approach to translate these features to elements of a programming language.
Teaching is conducted so that the student is presented to at least one programming language. There is selected a primary programming language as the basis for teaching. Work with examples of programs and the development of understanding of programming language is by experimenting with flavors of simple programs.
The teaching is differentiated and alternates between overview creative process and project teaching. The teaching method promotes progression in both substantive difficulty and independence in problem solving. There prepared project descriptions in the form of records, including an exam. The project has an extent of 20 hours of training time. The project consists of a product and a journal. The log must describe the development of the finished product. The record must not have a scope of 10 pages.
The project developed within the framework of the project proposal submitted by the school. The student will prepare a project to be approved by the school when the description is sufficiently academically broad and level terms applicable.
Along with the project the candidate submits a journal, describing the product and documentation. Delivery time must usually be at least one week before the examination period began.
If the course has been conferred apprenticeship, the written work is organized so that there is progression in the profession of writing and context for written work in other subjects in the development of the individual student's writing skills.
3.3. it
The course conducted with extensive use of IT tools for experiments, testing and preparation of documentation.
Programming tools that can automatically generate documentation and testing, used, like other information technology tools involved as needed.
Internet is used as a search tool for information, instructions, examples, software components and library modules in compliance with copyright rules and documentation requirements.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
The module works with subjects that can benefit from programming techniques. Students can develop projects including the examination project, as part of a project in another subject.
In the three-year upper secondary schools selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The student must have continuous feedback on its professional level compared to the targets. The evaluation is based on the student's daily work. This is done on the basis of a thorough evaluation of exercises and projects, so that the student gets ready response in his professional and self-development.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be one project examination with written records and related oral exam, see. Section. 3.2.
Before the oral part of the test sends the school a copy of the record to the examiner. Examiners discuss before the oral part of the exam, which issues the candidate must elaborate. The journal is before the sample is not addressed and commented on by the teacher.
The examination time is about 24 minutes. There is no preparation.
Exam is based on the student's presentation and the presentation of the project, supplemented by one or more pre-prepared questions from the examiner. The examination is shaped to fit like a perspectival conversation throughout the subject's core fabric and supplementary material.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on the student's ability to:


- Construct simple programs
- Use software components and library modules and document their use and origin
- Document programs so that they are understandable
- Go from the analysis of a given problem to develop a solution
- Explain the work process which led to the solution

- Reflect on how the problems could otherwise be resolved

One mark is awarded on the basis of an overall assessment of the student's oral presentation.
Annex 33
Psychology B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Psychology is the science of how the human senses, think, learn, feel, act and develop universal and under given circumstances of life. The scientific psychology uses natural science, social science and humanities methods and results of research are used in many different contexts for understanding man. The subject's historical background contains philosophical and scientific theories.
Psychology in secondary schools include recent research and theory in social psychology, developmental psychology, areas of cognition and learning as well as personality and identity.
1.2. purpose
The subject of psychology B contributes to the program's overall objective, by students gain proficiency in the science-based psychology core subjects and methods. The aim is to achieve the ability to analyze and reflect on the psychological conditions of both professional and general character and competence to critically evaluate psychological studies and theories including psychological theories historical and cultural context. Psychology B included in professional interaction with the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities, thus contributing to a holistic understanding. Psychology B contributes to the development of skills that make students able to reflect on their own studio practice and to cooperate with others. Likewise they get through psychology B possibilities for understanding and respect for people's differences on the basis of personal, social and cultural factors, which helps to make them competent to navigate in a changing and globalized world.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Demonstrate thorough knowledge of the subject material, primarily in relation to the normal functioning human
- Account for and critically to key psychological theories, concepts and studies and be able to understand them in a historical-cultural context
- Select and apply relevant psychological knowledge on specific issues and current drug and could be critical to this knowledge on a professional basis
- Involve different perspectives to explain the psychological issues, including able to place psychological theory in a science theoretical framework
- Account for and critically relate to the subject's research methods, including to discuss ethical issues in psychological research, and be able to distinguish between everyday psychology and scientifically based psychological knowledge
- Demonstrate knowledge of how knowledge is generated in psychology, and on that basis even be able to design and implement smaller types of field investigations, including to present and relate the results with the use of a methodical concepts
- Assess the importance of historical and cultural factors in human behavior
- Disseminating psychological knowledge in writing and verbally with an academic concepts in a clear and precise manner
- Perspective psychology's contributions to both the humanities as natural and social sciences.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is the following:
Social Psychology


- Group psychological processes and social influence
- Interpersonal communication
- Social cognition, including stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination
- Cultural psychology.

Developmental Psychology


- Human development in a lifelong learning perspective, including the importance of heritage, environment, and culture
- Care and the family's importance for development, including the importance of vulnerability and resilience.

Cognition and Learning


- Psychological, social and cultural environment for the learning, intelligence, motivation and memory
- Perception and think about the meaning of man's understanding of the outside world.

Personality and identity


- Self, identity and personality
- Individual differences in lifestyle and handling of challenges, including work stress and coping.

Psychological method


- Survey methods, including experimentation, observation, interview and questionnaire

2.3. additional substance

Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance in psychology B, including the possible interaction with other disciplines, to be put into perspective and deepen the core substance and in general expand professional horizons, so that students can meet the academic goals, see. Section. 2.1.
For the adjunctive agent hears the following areas:


- Health psychology
- Clinical psychology
- Child and family psychology
- Neuropsychology
- Sports psychology
- Media psychology
- Work and organizational psychology
- Educational Psychology
- Legal psychology.

Organized courses in at least one of these areas.
Depending on the individual educational profile, the supplemental material, together with the core material, arranged so that it contributes to the realization of the educational purposes. There can be no weighting:


- The practice and application-oriented
- Labor and business prospects
- Scientific and methodological issues.

3. Organization
The teaching is organized so that students achieve a holistic and coherent understanding of the psychological conditions curricula include. The teacher is responsible for planning the teaching and that it is implemented in varying shapes and learning.
3.1. Didactic principles
The fundamental principle of the organization is a theme-oriented teaching, where all core fabric strands are lit end of the teaching. The academic goals are guiding the educational organization of the thematic sessions. Students must be guaranteed a say in content and form, and they must be supported in their autonomy and accountability using a variety of teaching and learning methods. These and the metacognitive aspects of the profession must be involved so that they contribute to the development of personal and social skills based on a professional basis, and academic skills will be developed through work with the critical thinking and interaction with other disciplines. Through fieldwork introduced to the use of psychological method. In the study, field work is done in collaboration with other disciplines and contribute to the progression in students' writing skills.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching in order variation and progression. There must be varied between teacher-centered and student-centered teaching methods, and to be exchanged between inductive and deductive principles, including project organized work.
Depending on the option to connect to the practical world. Various media and relevant sites on the Internet are involved.
Field studies and writing
The training should cover the preparation of at least one major product-oriented project, where students independently immerse themselves in an academic issue and implement and process smaller types of field studies.
3.3. it
It is a tool for communication, information and communication in psychology teaching. The instruction also includes the use of professional and evaluating information from various Internet-based databases and pages of psychology professional content.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Psychology B is subject to the general requirement for interaction between the subjects and included in the general study preparation / study area in accordance with the rules governing these processes. When psychology B read as study subjects, treated parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area. The subject material for natural interfaces for all subjects, which in various ways deal with human beings, and cooperation with other subjects allows for contemplation and insight into the respective subjects contribution to the whole.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The purpose of the current evaluation is to ensure the quality of teaching and reinforcing the individual student's learning. The ongoing evaluation must also show the student's position in relation to the section. 2.1. set professional goals. At the same time the ongoing evaluation ability to support the subject's meta-cognitive aspects.
Evaluation is carried out several times during the teaching in written or oral form. Ensure that by the end of the course has been used different evaluation forms.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral examination based on a known theme with unknown annexes, chosen by the examiner.

The examination time is about 30 minutes.
The text material handed out the day before the test, and provides about 24 hours of preparation time, but not less than 24 hours to prepare a synopsis. If the school has determined that the preparation can be done in groups, choose the examinees, they will prepare themselves in group or individually.
The text material must be provided with a header that indicates the well-known theme, and annex material should be appropriate preparation time length, with a maximum of eight pages.
The total sample should broadly cover the studied themes, and each task must be used three times. Annex may be used several times by the examiner.
The sample material is sent to the examiner prior to the examination.
The sample is two-fold.
The first part of the test consists of the candidate's presentation and the presentation of the synopsis supplemented with additional questions from the examiner.
The second part takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner. Examiner may ask clarifying questions.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The assessment expresses the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 34
Psychology C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Psychology is the science of how the human senses, think, learn, feel, act and develop universal and under given circumstances of life. The scientific psychology uses natural science, social science and humanities methods and results of research are used in many different contexts for understanding man. The subject's historical background contains philosophical and scientific theories.
Psychology in secondary schools include recent research and theory in social psychology, developmental psychology, areas of cognition and learning as well as personality and identity.
1.2. purpose
The subject of psychology C contributes to the program's overall objective, by students gain proficiency in the science-based psychology core subjects and methods. The aim is to achieve the ability to analyze and reflect on the psychological conditions of both professional and general character and competence to critically evaluate psychological studies and theories. Psychology C included in professional interaction with the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities, thus contributing to a holistic understanding. Psychology C contributes to the development of skills that make students able to reflect on their own studio practice and to cooperate with others. Likewise they get through psychology C possibilities for understanding and respect for people's differences on the basis of personal, social and cultural factors, which helps to make them competent to navigate in a changing and globalized world.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Demonstrate a broad knowledge of the subject material, primarily in relation to the normal functioning human
- Explain central psychological theories and studies
- Select and apply relevant psychological knowledge on specific issues and current drug and could be critical to this knowledge on a professional basis
- Involve different perspectives to explain the psychological issues
- Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the research methods and ethical issues in psychological research and be able to distinguish between everyday psychology and scientifically based psychological knowledge
- Assess the importance of cultural factors in human behavior
- Disseminating psychological knowledge with an academic concepts in a clear and precise manner.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is the following:
Social Psychology


- Group psychological processes and social influence
- Stereotypes and prejudices.

Developmental Psychology


- Human development in a lifelong learning perspective, including the importance of heritage, environment and culture
- Care, vulnerability and resilience.

Cognition and Learning


- Psychological, social and cultural environment for the learning, intelligence and memory
- Perception and think about the meaning of man's understanding of the outside world.

Personality and identity


- Self, identity and personality
- Individual differences in lifestyle and handling of challenges including stress and coping.


2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance in psychology C, including the possible interaction with other disciplines, to be put into perspective and deepen the core substance and in general expand professional horizons, so that students can meet the academic goals, see. Section. 2.1.
Depending on the individual educational profile, the supplemental material, together with the core material, arranged so that it contributes to the realization of the educational purposes. There can be no weighting:


- The practice and application-oriented
- Labor and business prospects
- Scientific and methodological issues.

3. Organization
The teaching is organized so that students achieve a holistic and coherent understanding of the psychological conditions that curricula include. The teacher is responsible for planning the teaching, and for its implementation in varying shapes and learning.
3.1. Didactic principles
The fundamental principle of the organization is a theme-oriented education so that all core fabric strands are lit end of the teaching. The academic goals are guiding the educational organization of the thematic sessions. Students must be guaranteed a say in content and form, and they must be supported in their autonomy and accountability using a variety of teaching and learning methods. These and the metacognitive aspects of the profession must be involved so that they contribute to the development of personal and social skills based on a professional basis, and academic skills will be developed through work with the critical thinking and interaction with other disciplines.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching in order variation and progression. There must be varied between teacher-centered and student-centered teaching methods, and to be exchanged between inductive and deductive principles including the possibility of project organized work.
Depending on the option to connect to the practical world. Various media and information technologies involved.
3.3. it
It is a tool for communication, information and communication in education. The instruction also includes the use of professional and evaluating information from various Internet-based databases and pages of psychology professional content.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Psychology C are subject to the general requirement for interaction between the subjects and included in the general study preparation / study area in accordance with the rules governing these processes. When psychology C read as study subjects, treated parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area. The subject material for natural interfaces for all subjects, which in various ways deal with human beings, and cooperation with other subjects allows for contemplation and insight into the respective subjects contribution to the whole.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The purpose of the current evaluation is to ensure the quality of teaching and reinforcing the individual student's learning. The ongoing evaluation must also show the student's position in relation to the section. 2.1. set professional goals. At the same time the ongoing evaluation ability to support the subject's meta-cognitive aspects.
Evaluation is carried out several times during the teaching in written or oral form. Ensure that by the end of the course has been used different evaluation forms.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral exam on the basis of an unknown annexes, chosen by the examiner.
The examination time is about 20 minutes.
Preparation time is about 40 minutes.
The annexes must be provided with a header and indicative sub-questions. Annex Scope of adjusted preparation time, not exceeding three pages.
The total sample should broadly cover the studied themes, and each task must be used three times. Annex may be used several times by the examiner.
The total sample is sent to the examiner prior to the examination.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner. Examiner may ask clarifying questions.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 35
Religion B - electives June 2010
1. The identity and purpose

1.1. identity
World religions are central to the subject of religion, and of these, Christianity mandatory.
On scientific, non-denominational background described and understood religions and their central phenomena in relation to the individual, group, society, culture and nature.
The course deals with the origin of religions, their historical development, their contemporary form and their historical impact. The subject's perspective is global. Religions role in European and Danish history of ideas and identity conferred a special attention.
The work primarily with texts. Moreover involved other documentary material.
1.2. purpose
Through this course achieves the students knowledge and understanding of religions. They get insight into the relationship and tensions within individual religions, between religions with each other, and the relationship between religion and society.
Students gain an understanding of their own and others' attitudes on the basis of religious or secular traditions and acquire qualifications to decide and act in relation to the challenges that religions make up a modern national and global context.
This also helps the profession to develop students study competence at academic immersion and independent use of religion academic theory and method.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Explain central aspects of Christianity and Islam and Hinduism or Buddhism, including those religions formative, historical and contemporary figures
- Explain religious phenomena as myth, narrative, cosmology, eschatology, ritual, revelation, doctrine and ethics
- Use religious terminology
- Characterize, analyze and texts and other documentary material
- Interpret and evaluate religious views and issues from both a religious self-understanding as from secular, including religion critical angles
- Express themselves on important issues concerning the relationship between religion and modern secular society in a global context
- To express themselves on ethical issues
- Explain and apply religion academic theories
- Analyze and evaluate a long, complex religious or religion academic text
- Independently prepare and respond to a religious professional or a multidisciplinary problem formulation.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Christianity seen in a global perspective, particularly in its European and Danish outing. The work includes that of C-level texts from the Old and New Testament texts from the history of Christianity and contemporary texts
- Islam seen in a global perspective, drawing on its European and Danish context. The work includes texts from the Koran and contemporary texts
- Buddhism or Hinduism, including texts from its origin and from the present
- Religions key phenomena and religion terminology and methodology
- Religion scientific theory
- Masterpiece reading: a longer text of religious or religion academic nature.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional ingredient of religion B must, among other things, in interaction with other disciplines, both perspective core substance and expand professional horizons, so that students can meet the 2.1. stated objectives.
There should read one or two additional subjects. These can be either ethical or religious philosophical, a well-defined religion academic subject or consist of one to two religion (s) of your choice.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The approach to the phenomenon of religion is basically twofold. On the one hand they are treated selected religions as unique cultural and historical formations, each with their specific identity and problems. On the other hand, treated religion in a religionsfænomenologisk perspective as a cross-cultural size of recurring themes and issues.
Of the subject of education, about 30 per cent. on Christianity.
Students' academic overview strengthened by a brief overview of world religions that put them into a world historical and geographical context.

The main approach to the themes of the subject is the work with texts. These include both classic and representative texts that are read intensive, and wider presentations, reference books and information from the Internet. There are also read a longer text (about 30 pages) of religious or religion academic nature. Moreover involved other material such as image material, architecture, film, observations from field work or field trips.
The approach to texts and other material combines descriptive, interpretive and critical perspectives that lets both religions own worlds of imagination as secular viewpoints have their say.
3.2. Work methods
The teaching is organized as a combination of classroom and various forms of group work. Towards the end of the course prepares students, normally in groups, a project report (four to five pages per. Person) followed by an oral presentation. The project may be single or multi-disciplinary and must be within the areas that are working with earlier. If the course has been conferred apprenticeship, the written work is planned so that there is progression and coherence of written work in other subjects.
The report must include outreach activities such as excursions and field work in education.
3.3. it
It must be involved in teaching.
Internet and other electronic media to use as a source of religions and religious issues, including especially those relating to imagery.
There must be practiced a source critical approach to the Internet. Students should be trained to assess the relevance of the source, intention, level and reliability, including the source illuminates the fabric from inside or outside.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Religion B is in training to stx subject to the general requirement of interaction between the subjects, including classical studies, and included in the general study preparation in accordance with the rules applicable to this process.
When religion is B study subjects, parts of core material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area.
Through interaction promoted students' understanding of the relationship between religious issues and historical, social, literary, philosophical or ethical issues. Particularly obvious is the development of students' understanding of the relationship between religion and modern secular society in a global context. It also gives students here the opportunity to apply the concepts and methods to concrete problems.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Through individual counseling and evaluating the pupil during the process obtain a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level, including strengths and weaknesses. At least once in each semester must be an evaluation of the student's position, efforts and active participation in class.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral exam on the basis of the project and an unknown text up to two and a half standard page of a 1300 case, including any other material chosen by the examiner, in one of the reading lesson.
The examination consists of a discussion of the project report, part of the presentation and discussion of the unknown text. The order is arbitrary.
Tasks may be used twice.
The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee. Is given about 30 minutes preparation time.
The examination takes the form of a conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
4.3. Assessment criteria
In the evaluation, emphasis is placed on the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 36
Rhetoric C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Of rhetoric topic is production and reception of intention certain utterances in relation to their communication situation. Rhetoric is a cultural skills, which builds on a historic western tradition of teaching the text production, more recently continued with the study of public reasoning and communication. Rhetoric The course is characterized by its joining of theory and practice. It is normative, its theory largely about good practice, ie establish the criteria for how to evaluate the quality and effectiveness of argumentative and intermediary comments, and for the working methods you can use to produce appropriate utterances. The subject's main activities are the acquisition of rhetorical theory and thinking, working with rhetorical practice and study of authentic spoken or written.
1.2. Purpose

Retorik C is a dannelsesfag. Through knowledge and awareness of the functions of language and situation certainty acquire the students competence in rhetorical practice. This in turn increases their opportunities to engage qualified and actively in a democratic society and to contribute to development and change both nationally and internationally.
Rhetoric C is a university preparatory courses. By working with rhetoric research methodology achieves the students' awareness of the academic workflow and experience with various working on both the særfaglige as the interdisciplinary level. This in turn increases their ability to work independently, to work, to seek knowledge and thus the completion of a higher education.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to produce oral and written arguments end and intermediate expressions that are designed rhetorically appropriate and linguistically quality-conscious compared to their genre and communications situation, and they should be able to adopt a rhetorical account of authentic argumentative and intermediary utterances. Below, they could:


- Argue for a position in a way that is suitable to convince
- Communicating technical knowledge in a way that is suitable to interest and inform
- Analyze and assess the quality and effect of authentic utterances
- Provide constructive amendments to the authentic utterances
- Use basic rhetorical concepts of production and reception of authentic utterances
- Understand the features and power that utterances may have in relation to democracy.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is authentic, non-fictional, spoken or written with argumentative or intermediary function.
In working with speech focuses on:


- Communicative situation parts, including sender, recipient and context
- Function, genre and appropriateness
- Rhetorical argument
- Rhetoric appeal forms: logos, ethos and pathos
- Rhetoric processing phases inventio-, dispositions, elocutio, memoria and actio
- Principles of rational planning and workflow
- Principles of constructive criticism.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance into perspective and deepen the core substance, including the interaction with other disciplines.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Teaching is a continuous interaction between the students studying authentic examples of words spoken or written, that they study rhetorical theory, and that they communicate in different situations and receive constructive criticism. It lets largely introduction to rhetorical theory and thinking based on rhetorical exercises and the students' practical experience.
Tuition is based on students' different assumptions by being differentiated, both in terms of types of practical exercises and with respect to the goals of the individual practical exercises. The watchman subject's practical and theoretical sides equally and integrates the subject's oral and written pages and weigh them equally.
The training focuses on working with constructive criticism on the quality and potential for improvement lies in students' interim and final statements.
3.2. Work methods
Education shall be organized so that alternate between different forms of work.
Central to the teaching of rhetoric is students' oral and written statements followed by constructive criticism. The constructive criticism given orally in the form of responses to the individual student or groups of students in the class or in the form of individual guidance. The constructive criticism is also given in writing from student to student.
The students write a process report on their own production of an oral or written utterance. Process report shall include a description of the communication situation, planning, workflow and recipients reception of the utterance.
Under the teacher's guidance collects each student's utterances produced in its portfolio: drafts and manuscripts of words spoken or written, written critiques, process report, responses of theoretical and practical tasks that have been made in education. The portfolio is part of the ongoing evaluation of the student's standpoint. It is part of the basis for the oral exam and must be delivered to the teacher before teaching an end. The portfolio must contain at least three rounded utterances.

Progression of the teaching applies to both the complexity of the topics and genres, working with, and partly the work routines. The emphasis is on the students will be working more and more independently within the one-year course.
If the course has been conferred apprenticeship, the written work is planned so that there is progression and coherence of written work in other subjects. The students' experience of writing in other subjects involved in the teaching, and the students must be made aware that the genres they write in is non-fiction in the same way as the utterances they encounter in other subjects. The majority of the texts to be produced during lessons. Students should be given feedback on their texts in the teaching of both teacher and students.
3.3. it
It is part of the teaching by the students use computers:


- When editing and saving unfinished and finished utterances
- Joint production and mutual constructive criticism
- By searching and storing relevant example material in electronic databases.

3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Rhetoric C are subject to the general requirement for interaction between the subjects and included in the general study preparation / study area in accordance with the rules governing these processes. When rhetoric C is a Specialized study, parts of core material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in the study area.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The individual courses are evaluated by the students:


- Presenting oral statements
- Submit written statements
- To provide constructive criticism
- Receive constructive criticism
- Organize their oral and written productions in their own portfolio folder.

4.2 Types of test
There will be an individual, oral examination with preparation time. The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. student, and given some 60 minutes preparation time. The sample material is chosen by the examiner and sent to the examiner prior to the examination.
The test consists of two parts:


1) A theoretical test point where there are questions to an unknown oral or written authentic utterance which is parallel to the utterances that the student has engaged in teaching. Utterance made available in written form and possibly also in sound or visual recording shall be up to three pages and must be accompanied by a real comment on the utterance communication situation. The examinee must decide on a maximum of three rhetorical aspects of the utterance. On the basis of the student's oral presentations about five minutes shapes examination itself forward as a professional conversation about the drawn utterance.
2) A practical test point where the student must outline an adaptation of one of his utterances from his portfolio to match to the examiner formulated realistic communication situation. The candidate must justify its rhetorical choices for the design of the processed utterance that must be argumentative or intermediate species. The candidate must not design a whole utterance, but sketch an outline. The examinee must also concretely formulate a start. On the basis of the candidate's presentation of utterance disposition and justification of approximately five minutes shapes examination itself forward as a professional conversation about the candidate's considerations in portfolioytringens processing to the examiner formulated situation.

The examination time is evenly distributed between the theoretical and the practical test.
Even students give up a portfolio folder comprising at least five products, including:


- At least one draft / script for verbal utterance
- At least one draft / manuscript written utterance
- A process report.

Among the spoken or written, there must be:


- At least one argumentative utterance
- At least one intermediary utterance.

4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student meets the academic goals that they are specified in section. 2.1.
In the assessment of the theoretical performance emphasized that the student can:


- Make a rhetorical analysis and assessment of an utterance in a communication situation
- Comment on the utterance in relation to rhetoric role in democracy.
- Use of rhetoric concepts appropriate
- Deliver an oral presentation and enter into dialogue in a way that is clear and linguistically appropriate.


In the assessment of the practical performance emphasized that the student can:


- Explain and justify the processing of a rhetorical appropriate utterance
- Explain and justify an appropriate design of an utterance in a communication situation
- Use of rhetoric concepts appropriate
- Deliver an oral presentation and enter into dialogue in a way that is clear and linguistically appropriate.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the theoretical and the practical test point. The two delpræstationer weighted equally.
Annex 37
Russian B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Russian is a færdighedsfag, vidensfag and cultural skills. Its target area is the Russian language and, by extension, knowledge and understanding of literature, history, culture and society in Russia and other areas of Russian-speaking populations.
1.2. purpose
Russian B to give students insight into the Russian language and the Russian world.
Through linguistic insight achieves the students communicative competence, reading competence and awareness of language learning in general. Through insight into the Russian world give students knowledge and basic understanding of Russian literature, culture, history and social and basic intercultural competence, beyond the well-known Northwest European world.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the main points of single talked standard Russian
- Pronunciation single standard Russian understandable and natural
- Read and understand adapted texts, fiction and non-fiction, and easier uadapterede texts
- Use a vocabulary that enables them to communicate in Russian on everyday matters and on studied topics and texts
- Use the central form learn and phrase building in an understandable and simple Russian spoken
- At an elementary level understand the studied subjects on the basis of knowledge of Russian literature, culture, history and society and show basal intercultural competence
- Write Russian on the computer as well as hand and express themselves in writing in an understandable Russian in speech embossed genres
- Use the subject relevant tools
- Apply strategies for language acquisition and understanding of other cultures.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Pronunciation, intonation and reading
- Literary and non-literary texts of different size, which highlights key aspects of Russia's literary, cultural, historical and social development
- Audiovisual media and the Internet as support for listening comprehension, reading comprehension, fluency and writing skills
- An active vocabulary of about 1600 core Russian words
- The most central parts of Russian grammar
- Listening, reading and speaking skills and the ability to engage in dialogue
- The subject's most central aids
- Basic knowledge of Russian society, Russian history, culture and literature.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance into perspective and expands core substance, to further develop students' linguistic knowledge and their mastery of the most basic principles of text analysis and text interpretation and shall include material that puts into perspective the issues / themes being worked on, for example. pictures, movies (clips) or Danish and Russian-language texts.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
In the process, there is a natural evolution from the tight teacher-led learning to the more and more student-driven learning.
Students should as soon as possible obtain an elementary communicative competence. The teacher is in this initial phase, the central linguistic role model.
At the end of the course students should be able to exercise greater independence. The teacher remains active opponent of the continuing training of communicative competence, including the linguistic correctness.
The current written work supports the learning of grammar, vocabulary and fluency.
Differentiated teaching is a natural didactic principle in the whole process.
3.2. Work methods
orally

The dedicated teaching for beginners is natural teacher-led and includes systematic and targeted work on vocabulary, pronunciation and basic grammatical structures and inflections.
Via controlled dialogue and conversation exercises in the system begins achieves the students an elementary communicative competence, fleshed out in freer and freer dialogues conversation.
After the system begins prioritized communicative competence still maximum, but dialogue and conversation is now complemented with more text-based disciplines, particularly summary and characterization. An everyday vocabulary will continue to be built and maintained.
A systematic effort bulletin skill translation and overview reading.
The conversation about the texts takes place in the beginning often teacher-led, but students must gradually acquire skills in taking some independent initiative in the conversation.
Written
The written dimension is introduced very early. Students should quickly start to write the Russian alphabet - both by hand and on computer - and with small written exercises to support communicative skill.
After starting the system focuses the written work continued on genres that supports the communicative competence. Work with the dictionary and manual use, and the students get used to using all subject IT opportunities.
3.3. it
It is an integral part of Russian course and taken into account in all disciplines from the first alphabet learning.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the Russian B in interaction with other disciplines on topics of linguistic, cultural, inter-cultural and historical art. Faget interact with other language subjects in order to develop a general linguistic awareness and knowledge of how to learn foreign languages.
When the subject is part of a study course, selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Already begin teaching students tested regularly by the teacher and of themselves using IT-based glosetræningsprogrammer and grammar programs and teacher also tests students using small written assignments, which address specific problems.
Major completed programs evaluated targeted and forward-looking of the teacher and students together.
The teacher's continuous assessment includes both students' strengths and weaknesses and focuses on the areas students mainly should be put into.
4.2. Sample Form
There is an oral examination based on a text material with a scope of ¾ to one standard page from one of the major texts or one of the issues that have signed in teaching, and an unseen text of approx 2/3 standard page.
The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance.
The examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. Preparation time is equal to two times examination time.
During the preparation time, the student use any aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet and translation programs, ie software or web-based programs that can translate whole sentences and whole texts from one language to another is not allowed.
The sample is two-fold.
The first part of the exam consists of translation into Danish of the first third of ekstemporalteksten and summary in Danish of the main features of the rest.
The second part consists in the reading of a small number of lines that the examinee during preparation are selected from the drawn text examinee shorter presentations in Russian about the drawn text and an interview in Russian about the text.
The examination time is divided between the two parts so that the second part represents at least 2/3 of the exam.
The same unknown sample material must not be used by two exams on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
For the test evaluated the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
Particular emphasis is placed on:


- Intelligible pronunciation and intonation
- Plain and text related vocabulary
- Communication skills and oral expression skills in a simple and understandable Russian spoken
- Directory assistance and translation skills in connection with the first third and understanding of the context for the rest of ekstemporalteksten
- Text comprehension and oversight in the well-known text.

An overall character based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 38
Spanish B - electives, June 2010

1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Spanish is one færdighedsfag, a vidensfag and cultural skills, based on the acquisition of communicative competence. The subject's central work is the Spanish language, partly as a general means of communication in European and other international contexts, partly as a shortcut to understanding of other languages ​​and cultures. The subject of activity is language, culture and society in the broadest sense in the Spanish-speaking countries.
1.2. purpose
Faget Spanish B helps the students develop their ability to communicate in Spanish. The course imparts students insight into and understanding of the essential aspects of the Spanish-speaking communities and cultures and increases their communication, intercultural and aesthetic consciousness. The course develops students' ability to use the foreign language as input to understand an alien world. Students should also through oral and written proficiency develop their ability to communicate on personal and general topics as well as on community related issues.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the main points in a clearly spoken Spanish on familiar and common topics disseminated through various media
- Participate in a conversation in Spanish about famous as well as general topics
- Read and understand primary Spanish-language texts, both fiction and nonfiction, including media texts
- Express themselves in writing in Spanish in simple language about familiar and everyday subjects
- Understand and explain familiar topics in Spanish-speaking countries culture and society
- Relate the acquired knowledge of the culture and society in Spanish speaking countries to their own culture and society
- Use the knowledge of how to learn foreign languages ​​in their daily work.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- A basic general vocabulary to be used for oral communication
- Specific vocabulary related to the selected items
- Basic principles of language use and structure, including elementary morphology, syntax, phonetics and pragmatics
- Modern texts to represent Spain and America
- Historical and cultural conditions in Spain and America, which are relevant for the subjects studied
- Key social issues in Spain and America
- Current situations in Spain and America. There must be included Spanish-language material from both print and electronic media
- Key subject aids.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals through nuclear substance alone. The additional fabric consists of various social, cultural and literary expression from the Spanish-speaking areas. It should deepen and put into perspective the core substance and expand professional horizons, so that students meet the academic goals.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The teaching of Spanish B based on the communicative principle, and it is organized as far as possible inductively. Disciplines to be experienced as a whole, in accordance with the academic objectives focus primarily on being useful. The teaching will give students the opportunity to acquire the knowledge of languages ​​required to develop both oral and written communication skills.
Listening, reading and conversation strategies to give students the tools to initiate and maintain communication. Education shall integrate the work on skills, strategies, language skills and content in which the student is jointly responsible languages ​​learns. Students should be trained to use both two- and monolingual dictionaries and a Spanish grammar.
Teaching is the greatest possible extent in Spanish. Interconnecting language priority over linguistic precision.
3.2. Work methods
Central to the lab, the academic progression. After starting classes organized work mainly through three to five subjects, is to represent Spain and America. The work of Spanish culture and Spanish society continuously integrated in the work of the subjects.
Work methods and techniques adapted to the professional goals, working towards in that topic. There used a variation of work that everyone focuses on language learning through the acquisition of communication skills: listening, conversation skills, reading comprehension, oral presentation and writing skills so that students develop greater autonomy in their work. Glosetræning, linguistic and communicative exercises and student presentations are included in all phases.

Throughout the process, constitute the written work an integral part of teaching. It is organized with progression, so that in the whole process supports the language learning process.
3.3. IT and media
IT and electronic media used with the overall aim to promote students' learning process and learning results. Integration of IT and electronic media in the classroom allows students to experience language in varied authentic and current contexts. Thus contributes modern information and communications technologies and the use of electronic media to ensure and deepen students' language and content dividends.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the Spanish B in interaction with other disciplines on topics of linguistic, cultural, inter-cultural and historical art. Faget interact with other language subjects in order to develop a general linguistic awareness and knowledge of how to learn foreign languages.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
There are ongoing through education and at the end of each subject course or project process evaluation of the five communication skills: listening, conversation skills, reading comprehension, oral presentation and writing skills so that students achieve a clear view of the level and evolution in the academic level, and thus that the individual and collective reflection on the yield of learners. The basis for evaluation is the professional goals.
The students 'academic level evaluated during the project using various forms of screening, oral and written test, dialogue between the student, class and teacher, and assessments of the student's processes and products, including the students' own self-evaluation.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral exam. The test consists of two parts with a total examination time of about 30 minutes:


1) Accounting and depth interview in Spanish as well as text comprehension based on an unknown primary Spanish-language prose text of the extent of about one standard page. The text related to one of the subjects studied. The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance. The topic studied involved in the conversation in Spanish. The syllabus text only special vocabulary and real comments.
2) Interview in Spanish starting in an unfamiliar imagery on general topics.

For 1) and 2) provides a total preparation time of about 60 minutes. In this preparation, the student use any aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet is not allowed.
The sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
A page of prose 1,300 letters, of poetry 30 verse lines.
4.3. Assessment criteria
For the test evaluated the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on the examinee in Spanish can account for the unknown text material and incorporate relevant elements of Spanish culture, literature and society from the studied subject. Furthermore, the emphasis is on conversation skills on general topics and text comprehension. Interconnecting language is more important than correctness in detail.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 39
Statics and Strength C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Statics and Strength is a technical subject that describes basic concepts that form the basis for sizing and strength study of simple structural elements. The course is experimental and can interact with technological subjects.
1.2. purpose
Statics and Strength C contributes to the program's overall objective, by the student strengthens his ability to complete higher education in the technical field and can relate reflective of technical designs and solutions in the outside world, especially in terms of statics and strength. The aim is that students will learn the static and strength issues, including the interaction with technological subjects, and experience in combining theory and practical work.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Explain the types of loads on structures as permanent load, long-term load, medium load, short-term load and immediate load
- Develop the static model from a practical design and illustrate the connection to the computational model

- Determine reactions, normal force and shear force and torque for the design elements influenced bending
- From calculation make drawing of normalkraft-, tværkraft- and torque curve to assess the impact, impact design
- Illuminate tværsnitformens and material importance of the elections for a construction element bearing capacity.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Permanent load and variable load
- Guidelines for determining the load on a construction
- Simply supported and cantilevered structural elements loaded with concentrated loads and / or line load
- Push and pull rods, including column and trusses, loaded with single forces
- Normal, tværkraft- and moment calculation
- Tværsnitskonstanter and troop
- Stress concept and the various studies to determine the tensile, compression, shear and torsion and deformationspåvirkning
- Relevant regulations and standards.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance to elaborate, put into perspective and highlight new dimensions and includes an application-orientation of the core substance. It has a volume of approximately 20 per cent. of the subject of education. The additional fabric gathers the course of a whole and selected so that, in cooperation with the nuclear substance contributes to the development of the academic objectives, perspectives and expand areas of core substance and supports the subject's practical dimension.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Using deductive as well as inductive teaching principles, students work with the theory used to solve a given problem. Teaching is an interaction between theory and work with examples and students' self-experiments based on technical issues.
3.2. Work methods
The training is customized to the different working methods that ensure a progression, so that the student can work independently with limited problems both practical and theoretical.
Students work with the written dimension of the subject and oral communication in the central parts of the fabric. There Written assignments with increasing progression. The final assignment forms the basis for the oral test.
The final assignment made by the school. The task has an extent of approximately 20 hours of training time. In this connection, select the student or groups of up to four students a practical realistic construction as the basis for establishing a static model, make cuts force provision and make the necessary dimensioning and deformationsberegninger. The assignment must be in the basis for årskarakteren in the subject and should, where appropriate, could form the basis for the oral test.
3.3. it
The instruction includes software for calculating, drawing and visualization in order to strengthen students both academic level as their general IT skills.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Statics and Strength C are subject to the general requirement for subject interaction. In the three-year upper secondary schools selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction in the study area.
When the subject is included as study subjects, it has a disciplinary interactions with other technical or scientific subjects specific statics and strength elements and applications of these.
Part course as an elective in the program, selected the additional agent, so the subject of application in technical fields is illuminated and the involvement of knowledge from mathematics and physics.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Pupils' achievement and overall performance is regularly assessed. The assessment is an overall assessment of student's proficiency and performance.
4.2. Sample Form
Oral examination on the basis of the student's final assignment, which is made locally, see. Section. 3.2. A list of task formulations for eksaminandernes final assignments sent to the examiner prior to the examination. The final task is before the sample is not corrected and annotated by the teacher / examiner.
The examination time is about 24 minutes. There is no preparation.

Exam is based on the student's presentation and disclosure of his final assignment supplemented with one or more pre-prepared questions from the examiner. The examination is shaped to fit an in-depth interview, which may include topics throughout the entire profession core material and supplementary material.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on:


- Explanation of the solution principle for an issue that the student has chosen from the final assignment
- Demonstrate a broad understanding of statics and strength and be able to translate this understanding into practice
- Answering detailed and supplementary questions to the task in relation to the academic objectives. Below understand, reproduce and interpret their own or others' results.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the student's oral presentation.
Annex 40
Statistics C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
The course statistics are a subject from the math department. Theory and methods from statistics used in both the social sciences, the natural sciences and technical subjects. The course statistics work with basic elements of probability and statistics for the solution of both theoretical and practical issues.
1.2. purpose
The course statistics C contributes to the program's overall objective, by students achieve broad insight into the theory and methods of probability theory and statistics. Students gain further insight into and develop the ability to reflect on the situations in which and the manner in which probability theory and statistics can be used. Finally, strengthening students' ability to apply theory and methods from the subject of specific social science, natural science or technical issues including issues that includes international comparisons.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Handle probabilistic and statistical concepts in both theoretical and practical situations
- Formulate and solve authentic stochastic problems
- Interpret and communicate probabilistic or statistical statements and texts
- Select and use relevant tools such as calculator and IT.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Basic probability theory and combinatorics
- The concept of random variables generally
- Binomial and normal distributions
- Statistical test.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional material will contribute to insights into where and how probabilistic and statistical methods applied in social science, natural science or technical arguments and supporting the subject's practical dimension. The supplementary material should be equivalent to about 30 per cent. of the total training time.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
There should be teaching emphasized that the elements of the subject experienced as a whole. Working with the theoretical elements to happen to still view the practical application and practical work must be planned with the continued involvement of the theory. It should also be made to ensure that the social sciences, natural sciences and technical applications of the subject integrated into everyday teaching and subject usefulness of international comparisons must be included in the organization. The choice of method must support efforts to increase students' level of reflection.
Because of the important role anvendelsesdimensionen to play in the profession, the inductive teaching principle be dominant, but it shall be supreme.
3.2. Work methods
In order to accommodate students' opportunities for creativity, collaboration and academic immersion organized teaching in the topic, case or project.

In at least 15 per cent. of the training period, students work with a project that contains a practical problem and involve significant elements of the core substance. Project participation must be organized so that it strengthens students' ability to analyze probabilistic or statistical problems, develop solutions, propose solutions, document and assess these. Furthermore, the performed project work together cover the main areas of the core substance and the adjunctive agent. Students and teacher define project processes together and prepared a short presentation for each project.
3.3. it
The use of IT to work with probabilistic or statistical problems must play a significant role in teaching because students must become familiar with modern statistical tools and have knowledge of their capabilities and limitations.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Statistics C are subject to the general requirement for subject interaction.
When the subject is a Specialized study, it has a disciplinary interactions with other technical, scientific or social science subjects for specific probabilistic and statistical elements as well as applications of these. Parts of nuclear material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction, if the profession is included as study subjects.
Part course as an elective in the program, selected the additional agent, so the subject of applications in social sciences, natural sciences or technical fields is illuminated.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
After the end of each topic, case or project course, students should have an individual assessment of the level and development of the academic level in relation to the expected development and professional goals. Below involved activities that stimulate the individual and collective reflection on the benefits of education.
4.2. Sample Forms
The school selects for each team one of the following two methods of evaluation:
Examination form a)
Oral examination on the basis of an unknown material with associated issues. The sample material is sent to the examiner prior to the examination.
The examination time is about Per 20 minutes. examinee. Is given about 40 minutes preparation time.
The exam is based on the examinee the questions supplemented by a subsequent conversation between the candidate and the examiner.
A sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
Sample Form b)
Oral examination on the basis of a completed project progress and unknown material relating to this. Project Documentation and unknown material sent to the examiner prior to the examination.
The examination time is about Per 20 minutes. examinee. Is given about 20 minutes to prepare.
Exam is based on the student's account of key issues in the project, supplemented by a subsequent conversation about the material between the candidate and the examiner.
A sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which the student is able to meet the academic goals that they are specified in section. 2.1.
The candidate must be able to:


- Dispose and select relevant content from the unknown material respectively project to use for the presentation
- Demonstrate insight into and understanding of probabilistic and statistical concepts and be able to handle these with security
- Demonstrate the ability to practical application of probability theory and statistics, including the ability to select and apply relevant tools
- Understand, reproduce and interpret their own or others' results.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 41
Technology C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
The subject technology integrates assessments of the interplay between technology development and community development and analysis of the technology. The course includes the development of products and the interaction between technology, knowledge, organization and product, technical and scientific knowledge combined with practical work in workshops and laboratories.
The subject method is problem-based learning in the project.
1.2. purpose
The course contributes to the aims of the program by strengthening students' basis for the choice of higher education in engineering, technology and science.

The aim is for students to develop their understanding of the theoretical knowledge from the training different subjects as a tool for analysis of realistic and complex issues. Students gain an understanding of the relationship between science, technology and society, including that they can be critical and reflective to technological development and societal conditions. The course provides knowledge and understanding of technology as a solution to problems that technology creates problems and the need to take account of technology's social impact.
In this connection, the objective is that students get familiar with various technologies used in business, to develop their ideas and innovative and creative processes important in the development of products.
It further aims to give students experience in working with the connection between scientific theory and practical workshops and laboratories and background to the choice of production processes.
Finally, the aim is that students get experience with problem-based learning in the project, including study and work methods that are relevant in higher education.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Analyze and produce a simple product based on knowledge of different manufacturing processes
- Demonstrate knowledge of the importance of design in the development of a product both within the functionality associated with the product's environmental impact
- Seek out, collate, evaluate and use information in simple technological fields
- Account for a select company of production, -the organization and security
- Work taking account of risks and safety requirements for experimental work and the manufacture of its own products
- Explain sides of a selected technological development and interaction with the surrounding community
- Establish single technical documentation.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is the following:
Materials and machining processes


- Selected materials, their properties, structure and suitability in different contexts
- Electronic components, their construction, operation and use
- Machining and assembly technologies in connection with selected materials
- Selected unit operations and chemical reactions.

Control and regulation technique


- Electronic, chemical, mechanical and biological control.

Technology and Environment


- Environmental effects, cause and effect
- Examples of environmental assessments.

Technical Communication and Documentation


- Technical drawings, working drawings, diagrams and flow charts
- Production layout
- Report structure, including the drawing of diagrams and installation of tables.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The supplementary material elaborates and puts into perspective the core substance, and in connection with projects that involve new issues. The additional material shall also allow for interaction with other subjects in the study area. The supplementary material and the core substance must collectively meet the academic goals.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic considerations
The teaching is organized as a combination of theoretical, experimental and practical work. Teaching built around the products they work with. The work of the course takes place as an interaction between preliminary analysis, practical work and documentation - with an emphasis on practical work.
Project processes must include a progression, from subject-oriented project to project with the given problem, which students have influence on the choice of project and in cooperation with the teachers prepare the problem.
3.2. Work methods
The working method and the specific content based on the school's resources and the facilities provided by collaboration with external partners. Students plan and implement the practical work product manufacture individually and in cooperation with others.

Students gather their products and documentation in a portfolio. The works will represent a varied use of different methods, see. Targets of 2.1. The workers organized and defined by the teacher. For portfolio sample in the subject put together the students on the basis of the documentation included with a sample folder of selected works drawn by the school. Sample folder must broadly represent key subject areas of material. Each student's test folder also comprise short summaries of selected works and the reasons for the selection on the basis of the academic objectives.
Submission time student sample folder is usually at least one week before the examination period began.
3.3. it
Students should familiarize themselves with the opportunities of information technology in data collection and management, and use these opportunities to self-chosen issues.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
It involved elements of mathematics, the natural sciences and social studies. Preparation of documentation carried out in collaboration with Danish. Parts of nuclear material and supplementary material is selected and processed so that it contributes to strengthening the professional interaction in students' fields of study.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Students work in term of projects, resulting in a product with associated documentation. Pupils collection of products and documentation used in connection with students' self-evaluation and the evaluation interviews with the teacher. The evaluation carried out partly by project presentation with opponents, partly through in-depth conversations about how performance can be improved in the future. The evaluation provides an assessment of the level and evolution in the academic level in relation to the expected development and professional goals.
4.2. Sample Form
Oral examination on the basis of the examinee's test folder, see. Section. 3.2. Before the test sends school student's test folder to censor. Examiners undergo before the test the examinee's test folder and discussing on the basis of presentations by the examiner, which issues the candidate must elaborate.
The examination time is about 24 minutes. There is no preparation.
Exam is based on the student's presentation and disclosure of the test folder. The examination is shaped to fit an in-depth interview between the candidate and the examiner to identify relevant issues within the entire profession core material and supplementary material.
4.3. Assessment criteria
The rating is an assessment of the extent to which student performance to meet the academic goals that they are specified in section. 2.1.
Emphasis is placed on the extent to which the student:


- Shows precision and sufficient knowledge of the use of technical terms
- Have knowledge of the specific products, including materials, manufacturing techniques, function and usability and design
- Abilities, based on the sample directory, referring, analyze and evaluate the experimental and practical activities execution and results
- Has insight into and an understanding of the theoretical and practical issues
- Can put his knowledge into a larger context and thus put into perspective the substance
- Predisposes its presentation and display overview in relation to the problem.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the student's oral presentation.
Annex 42
Turkish A - elective, June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
Turkish is a færdighedsfag, vidensfag and cultural skills. Its target area is the Turkish language in Turkey and by extension, knowledge and understanding of literature, history, culture and society in Turkey and other regions Turkish-speaking populations.
1.2. purpose
Turkish A gives students insight into the Turkish language in Turkey and the Turkish world in general. Through linguistic insight achieves the students communicative competence, verbally or in writing, reading competence and awareness of the Turkish language and language acquisition in general.
When working with the Turkish language achieves the students knowledge and understanding of Turkish literature, culture, history and social and intercultural competence, beyond the well-known Northwest European world.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the main points of uncomplicated spoken standard turkish
- Pronunciation standard Turkish understandable and natural
- Read and understand simple modern texts, fiction and non-fiction

- Use a vocabulary that enables them to communicate in Turkish on everyday matters and on studied topics and texts
- Use the central form learn and phrase building in a simple, but coherent and fairly correct Turkish spoken
- Make an independent presentation of a simple text or a not too complicated topic in Turkish
- A Turkish perspective studied texts and topics for Turkish literature, culture, history and society and show basic intercultural competence
- Write essentially correct Turkish in various non-complicated topics using written language key phrase constructions
- Use the subject relevant tools.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Pronunciation, intonation, reading and translation
- Literary and non-literary texts of different size from the period after 1928 (alphabet reform). Texts from before 1928 is read mainly in 'clean' language, but examples of the original language text must also be used. The texts must as far as possible highlight key aspects of Turkey's recent cultural, historical and social development
- Audio and visual media such as support for listening and reading comprehension as well as speaking and writing
- An active vocabulary of about 2200 central Turkish word
- The central part of the Turkish grammar
- Key subject aids, including IT
- Turkish society, history, culture and literature.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional fabric consists of various cultural, literary, historical and social expressions that are grounded in Turkey. It should deepen and put into perspective the core substance and expand professional horizons, so that students meet the academic goals. The additional material shall also contribute to strengthen the interaction with other subjects.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
The course includes a natural evolution from the tight teacher-led learning to the more and more student-driven learning.
The pupil must as soon as possible obtain an elementary communicative competence that motivate learning of other skills. The teacher is in this initial phase, the central linguistic role model and therefore natural link between the student and substance.
At the end of the course the student must be able to show greater independence and the teacher more likely to take the role of a consultant.
The current written work aims not only on writing skills, but support the learning of grammar, vocabulary and fluency.
Differentiated teaching is a natural didactic principle in the whole process.
3.2. Work methods
Oral
The dedicated teaching for beginners is natural teacher-led and includes regular listening and reading training, systematic learning of bends and grammatical structures as well as targeted and systematic work with the vocabulary.
Via controlled dialogues give students a basic communicative competence developed in dialogues freer and freer conversation on the basis of the texts studied. The conversation about the texts takes place in early learning controlled, but gradually the pupils more independently be able to explain a text or an item, and the ultimate goal is the self-presentation of a text or a topic in Turkish and the subsequent conversation accordingly.
A systematic effort bulletin skill, translation and text comprehension.
Project work, both special and interdisciplinary work, are in the process, but without the linguistic work is neglected.
Written
The written dimension is introduced early. Students should quickly start to write Turkish on computer (elementary written exercises). After starting the system changes the written work character, since the extent and severity increases. The communicative competence remains a priority, but work is also focused on achieving the skills that are a prerequisite to be able to meet the academic goals. In this context, a focus of dictionary and manual use to the extent that this may be relevant, and students accustomed to utilizing IT possibilities. The written work is organized so as to ensure progression, and Turkish used in collaboration with other disciplines to develop students' writing skills.
3.3. it

IT and media used with the overall aim to promote students' learning process and learning results. Integration of ICT and media in education allows students to experience language in varied authentic and current contexts. Thus contributes ICT and media use to secure and deepen students' language and content dividends.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Turkish A covered by the general requirement for subject interaction. In STX program included the subject in general study preparation and general language understanding in accordance with the rules governing these processes.
When the subject is study subjects are selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Already in beginner classes tested students regularly by the teacher and of itself using the CD-ROM and IT-based glosetrænings- and grammar programs, to the extent they exist, and the teacher also tests students using small written assignments dealing with specific language problems .
Major completed programs evaluated targeted and forward-looking of the teacher and students together.
The teacher's continuous assessment includes both the student's strengths and weaknesses and focuses on the areas the student is particularly to be put into.
4.2. Sample Forms
There will be a written and an oral examination.
The written test
Written test on the basis of a core made assignments. The exam lasts five hours. The examination translation from Danish to Turkish and written fluency in Turkish, based on a contemporary Turkish language text material of approximately one standard page supplemented by imagery.
The oral examination
The training ends with a three-part oral exam on the basis of a text material for presentation from one of the major texts or one of the subjects studied, one primary text of the extent of about one standard page from one of the major texts or one of the topics from the last half of the course that the student has not withdrawn the presentation, as well as an unseen text of approx 1/3 standard page on general topics. The same sample material may be used three times on an examination team. The sample material is sent to the examiner prior to the examination. The examination time is about Per 30 minutes. examinee.
The text material for presentation assigned by lot about 24 hours, but not less than 24 hours before the start of the exam. On the other material pulled at the start, given a preparation time of about 30 minutes.
The sample consists of three parts.
The first part of the exam consists of translation of ekstemporalteksten to Danish.
The second part consists of the student's presentation on Turkish of the pre-drawn text material and a conversation in Turkish about the content of the presentation.
The third part consists in the reading of a small number of lines that the examinee during preparation are themselves chosen from at the start-drawn text, a shorter additional conversation in Turkish on the text and some questions of grammar in either Turkish or Danish.
The examination time is divided between the three parts so that the first part is a maximum of five minutes, the second a maximum of 15 minutes and the third part about five minutes.
A page is 1300 characters if the text is prose, verse 30, if the text is poetry.
4.3. Assessment criteria
In both the written and the oral examination assessed the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The written examination special emphasis on:


- Reading and text comprehension with the use of relevant tools
- Writing skills in various communication situations in an essentially correct Turkish written language
- Autonomy in relation to the model.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
At the oral exam special emphasis on:


- Understandable and natural pronunciation and intonation
- General and text related vocabulary, sentence construction and proficiency in a fairly correct Turkish
- Bulletin skill and understanding in the translation of unseen text
- Presentation and text comprehension
- Overview and perspective
- Grammar understanding.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 43
Turkish B - electives June 2010
1. The identity and purpose

1.1. identity
Turkish is a færdighedsfag, vidensfag and cultural skills. Its area is the Turkish language in Turkey and by extension, knowledge and understanding of literature, history, culture and society in Turkey and other regions Turkish-speaking populations.
1.2. purpose
Turkish B gives students insight into the Turkish language and Turkish world as well as the necessary competence to proceed with Turkish at higher levels. Through linguistic insight achieves the students communicative competence, verbally or in writing, reading competence and awareness of the Turkish language and language acquisition in general. Through insight into the Turkish world develops students' knowledge and basic understanding of Turkish literature, culture, history and social and basic, intercultural competence, beyond the well-known Northwest European world.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the main points of simple, spoken standard turkish
- Pronunciation single standard Turkish understandable and natural
- Read and understand adapted texts, both fiction and non-fiction, and easier uadapterede texts
- Use a vocabulary that enables them to communicate in Turkish on everyday matters and on studied topics and texts
- Use the central form learn and phrase building in an understandable and simple, but fairly consecutive Turkish spoken
- At an elementary level understand the subjects studied on the basis of knowledge of Turkish literature, culture, history and social
- Write Turkish on the computer and express themselves in writing in a simple, but fairly correct colloquial Turkish
- Use the subject relevant tools
- Apply strategies for language acquisition and understanding of other cultures.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Pronunciation, intonation, reading and translation
- Literary texts of different size, which illuminates the central parts of Turkey's literary, cultural, historical and social development
- Audio and visual media such as support for listening comprehension, reading comprehension, speaking and writing
- An active vocabulary of about 1600 central Turkish word
- The most central parts of Turkish grammar
- The subject's most central aids, including IT
- Elementary knowledge society, history, culture and literature in Turkey.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional fabric consists of various cultural, literary, historical and social expressions that are grounded in Turkey. It should deepen and put into perspective the core substance and expand professional horizons, so that students meet the academic goals. The additional material shall also contribute to strengthen the interaction with other subjects.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
In the process, there is a natural evolution from the tight teacher-led learning to the more and more student-driven learning.
Students should as soon as possible obtain an elementary communicative competence that motivate the acquisition of all other skills. The teacher is in this initial phase, the central linguistic role model and thus the natural link between the student and substance. At the end of the course students should be able to exercise greater independence. The teacher remains active opponent of the continuing training of communicative competence, including the linguistic correctness.
Ongoing writing work is aimed not only at writing skills, but support the learning of grammar, vocabulary and fluency.
Differentiated teaching is a natural didactic principle in the whole process.
3.2 Work methods
Oral
The dedicated teaching for beginners is natural teacher-led and includes regular listening and reading training, systematic learning of bends and grammatical structures as well as targeted and systematic work with the vocabulary.
Via controlled dialogue and conversation exercises in beginner classes give students an elementary communicative competence developed in dialogues freer and freer conversation.
After the discussion of the priority communicative competence still higher, but dialogue and conversation is now complemented with more text-based disciplines, particularly summary and characterization. An everyday vocabulary will continue to be built and maintained.

In text reading effort is placed on bulletin skill, translation, overview reading comprehension.
The conversation about the texts takes place in the beginning often teacher-led, but students must gradually acquire skills in taking some independent initiative in the conversation.
Written
The written dimension is introduced early. Students should quickly start to write Turkish on the computer and with small written exercises to support communicative skill.
After starting the system focuses the written work continued on genres that supports the communicative competence. Work with the dictionary and manual use, and the students get used to using the subject's IT capabilities. The written work is organized so as to ensure progression, and Turkish used in collaboration with other disciplines to develop students' writing skills.
3.3. it
IT and media used with the overall aim to promote students' learning process and learning results. Integration of ICT and media in education allows students to experience language in varied authentic and current contexts. Thus contributes ICT and media use to secure and deepen students' language and content dividends.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Turkish B is subject to the general requirement for subject interaction. In STX program included the subject in general study preparation and general language understanding in accordance with the rules governing these processes.
When the subject is study subjects are selected and processed parts of the core material and supplementary material, so it helps to improve the academic interaction.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
Already in beginner classes tested students regularly by the teacher and of itself using the CD-ROM and IT-based glosetræningsprogrammer and grammar programs, to the extent they exist, and the teacher also tests students using small written assignments dealing with specific areas.
Major completed programs evaluated by the teacher and students together. The teacher's continuous assessment includes both students' strengths and weaknesses and focuses on the areas students especially should practice.
4.2. Sample Form
There is an oral examination based on a text material with a scale of one to one and a half pages from one of the major texts or subjects concluded in teaching, and an unseen text of approx 2/3 standard page on general topics. The same sample material may be used three times on an examination team. The sample material is sent to the examiner prior to the examination.
The examination time is about 24 minutes per. examinee. Is given about 48 minutes of preparation time.
The sample is two-fold.
The first part of the exam consists of translation into Danish of the first third of ekstemporalteksten and summary in Danish of the main features of the rest.
The second part consists in the reading of a small number of lines that the examinee during preparation are selected from the drawn text examinee shorter presentations in Turkish on the drawn text and a conversation in Turkish on the text.
In both texts the students at Danish or Turkish answer questions about various parts of the grammar.
The examination time is divided between the two parts so that the second part represents at least 2/3 of the exam.
A page is 1300 characters if the text is prose, verse 30, if the text is poetry.
4.3. Assessment criteria
At the oral examination assessed the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
Particular emphasis is placed on:


- Intelligible pronunciation and intonation
- Plain and text related vocabulary
- Communication skills and oral expression skills in a simple, understandable and fairly consecutive Turkish spoken
- Directory assistance and translation skills in connection with the first third and understanding of the context for the rest of ekstemporalteksten
- Text comprehension and oversight in the well-known text
- Grammar understanding.

One mark is given based on an overall assessment of the examinee's performance.
Annex 44
German beginner's language B - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. Identity

German is a færdighedsfag, a vidensfag and cultural skills and contains elements from different disciplines. The subject's core work is the German language and culture with the involvement of social and historical conditions. Central to the course is the practical dimension that develop skills in using German as a means of communication, understand and relate to spoken and written German, awareness of language use and structure, as well as knowledge of German speaking countries in Europe and other international forums.
1.2. purpose
Through work with the German language achieves the students competence to communicate in German and insight into the cultural, historical and social conditions in German-speaking countries. This gives the desire and ability to reflect on and understanding dialogue with other cultures. Pupils in German art language skills, knowledge and awareness as well as knowledge of the German language in functional contexts, and through pupils develop their communication skills. Through working with German pupils develop further their understanding of literature and other artistic expressions as a platform for experience, reflection and aesthetic awareness. Additionally reprocess students intercultural competence, as they worked with German involve their knowledge and awareness of other cultural and social conditions. Finally builds students study competence in that they are able to combine knowledge of German art with knowledge from other disciplines.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the content of spoken German when spoken a single standard language
- Use language to gain knowledge of the German language, culture
- Read and understand different types of recent German-language texts, including German-language texts from the last 10 years
- Explain studied German language texts and topics and perspective to other texts and topics on a single and coherent German with a basic vocabulary
- Hold a conversation in German on various personal, cultural and social issues with the relevant German-speaking audiences in a simple and coherent language and have a conversation on topics they are familiar with, refer, comment and express different views on a single and coherent German
- Write short texts in German in relation to the studied texts and topics
- Apply appropriate listening and reading strategies and relevant oral communication strategies
- Express in German for understanding and reflecting on German literature and other art genres
- Express in German for understanding non-fictional German-language texts related to the profile of the training which the elective offered
- Express in German for insight into selected, current conditions in Germany as well as in cultural, including selected social and historical issues in German-speaking countries.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Basic German vocabulary, basic German grammar, language acquisition
- Basic knowledge of German culture and society
- Cultural, historical and social conditions in Germany after 1945, including the last 10 years. There must be included German language material from both print and electronic media
- Current German literature and nonfiction
- Basic standards for oral language and communication.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance deepens students' linguistic knowledge and awareness as well as perspectives on core substance literary and cultural aspects to a broader understanding of German-language culture in a European context.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Central to the lab, students' academic progress. Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on the disciplines experienced as a whole. Work on the linguistic aspects happens with ever order in the language of the application.
The program teaches the students' linguistic creativity and ability to think outside the box.
Teaching is the greatest possible extent in German.
3.2. Work methods
The choice of work shall be based on the principles of variation and progression in terms of language and content complexity and the degree of independent work. The focus is on work and job types that develop students' communication skills and creative abilities. The work is organized mainly through three to five different issues and ensure that the academic objectives integrated into this work.

The written text is like training a key competence in German as it strengthens students' communication skills and linguistic security.
Part of the written work should aim at authentic communication situations.
3.3. IT and media
IT and media used with the overall aim to promote students' learning process and learning results. Integration of ICT and media in education allows students to experience language in varied authentic and current contexts. Thus contributes ICT and media use to secure and deepen students' language and content dividends, like skills training supported by relevant interactive exercises and language training programs.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the German beginner language B in interaction with other disciplines.
The aim is that the course is part of a close interaction with the other foreign languages, Danish and subjects from the cultural and social studies group. This will ensure that students acquire the necessary linguistic and historical depth and breadth of understanding of the specific linguistic and cultural, including social and historical elements.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The academic goals are the basis for the ongoing assessment of students' oral and written standpoint.
The students' oral and written skills are evaluated regularly with regard to skills, knowledge and effort. Screening, tests and samples during the process is to learn about the students 'position in relation to the course objectives and shall contribute to students' continued progression in the subject.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral examination, which consists of two parts with a total examination time of about 30 minutes:


1) Presentation in German by an unknown German-language text material amounting to approximately four pages a 1,300 letters. The text material must be related to one of the subjects studied. The syllabus material only particularly difficult vocabulary and necessary real comments. The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance. The topic studied involved in the presentation, which is followed by a detailed conversation in German. The text material handed out the day before the test, and provides about 24 hours of preparation time, but not less than 24 hours. All Aid.
2) Text Understanding the basis of an unknown German-language prose amounting to one standard page of a 1300 case. The text referenced in Danish. The examiner sets the Danish supplementary questions to deepen the student's understanding of the text. For this part of the test is given in preparation of approximately 30 minutes. In this preparation, the student use any aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet is not allowed.

The same unknown sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
For the test evaluated the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on the examinee in German can present and put into perspective the unknown text material and may incorporate relevant elements of German culture, literature and society from the studied subject. Furthermore, the emphasis is on conversation skills and reading comprehension skills. Interconnecting language is more important than correctness in detail.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.
Annex 45
German at C - electives June 2010
1. Identity and purpose
1.1. identity
German is a færdighedsfag, a vidensfag and cultural skills and contains elements from different disciplines. The subject's core work is the German language and culture with the involvement of social and historical conditions. Central to the course is the practical dimension that develop skills in using German as a means of communication, understand and relate to spoken and written German, awareness of language use and structure, as well as knowledge of German speaking countries in Europe and other international forums.
1.2. Purpose

Through work with the German language achieves the students competence to communicate in German and insight into the cultural, historical and social conditions in German-speaking countries. This gives the desire and ability to reflect on and understanding dialogue with other cultures. Pupils in German art language skills, knowledge and awareness as well as knowledge of the German language in functional contexts, and through pupils develop their communication skills. Through working with German pupils develop further their understanding of literature and other artistic expressions as a platform for experience, reflection and aesthetic awareness. Additionally reprocess students intercultural competence, as they worked with German involve their knowledge and awareness of other cultural and social conditions. Finally builds students study competence in that they are able to combine knowledge of German art with knowledge from other disciplines.
2. Academic goals and academic content
2.1. Academic goals
Students should be able to:


- Understand the content of spoken German when spoken a single standard language
- Use language to gain knowledge of the German language, culture
- Read and understand different types of recent German-language texts, including German-language texts from the last 10 years
- Explain studied German language texts and topics and perspective to other texts and topics on a single and coherent German with a basic vocabulary
- Hold a conversation in German on various personal, cultural and social issues with the relevant German-speaking audiences in a simple and coherent language and have a conversation on topics they are familiar with, refer, comment and express different views on a single and coherent German
- Write short texts in German in relation to the studied texts and topics
- Apply appropriate listening and reading strategies and relevant oral communication strategies
- Express in German for understanding and reflecting on German literature and other art genres
- Express in German for understanding non-fictional German-language texts related to the profile of the education, where elective offered
- Express in German for insight into selected, current conditions in Germany as well as in cultural, including selected social and historical issues in German-speaking countries.

2.2. Basic courses
The core fabric is:


- Basic German vocabulary, basic German grammar, language acquisition
- Basic knowledge of German culture and society
- Cultural, historical and social conditions in Germany after 1945, including the last 10 years. There must be included German language material from both print and electronic media
- Current German literature and nonfiction
- Basic standards for oral language and communication.

2.3. Additional substance
Students will not be able to meet the academic goals using only the core substance. The additional substance deepens students' linguistic knowledge and awareness as well as perspectives on core substance literary and cultural aspects to a broader understanding of German-language culture in a European context.
3. Organization
3.1. Didactic principles
Tuition must be based on an academic level equivalent to students' level of primary school.
Central to the lab, students' academic progress. Emphasis in the teaching emphasis on the disciplines experienced as a whole. Work on the linguistic aspects happens with ever order in the language of the application.
The program teaches the students' linguistic creativity and ability to think outside the box.
Teaching is the greatest possible extent in German.
3.2. Work methods
The choice of work shall be based on the principles of variation and progression in terms of language and content complexity and the degree of independent work. The focus is on work and job types that develop students' communication skills and creative abilities. The work is organized mainly through three to five different issues and ensure that the academic objectives integrated into this work.
The written text is like training a key competence in German as it strengthens students' communication skills and linguistic security.
Part of the written work should aim at authentic communication situations.
3.3. IT and media

IT and media used with the overall aim to promote students' learning process and learning results. Integration of ICT and media in education allows students to experience language in varied authentic and current contexts. Thus contributes ICT and media use to secure and deepen students' language and content dividends, like skills training supported by relevant interactive exercises and language training programs.
3.4. Interaction with other disciplines
Where possible, the German continuation language C in interaction with other disciplines.
The aim is that the course is part of a close interaction with the other foreign languages, Danish and subjects from the cultural and social studies group. This will ensure that students acquire the necessary linguistic and historical depth and breadth of understanding of the specific linguistic and cultural, including social and historical elements.
4. Evaluation
4.1. Ongoing evaluation
The academic goals are the basis for the ongoing assessment of students' oral and written standpoint.
The students' oral and written skills are evaluated regularly with regard to skills, knowledge and effort. Screening, tests and samples during the process is to learn about the students 'position in relation to the course objectives and shall contribute to students' continued progression in the subject.
4.2. Sample Form
There will be an oral examination, which consists of two parts with a total examination time of about 30 minutes:


1) Presentation in German by an unknown German-language text material amounting to approximately four pages a 1,300 letters. The text material must be related to one of the subjects studied. The syllabus text material only particularly difficult vocabulary and necessary real comments. The issues that form the basis for the test shall collectively cover the academic objectives and core substance. The topic studied involved in the presentation, which is followed by a detailed conversation in German. The text material handed out the day before the test, and provides about 24 hours of preparation time, but not less than 24 hours. All Aid.
2) Text Understanding the basis of an unknown German-language prose amounting to one standard page of a 1300 case. The text referenced in Danish. The examiner sets the Danish supplementary questions to deepen the student's understanding of the text. For this part of the test is given in preparation of approximately 30 minutes. In this preparation, the student use any aids. Communication with the outside world is not allowed. Furthermore, use of the Internet is not allowed.

The same unknown sample material must not be used three times on the same team.
4.3. Assessment criteria
For the test evaluated the extent to which the student's performance lives up to the professional goals as they are expressed in points. 2.1.
The emphasis is on the examinee in German can present and put into perspective the unknown text material and may incorporate relevant elements of German culture, literature and society from the studied subject. Furthermore, the emphasis is on conversation skills and reading comprehension skills. Interconnecting language is more important than correctness in detail.
One mark is given based on an overall assessment.