Notice On The Spectrum Policy Framework Mandate

Original Language Title: Bekendtgørelse om det frekvenspolitiske rammemandat

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Read the untranslated law here: https://www.retsinformation.dk/Forms/R0710.aspx?id=116393

Overview (table of contents) Annex 1 The full text of the Decree on the spectrum policy framework mandate 1)

Under section 2 of the Act on radio frequencies, without prejudice. lovbekendtgørelse nr. 680 of 23. June 2004 shall be fixed:

§ 1. IT and Telecom Agency must prepare, adopt and implement decisions on frequency range within the framework of the mandate, without prejudice to spectrum policy framework. Annex 1.

§ 2. The notice shall enter into force on 7 August. May 2008.

(2). Executive Order No. 1128 by 18. November 2005 about the spectrum policy framework mandate is repealed.
Ministry of science, technology and innovation, the 23. April 2008 Helge Sander/Søren Johansen Annex 1

The spectrum policy framework mandate

In this spectrum policy framework mandate sets out the policy framework within which the national IT and Telecom Agency must prepare, adopt and implement decisions on radio spectrum matters. The spectrum policy framework mandate constitutes the political guidelines for the telecommunications Trade Union administration in the national IT and Telecom Agency on the frequency range.

Overall objectives of the national IT and Telecom Agency's spectrum planning

The objectives of the Danish spectrum planning is formulated in accordance with the rate law and its framework.

Objectives















The national it and Telecom Agency must promote a development that leads to innovation and growth, and supporting that Denmark can develop into one of the world's leading high-tech society within the next few years with the creation of new high-tech jobs to follow, among other things. by making it attractive for foreign companies to place innovation activities in Denmark.













The national it and Telecom Agency must work to ensure that Denmark has a comprehensive ICT infrastructure in terms of price and quality supports Danish development, test, production, exports, competitiveness, adaptability and innovation strength.













The national it and Telecom Agency must promote a development, which supports the development of appropriate, affordable and well functioning ICT infrastructure that ensures all Danes access to modern ICT technologies and thereby access to the global network.













The national it and Telecom Agency must work to ensure that the widest possible range of providers and users of radio frequencies has access to sufficient radio spectrum capacity to build and ensure high quality and capacity in the Danish ICT infrastructure.













The national it and Telecom Agency to promote the possibilities for width and diversity in the supply of ICT services, also in the case of combination products, and convergence – including by securing the greatest possible technological neutrality in the relevant regulation – thus, to technology choice, where possible, be left to the market.













The national it and Telecom Agency to promote opportunities for the use of radio spectrum for research and experimental purposes with a view to the development of innovative services.









General principles for national IT and Telecom Agency's spectrum planning

The following strategies and principles apply generally for the national IT and Telecom Agency's spectrum planning.















The national it and Telecom Agency's spectrum planning should be objective, transparent, non-discriminatory and proportionate.













The national it and Telecom Agency must in spectrum management specific societal concerns, including media policy considerations.













The national it and Telecom Agency's spectrum management must in all cases be carried out with due involvement of relevant parties.













The national it and Telecom Agency to process applications for frequency licences as soon as possible and issue permits within a maximum of six weeks from the receipt of the complete application.













If the national IT and Telecom Agency is considering limiting the number of frequency authorisations or to make changes in terms of frequency authorisations already issued, notice must be given to all interested parties, who shall be given the opportunity to, with a deadline of four weeks to present their views with regard to the proposed limits or changes. The national it and Telecom Agency must publish the final decision with reasons.













The national it and Telecom Agency must publish the ongoing consultations and publish the decisions taken after the individual hearings.













The national it and Telecom Agency to carry out frequency scarcity assessments in close dialogue with the industry. The national it and Telecom Agency must therefore in connection with decisions on radio spectrum scarcity involve relevant parties before the decision is taken. This can URf.eks. be done at the public hearing or an industry meeting.













If the national IT and Telecom Agency finds violations of conditions of frequency permissions, the user must be notified and given the opportunity to submit within four weeks his views.













The national it and Telecom Agency must ensure that users of the radio frequency spectrum administration inflicts the least amount of administrative burden. Where it is possible, and in particular where there are only negligible risk of unacceptable disruption, the national IT and Telecom Agency work to exempt the use of radio frequencies from the requirement for a permit.













The national it and Telecom Agency to ensure a rapid implementation of international decisions on spectrum use, including common European decisions which the ECC decisions, who are joined from the Danish side, as well as the European Commission's decisions on harmonised radio spectrum use.













Technology choices should be left to the market. The national it and Telecom Agency's issuance of frequency authorisations must therefore, as far as possible be as technology-and service-neutral authorisations, and where possible also for existing permissions.













The national it and Telecom Agency must work for a more flexible use of the radio spectrum, promoting the development of new innovative services and technologies and remove barriers to the market, which is due to the fact that radio frequencies are not available for a given service or technology. In order to promote the development of new technological platforms to the national IT and Telecom Agency therefore adopt a broader interpretation of the allokeringsmæssige framework by introducing more flexible spectrum allocations in the Danish frequency plan.













If the national IT and Telecom Agency determines that multiple frequency applications can coexist in a radio frequency bands, the national IT and Telecom Agency can allow these uses, possibly in the form of multiple permissions at the same radio frequency. The prerequisite for this is that the additional use does not cause unacceptable interference to other users. This means that no users will get an exclusive right of use of that radio frequency band.









Specific strategies

The specific strategies of the selected focus areas is formulated with a view to promoting the implementation of the broad telecommunications policy objectives, including ensuring the dissemination of ICT infrastructure and ICT services with citizens and businesses. The focus areas are specifically based on the overarching objectives of promoting growth and innovation and to ensure an ever cheaper, more varied and wide range of ICT services. With a view to achieving the overall objectives set out for each focus area set out a specific strategy, which constitutes the political framework for the national IT and Telecom Agency's spectrum planning.

The use of radio frequencies for the purpose of providing electronic communications networks and services

Background

A relevant, affordable and well functioning ICT infrastructure is crucial for Denmark's competitiveness, adaptability and innovation strength. The creation of new ICT infrastructure will help to make Denmark one of the world's leading high-tech society and thus ensure growth and welfare.

Access to and flexibility of use of radio frequencies is the key to innovation and new products and services, as well as to the creation of new and alternative ICT infrastructures.


Radio chains, FWA (Fixed Wireless Access), BWA (Broadband Wireless Access) and MWS (multimedia Wireless Systems) are names of technologies, all of which can be used for the development of ICT infrastructure. In particular, FWA and BWA is essential wireless alternatives to the two-threaded access to broadband-ADSL and cable-tv – which dominate today. This is due, among other things. the expected large deployment of WiMAX-certified systems.

In the mobile communications area is 2 g networks fully extended, while 3 g networks are still under development.

On the land mobile area is primarily talking about non-commercial frequency use, IE. where the authorisation holder does not use radio frequencies for the provision of electronic communications networks and services. On the other hand, uses radio spectrum licence holders for the creation of own radio services.

The Danish preparedness as well as municipalities and regions have so far operated with private land mobile radio services. Act No. 508 of 6. June 2007 amending the emergency law, however, introduces an obligation to use a common network for emergency communications. The State has contracted with Emergency Communications a/s Danish on access to a nationwide radio network for beredskaberne, the safety net (ITS). This restructuring of the Danish beredskabers, municipalities and regions use of radio frequencies is expected to have substantial impact on the region, a large part of the public users only want a limited or possibly no need to apply the traditional land mobile radio services.

Development

Previously it was the supply of a specific communication service closely linked to the application of a specific technology platform. Recent years have been marked by a growing convergence between different technologies and platforms. Many different technologies can be used to cover a given communication needs. Today's technological platforms are therefore harder to define as belonging to a particular service category in the traditional sense (mobile, fixed, etc.). The technological convergence means that there is less of a need for that authority to the same extent as the previous distinction between frequency allocations for individual technologies. It should therefore be more users of radio frequencies, that determines the technology choice, rather than to technology choice depends on the selected radio frequency bands. At EU-level is discussed the CEPT and, therefore, whether there is a need to change the frequency of the Administration in the direction of further liberalization and technology-and service-neutral spectrum.

The radio spectrum policy group (Radio Spectrum Policy Group) drew up in november 2005 a proposal for a future more flexible spectrum management policy, WAPECS (Wireless Access Policy for Electronic Communications Services). The European Commission followed in February 2007 that end up with a communication on more flexible regulation in order to allow faster access to spectrum for wireless electronic communications services. The purpose of this communication is to describe the practical steps that the Commission considers there is a need for 2010 in order to prepare for the more flexible frequency management. At the same time points to the message – on the basis of the current legislative framework — even in areas where there is an urgent need for a more flexible management of radio spectrum use. This concerns, among other things. the radio frequency bands currently used for mobile telephony to 2 g and 3 g (radio frequencies 900 MHz, 1800 MHz and about 2100 MHz). It also applies to the UHF tv band and radio frequencies in the radio frequency band 3.4-3.8 GHz, used for FWA.

From Danish side supported it, the Commission shall draw up a recommendation, which sets guidelines for licensing conditions in the radio frequency bands, where there are already now to be introduced a more flexible spectrum use, without prejudice to the Member States in the radio frequency bands may limit the frequency referred to the use of certain electronic communications services in order to meet essential societal need, including media policy considerations, URf.eks. public service obligations.

The new EU regulatory basis will be a technology and service neutral and non-restrictive access to spectrum resources, and General rather than individual licences in the form of harmonised rights and licensing conditions. A special set of radio frequency bands identified as possible precursors in the work to remove restrictive regulatory provisions. Examples include the repeal of the GSM directive, which has hitherto reserved 900 MHz radio spectrum band for GSM-services only, and which must also be applied to new, more efficient and innovative technologies such as URf.eks. UMTS. More technology-and service-neutral authorisations leads to a greater need for protection against interference between users. In this respect, the Commission has given a mandate to ETSI with a view to drawing up standards for equipment that uses these "flexible" radio frequency bands, so that the disturbance, which the national IT and Telecom Agency has so far been able to protect against in the terms and conditions related to specific services or technologies, be avoided.

The emergence of WiMAX-certified equipment has led to a growing interest in the field in the radio frequency band FWA below 10 GHz, including particularly in the radio frequency band 3410-4200 MHz. Market is also influenced by a growing range of – and falling prices of equipment. Development of equipment goes, however, most of the radio spectrum between 3410 and 3800 MHz, which was the cause of that science Minister in the light of the national IT and Telecom Agency's recommendation on the frequency scarcity of radio tape 3410-4200 MHz decided alone to hold an auction of radio frequencies between 3410 and 3800 MHz. A permit was issued in June 2007 after the auction. Radio frequency band 3800-4200 MHz is also used intensively for satellite services, and communication to, among other things. Greenland as well as many countries in Africa and Asia can often only be realized through the use of satellite services, since there does not exist a terrestrial infrastructure in these countries. Here is the radio frequency band is particularly important, since it is the only radio frequency bands where there are global satellite coverage. At European level within the CEPT and the EUROPEAN UNION also recognises that there are no real alternatives to satellite communications in the radio frequency band 3800-4200 MHz. Therefore, CEPT decided that satellite uses take precedence in the radio frequency band 3800-4200 MHz. This means that it is not from the Cept page will earmark radio frequency band 3800-4200 MHz for high-intensity of communication services, such as FWA. The national it and Telecom Agency has carried out a consultation on the opportunities for future use of the radio frequency band. The hearing showed some interest for the use of radio frequency band for FWA-like services, but it also showed that it is essential to maintain satellite application in this RF band.

The availability of 3 g services have been launched in Denmark. One of the four 3 g licences were returned to the national IT and Telecom Agency in January 2005. This permit was issued again in december 2005 after an auction.

At the ITU Conference WRC-2000 radio frequency band 2500-2690 MHz was identified as the radio frequency band, where additional frequency allocations for 3 g services can happen. According to the common European ECC decisions from 2002 and 2005 to this radio frequency bands allocated – however not necessarily exclusively – for ground-based 3 g no later than 1 January 1999. January 2008, to the extent that the market dictates it. There has been an increasing need to clarify how and when radio frequencies in the radio frequency band 2500-2690 MHz would be made available for new services, including 3 g and FWA services. As the basis for this decision, the national IT and Telecom Agency conducted a hearing.

Valid from 1. January 2006 is a new regulation entered into force for the radio frequency band 410-430 MHz. Adjustment frequency implies that the use is in accordance with a harmonised pan-European channel plan. This means that the radio frequency band 410-430 MHz may be used for duplex applications, and that 440-450 MHz alone used for simplex applications.

Significant changes are expected in the local spectrum as a result of the implementation of structural reform on 1 January. January 2007. A number of municipal consent holders have thus already, as a consequence of the municipality mergers will take, canceled their original frequency permissions, and apply now rather common networks in the new merged municipalities.

The change of emergency law, see. Act No. 508 of 6. June 2007, involves substantial changes in other public sectors spectrum. The amendment introduces an obligation to apply a common operator driven network for emergency communications. After the entry into force of the Act 1. August 2007 implemented the new safety net (ITS) over a period of time, which is expected to be completed in 2. half of 2009. As a result, a significant number of consent holders are expected to cancel their permissions to use for land mobile services. The time of the final transition to a new channel plan for existing consent holders should therefore wait for the completed transition to the new joint emergency communications network in Denmark. It is thus predicted that the current users of the radio frequency band 410-430 MHz must be changed to a new channel plan in 2011 or 2012, where restructuring is expected to be dropped is finally in place.


The 14. February 2007, the European Commission adopted a decision which results in the radio frequency bands 1980-2010 MHz and 2170-2200 MHz shall be made available for pan-European mobile satellite services (MSS). This decision implies that there must be radio frequencies available for the provision of mobile satellite services. Such services may include, for example, mobile phone like services offered throughout Europe by one operator, where communication takes place between a satellite and a mobile terminal. In geographic areas that are difficult to cover from a satellite, can establish ground stations, such as mobile terminals can communicate with in addition to the satellite signals. The establishment of a ground station assumes that the operator obtains a permit in accordance with the rules laid down there, where the ground station is established. A group of experts set up by the Commission has drawn up a draft set of common framework for selecting and assigning permissions to operators that offer mobile satellite services. In this regard, the Commission has published a consultation document, which raised a number of questions relating to the selection and appointment of consent holders. Inter alia on the basis of the consultation, the Commission has brought forward a proposal for a Council and Parliament decision pursuant to article 95 of the EC Treaty on the internal market. The purpose of this decision is, among other things. to make it compulsory for Member States to issue permits for the companies that have won the tender on EU-level.

Strategy















The national it and Telecom Agency in 2008 must decide on the future of spectrum in the radio frequency band 2500-2690 MHz.













The national it and Telecom Agency to bring the application of radio frequency 406,1-470 MHz band in accordance with the strategic plan for the area 406,1-470 MHz radio frequency, as shown by the ECC report 25 on, among other things. increased digitization, with the aim of promoting a harmonised European use of the radio frequency field. The time of the final transition to a new channel in the radio frequency band plan 410-430 MHz, however, must wait for the final transition of users to a common network for emergency communications in the 2. half of 2009. The final transition to a new channel plan should therefore take place from 2011-2012.













The national it and Telecom Agency to be in connection with the phasing out of existing analog services in radio frequency 406,1-470 MHz band seek the least intrusive regulation in relation to existing users. The withdrawal must be carried out in continuous dialogue with the existing users in the radio frequency band.













The national it and Telecom Agency must ensure that the frequency applied to the injury site radios around 423 MHz must be able to be done until the time when the final transition of users to a common network for emergency communications is completed. This time shall be agreed with emergency authorities.













The national it and Telecom Agency will give priority to the use of radio frequencies for satellite services, so that they can continue to be used for this purpose with a minimal risk of unacceptable disruption. The national it and Telecom Agency shall ensure that the satellite application priority by providers of satellite services can obtain permissions in order to be able to cater for satellite use by issuing spectrum licences for other purposes.













The national it and Telecom Agency to promote the possibilities for the provision of pan-European mobile satellite services in the radio frequency bands 1980-2010 MHz and 2170-2200 MHz.













The national it and Telecom Agency shall, in accordance with the WAPECS concept, to the extent possible, ensure a flexible spectrum use by issuing technology-and service-neutral authorisations where possible.









Radio and tv

Background

The use of radio frequencies for round dispersion of radio and television is done within the framework of the existing media and telecommunications policy agreements and applicable laws. If that proves a need to make changes to the existing frequency permissions, which are rooted in media policy considerations, the national IT and Telecom Agency after negotiation with the Ministry of culture, make these changes.

Radio-and tv-the area is undergoing a transformation from analog to digital broadcasting. On the radio since it is European-developed Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) system in operation and involves a number of advantages in terms of quality and frekvensmæssige savings. In Denmark, in large parts of the country today received two DAB stations (two multiplex), each containing a large number of radio applications.

On the tv side is a similar conversion on his way from the current analogue PAL tv system to the European-developed system of Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB). Also the digital tv system has come into operation and involves a number of advantages in terms of quality, mobility and frekvensmæssige savings in connection with the broadcast of regional and national tv.

At the ITU regional radio Conference (RRC-06) adopted new rate plans for DVB and DAB in the radio frequency bands 174-230 MHz and 470-862 MHz. This means that Denmark has frequency options for a total of eight digital broadcasting network (multiplex). In addition, there is the option of a second nationwide DAB broadcasting network (multiplex) and a regional DAB broadcasting network (multiplex) to Jutland in addition to the two DAB broadcasting network (multiplex), already in operation.

Radio frequency bands 174-230 MHz and 470-862 MHz is also used by other services in Denmark and our neighbouring countries, which may be protected. The technical negotiations with neighbouring countries is not yet complete. It should be noted that the agreement, which was concluded under the auspices of RRC-06, do not restrict the use of the assigned radio resources for round dispersion alone, and that other frequency uses also are possible, provided these can be realized within the RRC-06 agreement technical framework.

Development

It is clear from the media political agreement for 2007-2010 by 6. June 2006, that the digital television system developed by the fact that, in addition to the Dr and TV 2/Denmark's current digital broadcast of public service programs establish a terrestrial, digital television platform, to be operated by an operator ("gatekeeper") on a commercial basis. In addition, it is apparent from, inter alia, that the supply of gatekeeper function must be made in the form of beauty contest.

That is, by extension, the 11. June 2007 signed an agreement between the parties behind the media political agreement 2007-2010 and the parties behind the telecommunications policy agreement, which clarifies the distribution of digital television broadcasting networks.

It is therefore agreed that, from the end of October 2009 used five terrestrial network for television purposes, including two broadcasting networks for public service purposes. From the end of October 2009 to the end of October 2010 used also a broadcasting network for experimental and research purposes. This network surpasses then for television purposes, including broadcast of mobile tv. There will at a later stage in the current agreement period for media agreement be initiated a joint resolution in the two circles of the agreement on the application of two nationwide transmission options that will be available during the period 2009-2015.

The digital television system allows for that traditional radio and tv round spread expands with new programs and new application types, which alone is practicable with digital broadcast technology. An extension of the traditional electronic communications networks will also be possible when these are combined with the round distribution capacity in, for example, digital television systems. Thus, there is the possibility of a multiple and diverse use of the radio spectrum for innovation purposes. Be made already now trials of DVB-H.

By ensuring the possibility for the use of radio spectrum for research and experimental purposes will researchers and companies in Denmark be put in an extremely favourable position, as it is in the international context is unique with such allocation.

It is against this background, the purpose of the broadcasting network (multiplex) that is set aside for research and experimental purposes, to be used for the further development of existing as well as to the development of new services.

By "research and experimental purposes" means in this context, activities from basic research to study business and thus also includes applied research and development work. While basic research consists in the original theoretical or experimental work with the primary purpose of obtaining new knowledge and understanding, is an experimental company in this context defined as experimental operation of the pilot plant, with the aim of development and testing of new or improved processes, products, systems or services. Common for these activities is that they contain a significant news item.


Among the possible topics can, among other things. include the study of the possibilities and perspectives on interactive communication via radio frequencies earmarked for digital services, development and testing of hardware, software, interface and content linked to the new services and the development and testing of new advertising formats and business models on television. It will therefore be essential that there is talk about testing new options in order to test and develop the future of digital services, so that Denmark can be on the cutting edge of development.

Strategy















The national it and Telecom Agency must support the Government's ongoing Telecom and media policy, and in this context, contribute to the implementation of tele-and media policy decisions relating to the use of the radio frequencies allocated to broadcasting services, including to ensure efficient spectrum use of these radio frequencies.













The national it and Telecom Agency shall ensure that radio frequencies are allocated to public service, gatekeeper and to research and innovation purposes, can be taken into use from 1. November 2009 with a minimum of technical limitations.













The national it and Telecom Agency must guarantee the possibility that providers can combine electronic communications services with round proliferation networks, for example via radio frequencies allocated to radio or tv-purposes.













The national it and Telecom Agency must ensure that broadcasting network (multiplex), which can be used for research and experimental purposes, be assigned to research and/or experimental purposes with a view to the development of innovative services.









-Free spectrum use of radio frequencies

Background

The national it and Telecom Agency shall determine in accordance with section 4 of the regulations on the law-free spectrum frequency spectrum, where there is a high probability that those radio frequencies for a long time in the future will be used for the same purpose and under the same conditions, and when there is no need to issue permits because of the slight risk of interfering with other spectrum.

The national it and Telecom Agency can, for example, lay down rules to exempt spectrum with low power equipment, including certain types of medical devices, from the permit requirement, since this type of frequency use is associated with very few disturbances.

Low power equipments – Short Range Devices (SRD) – covers a wide range of equipment, incorporating a radio transmitter. Equipment typically use radio frequencies, which are harmonised at European level and often also at the global level. The equipment is characterized by sending low-effects that only gives a short range, but which, in turn, means that the same radio frequency can be used over and over again, without the emergence of disturbances. The technical features means that many users can share the same radio frequencies. Examples of SRD is:















Remote control of, among other things. toys, billåse, garage doors, alarms, etc.













Wireless transmission of picture and sound, inter alia. wireless microphones, wireless headphones, video transmitters, etc.













Wireless computer networks (RLAN and WLAN), wireless mouse and keyboard, etc.













Radio Frequency Identification (RFID), including the small transmitters to the identification or registration purposes in URf.eks. burglar alarm system, card key, product codes, etc.









In addition there are systems where the user terminal is controlled by a network. This applies to GSM phones, TETRA-terminals, 3 g phones, FWA-terminals etc. In such situations is that a similarly low risk of disruption, why such spectrum should be-free spectrum.

Development in the coming years is expected SRD-equipment (specially wireless computer networks, including WIRELESS and RFID) continuing to expel a large growth due to low prices on electronics and radio transmitters. RFID is expected to be used in stores, businesses and private homes, both as bar codes, electronic keys, alarm systems, etc.

Denmark opened in november 2006 as one of the first countries in the EU up to the use of UWB (Ultra Wide Band). UWB-equipment will be able to be used without permission from the national IT and Telecom Agency. UWB can URf.eks. used for wireless broadband over a very short distance – typically 2-5 meters. Thus, among other things, the new technology can be used to communicate with external devices directly from the USB plug into a computer, television set, radio, etc., and is expected to have the same distribution as Bluetooth, which today is used by most mobile manufacturers. UWB is a new way to use radio frequencies, as sent on the same radio frequencies, which are used for quite different services. Technical studies have shown, however, that frequency sharing is possible, and that the risk of disruption of existing services is very small.

Strategy















The national it and Telecom Agency must ensure that there are sufficient opportunities for spectrum-free spectrum, including for URf.eks. WLAN and UWB. The use of radio frequencies, including URf.eks. WLAN and UWB, should be-free spectrum, where possible, and where there are only negligible risk of unacceptable disruption.













The use of radio frequencies in the user terminals, which are under the control of a network, be-free spectrum.









The use of radio frequencies for non-commercial use

Background

With radio frequencies for non-commercial use is believed that radio frequencies are not used as the basis for the provision of electronic communications networks and services. This does not mean, however, that radio frequencies are used for commercial purposes. This is for example the case with radio frequencies used by transport companies (URf.eks. taxi-companies and bicycle messengers), in connection with major projects (URf.eks. building bridges we), by municipalities (URf.eks. home care) and to beredskabsmæssige tasks (URf.eks. police, Falck and fire brigade). Several companies have also established their own telecommunications infrastructure URf.eks. in order to connect more of the company's offices by use of radio links.

In addition, there is a considerable spectrum, where the use is not for actual communication purposes. This applies to the use of radio frequencies for scientific purposes, such as Earth observation, space science and meteorological services. In addition, there is a significant use of radio frequencies to the location determination using radars. Finally, there is a considerable spectrum for ENG/OB-purpose, IE. wireless microphones and video cameras as well as reportage transmitters.

The land mobile radio services, which most often are not used for the provision of electronic communications networks and services, includes mainly communication between mobile and portable radios and base stations on VHF and UHF radio frequencies, i.e. frequencies between 30 and 960 MHz. To the land mobile services belong, inter alia. paging systems, broadcasting equipment and wireless video cameras (ENG/OB).

Development

On the land mobile area development generally goes in the direction of fewer users have their own networks. Existing communication needs covered increasingly using the subscribed services, URf.eks. the use of mobile phones, including also offered TETRA services. The implementation of the overall safety net (ITS) will in the coming years lead to extensive changes in this area. Where there currently used over 100 different radio systems in all parts of preparedness, there will in the next few years be a gradual transition for use by one operator-driven networks. This, as well as the final transition to a new channel plan in the 400 MHz range will give opportunity to new services could be established in this frequency range, with significant frequency resources likely to be released.

However, there is still a need for that other users may be issued permits to own communication purposes. This applies to both private and public companies, who need to be able to establish traditional land mobile radio services. In addition, there are more and more companies that are interested in establishing their own broadband connections through the use of wireless technology rather than buy a package solution with a provider.

There are also expected in the future to be a significant demand for radio frequencies for non-commercial purposes. This is partly due to the need to maintain the possibility of users can establish their own radio networks, rather than having to buy access with a provider and, on the other hand, the need for spectrum use for scientific and meteorological purposes.


In connection with the transition from analog to digital tv 1. November 2009 will use radio frequencies in the radio frequency band 800-820 MHz currently used for wireless microphones, were to be used for broadcasting by tv. Since there is no readily available real alternatives to these radio frequency bands, there is a need for the existing application to wireless microphones can continue, without, however, restricting the use of these radio frequencies for digital television.

Strategy















The national it and Telecom Agency must, as far as the demand dictates it, ensure the option of establishing their own systems, including wireless broadband systems.













The national it and Telecom Agency must, as far as the demand dictates it, continue to ensure the frekvensmæssige options that can be set up closed radio systems, particularly for smaller users.













The national it and Telecom Agency must, as far as the demand dictates it, continue to ensure the frekvensmæssige possibilities for scientific purposes.













The national it and Telecom Agency shall, to the extent possible, continue to ensure the frekvensmæssige possibilities of wireless microphones in the radio frequency band 800-820 MHz.













The national it and Telecom Agency shall, to the extent possible, guarantee the possibility to establish wireless microphones in the UHF tv band in geographical areas where radio spectrum is not used for broadcasting purposes.









The armed forces ' use of radio frequencies

Background

The overall framework for the military's radio spectrum use will be established nationally and in NATO with the participation of individual NATO countries ' civilian and military authorities.

The military's broad spectrum shown by "Nato Joint Frequency Agreement" (NJFA) and "notice on the definition of the framework for the application and the priority given by the total radio spectrum resources (frequency plan)". The armed forces ' use of radio frequencies in the radio frequency bands, as in the Danish frequency plan is identified as exclusive radio frequency bands or joint military/civilian radio frequency bands exempted from the requirements of frequency authorisation. In other radio frequency bands determined the military's conditions for spectrum use in each case on the basis of a frequency authorisation.

Development

There is a continued trend towards new spectrum efficient technologies, so that the ever-growing information needs can be met within the current framework.

Danish defence imposed increasingly to solve tasks in international level. This fact leads to increased requirements for interoperable technology and not least to the harmonised military use of radio frequency bands. This applies not only in Europe, but for all Nations, taking part in UN and NATO missions.

At the same time that there is an increased need for a harmonized military use of certain radio frequency bands, there is also an increasing need for civilian access to the radio frequency band, where the Defense up until now has had an exclusive access to radio frequencies. This applies, among other things. frequency ranges, where frequency use has been harmonised in Europe for civilian radio services in the radio frequency band 400-470 MHz, and where the military spectrum limits in Denmark can benefit from the advantages of the European harmonisation.

Strategy















IT and Telecom Agency must ensure that the armed forces ' needs for radio spectrum continues to be safeguarded, so that Denmark can live up to the legal requirements, both nationally and internationally, including to the obligations, as the United Nations and NATO cooperation requires.













In this context, the national IT and Telecom Agency work to ensure that civil services continue to get access to the radio frequency bands used by the defence, to the extent possible, as well as to frequency sharing is defended as former parts of the radio frequency spectrum gives back, as defense uses, in line with changes in the military's duties and requirements as well as in line with the amended civil needs for additional radio frequencies.













The national it and Telecom Agency must work in order to free the parts of the radio spectrum band 410-430 MHz, which is currently used by the defense, to new communications services.













The national it and Telecom Agency will work to free up further by the Defense used radio frequencies in the radio frequency band 380-400 MHz with a view on beredskabsmæssig utilization of applications with higher transmission speed.







Official notes 1) Executive order implementing parts of a European Parliament and Council Directive 2002/20/EC of 7. March 2002 on the authorisation of electronic communications networks and services (authorisation directive) (Official Journal of the European communities 2002 nr. L 108 s. 21) and parts of the European Parliament and Council Directive 2002/21/EC of 7. March 2002 on a common regulatory framework for electronic communications networks and services (framework directive) (Official Journal of the European communities 2002 nr. L 108 s 33).