Act 984 2005

Original Language Title: LEY 984 de 2005

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LAW 984 2005
(August 12)
Official Gazette No. 46,002 of 16 August 2005 COLOMBIA CONGRESS

Through which the "Optional Protocol to the Convention on the approved elimination of all forms of discrimination against women "adopted by the United Nations General Assembly six (6) October in 1999 (1999). Summary

Term Notes
THE CONGRESS OF THE REPUBLIC
having regard to the text of the "Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women" adopted by the United Nations General Assembly six (6) October in 1999 (1999).
(To be transliterated: photocopy of the full text of that instrument is attached).
NUMBER 202 BILL SENATE
through which the "Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women" is approved, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on six (6) October in 1999 (1999).
THE CONGRESS OF THE REPUBLIC
having regard to the text of the "Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women" adopted by the United Nations General Assembly six (6) October in 1999 (1999).
(To be transliterated: photocopy of the full text of that instrument is attached).
"Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women
States Parties to this Protocol,
Noting that the United Nations Charter reaffirms faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person and in the equal rights of men and women,
noting that the Universal Declaration of human rights proclaims that all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights and that everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth therein, without distinction of any kind, including those based on sex,
Recalling that the international Covenants on human rights and other international human rights instruments prohibit discrimination sex,
Recalling the Convention on the elimination of all forms of discrimination against women ( "the Convention"), in which the States Parties thereto condemn discrimination against women in all its forms and agree to pursue , by all appropriate means and without delay a policy of eliminating discrimination against women,
Reaffirming its determination to ensure the full enjoyment of women and equal for all human rights and all fundamental freedoms and to take effective measures to prevent violations of these rights and freedoms,
agreed as follows: ARTICLE 1o
. Any State Party to the present Protocol ( "State Party") recognizes the competence of the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women ( "the Committee") to receive and consider communications submitted in accordance with article 2.
Article 2.
. Communications may be submitted by individuals or groups of persons who are under the jurisdiction of the State party, claiming to be victims of a violation by that State party of any of the rights contained in the Convention or on behalf of such persons or groups of people. When a communication on behalf of individuals or groups of people are present, their consent will be required, unless the author can justify acting on their behalf without such consent.

ARTICLE 3. Communications be in writing and shall not be anonymous. The Committee will not receive if it concerns a State party to the Convention not party to this Protocol communication.

ARTICLE 4.

1. The Committee shall not consider a communication unless it has ascertained that have exhausted all remedies under domestic jurisdiction, unless the application of such remedies is unreasonably prolonged or is unlikely to bring effective relief.
2. The Committee shall declare a communication inadmissible where:
a) The same matter has already been examined by the Committee or has been or is being examined under another procedure of international investigation or settlement;
B) It is incompatible with the provisions of the Convention;
C) It is manifestly ill-founded or not sufficiently substantiated;
D) It is an abuse of the right to submit a communication;

E) The facts of the communication occurred before the date of entry into force of this Protocol for the State Party concerned unless those facts continued after that date.

The 5th ITEM.

1. After receipt of a communication and before a determination on the merits, at any time the Committee may transmit to the State party concerned, for the purposes of its urgent consideration a request that it take such interim measures to avoid possible irreparable damage the victim or victims of the alleged violation.
2. Where the Committee exercises its discretion under paragraph 1 of this article, this does not imply a determination on admissibility or on the merits of the communication.

ARTICLE 6o.

1. Unless the Committee considers a communication inadmissible without reference to the State Party concerned, and provided that the individual or individuals consent to the disclosure of their identity to that State Party, the Committee shall inform the State party confidentially any communications received under this Protocol.
2. Within six months, the State shall submit to the Committee written explanations or statements clarifying the matter and the corrective measures taken by the State party, if any are indicated.

ARTICLE 7.

1. The Committee shall consider communications received under this Protocol in the light of all information made available to it by persons or groups of persons, or on their behalf, and by the State Party concerned, provided that such information is transmitted to the concerned parties.
2. The Committee considered in closed meetings communications received under this Protocol.
3. After examining a communication, the Committee shall transmit its views on the communication, together with its recommendations, if any, to the parties concerned.
4. The State Party shall give due consideration to the views of the Committee and its recommendations, if any, and submit to the Committee, within six months, a written response, including information on any action had been taken in light of the views and recommendations of the Committee.
5. The Committee may invite the State Party to submit further information about any measures the State Party has taken in response to the views or recommendations, if any, even if the Committee deems appropriate, in its reports later the State Party in accordance with Article 18 of the Convention.

Article 8.

1. If the Committee receives reliable information indicating grave or systematic violations by a State Party of rights set forth in the Convention, the Committee shall invite that State Party to cooperate in the examination of the information and to this end to submit observations on that information.
2. Taking into consideration the observations presented to the State Party concerned as well as any other reliable information available to it, the Committee may designate one or more of its members to conduct an inquiry and report urgently a report to the Committee. Where warranted and with the consent of the State Party, the inquiry may include a visit to its territory.
3. After examining the findings of the investigation, the Committee shall transmit to the State Party concerned together with any observations and recommendations it deems appropriate.
4. Within six months after receiving the results of the research and observations and recommendations transmitted by the Committee, the State party concerned shall submit its observations to the Committee.
5. The investigation shall be conducted confidentially and at all stages of the cooperation of the State Party shall be sought.

Article 9.

1. The Committee may invite the State Party concerned to include in the report to be submitted under article 18 of the Convention details of any measures taken in response to an inquiry conducted under article 8 of the present Protocol Party.
2. After the six months referred to in paragraph 4 of Article 8, the Committee may, if necessary, invite the State Party concerned to inform it of any action taken as a result of the inquiry.
ARTICLE 10.


1. Any State Party may, at the time of signature or ratification of this Protocol or accession thereto, declare that it does not recognize the competence of the Committee provided for in Articles 8 and 9.

2. Any State Party which has made a declaration under paragraph 1 of this Article may withdraw this declaration at any time upon notice to the Secretary General.

ARTICLE 11. Each State Party shall adopt all necessary measures to ensure that persons within their jurisdiction are not subjected to ill treatment or intimidation as a consequence of communicating with the Committee pursuant to this Protocol.

ARTICLE 12. The Committee shall include in the annual report to be submitted under Article 21 of the Convention a summary of its activities under this Protocol.

ARTICLE 13. Each State Party undertakes to make widely known the Convention and this Protocol and give them publicity and to facilitate access to information about the views and recommendations of the Committee, particularly on issues that involving that State Party.

ARTICLE 14. The Committee shall develop its own rules, which apply in the exercise of functions under this Protocol.
ARTICLE 15.


1. This Protocol shall be open for signature by any State that has signed the Convention, ratified or acceded to it.
2. This Protocol shall be subject to ratification by any State that has ratified the Convention or acceded to it. The instruments of ratification shall be deposited with the Secretary General of the United Nations.
3. This Protocol shall be open to accession by any State that has ratified the Convention or acceded to it.
4. Accession shall be effected by the deposit of an instrument with the Secretary General of the United Nations.
ARTICLE 16.


1. This Protocol shall enter into force three months after the date on which has been deposited with the Secretary General of the United Nations of the tenth instrument of ratification or accession.
2. For each State ratifying this Protocol or acceding to it after its entry into force, this Protocol shall enter into force after three months from the date of the deposit of its instrument of ratification or accession.

ARTICLE 17. No reservations to this Protocol shall be permitted.
ARTICLE 18.


1. Any State Party may propose amendments to this Protocol and submit it to the Secretary General of the United Nations. The Secretary General shall inform the States Parties to the proposed amendments and asked to indicate whether they favor a conference of States Parties be convened to consider the proposals and voting. If at least one third of the States Parties Parties favors such a conference, the Secretary General shall convene the conference under the auspices of the United Nations. Any amendment approved by a majority of States Parties present and voting at the conference shall be submitted to the approval of the United Nations General Assembly.
2. Such amendments shall enter into force when they have been approved by the United Nations General Assembly and accepted by a two-thirds majority of the States Parties to this Protocol, in accordance with their respective constitutional processes.
3. When amendments come into force, will be binding on those States Parties which have accepted them, other States Parties still being bound by the provisions of this Protocol and any earlier amendments they have accepted.
ARTICLE 19.


1. Any State Party may denounce this Protocol at any time by the Secretary-General addressed to the United Nations written notice. The denunciation shall take effect six months after the date on which the Secretary General has received the notification.
2. Denunciation shall be without prejudice to the provisions of this Protocol shall continue to apply to any communication submitted under article 2 or any inquiry initiated under article 8 with before the effective date of denunciation.

ARTICLE 20. The Secretary General of the United Nations shall inform all States:
a) Signatures, ratifications and accessions under this Protocol;
B) The date of entry into force of this Protocol and any amendment under Article 18;
C) Any denunciation under article 19
ARTICLE 21.


1. This Protocol, of which the Arabic, Chinese, Spanish, French, English and Russian texts are equally authentic, shall be deposited in the archives of the United Nations.

2. The Secretary General of the United Nations shall transmit certified copies of this Protocol to all States referred to in Article 25 of the Convention.
I hereby certify That the foregoing text is a Je certifie that le texte qui est une Precede
true copy of the Optional Protocol to the copie conforme du Protocole facultatif to the Convention on the Elimination
of All Convention south
lélimination de toutes les forms of discrimination against Women, formes de discrimination Legard des
aDOPTED by the General Assembly of the femmes, I took par lAssemblée générale des
United Nations on 6 October 1999, the Nations Unies him 6 octobre 1999 et dont
Which is the original of loriginal Déposé deposited With the Secretary-deposited
General of the United Nations se trouve. Secrétaire général des Nations Unies.

For the Secretary-General, Pour le Secrétaire général,
The Legal Counsel Le Conseiller juridique
(Under-Secretary-General (Secrétaire général adjoint
for Legal Affairs) aux Legal Affairs)
Hans Corell
United Nations, New York Organisation des Nations Unies
10 November 1999 New York, you 10 novembre 1999
EXECUTIVE BRANCH PUBLIC POWER

PRESIDENCY OF THE REPUBLIC Bogotá, DC, September 3, 2003
Approved. Submit to the consideration of the honorable National Congress for constitutional purposes.
(Sgd.)
The Alvaro Uribe Minister of Foreign Affairs,
(FDO.) CAROLINA Barco Isakson. "
DECREES: Article 1.
. To approve the "Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women" adopted by the United Nations General Assembly, the six (6) October in 1999 (1999). Article 2.
. In accordance with the provisions of article 1 of Law 7 of 1944, the "Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women" adopted by the United Nations General Assembly, the six ( 6) October in 1999 (1999), that article 1 of this law is approved, it will force the country from the date the international link is perfect therefrom.
Article 3o. This law applies from the date of publication.
Given in Bogotá, DC, to ...
honorable Presented to Congress by the Minister of Interior and Justice and the Minister of Foreign Affairs.
The Minister of Interior and Justice, Sabas
EDUARDO Pretelt de la Vega.
The Minister of Foreign Affairs, Carolina Barco Isakson
. STATEMENT OF MOTIVES

Honorable Senators and Representatives:
On behalf of the Government and in compliance with Articles 150, paragraph 16 and 189, paragraph 2 of the Constitution of Colombia, presented for consideration by the honorable Congress Republic the bill through which the "optional Protocol to the Convention on the elimination of all forms of discrimination against women" adopted by the United Nations General Assembly six (6) October approved in 1999 (1999).
The Protocol can raise complaints of violation of the rights of women, to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), a body of 23 experts charged with monitoring the implementation of the Convention.
The Protocol comprises a total of 21 items, including highlights on conditions for submissions to the "Committee" aimed allege a violation of the rights contained in the Convention. Such conditions are:
- The defendant State must be party to the Protocol.
- The accused State must have violated one of the rights enshrined in the Convention.
- The claimant must have exhausted all remedies under domestic jurisdiction, except that the exhaustion of these remedies is unreasonably prolonged or is unlikely to provide an effective remedy.
- The facts manifested in communication should have been submitted after the entry into force of the Protocol or unless they continue occurring after this date.
- The communication must not be pending in another international proceeding or being studied by the Committee earlier.

Colombia is a party to the Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, adopted by Law 51 of 1981, ratified on 19 January 1982. The Convention condemns discrimination against women in all its forms and forces States to adopt a policy of eliminating this discrimination by all appropriate means and without delay policy. Colombia is party to the Convention since 1983. By signing the Protocol stated that: "(...) this is a step in the quest for respect for human rights and equal conditions between men and women consecrated in the Constitution ... ".
In regard to the ratification of the Protocol, the decision of the relevant government agencies in the field adds expressed by a large number of congressmen women; various non-governmental organizations and academia, who have asked the National Government presentation of the Protocol for consideration by the honorable Congress organizations. You
For example, in the Human Rights Program, International Humanitarian Law and Peace of the Universidad Javeriana opinion, in a detailed concept developed at the request of the Presidential Council for Women Equity stands out:
"(...) the ratification of the optional Protocol to the Convention on the elimination of all forms of discrimination against women (CEDAW) -Law 51 of 1981 of the Republic of Colombia, without any unilateral declaration, constitutes in a coherent legal act of the Government to its policy of building equity between women and -social, cultural Men, political, economic, familiar and National and International Defence Policy and Protection of Human Rights, particularly in the context internal war we face today.
arguments different order than proceed to expose prove the above statement, as they tend to cultural change towards men and women more free, fair and tolerant roles, although still far required among other tools, potential national and international legal action. These are some of the arguments: The related to international and inter-American human rights framework to avails Colombia; the mandates of the Constitution; jurisprudential developments of the Colombian Constitutional Court; Public policies with a gender perspective in social and development plans; the national legal framework; regulated procedures before the Commissions of Inter-American United Nations or in any case subsidiary and complementary to national procedures; the concepts of international law on reservations and declarations.
The ratification of the CEDAW Optional Protocol.1 constitutes an opportunity for the Colombian government. First, because it gives another step forward to continue the transition from formal to substantive justice for citizens, justice as international instruments that allow a democratic government explain its actions in defense of human rights extend its legitimacy and support of its nationals, to the extent that these / as receive a message of commitment, professionalism, transparency and positive desire for control of state bodies. Secondly, it is time to comply with the dissemination of CEDAW as it forces its articles and recommended by the Committee (1999) to generate a dialectical process that cultural and social changes on specificity is achieved in human rights women, for propender by new attitudes among judges and civil servants for example, so they are more willing to respect, protect and realize the rights of women under national jurisdiction. Consequently, for as to minimize the need for International Human Rights Committees that, in any case, must undergo Colombia, through reports, as part of their commitment.
The current government policy, led by the Vice President of the Republic and the Office of Human Rights and the decision of permanence of the Presidential Council for Women Equity, they are interpreted by women as a sign of commitment to real equality, not just formal, between women and men, as the will to materialize the respect for the rights of human, as a desire to close the inequality gap built from patterns of patriarchal gender and hierarchical that discriminate against women in work, family, economic, political and representative, among others. "

The aims of the "Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women" are also consistent with the advances of the Colombian State for gender equality.
Are now evident progress in the effective recognition of equality between men and women. Suffice it to recall that well into the twentieth century, women in Colombia had restricted their citizenship, were equated to minors and lunatics in the management of their assets, could not exercise parental authority, they were forced to adopt her husband's surname, adding to his particle "of" as a symbol of belonging, among other limitations.
Slowly the struggle of women to gain recognition of legal equality, hand in hand with government action took shape in various standards that helped transform this state of affairs. For example, in politics, in 1954 they were granted the right to vote, which could be exercised for the first time in 1957. In education, through Decree 1972 of 1933 to the female population were allowed to enter university . In civil matters, Law 28 of 1932 recognized the married woman free administration and disposal of assets and abolished the marital power, so that the man was no longer his legal representative.
Decree 2820 of 1974 granted parental rights to both men and women, eliminated the obligation of obedience to the husband, and living with him and follow him wherever he could remove his residence; Article 94 Decree Law 999 of 1988 abolished the obligation to bear the surname of the husband, and the Laws 1st of 1976 and 75 of 1968 introduced reforms of signal importance in the path towards gender equality before the law. In labor matters, Law 83 of 1931 allowed women workers receive their wages directly. In 1938, they were put into effect rules on maternity protection, recommended by the ILO since 1919, among others, recognizing a paid eight weeks after childbirth leave, extended to twelve weeks by Law 50 of 1990. For its part, by Decree 2351 of 1965 was forbidden to fire women who are pregnant.
1 Adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in its resolution A / 54/4 of 6 October 1999 and opened for signature on 10 December 1999. It entered into force on 22 December 2000. Colombia signed the Protocol in accordance with Article 16 of the instrument: for each State ratifying this Protocol or acceding to it after its entry into force, this Protocol shall enter into force after three months from the date on which such State deposit of its own instrument of ratification or accession.
In this regard recognition of the legal equality of women the Constituent 1991 has also added the first time in our superior system expressly recognized that "women and men have equal rights and opportunities" and that " women may not be subjected to any kind of discrimination. " International context

The Colombia international commitments concerning women are consigned in:
a) The International Human Rights Treaties as a whole;
B) The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women and the Convention of Belém do Pará to prevent and punish violence against women, among others;
C) The Fourth World Conference on Women, Beijing, 1995: Platform for Action;
D) World Conferences Sector: Environment, Human Rights, Population and Urban Social Summit;
E) The Ibero-American Summit of Presidents and Heads of State;
F) The Sixth Summit on democratic governance; and
g) The Inter-American Summit of Presidents: Miami and Chile, Item 18.
In the view of the United Nations, equality is the cornerstone of any society that aspires to democracy, social justice and rights humans. In virtually all societies and s scope of activity, women are subject to inequalities of fact and law. This situation is because there is discrimination in the family, community and workplace, and is aggravated by this circumstance. Although its causes and effects vary between countries, discrimination against women is widespread and is perpetuated by the survival of prejudices and harmful traditions for her.

The work of the United Nations to document the real situation of women worldwide has provided some alarming statistics of economic and social disparity between men and women. Of the 1,300 million people living in poverty, 70% are women. The increasing poverty among women has been attributed directly to their inequality in the labor market, the welfare system and in their position and power in the family. Women constitute the majority of illiterate people in the world. Everywhere women work longer hours than men, and most of their work is unpaid and grateful and is underappreciated.
Women hold between 10 and 20% of administrative and management positions worldwide and less than 20% of jobs in the factories. Women receive an excessively small proportion of loans granted by banks. The participation of women in making economic and political decisions remains very low. Women hold only 10% of parliamentary seats and less than 5% of the Heads of State. The clearest evidence of the low position assigned to women is legal discrimination. In many countries, the treatment of women in terms of property rights, inheritance rights, marriage law and divorce, the right to acquire nationality and the right to administer property or obtain employment reflect the inequality of man and woman.
The idea of ​​equality means much more than treating everyone the same way. Equal treatment of persons who are in unequal situations perpetuate injustice rather than eradicate it. True equality can only be achieved through efforts to rectify existing imbalances. In this broader context, the theme of "women's rights, everyone's responsibility" has a special meaning. Progress

internationally Among the major progress made in recent decades at the international level, in favor of women, are the following:
- Celebration of four global UN conferences (Mexico, 1975, Copenhagen 1980, Nairobi 1985 and Beijing 1995), on women and proposed strategies for their integral development.
- Overcoming certain discussions on the recognition of the historical discrimination against women.
- The need for public and private institutions exist specifically dedicated to responding to the needs and interests of women.
- The need for actions aimed at women are conducted in an integrated, systemic (transversal) way, playing with all sectors comprising development initiatives. (Gender Mainstreaming).
- The abandonment of the view that women are a vulnerable group and the recognition that constitute half of the population.
- Postponing consideration of the situation of women in connection with the theme of the family. The recognition of the universality of human rights of women; and
- full acceptance of the approach and gender criteria.
Strategic objectives of the Beijing Platform for Action in Human Rights and major recommendations to governments:
The Beijing Platform for Action is undoubtedly the most dynamic commitment that is demanding of States. From the twelve subjects comprising the Platform -Poverty, Violence, Armed Conflict, Labor, Health, Education, Media, Environment, National Mechanisms, Girl, Human Rights and Power and decision-making-, the experts of the Committee They tend to highlight the following objectives:
- promote and protect the human rights of women through the full implementation of international instruments, particularly CEDAW and promote the acquisition of basic legal knowledge.
In this area are: Ratify treaties; ratify the CEDAW; limit the scope of reservations; consider the creation of National Action Plans DDHHH, to consider the rights of women; create or strengthen national institutions for the protection of women DD; validate national legislation with CEDAW; human rights education; adopt gender in reports to the Committees; support to the CEDAW Committee, the CSW and the Optional Protocol to the CEDAW.
- Ensure equality and non-discrimination in law and in fact

Provides: Prioritize the promotion and protection of human rights without discrimination of any upo g or sector; constitutional guarantees and legislation against discrimination; incorporation into the law of the principle of equality; validating legislation and customary laws with international human rights treaties; establishment of programs to protect the human rights of women; urgent action against violence; prohibit female circumcision; génerosensitiva training in human rights officials / as in charge of law enforcement; establishment of mechanisms for investigating violations of DD women by public officials; ensure the effective protection of women's rights in criminal law; existence of free legal assistance for women; protection and guarantees to women and human rights NGOs for their work in favor of the subject; ensure gender perspective in human rights initiatives.
- To promote the acquisition of basic legal knowledge
Demand: translation of treaties into national languages; dissemination of information on human rights; dissemination of national and international law; introduce human rights in the education system; promote the articulation and coordination of all and all those working in the field, including NGOs; promotion of human rights education, especially among women; Special measures for women refugees, displaced migrants, aimed to sensitize them about their rights.
To date, the Protocol has been ratified by a large number of countries. are the following In Latin America: Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela.
Given the above, the Government, through the Minister of Interior and Justice, and the Minister of Foreign Affairs requests the honorable Congress to approve the "Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of discrimination against women "adopted by the United Nations General Assembly six (6) October in 1999 (1999).
Of the honorable Congressmen,
Sabas Pretelt EDUARDO DE LA VEGA,
Minister of Interior and Justice;
Carolina Barco Isakson,
Minister of Foreign Affairs.

LAW 424 1998 (January 13)
why follow international conventions signed by Colombia
ordered.

The Congress of Colombia DECREES: Article 1.
. The National Government through the Foreign Ministry presented annually to the Second Committee on Foreign Affairs of the Senate and House, and within the first thirty calendar days after the legislative session that begins each July 20, a detailed report on how they are fulfilling and developing the existing international agreements signed by Colombia with other States. Article 2.
. Each branch of the National Government responsible for implementing international treaties within their competence and require reciprocity in them, will communicate the relevant information to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and east to the Second Committees.
Article 3o. The full text of this law shall be annexed to each and every one of the international conventions that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs present to Congress.
Article 4o. This law governs from its promulgation.
The President of the honorable Senate.
Amylkar ACOSTA MEDINA.
The Secretary General of the honorable Senate,
PUMAREJO PEDRO VEGA.
The President of the honorable Chamber of Representatives,
CARLOS ARDILA BALLESTEROS.
The Secretary General of the honorable House of Representatives, DIEGO VIVAS
TAFUR.
REPUBLIC OF COLOMBIA - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT
published and execute.
Given in Santa Fe de Bogota, DC, 13 January 1998.

Ernesto Samper Pizano Minister of Foreign Affairs, Maria Emma Mejia
VÉLEZ. RAMA

PUBLIC POWER EXECUTIVE PRESIDENCY OF THE REPUBLIC
Bogotá, DC, September 3, 2003. Approved
. Submit to the consideration of the honorable National Congress for constitutional purposes.
(Sgd.)
The Alvaro Uribe Minister of Foreign Affairs,
(FDO.) CAROLINA Barco Isakson.
DECREES: Article 1.
. Approval of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly six (6) October in 1999 (1999).
Article 2.
. In accordance with the provisions of article 1 of Law 7 of 1944 the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly six (6) October in 1999 (1999), that the first article of this law is passed, will force the country from the date the international link of it is perfect.
Article 3o. This law applies from the date of publication.
The President of the honorable Senate,
Luis Humberto Gómez Gallo.
The Secretary General of the honorable Senate,
EMILIO RAMÓN OTERO DAJUD.
The President of the honorable House of Representatives,
Zulema Jattin Corrales.
The Secretary General of the honorable House of Representatives, ANGELINO
LIZCANO RIVERA.
REPUBLIC OF COLOMBIA - NATIONAL GOVERNMENT
transmittal and enforcement.
Run, after review by the Constitutional Court, pursuant to Article 241-10 of the Constitution.
Given in Bogotá, DC, on August 12, 2005.

The Alvaro Uribe Deputy Foreign Minister Responsible for the functions of the Office of the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Camilo Reyes Rodriguez
.


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