Chapter 553 Building Construction Standards

Link to law: http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&URL=0500-0599%2F0553%2F0553.html
Published: 2015

CHAPTER 553
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION STANDARDS

PART I
MANUFACTURED BUILDINGS(ss. 553.35-553.42)

PART II
ACCESSIBILITY BY HANDICAPPED PERSONS(ss. 553.501-553.514)

PART III
TRENCH SAFETY ACT(ss. 553.60-553.64)

PART IV
FLORIDA BUILDING CODE(ss. 553.70-553.898)

PART V
THERMAL EFFICIENCY STANDARDS(ss. 553.900-553.912)

PART VI
ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS(ss. 553.951-553.975)

PART VII
STANDARDS FOR RADON-RESISTANT BUILDINGS(s. 553.98)

PART VIII
BUILDING ENERGY-EFFICIENCY RATING SYSTEM(ss. 553.990-553.998)

PART I
MANUFACTURED BUILDINGS

553.35 Short title.

553.355 Minimum construction requirements established.

553.36 Definitions.

553.37 Rules; inspections; and insignia.

553.375 Recertification of manufactured buildings.

553.38 Application and scope.

553.381 Manufacturer certification.

553.382 Placement of certain housing.

553.39 Injunctive relief.

553.41 Penalties.

553.415 Factory-built school buildings.

553.42 Legislative intent.

553.35 Short title.—This part shall be known and may be cited as the “Florida Manufactured Building Act of 1979.”
History.—s. 1, ch. 71-172; s. 1, ch. 74-208; s. 3, ch. 76-168; s. 1, ch. 77-457; ss. 1, 6, ch. 79-152; ss. 2, 3, ch. 81-318; ss. 3, 4, ch. 84-32; s. 4, ch. 91-429.

553.355 Minimum construction requirements established.—The Florida Building Code and the Florida Fire Prevention and Lifesafety Codes shall be the minimum construction requirements governing the manufacture, design, construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, and demolition of manufactured buildings.
History.—s. 54, ch. 2000-141; s. 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372.

553.36 Definitions.—The definitions contained in this section govern the construction of this part unless the context otherwise requires.
(1) “Approved” means conforming to the requirements of the Florida Building Code.

(2) “Approved inspection agency” means an organization determined by the department to be especially qualified by reason of facilities, personnel, experience, and demonstrated reliability to investigate, test, and evaluate manufactured building units or systems or the component parts thereof, together with the plans, specifications, and quality control procedures to ensure that such units, systems, or component parts are in full compliance with the Florida Building Code and to label such units complying with those standards.

(3) “Closed construction” means that condition when any building, component, assembly, subassembly, or system is manufactured in such a manner that all portions cannot be readily inspected at the installation site without disassembly or destruction thereof.

(4) “Open construction” means any building, building component, assembly, or system manufactured in such a manner that all portions can be readily inspected at the building site without disassembly thereof, damage thereto, or destruction thereof.

(5) “Columbarium” means a permanent structure consisting of niches.

(6) “Component” means any assembly, subassembly, or combination of parts for use as a part of a building, which may include structural, electrical, mechanical, and fire protection systems and other systems affecting health and safety. Components that incorporate elements of a building subject to the product approval system adopted under s. 553.842 are subject to approval in accordance with the product approval system upon implementation thereof and are not subject to the rules adopted under this part. Components to which the rules adopted under this part apply are limited to three-dimensional systems for use as part of a building.

(7) “Department” means the Department of Business and Professional Regulation.

(8) “Factory-built school shelter” means any site-assembled or factory-built school building that is designed to be portable, relocatable, demountable, or reconstructible and that complies with the provisions for enhanced hurricane protection areas, as required by the applicable code.

(9) “Insignia” means an approved device or seal issued by the department to indicate compliance with the standards and rules established pursuant to this part.

(10) “Install” means the assembly of a manufactured building component or system on site and the process of affixing a manufactured building component or system to land, a foundation, or an existing building, and service connections which are a part thereof.

(11) “Local government” means any municipality, county, district, or combination thereof comprising a governmental unit.

(12) “Manufacture” means the process of making, fabricating, constructing, forming, or assembling a product from raw, unfinished, semifinished, or finished materials.

(13) “Manufactured building”, “modular building,” or “factory-built building” means a closed structure, building assembly, or system of subassemblies, which may include structural, electrical, plumbing, heating, ventilating, or other service systems manufactured in manufacturing facilities for installation or erection as a finished building or as part of a finished building, which shall include, but not be limited to, residential, commercial, institutional, storage, and industrial structures. The term includes buildings not intended for human habitation such as lawn storage buildings and storage sheds manufactured and assembled offsite by a manufacturer certified in conformance with this part. This part does not apply to mobile homes.

(14) “Mobile home” means any residential unit constructed to standards promulgated by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development.

(15) “Module” means a separately transported three-dimensional component of a manufactured building which contains all or a portion of structural systems, electrical systems, plumbing systems, mechanical systems, fire systems, and thermal systems.

(16) “Private mausoleum” means a structure intended for the private use of a family or group of family members.

(17) “Site” is the location on which a manufactured building is installed or is to be installed.

(18) “System” means structural, plumbing, mechanical, heating, electrical, or ventilating elements, materials, or components combined for use in a building.

History.—s. 2, ch. 71-172; s. 1, ch. 74-208; s. 3, ch. 76-168; s. 1, ch. 77-457; ss. 1, 6, ch. 79-152; s. 76, ch. 81-167; ss. 2, 3, ch. 81-318; s. 79, ch. 83-55; ss. 3, 4, ch. 84-32; s. 4, ch. 91-429; ss. 55, 56, ch. 2000-141; ss. 21, 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372; s. 12, ch. 2007-55; s. 5, ch. 2008-191; s. 410, ch. 2011-142.

553.37 Rules; inspections; and insignia.—
(1) The Florida Building Commission shall adopt within the Florida Building Code requirements for construction or modification of manufactured buildings and building modules, to address:
(a) Submittal to and approval by the department of manufacturers’ drawings and specifications, including any amendments.

(b) Submittal to and approval by the department of manufacturers’ internal quality control procedures and manuals, including any amendments.

(c) Inspection criteria, which shall require the approved inspection agency to:
1. Observe the first building built, or with regard to components, observe the first unit assembled, after certification of the manufacturer, from start to finish, inspecting all subsystems: electrical, plumbing, structural, mechanical, or thermal.

2. Continue observation of the manufacturing process until the approved inspection agency determines that the manufacturer’s quality control program, in conjunction with the application of the plans approved by the approved inspection agency, will result in a building and components that meet or exceed the applicable Florida Building Code requirements.

3. Thereafter, inspect each module produced during at least one point of the manufacturing process and inspect at least 75 percent of the subsystems of each module: electrical, plumbing, structural, mechanical, or thermal.

4. With respect to components, inspect at least 75 percent of the manufactured building components and at least 20 percent of the storage sheds that are not designed for human habitation and that have a floor area of 720 square feet or less.

(2) The department shall adopt rules to address:
(a) Procedures and qualifications for approval of third-party plan review and inspection agencies and of those who perform inspections and plan reviews.

(b) Investigation of consumer complaints of noncompliance of manufactured buildings with the Florida Building Code and the Florida Fire Prevention Code.

(c) Issuance, cancellation, and revocation of any insignia issued by the department and procedures for auditing and accounting for disposition of them.

(d) Monitoring the manufacturers’, inspection agencies’, and plan review agencies’ compliance with this part and the Florida Building Code. Monitoring may include, but is not limited to, performing audits of plans, inspections of manufacturing facilities and observation of the manufacturing and inspection process, and onsite inspections of buildings.

(e) The performance by the department and its designees and contractors of any other functions required by this part.

(3) After the effective date of the Florida Building Code, no manufactured building, except as provided in subsection (12), may be installed in this state unless it is approved and bears the insignia of approval of the department and a manufacturer’s data plate. Approvals issued by the department under the provisions of the prior part shall be deemed to comply with the requirements of this part.

(4) All manufactured buildings issued and bearing insignia of approval pursuant to subsection (3) shall be deemed to comply with the Florida Building Code and are exempt from local amendments enacted by any local government.

(5) No manufactured building bearing department insignia of approval pursuant to subsection (3) shall be in any way modified prior to installation, except in conformance with the Florida Building Code.

(6) Manufactured buildings which have been issued and bear the insignia of approval pursuant to this part upon manufacture or first sale shall not require an additional approval or insignia by a local government in which they are subsequently sold or installed. Buildings or structures that meet the definition of “open construction” are subject to permitting by the local jurisdiction and are not required to bear insignia.

(7) If the department determines that the standards for construction and inspection of manufactured buildings prescribed by statute or rule of another state are at least equal to the Florida Building Code and that such standards are actually enforced by such other state, it may provide by rule that the manufactured building which has been inspected and approved by such other state shall be deemed to have been approved by the department and shall authorize the affixing of the appropriate insignia of approval.

(8) The department, by rule, shall establish a schedule of fees to pay the cost of the administration and enforcement of this part. The rule may provide for manufacturers to pay fees to the administrator directly via the Building Code Information System.

(9) The department may delegate its enforcement authority to a state department having building construction responsibilities or a local government and may enter into contracts for the performance of its administrative duties under this part. The department may delegate its plan review and inspection authority to one or more of the following in any combination:
(a) A state department having building construction responsibilities;

(b) A local government;

(c) An approved inspection agency;

(d) An approved plan review agency; or

(e) An agency of another state.

(10) The department shall develop an insignia to be affixed to all newly constructed buildings by the manufacturer or the inspection agency prior to the building leaving the plant. The department may charge a fee for issuing such insignias. Such insignias shall bear the department’s name, the state seal, an identification number unique to that insignia, and such other information as the department may require by rule.

(11) The department shall by rule develop minimum criteria for manufacturer’s data that must be affixed to all newly constructed buildings by the manufacturer prior to the building leaving the plant.

(12) Custom or one-of-a-kind prototype manufactured buildings are not required to have state approval, but must be in compliance with all local requirements of the governmental agency having jurisdiction at the installation site.

History.—s. 3, ch. 71-172; s. 1, ch. 74-208; s. 3, ch. 76-168; s. 1, ch. 77-457; ss. 1, 6, ch. 79-152; ss. 1, 4, ch. 80-86; ss. 2, 3, ch. 81-318; ss. 1, 3, 4, ch. 84-32; s. 4, ch. 91-429; s. 1, ch. 98-145; ss. 57, 58, ch. 2000-141; s. 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372; s. 6, ch. 2008-191; s. 28, ch. 2010-176; s. 16, ch. 2014-154.

553.375 Recertification of manufactured buildings.—Prior to the relocation to a site that has a higher design wind speed, modification, or change of occupancy of a manufactured building within the state, the manufacturer, dealer, or owner thereof may apply to the department for recertification of that manufactured building. The department shall, by rule, provide what information the applicant must submit for recertification and for plan review and inspection of such manufactured buildings and shall establish fees for recertification. Upon a determination by the department that the manufactured building complies with the applicable building codes, the department shall issue a recertification insignia. A manufactured building that bears recertification insignia does not require any additional approval by an enforcement jurisdiction in which the building is sold or installed, and is considered to comply with all applicable codes. As an alternative to recertification by the department, the manufacturer, dealer, or owner of a manufactured building may seek appropriate permitting and a certificate of occupancy from the local jurisdiction in accordance with procedures generally applicable under the Florida Building Code.
History.—s. 59, ch. 2000-141; s. 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372; s. 29, ch. 2010-176.

553.38 Application and scope.—The department shall enforce every provision of the Florida Building Code adopted pursuant hereto, except that local land use and zoning requirements, fire zones, building setback requirements, side and rear yard requirements, site development requirements, property line requirements, subdivision control, and onsite installation requirements, as well as the review and regulation of architectural and aesthetic requirements, are specifically and entirely reserved to local authorities. Such local requirements and rules which may be enacted by local authorities must be reasonable and uniformly applied and enforced without any distinction as to whether a building is a conventionally constructed or manufactured building. A local government shall require permit fees only for those inspections actually performed by the local government for the installation of a factory-built structure. Such fees shall be equal to the amount charged for similar inspections on conventionally built housing.
History.—s. 4, ch. 71-172; s. 1, ch. 74-208; s. 3, ch. 76-168; s. 1, ch. 77-457; s. 3, ch. 78-323; ss. 1, 6, ch. 79-152; ss. 2, 4, ch. 80-86; ss. 2, 3, ch. 81-318; ss. 3, 4, ch. 84-32; s. 4, ch. 91-429; s. 60, ch. 2000-141; s. 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372.

553.381 Manufacturer certification.—
(1) Before manufacturing buildings to be located within this state or selling manufactured buildings within this state, whichever occurs later, a manufacturer must be certified by the department. The department shall certify a manufacturer upon receipt from the manufacturer and approval and verification by the department of the following:
(a) The manufacturer’s internal quality control procedures and manuals, including any amendments;

(b) Evidence that the manufacturer has product liability insurance for the safety and welfare of the public in amounts determined by rule of the department; and

(c) The fee established by the department under s. 553.37(8).

(2) The department may revoke any certification upon the failure of the manufacturer to comply with the Florida Building Code or other requirements of this part.

(3) Certification of manufacturers under this section shall be for a period of 3 years, subject to renewal by the manufacturer. Upon application for renewal, the manufacturer must submit the information described in subsection (1) or a sworn statement that there has been no change in the status or content of that information since the manufacturer’s last submittal. Fees for renewal of manufacturers’ certification shall be established by the department by rule.

History.—ss. 2, 4, ch. 84-32; s. 4, ch. 91-429; s. 802, ch. 97-103; ss. 61, 62, ch. 2000-141; s. 30, ch. 2001-63; s. 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372; s. 7, ch. 2008-191.

553.382 Placement of certain housing.—Notwithstanding any other law or ordinance to the contrary, in order to expand the availability of affordable housing in this state, any residential manufactured building that is certified under this chapter by the department may be placed on a mobile home lot in a mobile home park, recreational vehicle park, or mobile home condominium, cooperative, or subdivision. Any such housing unit placed on a mobile home lot is a mobile home for purposes of chapter 723 and, therefore, all rights, obligations, and duties under chapter 723 apply, including the specifics of the prospectus. However, a housing unit subject to this section may not be placed on a mobile home lot without the prior written approval of the park owner. Each housing unit subject to this section shall be taxed as a mobile home under s. 320.08(11) and is subject to payments to the Florida Mobile Home Relocation Fund under s. 723.06116.
History.—s. 7, ch. 2007-227; s. 411, ch. 2011-142.

553.39 Injunctive relief.—The department may seek injunctive or other relief from the circuit court of appropriate jurisdiction to compel compliance with the requirements of this part or with the Florida Building Code or to enjoin the sale, delivery, or installation of a manufactured building, upon an affidavit specifying the manner in which the building does not conform to the Florida Building Code or other requirements of this part. Noncompliance with the Florida Building Code or this part shall be considered prima facie evidence of irreparable damage in any cause of action brought under the authority of this part.
History.—s. 6, ch. 71-172; s. 1, ch. 74-208; s. 3, ch. 76-168; s. 1, ch. 77-457; ss. 1, 6, ch. 79-152; ss. 3, 4, ch. 80-86; ss. 2, 3, ch. 81-318; ss. 3, 4, ch. 84-32; s. 4, ch. 91-429; s. 63, ch. 2000-141.

553.41 Penalties.—Any person who violates any of the provisions of this part is guilty of a misdemeanor of the second degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.
History.—s. 5A, ch. 71-172; s. 1, ch. 74-208; s. 3, ch. 76-168; s. 1, ch. 77-457; ss. 1, 6, ch. 79-152; ss. 2, 3, ch. 81-318; ss. 3, 4, ch. 84-32; s. 146, ch. 91-224; s. 4, ch. 91-429.

553.415 Factory-built school buildings.—
(1) It is the purpose of this section to provide an alternative procedure for the construction and installation of factory-built school buildings designed or intended for use as school buildings. As used in this section, the term “factory-built school building” means any building designed or intended for use as a school building, which is in whole or in part, manufactured at an offsite facility in compliance with the State Uniform Code for Public Educational Facilities and Department of Education rule, effective on January 5, 2000. After March 1, 2002, the Uniform Code for Public Educational Facilities shall be incorporated into the Florida Building Code, including specific requirements for Public Educational Facilities and the Department of Education rule, effective on January 5, 2000. For the purpose of this section, factory-built school buildings include prefabricated educational facilities, factory-built educational facilities, and modular-built educational facilities, that are designed to be portable, relocatable, demountable, or reconstructible; are used primarily as classrooms or the components of an entire school; and do not fall under the provisions of ss. 320.822-320.862.

(2) A manufacturer of factory-built school buildings shall be subject to the certification and enforcement requirements in this part except as provided in this section.

(3) Within 90 days after the effective date of this section, the department shall adopt by emergency rule regulations to carry out the provisions of this section. Such rule shall ensure the safety of design, construction, accessibility, alterations, and inspections and shall also prescribe procedures for the plans, specifications, and methods of construction to be submitted to the department for approval.

(4) A manufacturer of factory-built school buildings designed or intended for use as school buildings shall submit to the department for approval the manufacturer’s plans, specifications, alterations, and methods of construction. The department is authorized to charge manufacturers a fee which reflects the actual expenses incurred for the review of such plans and specifications.

(5) The department, in accordance with the standards and procedures adopted pursuant to this section and as such standards and procedures may thereafter be modified, shall approve or reject such plans, specifications, and methods of construction. Approval shall not be given unless such plans, specifications, and methods of construction are in compliance with the State Uniform Building Code for Public Educational Facilities and department rule. After March 1, 2002, the Uniform Code for Public Educational Facilities shall be incorporated into the Florida Building Code, including specific requirements for public educational facilities and department rule.

(6) The department may delegate its plans review authority to a state agency or public or private entity; however, the department shall ensure that any person conducting plans reviews is a certified plans examiner, pursuant to part XII of chapter 468.

(7) A standard plan approval may be obtained from the department for factory-built school buildings and such department-approved plans shall be accepted by the enforcement agency as approved for the purpose of obtaining a construction permit for the structure itself. The department, or its designated representative, shall determine if the plans qualify for purposes of a factory-built school shelter, as defined in s. 553.36.

(8) Any amendment to the State Uniform Code for Public Educational Facilities, and after March 1, 2002, the Florida Building Code, shall become effective 180 days after the amendment is filed with the Secretary of State. Notwithstanding the 180-day delayed effective date, the manufacturer shall submit and obtain a revised approved plan within the 180 days. A revised plan submitted pursuant to this subsection shall be processed as a renewal or revision with appropriate fees. A plan submitted after the period of time provided shall be processed as a new application with appropriate fees.

(9) The school district or community college district for which any factory-built school building is constructed or altered after July 1, 2001, shall provide for periodic inspection of the proposed factory-built school building during each phase of construction or alteration. The inspector shall act under the direction of the governing board for employment purposes. This subsection does not prevent a school district or community college district from purchasing or otherwise using a factory-built school building that has been inspected during all phases of construction or alteration conducted after July 1, 2001, by another school district or community college or by an approved inspection agency certified pursuant to s. 553.36(2). If a factory-built school building is constructed or altered for an entity other than a school district or community college district, such entity may employ at its election a school district, community college district, or such approved inspection agency to conduct such inspections. A school district or community college district so employed may charge such entity for services at reasonable rates comparable to those charged for similar services by approved inspection agencies.

(10) The department shall, by rule, develop forms and reporting periods for the architect or structural engineer in charge of the supervision of the work of construction in the factory, the inspector on the work, and the manufacturer verifying that based upon personal knowledge, the work during the period covered by the report has been performed, and the materials used and installed, in every particular, in accordance with the approved plans and specifications, setting forth such detailed statements of facts as required by the department.

(11) The department shall require that an insignia bearing the department’s name and state seal and a manufacturer’s data plate be affixed to all newly constructed factory-built school buildings and existing factory-built school buildings which have been brought into compliance with the standards for existing “satisfactory” buildings pursuant to chapter 5 of the Uniform Code for Public Educational Facilities, and after March 1, 2002, the Florida Building Code. The department may charge a fee for issuing such insignias. The manufacturer’s data plate shall, at a minimum, contain:
(a) The name of the manufacturer.

(b) The standard plan approval number or alteration number.

(c) The date of manufacture or alteration.

(d) The serial or other identification number.

(e) The following designed-for loads: lbs. per square foot live load; lbs. per square foot floor live load; lbs. per square foot horizontal wind load; and lbs. per square foot wind uplift load.

(f) The designed-for flood zone usage.

(g) The designed-for wind zone usage.

(h) The designed-for enhanced hurricane protection zone usage: yes or no.

(12) Such insignia and data plate shall be permanently affixed by the manufacturer in the case of newly constructed factory-built school buildings, or by the department or its designee in the case of an existing factory-built building altered to comply with provisions of s. 1013.20.

(13) As of July 1, 2001, all newly constructed factory-built school buildings shall bear a label pursuant to subsection (12). As of July 1, 2002, existing factory-built school buildings and manufactured buildings used as classrooms and not bearing such label shall not be used as classrooms pursuant to s. 1013.20.

(14) Nothing in this section shall affect any requirement for compliance with firesafety criteria.

History.—s. 64, ch. 2000-141; s. 22, ch. 2001-186; s. 1, ch. 2001-372; s. 1028, ch. 2002-387; s. 8, ch. 2008-191.

553.42 Legislative intent.—Nothing herein shall act to nullify or supersede the provisions of chapter 527 relating to sale, use, or storage of liquefied petroleum gas, except that inspections made pursuant to chapter 527 shall be made at the place of manufacture.
History.—s. 7, ch. 71-172; s. 1, ch. 74-208; s. 3, ch. 76-168; s. 1, ch. 77-457; ss. 1, 6, ch. 79-152; ss. 2, 3, ch. 81-318; ss. 3, 4, ch. 84-32; s. 4, ch. 91-429.

PART II
ACCESSIBILITY BY HANDICAPPED PERSONS

553.501 Short title.

553.502 Intent.

553.503 Adoption of federal standards.

553.504 Exceptions to applicability of the federal standards.

553.5041 Parking spaces for persons who have disabilities.

553.505 Exceptions to applicability of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

553.506 Powers of the commission.

553.507 Applicability.

553.508 Architectural barrier removal.

553.509 Vertical accessibility.

553.511 Parking facilities; minimum height clearance requirement.

553.512 Modifications and waivers; advisory council.

553.513 Enforcement.

553.514 Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design.

553.501 Short title.—Sections 553.501-553.513 may be cited as the “Florida Americans With Disabilities Accessibility Implementation Act.”
History.—s. 1, ch. 93-183.

553.502 Intent.—The purpose and intent of this part is to incorporate into the law of this state the accessibility requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended, 42 U.S.C. ss. 12101 et seq., and to obtain and maintain United States Department of Justice certification of the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction as equivalent to federal standards for accessibility of buildings, structures, and facilities. All state laws, rules, standards, and codes governing facilities covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design shall be maintained to assure certification of the state’s construction standards and codes. This part is not intended to expand or diminish the defenses available to a place of public accommodation or a commercial facility under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the standards, including, but not limited to, the readily achievable standard, and the standards applicable to alterations to private buildings or facilities as defined by the standards.
History.—s. 1, ch. 93-183; s. 1, ch. 97-76; s. 21, ch. 2011-222.

553.503 Adoption of federal standards.—Subject to modifications under this part, the federal Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design, and related regulations provided in 28 C.F.R. parts 35 and 36 and 49 C.F.R. part 37, are hereby adopted and incorporated by reference as the law of this state and shall be incorporated into the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction and adopted by the Florida Building Commission in accordance with chapter 120.
History.—s. 1, ch. 93-183; s. 2, ch. 97-76; s. 65, ch. 2000-141; s. 59, ch. 2000-154; s. 22, ch. 2011-222.

553.504 Exceptions to applicability of the federal standards.—Notwithstanding the adoption of the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design pursuant to s. 553.503, all buildings, structures, and facilities in this state must meet the following additional requirements if such requirements provide increased accessibility:
(1) All new or altered public buildings and facilities, private buildings and facilities, places of public accommodation, and commercial facilities, as those terms are defined by the standards, subject to this part, must comply with this part.

(2) All new single-family houses, duplexes, triplexes, condominiums, and townhouses shall provide at least one bathroom, located with maximum possible privacy, where bathrooms are provided on habitable grade levels, with a door that has a 29-inch clear opening. However, if only a toilet room is provided at grade level, such toilet room must have a clear opening of at least 29 inches.

(3) Notwithstanding the requirements in s. 404.2.9 of the standards, exterior hinged doors must be designed so that such doors can be pushed or pulled open with a force not exceeding 8.5 foot pounds.

(4) In motels and hotels a number of rooms equaling at least 5 percent of the guest rooms minus the number of accessible rooms required by the standards must provide the following special accessibility features:
(a) Grab rails in bathrooms and toilet rooms that comply with s. 604.5 of the standards.

(b) All beds in designed accessible guest rooms must be an open-frame type that allows the passage of lift devices.

(c) Water closets that comply with section 604.4 of the standards.

All buildings, structures, or facilities licensed as a hotel, motel, or condominium pursuant to chapter 509 are subject to this subsection. This subsection does not relieve the owner of the responsibility of providing accessible rooms in conformance with ss. 224 and 806 of the standards.

(5) Notwithstanding ss. 213 and 604 of the standards, required bathing rooms and toilet rooms in new construction shall be designed and constructed in accordance with the following:
(a) The wheelchair accessible toilet compartment must contain an accessible lavatory within it, which must be at least 19 inches wide by 17 inches deep, nominal size, and wall-mounted. The lavatory shall be mounted so as not to overlap the clear floor space areas required by s. 604 of the standards for the wheelchair accessible toilet compartment and comply with s. 606 of the standards. Such lavatories shall be counted as part of the required fixture count for the building.

(b) The accessible water closet within the wheelchair accessible toilet compartment must be located in the corner, diagonal to the door.

(6) Barriers at common or emergency entrances and exits of business establishments conducting business with the general public that are existing, under construction, or under contract for construction which would prevent a person from using such entrances or exits must be removed.

History.—s. 1, ch. 93-183; s. 3, ch. 97-76; s. 23, ch. 2011-222.

553.5041 Parking spaces for persons who have disabilities.—
(1) This section is not intended to expand or diminish the defenses available to a place of public accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the federal Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design, including, but not limited to, the readily achievable standard, and the standards applicable to alterations to places of public accommodation and commercial facilities. Subject to the exceptions described in subsections (2), (4), (5), and (6), if the parking and loading zone requirements of the federal standards and related regulations provide increased accessibility, those requirements are adopted and incorporated by reference as the law of this state.

(2) State agencies and political subdivisions having jurisdiction over street parking or publicly owned or operated parking facilities are not required to provide a greater right-of-way width than would otherwise be planned under regulations, guidelines, or practices normally applied to new development.

(3) Designated accessible spaces shall be designed and marked for the exclusive use of individuals who have a severe physical disability and have permanent or temporary mobility problems that substantially impair their ability to ambulate and who have been issued a disabled parking permit under s. 316.1958 or s. 320.0848 or a license plate under s. 320.084, s. 320.0842, s. 320.0843, or s. 320.0845.

(4) The number of accessible parking spaces must comply with the parking requirements in s. 208 of the standards and the following:
(a) There must be one accessible parking space in the immediate vicinity of a publicly owned or leased building that houses a governmental entity or a political subdivision, including, but not limited to, state office buildings and courthouses, if parking for the public is not provided on the premises of the building.

(b) There must be one accessible parking space for each 150 metered on-street parking spaces provided by state agencies and political subdivisions.

(c) The number of parking spaces for persons who have disabilities must be increased on the basis of demonstrated and documented need.

(5) Accessible perpendicular and diagonal accessible parking spaces and loading zones must be designed and located to conform to ss. 502 and 503 of the standards.
(a) All spaces must be located on an accessible route that is at least 44 inches wide so that users are not compelled to walk or wheel behind parked vehicles except behind his or her own vehicle.

(b) If there are multiple entrances or multiple retail stores, the parking spaces must be dispersed to provide parking at the nearest accessible entrance. If a theme park or an entertainment complex as defined in s. 509.013(9) provides parking in several lots or areas from which access to the theme park or entertainment complex is provided, a single lot or area may be designated for parking by persons who have disabilities, if the lot or area is located on the shortest accessible route to an accessible entrance to the theme park or entertainment complex or to transportation to such an accessible entrance.

(c)1. Each parking space must be at least 12 feet wide. Parking access aisles must be at least 5 feet wide and must be part of an accessible route to the building or facility entrance. The access aisle must be striped diagonally to designate it as a no-parking zone.

2. The parking access aisles are reserved for the temporary exclusive use of persons who have disabled parking permits and who require extra space to deploy a mobility device, lift, or ramp in order to exit from or enter a vehicle. Parking is not allowed in an access aisle. Violators are subject to the same penalties imposed for illegally parking in parking spaces that are designated for persons who have disabilities. A vehicle may not be parked in an access aisle even if the vehicle owner or passenger is disabled or owns a disabled parking permit.

3. Notwithstanding any other provision of this subsection, a theme park or an entertainment complex as defined in s. 509.013 in which continuous attendant services are provided for directing individuals to marked accessible parking spaces or designated lots for parking by persons who have disabilities, may, in lieu of the required parking space design, provide parking spaces that comply with ss. 208 and 502 of the standards.

(d) On-street parallel parking spaces must be designed to conform to ss. 208 and 502 of the standards, except that access aisles are not required. Curbs adjacent to such spaces must be of a height that does not interfere with the opening and closing of motor vehicle doors. This subsection does not relieve the owner of the responsibility to comply with the parking requirements of ss. 208 and 502 of the standards.

(e)1. The removal of architectural barriers from a parking facility in accordance with 28 C.F.R. s. 36.304 or with s. 553.508 must comply with this section unless compliance would cause the barrier removal not to be readily achievable. If compliance would cause the barrier removal not to be readily achievable, a facility may provide parking spaces at alternative locations for persons who have disabilities and provide appropriate signage directing such persons to the alternative parking if readily achievable. The facility may not reduce the required number or dimensions of those spaces or unreasonably increase the length of the accessible route from a parking space to the facility. The removal of an architectural barrier must not create a significant risk to the health or safety of a person who has a disability or to others.

2. A facility that is making alterations under s. 553.507(2) must comply with this section to the maximum extent feasible. If compliance with parking location requirements is not feasible, the facility may provide parking spaces at alternative locations for persons who have disabilities and provide appropriate signage directing such persons to alternative parking. The facility may not reduce the required number or dimensions of those spaces, or unnecessarily increase the length of the accessible route from a parking space to the facility. The alteration must not create a significant risk to the health or safety of a person who has a disability or to others.

(6) Each such parking space must be striped in a manner that is consistent with the standards of the controlling jurisdiction for other spaces and prominently outlined with blue paint, and must be repainted when necessary, to be clearly distinguishable as a parking space designated for persons who have disabilities. The space must be posted with a permanent above-grade sign of a color and design approved by the Department of Transportation, which is placed on or at least 60 inches above the finished floor or ground surface measured to the bottom of the sign and which bears the international symbol of accessibility meeting the requirements of s. 703.7.2.1 of the standards and the caption “PARKING BY DISABLED PERMIT ONLY.” Such a sign erected after October 1, 1996, must indicate the penalty for illegal use of the space. Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, in a theme park or an entertainment complex as defined in s. 509.013 in which accessible parking is located in designated lots or areas, the signage indicating the lot as reserved for accessible parking may be located at the entrances to the lot in lieu of a sign at each parking place. This subsection does not relieve the owner of the responsibility of complying with the signage requirements of s. 502.6 of the standards.

History.—s. 66, ch. 2000-141; s. 24, ch. 2011-222; s. 12, ch. 2012-13.

553.505 Exceptions to applicability of the Americans with Disabilities Act.—Notwithstanding the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, private clubs are governed by this part.
History.—s. 1, ch. 93-183; s. 14, ch. 96-200; s. 4, ch. 97-76; s. 23, ch. 2001-186; s. 25, ch. 2011-222.

553.506 Powers of the commission.—In addition to any other authority vested in the Florida Building Commission by law, the commission, in implementing this part, may, by rule, adopt revised and updated versions of the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design in accordance with chapter 120.
History.—s. 1, ch. 93-183; s. 67, ch. 2000-141; s. 60, ch. 2000-154; s. 26, ch. 2011-222.

553.507 Applicability.—This part applies to:
(1) All areas of newly designed and newly constructed buildings and facilities as determined by the federal standards established and adopted pursuant to s. 553.503.

(2) Portions of altered buildings and facilities as determined by the federal standards established and adopted pursuant to s. 553.503.

(3) A building or facility that is being converted from residential to nonresidential or mixed use as defined by the Florida Building Code. Such building or facility must, at a minimum, comply with s. 553.508 and the requirements for alterations as determined by the federal standards established and adopted pursuant to s. 553.503.

(4) Buildings and facilities where the original construction or any former alteration or renovation was carried out in violation of applicable permitting law.

History.—s. 1, ch. 93-183; s. 5, ch. 97-76; s. 31, ch. 2001-63; s. 24, ch. 2001-186; s. 27, ch. 2011-222.

553.508 Architectural barrier removal.—Removal of architectural barriers, pursuant to 28 C.F.R. s. 36.304, from buildings, structures, or facilities to which this act applies shall comply with ss. 553.501-553.513 unless compliance would render the removal not readily achievable. In no instance shall the removal of an architectural barrier create a significant risk to the health or safety of an individual with a disability or others.
History.—s. 1, ch. 93-183.

553.509 Vertical accessibility.—
(1) This part and the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design do not relieve the owner of any building, structure, or facility governed by this part from the duty to provide vertical accessibility to all levels above and below the occupiable grade level, regardless of whether the standards require an elevator to be installed in such building, structure, or facility, except for:
(a) Elevator pits, elevator penthouses, mechanical rooms, piping or equipment catwalks, and automobile lubrication and maintenance pits and platforms.

(b) Unoccupiable spaces, such as rooms, enclosed spaces, and storage spaces that are not designed for human occupancy, for public accommodations, or for work areas.

(c) Occupiable spaces and rooms that are not open to the public and that house no more than five persons, including, but not limited to, equipment control rooms and projection booths.

(d) Theaters, concert halls, and stadiums, or other large assembly areas that have stadium-style seating or tiered seating if ss. 221 and 802 of the standards are met.

(e) All play and recreation areas if the requirements of chapter 10 of the standards are met.

(f) All employee areas as exempted in s. 203.9 of the standards.

(g) Facilities, sites, and spaces exempted by s. 203 of the standards.

(2) However, buildings, structures, and facilities must, as a minimum, comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design.

History.—s. 1, ch. 93-183; s. 6, ch. 97-76; s. 12, ch. 2006-71; s. 28, ch. 2011-222.

553.511 Parking facilities; minimum height clearance requirement.—Every nonresidential structure built on or after January 1, 1991, which is designed to use covered or underground parking as the primary available parking space shall design the covered or underground parking facility to maintain a minimum height for the portion of the street-accessible level of the parking facility directly over van-accessible parking spaces and for providing ingress and egress to such parking spaces of at least 8 feet 2 inches. Signs shall be posted to warn operators of handicapped-equipped vans that they cannot pass beyond a certain point due to height limitations. If compliance with this minimum height clearance requirement will cause the structure to exceed local height limitations imposed by local zoning, planning, or fire ordinances, or will result in the imposition of any additional requirements of such ordinances, the structure may exceed the height limitation specified in those particular codes as necessary to comply with the requirements of this section and is exempt from such additional requirements. Structures for which the plans were sealed by an architect prior to January 1, 1991, are exempt from this section.
History.—s. 2, ch. 90-250; s. 2, ch. 93-183; s. 7, ch. 97-76.

Note.—Former s. 553.482.

553.512 Modifications and waivers; advisory council.—
(1) The Florida Building Commission shall provide by regulation criteria for granting individual modifications of, or exceptions from, the literal requirements of this part upon a determination of unnecessary, unreasonable, or extreme hardship, provided such waivers shall not violate federal accessibility laws and regulations and shall be reviewed by the Accessibility Advisory Council. The commission shall establish by rule a fee to be paid upon submitting a request for a waiver as provided in this section. Notwithstanding any other provision of this subsection, if an applicant for a waiver demonstrates economic hardship in accordance with 28 C.F.R. s. 36.403(f)(1), a waiver shall be granted. The commission may not consider waiving any of the requirements of s. 553.5041 unless the applicant first demonstrates that she or he has applied for and been denied waiver or variance from all local government zoning, subdivision regulations, or other ordinances that prevent compliance therewith. Further, the commission may not waive the requirement of s. 553.5041(5)(a) and (c)1. governing the minimum width of accessible routes and minimum width of accessible parking spaces.

(2) The Accessibility Advisory Council shall consist of the following seven members, who shall be knowledgeable in the area of accessibility for persons with disabilities. The Secretary of Business and Professional Regulation shall appoint the following: a representative from the Advocacy Center for Persons with Disabilities, Inc.; a representative from the Division of Blind Services; a representative from the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation; a representative from a statewide organization representing the physically handicapped; a representative from the hearing impaired; a representative from the President, Florida Council of Handicapped Organizations; and a representative of the Paralyzed Veterans of America. The terms for the first three council members appointed subsequent to October 1, 1991, shall be for 4 years, the terms for the next two council members appointed shall be for 3 years, and the terms for the next two members shall be for 2 years. Thereafter, all council member appointments shall be for terms of 4 years. No council member shall serve more than two 4-year terms subsequent to October 1, 1991. Any member of the council may be replaced by the secretary upon three unexcused absences. Upon application made in the form provided, an individual waiver or modification may be granted by the commission so long as such modification or waiver is not in conflict with more stringent standards provided in another chapter.

(3) Members of the council shall serve without compensation, but shall be entitled to reimbursement for per diem and travel expenses as provided by s. 112.061.

(4) Meetings of the advisory council shall be held in conjunction with the regular meetings of the commission.

History.—s. 3, ch. 78-333; s. 1, ch. 82-46; s. 2, ch. 83-265; s. 25, ch. 86-220; s. 5, ch. 89-97; ss. 1, 5, 6, ch. 91-172; s. 5, ch. 91-429; s. 2, ch. 93-183; s. 10, ch. 97-76; s. 68, ch. 2000-141; s. 61, ch. 2000-154; s. 13, ch. 2002-293; s. 30, ch. 2010-176; s. 412, ch. 2011-142.

Note.—Former s. 553.49.

553.513 Enforcement.—It shall be the responsibility of each local government and each code enforcement agency established pursuant to s. 553.80 to enforce the provisions of this part. This act expressly preempts the establishment of handicapped accessibility standards to the state and supersedes any county or municipal ordinance on the subject. However, nothing in this section shall prohibit municipalities and counties from enforcing the provisions of this act.
History.—s. 6, ch. 89-97; s. 2, ch. 93-183.

Note.—Former s. 553.495.

553.514 Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design.—Consistent with the federal implementation of the 2010 Americans with Disabilities Act Standards for Accessible Design, buildings and facilities in this state may be designed in conformity with the 2010 standards if the design also complies with Florida-specific requirements provided in this part until the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction is updated to implement the changes to this part as provided by this act.
History.—s. 29, ch. 2011-222.

PART III
TRENCH SAFETY ACT

553.60 Short title.

553.61 Intent.

553.62 State standard.

553.63 Trench excavations in excess of 5 feet deep; required information.

553.64 Certain requirements for contract bids.

553.60 Short title.—This act may be cited as the “Trench Safety Act.”
History.—s. 1, ch. 90-96.

553.61 Intent.—The purpose and intent of this act is to provide for increased worker safety by requiring compliance with sufficient standards for trench safety.
History.—s. 2, ch. 90-96.

553.62 State standard.—The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s excavation safety standards, 29 C.F.R. s. 1926.650 Subpart P, are hereby incorporated as the state standard.
History.—s. 3, ch. 90-96; s. 31, ch. 2011-213.

553.63 Trench excavations in excess of 5 feet deep; required information.—On all specific contracts for trench excavation in which such excavation will exceed a depth of 5 feet:
(1) The contract bid submitted by the contractor who will perform such excavation shall include:
(a) A reference to the trench safety standards that will be in effect during the period of construction of the project.

(b) Written assurance by the contractor performing the trench excavation that such contractor will comply with the applicable trench safety standards.

(c) A separate item identifying the cost of compliance with the applicable trench safety standards.

(2) A contractor performing trench excavation shall:
(a) As a minimum, comply with the excavation safety standards which are applicable to a project.

(b) Adhere to any special shoring requirements, if any, of the state or other political subdivisions which may be applicable to such a project.

(c) If any geotechnical information is available from the owner, the contractor, or otherwise, the contractor performing trench excavation shall consider this information in the contractor’s design of the trench safety system which it will employ on the project. This paragraph shall not require the owner to obtain geotechnical information.

History.—s. 4, ch. 90-96.

553.64 Certain requirements for contract bids.—The separate item identifying the cost of compliance with trench safety standards shall be based on the linear feet of trench to be excavated. The separate item for special shoring requirements, if any, shall be based on the square feet of shoring used. Every separate item shall indicate the specific method of compliance as well as the cost of that method.
History.—s. 5, ch. 90-96.

PART IV
FLORIDA BUILDING CODE

553.70 Short title.

553.71 Definitions.

553.72 Intent.

553.721 Surcharge.

553.73 Florida Building Code.

553.74 Florida Building Commission.

553.75 Organization of commission; rules and regulations; meetings; staff; fiscal affairs; public comment.

553.76 General powers of the commission.

553.77 Specific powers of the commission.

553.775 Interpretations.

553.781 Licensee accountability.

553.79 Permits; applications; issuance; inspections.

553.791 Alternative plans review and inspection.

553.792 Building permit application to local government.

553.793 Streamlined low-voltage alarm system installation permitting.

553.794 Local government residential master building permit program.

553.80 Enforcement.

553.83 Injunctive relief.

553.835 Implied warranties.

553.84 Statutory civil action.

553.841 Building code compliance and mitigation program.

553.842 Product evaluation and approval.

553.8425 Local product approval.

553.844 Windstorm loss mitigation; requirements for roofs and opening protection.

553.85 Liquefied petroleum gases.

553.86 Public restrooms; ratio of facilities for men and women; application; incorporation into the Florida Building Code.

553.88 Adoption of electrical and alarm standards.

553.883 Smoke alarms in one-family and two-family dwellings and townhomes.

553.885 Carbon monoxide alarm required.

553.886 Energy efficiency technologies.

553.895 Firesafety.

553.896 Mitigation grant program guideline.

553.898 Preemption; certain special acts concerning general purpose local government repealed.

553.70 Short title.—This part shall be known and may be cited as the “Florida Building Codes Act.”
History.—s. 1, ch. 74-167; s. 1, ch. 77-365.

553.71 Definitions.—As used in this part, the term:
(1) “Commission” means the Florida Building Commission created by this part.

(2) “Department” means the Department of Business and Professional Regulation.

(3) “Housing code” means any code or rule intending postconstruction regulation of structures which would include, but not be limited to: standards of maintenance, condition of facilities, condition of systems and components, living conditions, occupancy, use, and room sizes.

(4) “Load management control device” means any device installed by any electric utility or its contractors which temporarily interrupts electric service to major appliances, motors, or other electrical systems contained within the buildings or on the premises of consumers for the purpose of reducing the utility’s system demand as needed in order to prevent curtailment of electric service in whole or in part to consumers and thereby maintain the quality of service to consumers, provided the device is in compliance with a program approved by the Florida Public Service Commission.

(5) “Local enforcement agency” means an agency of local government, a local school board, a community college board of trustees, or a university board of trustees in the State University System with jurisdiction to make inspections of buildings and to enforce the codes which establish standards for design, construction, erection, alteration, repair, modification, or demolition of public or private buildings, structures, or facilities.

(6) “Local technical amendment” means an action by a local governing authority that results in a technical change to the Florida Building Code and its local enforcement.

(7) “Prototype building” means a building constructed in accordance with architectural or engineering plans intended for replication on various sites and which will be updated to comply with the Florida Building Code and applicable laws relating to firesafety, health and sanitation, casualty safety, and requirements for persons with disabilities which are in effect at the time a construction contract is to be awarded.

(8) “Secretary” means the Secretary of Business and Professional Regulation.

(9) “Special inspector” means a licensed architect or registered engineer who is certified under chapter 471 or chapter 481 to conduct inspections of threshold buildings.

(10) “State enforcement agency” means the agency of state government with authority to make inspections of buildings and to enforce the codes, as required by this part, which establish standards for design, construction, erection, alteration, repair, modification, or demolition of public or private buildings, structures, or facilities.

(11) “Temporary” includes, but is not limited to, buildings identified by, but not designated as permanent structures on, an approved development order.

(12) “Threshold building” means any building which is greater than three stories or 50 feet in height, or which has an assembly occupancy classification as defined in the Florida Building Code which exceeds 5,000 square feet in area and an occupant content of greater than 500 persons.

History.—s. 2, ch. 74-167; s. 1, ch. 75-111; s. 1, ch. 77-365; s. 4, ch. 78-323; ss. 3, 4, ch. 81-7; s. 77, ch. 81-167; ss. 1, 4, ch. 82-46; s. 80, ch. 83-55; s. 8, ch. 83-160; s. 2, ch. 83-265; s. 1, ch. 84-24; s. 1, ch. 84-365; ss. 5, 6, ch. 91-172; s. 5, ch. 91-429; s. 3, ch. 93-249; s. 37, ch. 98-287; ss. 69, 70, ch. 2000-141; s. 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372; s. 3, ch. 2006-65; s. 58, ch. 2007-217; s. 9, ch. 2008-191; s. 413, ch. 2011-142; s. 13, ch. 2013-193.

553.72 Intent.—
(1) The purpose and intent of this act is to provide a mechanism for the uniform adoption, updating, amendment, interpretation, and enforcement of a single, unified state building code, to be called the Florida Building Code, which consists of a single set of documents that apply to the design, construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, or demolition of public or private buildings, structures, or facilities in this state and to the enforcement of such requirements and which will allow effective and reasonable protection for public safety, health, and general welfare for all the people of Florida at the most reasonable cost to the consumer. The Florida Building Code shall be organized to provide consistency and simplicity of use. The Florida Building Code shall be applied, administered, and enforced uniformly and consistently from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The Florida Building Code shall provide for flexibility to be exercised in a manner that meets minimum requirements, is affordable, does not inhibit competition, and promotes innovation and new technology. The Florida Building Code shall establish minimum standards primarily for public health and lifesafety, and secondarily for protection of property as appropriate.

(2) It is the intent of the Legislature that local governments shall have the power to inspect all buildings, structures, and facilities within their jurisdictions in protection of the public health, safety, and welfare pursuant to chapters 125 and 166.

(3) It is the intent of the Legislature that the Florida Building Code be adopted, modified, updated, interpreted, and maintained by the Florida Building Commission in accordance with ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54 and enforced by authorized state and local government enforcement agencies.

(4) It is the intent of the Legislature that the Florida Fire Prevention Code and the Life Safety Code of this state be adopted, modified, updated, interpreted, and maintained by the Department of Financial Services in accordance with ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54 and included by reference as sections in the Florida Building Code.

(5) It is the intent of the Legislature that there be no conflicting requirements between the Florida Fire Prevention Code and the Life Safety Code of the state and other provisions of the Florida Building Code or conflicts in their enforcement and interpretation. Potential conflicts shall be resolved through coordination and cooperation of the State Fire Marshal and the Florida Building Commission as provided by this part and chapter 633.

(6) It is the intent of the Legislature that the nationally recognized private sector third-party testing and evaluation system shall provide product evaluation for the product-approval system and that effective government oversight be established to ensure accountability to the state.

History.—s. 3, ch. 74-167; s. 38, ch. 98-287; ss. 71, 72, ch. 2000-141; ss. 34, 35, ch. 2001-186; ss. 3, 4, ch. 2001-372; s. 662, ch. 2003-261.

553.721 Surcharge.—In order for the Department of Business and Professional Regulation to administer and carry out the purposes of this part and related activities, there is created a surcharge, to be assessed at the rate of 1.5 percent of the permit fees associated with enforcement of the Florida Building Code as defined by the uniform account criteria and specifically the uniform account code for building permits adopted for local government financial reporting pursuant to s. 218.32. The minimum amount collected on any permit issued shall be $2. The unit of government responsible for collecting a permit fee pursuant to s. 125.56(4) or s. 166.201 shall collect the surcharge and electronically remit the funds collected to the department on a quarterly calendar basis for the preceding quarter and continuing each third month thereafter. The unit of government shall retain 10 percent of the surcharge collected to fund the participation of building departments in the national and state building code adoption processes and to provide education related to enforcement of the Florida Building Code. All funds remitted to the department pursuant to this section shall be deposited in the Professional Regulation Trust Fund. Funds collected from the surcharge shall be allocated to fund the Florida Building Commission and the Florida Building Code Compliance and Mitigation Program under s. 553.841. Funds allocated to the Florida Building Code Compliance and Mitigation Program shall be $925,000 each fiscal year. The funds collected from the surcharge may not be used to fund research on techniques for mitigation of radon in existing buildings. Funds used by the department as well as funds to be transferred to the Department of Health shall be as prescribed in the annual General Appropriations Act. The department shall adopt rules governing the collection and remittance of surcharges pursuant to chapter 120.
History.—s. 1, ch. 88-285; s. 4, ch. 91-429; s. 28, ch. 92-173; s. 19, ch. 93-120; s. 33, ch. 93-166; s. 2, ch. 94-284; s. 1, ch. 95-339; s. 2, ch. 98-145; s. 32, ch. 2008-153; s. 31, ch. 2010-176; s. 414, ch. 2011-142; s. 13, ch. 2012-13; s. 17, ch. 2014-154.

Note.—Former s. 404.056(3).

553.73 Florida Building Code.—

(1)(a) The commission shall adopt, by rule pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54, the Florida Building Code which shall contain or incorporate by reference all laws and rules which pertain to and govern the design, construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, and demolition of public and private buildings, structures, and facilities and enforcement of such laws and rules, except as otherwise provided in this section.

(b) The technical portions of the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction shall be contained in their entirety in the Florida Building Code. The civil rights portions and the technical portions of the accessibility laws of this state shall remain as currently provided by law. Any revision or amendments to the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction pursuant to part II shall be considered adopted by the commission as part of the Florida Building Code. Neither the commission nor any local government shall revise or amend any standard of the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction except as provided for in part II.

(c) The Florida Fire Prevention Code and the Life Safety Code shall be referenced in the Florida Building Code, but shall be adopted, modified, revised, or amended, interpreted, and maintained by the Department of Financial Services by rule adopted pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54. The Florida Building Commission may not adopt a fire prevention or lifesafety code, and nothing in the Florida Building Code shall affect the statutory powers, duties, and responsibilities of any fire official or the Department of Financial Services.

(d) Conflicting requirements between the Florida Building Code and the Florida Fire Prevention Code and Life Safety Code of the state established pursuant to ss. 633.206 and 633.208 shall be resolved by agreement between the commission and the State Fire Marshal in favor of the requirement that offers the greatest degree of lifesafety or alternatives that would provide an equivalent degree of lifesafety and an equivalent method of construction. If the commission and State Fire Marshal are unable to agree on a resolution, the question shall be referred to a mediator, mutually agreeable to both parties, to resolve the conflict in favor of the provision that offers the greatest lifesafety, or alternatives that would provide an equivalent degree of lifesafety and an equivalent method of construction.

(e) Subject to the provisions of this act, responsibility for enforcement, interpretation, and regulation of the Florida Building Code shall be vested in a specified local board or agency, and the words “local government” and “local governing body” as used in this part shall be construed to refer exclusively to such local board or agency.

(2) The Florida Building Code shall contain provisions or requirements for public and private buildings, structures, and facilities relative to structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, energy, and gas systems, existing buildings, historical buildings, manufactured buildings, elevators, coastal construction, lodging facilities, food sales and food service facilities, health care facilities, including assisted living facilities, adult day care facilities, hospice residential and inpatient facilities and units, and facilities for the control of radiation hazards, public or private educational facilities, swimming pools, and correctional facilities and enforcement of and compliance with such provisions or requirements. Further, the Florida Building Code must provide for uniform implementation of ss. 515.25, 515.27, and 515.29 by including standards and criteria for residential swimming pool barriers, pool covers, latching devices, door and window exit alarms, and other equipment required therein, which are consistent with the intent of s. 515.23. Technical provisions to be contained within the Florida Building Code are restricted to requirements related to the types of materials used and construction methods and standards employed in order to meet criteria specified in the Florida Building Code. Provisions relating to the personnel, supervision or training of personnel, or any other professional qualification requirements relating to contractors or their workforce may not be included within the Florida Building Code, and subsections (4), (6), (7), (8), and (9) are not to be construed to allow the inclusion of such provisions within the Florida Building Code by amendment. This restriction applies to both initial development and amendment of the Florida Building Code.

(3) The commission shall use the International Codes published by the International Code Council, the National Electric Code (NFPA 70), or other nationally adopted model codes and standards needed to develop the base code in Florida to form the foundation for the Florida Building Code. The Florida Building Commission may approve technical amendments to the code, subject to subsections (8) and (9), after the amendments have been subject to the following conditions:
(a) The proposed amendment has been published on the commission’s website for a minimum of 45 days and all the associated documentation has been made available to any interested party before any consideration by a Technical Advisory Committee;

(b) In order for a Technical Advisory Committee to make a favorable recommendation to the commission, the proposal must receive a three-fourths vote of the members present at the Technical Advisory Committee meeting and at least half of the regular members must be present in order to conduct a meeting;

(c) After Technical Advisory Committee consideration and a recommendation for approval of any proposed amendment, the proposal must be published on the commission’s website for at least 45 days before any consideration by the commission; and

(d) A proposal may be modified by the commission based on public testimony and evidence from a public hearing held in accordance with chapter 120.

The commission shall incorporate within sections of the Florida Building Code provisions which address regional and local concerns and variations. The commission shall make every effort to minimize conflicts between the Florida Building Code, the Florida Fire Prevention Code, and the Life Safety Code.

(4)(a) All entities authorized to enforce the Florida Building Code pursuant to s. 553.80 shall comply with applicable standards for issuance of mandatory certificates of occupancy, minimum types of inspections, and procedures for plans review and inspections as established by the commission by rule. Local governments may adopt amendments to the administrative provisions of the Florida Building Code, subject to the limitations of this paragraph. Local amendments shall be more stringent than the minimum standards described herein and shall be transmitted to the commission within 30 days after enactment. The local government shall make such amendments available to the general public in a usable format. The State Fire Marshal is responsible for establishing the standards and procedures required in this paragraph for governmental entities with respect to applying the Florida Fire Prevention Code and the Life Safety Code.

(b) Local governments may, subject to the limitations of this section, adopt amendments to the technical provisions of the Florida Building Code which apply solely within the jurisdiction of such government and which provide for more stringent requirements than those specified in the Florida Building Code, not more than once every 6 months. A local government may adopt technical amendments that address local needs if:
1. The local governing body determines, following a public hearing which has been advertised in a newspaper of general circulation at least 10 days before the hearing, that there is a need to strengthen the requirements of the Florida Building Code. The determination must be based upon a review of local conditions by the local governing body, which review demonstrates by evidence or data that the geographical jurisdiction governed by the local governing body exhibits a local need to strengthen the Florida Building Code beyond the needs or regional variation addressed by the Florida Building Code, that the local need is addressed by the proposed local amendment, and that the amendment is no more stringent than necessary to address the local need.

2. Such additional requirements are not discriminatory against materials, products, or construction techniques of demonstrated capabilities.

3. Such additional requirements may not introduce a new subject not addressed in the Florida Building Code.

4. The enforcing agency shall make readily available, in a usable format, all amendments adopted pursuant to this section.

5. Any amendment to the Florida Building Code shall be transmitted within 30 days by the adopting local government to the commission. The commission shall maintain copies of all such amendments in a format that is usable and obtainable by the public. Local technical amendments shall not become effective until 30 days after the amendment has been received and published by the commission.

6. Any amendment to the Florida Building Code adopted by a local government pursuant to this paragraph shall be effective only until the adoption by the commission of the new edition of the Florida Building Code every third year. At such time, the commission shall review such amendment for consistency with the criteria in paragraph (9)(a) and adopt such amendment as part of the Florida Building Code or rescind the amendment. The commission shall immediately notify the respective local government of the rescission of any amendment. After receiving such notice, the respective local government may readopt the rescinded amendment pursuant to the provisions of this paragraph.

7. Each county and municipality desiring to make local technical amendments to the Florida Building Code shall by interlocal agreement establish a countywide compliance review board to review any amendment to the Florida Building Code, adopted by a local government within the county pursuant to this paragraph, that is challenged by any substantially affected party for purposes of determining the amendment’s compliance with this paragraph. If challenged, the local technical amendments shall not become effective until time for filing an appeal pursuant to subparagraph 8. has expired or, if there is an appeal, until the commission issues its final order determining the adopted amendment is in compliance with this subsection.

8. If the compliance review board determines such amendment is not in compliance with this paragraph, the compliance review board shall notify such local government of the noncompliance and that the amendment is invalid and unenforceable until the local government corrects the amendment to bring it into compliance. The local government may appeal the decision of the compliance review board to the commission. If the compliance review board determines such amendment to be in compliance with this paragraph, any substantially affected party may appeal such determination to the commission. Any such appeal shall be filed with the commission within 14 days of the board’s written determination. The commission shall promptly refer the appeal to the Division of Administrative Hearings by electronic means through the division’s website for the assignment of an administrative law judge. The administrative law judge shall conduct the required hearing within 30 days, and shall enter a recommended order within 30 days of the conclusion of such hearing. The commission shall enter a final order within 30 days thereafter. The provisions of chapter 120 and the uniform rules of procedure shall apply to such proceedings. The local government adopting the amendment that is subject to challenge has the burden of proving that the amendment complies with this paragraph in proceedings before the compliance review board and the commission, as applicable. Actions of the commission are subject to judicial review pursuant to s. 120.68. The compliance review board shall determine whether its decisions apply to a respective local jurisdiction or apply countywide.

9. An amendment adopted under this paragraph shall include a fiscal impact statement which documents the costs and benefits of the proposed amendment. Criteria for the fiscal impact statement shall include the impact to local government relative to enforcement, the impact to property and building owners, as well as to industry, relative to the cost of compliance. The fiscal impact statement may not be used as a basis for challenging the amendment for compliance.

10. In addition to subparagraphs 7. and 9., the commission may review any amendments adopted pursuant to this subsection and make nonbinding recommendations related to compliance of such amendments with this subsection.

(c) Any amendment adopted by a local enforcing agency pursuant to this subsection shall not apply to state or school district owned buildings, manufactured buildings or factory-built school buildings approved by the commission, or prototype buildings approved pursuant to s. 553.77(3). The respective responsible entities shall consider the physical performance parameters substantiating such amendments when designing, specifying, and constructing such exempt buildings.

(5) Notwithstanding subsection (4), counties and municipalities may adopt by ordinance an administrative or technical amendment to the Florida Building Code relating to flood resistance in order to implement the National Flood Insurance Program or incentives. Specifically, an administrative amendment may assign the duty to enforce all or portions of flood-related code provisions to the appropriate agencies of the local government and adopt procedures for variances and exceptions from flood-related code provisions other than provisions for structures seaward of the coastal construction control line consistent with the requirements in 44 C.F.R. s. 60.6. A technical amendment is authorized to the extent it is more stringent than the code. A technical amendment is not subject to the requirements of subsection (4) and may not be rendered void when the code is updated if the amendment is adopted for the purpose of participating in the Community Rating System promulgated pursuant to 42 U.S.C. s. 4022, the amendment had already been adopted by local ordinance prior to July 1, 2010, or the amendment requires a design flood elevation above the base flood elevation. Any amendment adopted pursuant to this subsection shall be transmitted to the commission within 30 days after being adopted.

(6) The initial adoption of, and any subsequent update or amendment to, the Florida Building Code by the commission is deemed adopted for use statewide without adoptions by local government. For a building permit for which an application is submitted prior to the effective date of the Florida Building Code, the state minimum building code in effect in the permitting jurisdiction on the date of the application governs the permitted work for the life of the permit and any extension granted to the permit.

(7)(a) The commission, by rule adopted pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54, shall update the Florida Building Code every 3 years. When updating the Florida Building Code, the commission shall select the most current version of the International Building Code, the International Fuel Gas Code, the International Mechanical Code, the International Plumbing Code, and the International Residential Code, all of which are adopted by the International Code Council, and the National Electrical Code, which is adopted by the National Fire Protection Association, to form the foundation codes of the updated Florida Building Code, if the version has been adopted by the applicable model code entity. The commission shall select the most current version of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) as a foundation code; however, the IECC shall be modified by the commission to maintain the efficiencies of the Florida Energy Efficiency Code for Building Construction adopted and amended pursuant to s. 553.901.

(b) Codes regarding noise contour lines shall be reviewed annually, and the most current federal guidelines shall be adopted.

(c) The commission may modify any portion of the foundation codes only as needed to accommodate the specific needs of this state. Standards or criteria referenced by the codes shall be incorporated by reference. If a referenced standard or criterion requires amplification or modification to be appropriate for use in this state, only the amplification or modification shall be set forth in the Florida Building Code. The commission may approve technical amendments to the updated Florida Building Code after the amendments have been subject to the conditions set forth in paragraphs (3)(a)-(d). Amendments to the foundation codes which are adopted in accordance with this subsection shall be clearly marked in printed versions of the Florida Building Code so that the fact that the provisions are Florida-specific amendments to the foundation codes is readily apparent.

(d) The commission shall further consider the commission’s own interpretations, declaratory statements, appellate decisions, and approved statewide and local technical amendments and shall incorporate such interpretations, statements, decisions, and amendments into the updated Florida Building Code only to the extent that they are needed to modify the foundation codes to accommodate the specific needs of the state. A change made by an institute or standards organization to any standard or criterion that is adopted by reference in the Florida Building Code does not become effective statewide until it has been adopted by the commission. Furthermore, the edition of the Florida Building Code which is in effect on the date of application for any permit authorized by the code governs the permitted work for the life of the permit and any extension granted to the permit.

(e) A rule updating the Florida Building Code in accordance with this subsection shall take effect no sooner than 6 months after publication of the updated code. Any amendment to the Florida Building Code which is adopted upon a finding by the commission that the amendment is necessary to protect the public from immediate threat of harm takes effect immediately.

(f) Provisions of the foundation codes, including those contained in referenced standards and criteria, relating to wind resistance or the prevention of water intrusion may not be modified to diminish those construction requirements; however, the commission may, subject to conditions in this subsection, modify the provisions to enhance those construction requirements.

(g) Amendments or modifications to the foundation code pursuant to this subsection shall remain effective only until the effective date of a new edition of the Florida Building Code every third year. Amendments or modifications related to state agency regulations which are adopted and integrated into an edition of the Florida Building Code shall be carried forward into the next edition of the code, subject to modification as provided in this part. Amendments or modifications related to the wind-resistance design of buildings and structures within the high-velocity hurricane zone of Miami-Dade and Broward Counties which are adopted to an edition of the Florida Building Code do not expire and shall be carried forward into the next edition of the code, subject to review or modification as provided in this part. If amendments that expire pursuant to this paragraph are resubmitted through the Florida Building Commission code adoption process, the amendments must specifically address whether:
1. The provisions contained in the proposed amendment are addressed in the applicable international code.

2. The amendment demonstrates by evidence or data that the geographical jurisdiction of Florida exhibits a need to strengthen the foundation code beyond the needs or regional variations addressed by the foundation code, and why the proposed amendment applies to this state.

3. The proposed amendment was submitted or attempted to be included in the foundation codes to avoid resubmission to the Florida Building Code amendment process.

If the proposed amendment has been addressed in the international code in a substantially equivalent manner, the Florida Building Commission may not include the proposed amendment in the foundation code.

(8) Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (3) or subsection (7), the commission may address issues identified in this subsection by amending the code pursuant only to the rule adoption procedures contained in chapter 120. Provisions of the Florida Building Code, including those contained in referenced standards and criteria, relating to wind resistance or the prevention of water intrusion may not be amended pursuant to this subsection to diminish those construction requirements; however, the commission may, subject to conditions in this subsection, amend the provisions to enhance those construction requirements. Following the approval of any amendments to the Florida Building Code by the commission and publication of the amendments on the commission’s website, authorities having jurisdiction to enforce the Florida Building Code may enforce the amendments. The commission may approve amendments that are needed to address:
(a) Conflicts within the updated code;

(b) Conflicts between the updated code and the Florida Fire Prevention Code adopted pursuant to chapter 633;

(c) Unintended results from the integration of previously adopted Florida-specific amendments with the model code;

(d) Equivalency of standards;

(e) Changes to or inconsistencies with federal or state law; or

(f) Adoption of an updated edition of the National Electrical Code if the commission finds that delay of implementing the updated edition causes undue hardship to stakeholders or otherwise threatens the public health, safety, and welfare.

(9)(a) The commission may approve technical amendments to the Florida Building Code once each year for statewide or regional application upon a finding that the amendment:
1. Is needed in order to accommodate the specific needs of this state.

2. Has a reasonable and substantial connection with the health, safety, and welfare of the general public.

3. Strengthens or improves the Florida Building Code, or in the case of innovation or new technology, will provide equivalent or better products or methods or systems of construction.

4. Does not discriminate against materials, products, methods, or systems of construction of demonstrated capabilities.

5. Does not degrade the effectiveness of the Florida Building Code.

The Florida Building Commission may approve technical amendments to the code once each year to incorporate into the Florida Building Code its own interpretations of the code which are embodied in its opinions, final orders, declaratory statements, and interpretations of hearing officer panels under s. 553.775(3)(c), but only to the extent that the incorporation of interpretations is needed to modify the foundation codes to accommodate the specific needs of this state. Amendments approved under this paragraph shall be adopted by rule after the amendments have been subjected to subsection (3).

(b) A proposed amendment must include a fiscal impact statement that documents the costs and benefits of the proposed amendment. Criteria for the fiscal impact statement shall be established by rule by the commission and shall include the impact to local government relative to enforcement, the impact to property and building owners, and the impact to industry, relative to the cost of compliance. The amendment must demonstrate by evidence or data that the state’s geographical jurisdiction exhibits a need to strengthen the foundation code beyond the needs or regional variations addressed by the foundation code and why the proposed amendment applies to this state.

(c) The commission may not approve any proposed amendment that does not accurately and completely address all requirements for amendment which are set forth in this section. The commission shall require all proposed amendments and information submitted with proposed amendments to be reviewed by commission staff prior to consideration by any technical advisory committee. These reviews shall be for sufficiency only and are not intended to be qualitative in nature. Staff members shall reject any proposed amendment that fails to include a fiscal impact statement. Proposed amendments rejected by members of the staff may not be considered by the commission or any technical advisory committee.

(d) Provisions of the Florida Building Code, including those contained in referenced standards and criteria, relating to wind resistance or the prevention of water intrusion may not be amended pursuant to this subsection to diminish those construction requirements; however, the commission may, subject to conditions in this subsection, amend the provisions to enhance those construction requirements.

(10) The following buildings, structures, and facilities are exempt from the Florida Building Code as provided by law, and any further exemptions shall be as determined by the Legislature and provided by law:
(a) Buildings and structures specifically regulated and preempted by the Federal Government.

(b) Railroads and ancillary facilities associated with the railroad.

(c) Nonresidential farm buildings on farms.

(d) Temporary buildings or sheds used exclusively for construction purposes.

(e) Mobile or modular structures used as temporary offices, except that the provisions of part II relating to accessibility by persons with disabilities apply to such mobile or modular structures.

(f) Those structures or facilities of electric utilities, as defined in s. 366.02, which are directly involved in the generation, transmission, or distribution of electricity.

(g) Temporary sets, assemblies, or structures used in commercial motion picture or television production, or any sound-recording equipment used in such production, on or off the premises.

(h) Storage sheds that are not designed for human habitation and that have a floor area of 720 square feet or less are not required to comply with the mandatory wind-borne-debris-impact standards of the Florida Building Code. In addition, such buildings that are 400 square feet or less and that are intended for use in conjunction with one- and two-family residences are not subject to the door height and width requirements of the Florida Building Code.

(i) Chickees constructed by the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians of Florida or the Seminole Tribe of Florida. As used in this paragraph, the term “chickee” means an open-sided wooden hut that has a thatched roof of palm or palmetto or other traditional materials, and that does not incorporate any electrical, plumbing, or other nonwood features.

(j) Family mausoleums not exceeding 250 square feet in area which are prefabricated and assembled on site or preassembled and delivered on site and have walls, roofs, and a floor constructed of granite, marble, or reinforced concrete.

(k) A building or structure having less than 1,000 square feet which is constructed and owned by a natural person for hunting and which is repaired or reconstructed to the same dimension and condition as existed on January 1, 2011, if the building or structure:
1. Is not rented or leased or used as a principal residence;

2. Is not located within the 100-year floodplain according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s current Flood Insurance Rate Map; and

3. Is not connected to an offsite electric power or water supply.

With the exception of paragraphs (a), (b), (c), and (f), in order to preserve the health, safety, and welfare of the public, the Florida Building Commission may, by rule adopted pursuant to chapter 120, provide for exceptions to the broad categories of buildings exempted in this section, including exceptions for application of specific sections of the code or standards adopted therein. The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services shall have exclusive authority to adopt by rule, pursuant to chapter 120, exceptions to nonresidential farm buildings exempted in paragraph (c) when reasonably necessary to preserve public health, safety, and welfare. The exceptions must be based upon specific criteria, such as under-roof floor area, aggregate electrical service capacity, HVAC system capacity, or other building requirements. Further, the commission may recommend to the Legislature additional categories of buildings, structures, or facilities which should be exempted from the Florida Building Code, to be provided by law. The Florida Building Code does not apply to temporary housing provided by the Department of Corrections to any prisoner in the state correctional system.

(11)(a) In the event of a conflict between the Florida Building Code and the Florida Fire Prevention Code and the Life Safety Code as applied to a specific project, the conflict shall be resolved by agreement between the local building code enforcement official and the local fire code enforcement official in favor of the requirement of the code which offers the greatest degree of lifesafety or alternatives which would provide an equivalent degree of lifesafety and an equivalent method of construction.

(b) Any decision made by the local fire official and the local building official may be appealed to a local administrative board designated by the municipality, county, or special district having firesafety responsibilities. If the decision of the local fire official and the local building official is to apply the provisions of either the Florida Building Code or the Florida Fire Prevention Code and the Life Safety Code, the board may not alter the decision unless the board determines that the application of such code is not reasonable. If the decision of the local fire official and the local building official is to adopt an alternative to the codes, the local administrative board shall give due regard to the decision rendered by the local officials and may modify that decision if the administrative board adopts a better alternative, taking into consideration all relevant circumstances. In any case in which the local administrative board adopts alternatives to the decision rendered by the local fire official and the local building official, such alternatives shall provide an equivalent degree of lifesafety and an equivalent method of construction as the decision rendered by the local officials.

(c) If the local building official and the local fire official are unable to agree on a resolution of the conflict between the Florida Building Code and the Florida Fire Prevention Code and the Life Safety Code, the local administrative board shall resolve the conflict in favor of the code which offers the greatest degree of lifesafety or alternatives which would provide an equivalent degree of lifesafety and an equivalent method of construction.

(d) All decisions of the local administrative board, or if none exists, the decisions of the local building official and the local fire official, are subject to review by a joint committee composed of members of the Florida Building Commission and the Fire Code Advisory Council. If the joint committee is unable to resolve conflicts between the codes as applied to a specific project, the matter shall be resolved pursuant to the provisions of paragraph (1)(d).

(e) The local administrative board shall, to the greatest extent possible, be composed of members with expertise in building construction and firesafety standards.

(f) All decisions of the local building official and local fire official and all decisions of the administrative board shall be in writing and shall be binding upon a person but do not limit the authority of the State Fire Marshal or the Florida Building Commission pursuant to paragraph (1)(d) and ss. 633.104 and 633.228. Decisions of general application shall be indexed by building and fire code sections and shall be available for inspection during normal business hours.

(12) Except within coastal building zones as defined in s. 161.54, specification standards developed by nationally recognized code promulgation organizations to determine compliance with engineering criteria of the Florida Building Code for wind load design shall not apply to one or two family dwellings which are two stories or less in height unless approved by the commission for use or unless expressly made subject to said standards and criteria by local ordinance adopted in accordance with the provisions of subsection (4).

(13) The Florida Building Code does not apply to, and no code enforcement action shall be brought with respect to, zoning requirements, land use requirements, and owner specifications or programmatic requirements which do not pertain to and govern the design, construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, or demolition of public or private buildings, structures, or facilities or to programmatic requirements that do not pertain to enforcement of the Florida Building Code. Additionally, a local code enforcement agency may not administer or enforce the Florida Building Code to prevent the siting of any publicly owned facility, including, but not limited to, correctional facilities, juvenile justice facilities, or state universities, community colleges, or public education facilities, as provided by law.

(14) The general provisions of the Florida Building Code for buildings and other structures shall not apply to commercial wireless communication towers when such general provisions are inconsistent with the provisions of the code controlling radio and television towers. This subsection is intended to be remedial in nature and to clarify existing law.

(15) An agency or local government may not require that existing mechanical equipment located on or above the surface of a roof be installed in compliance with the requirements of the Florida Building Code except when the equipment is being replaced or moved during reroofing and is not in compliance with the provisions of the Florida Building Code relating to roof-mounted mechanical units.

(16) The Florida Building Code must require that the illumination in classroom units be designed to provide and maintain an average of 40 foot-candles of light at each desktop. Public educational facilities must consider using light-emitting diode lighting before considering other lighting sources.

(17) A provision of the International Residential Code relating to mandated fire sprinklers may not be incorporated into the Florida Building Code as adopted by the Florida Building Commission and may not be adopted as a local amendment to the Florida Building Code. This subsection does not prohibit the application of cost-saving incentives for residential fire sprinklers that are authorized in the International Residential Code upon a mutual agreement between the builder and the code official. This subsection does not apply to a local government that has a lawfully adopted ordinance relating to fire sprinklers which has been in effect since January 1, 2010.

(18) In a single-family dwelling, makeup air is not required for range hood exhaust systems capable of exhausting:
(a) Four hundred cubic feet per minute or less; or

(b) More than 400 cubic feet per minute but no more than 800 cubic feet per minute if there are no gravity vent appliances within the conditioned living space of the structure.

History.—s. 4, ch. 74-167; s. 3, ch. 75-85; s. 1, ch. 77-365; s. 225, ch. 79-400; s. 1, ch. 80-106; s. 6, ch. 82-197; s. 2, ch. 84-273; s. 1, ch. 85-97; s. 33, ch. 86-191; s. 1, ch. 87-287; s. 1, ch. 88-142; s. 1, ch. 89-369; s. 2, ch. 91-172; s. 41, ch. 91-220; s. 49, ch. 95-144; s. 1, ch. 97-177; ss. 39, 40, 65, ch. 98-287; s. 61, ch. 98-419; ss. 73, 74, 75, ch. 2000-141; s. 62, ch. 2000-154; ss. 25, 34, 35, 36, ch. 2001-186; ss. 2, 3, 4, 5, ch. 2001-372; s. 86, ch. 2002-1; ss. 1, 14, ch. 2002-293; s. 66, ch. 2003-1; s. 663, ch. 2003-261; s. 7, ch. 2005-147; s. 1, ch. 2005-191; s. 4, ch. 2006-65; s. 7, ch. 2007-1; s. 4, ch. 2007-187; s. 140, ch. 2008-4; s. 10, ch. 2008-191; s. 108, ch. 2008-227; s. 1, ch. 2010-99; s. 32, ch. 2010-176; s. 14, ch. 2011-208; s. 30, ch. 2011-222; s. 14, ch. 2012-13; s. 148, ch. 2013-183; s. 14, ch. 2013-193; s. 18, ch. 2014-154.

553.74 Florida Building Commission.—
(1) The Florida Building Commission is created and located within the Department of Business and Professional Regulation for administrative purposes. Members are appointed by the Governor subject to confirmation by the Senate. The commission is composed of 27 members, consisting of the following:
(a) One architect registered to practice in this state and actively engaged in the profession. The American Institute of Architects, Florida Section, is encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(b) One structural engineer registered to practice in this state and actively engaged in the profession. The Florida Engineering Society is encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(c) One air-conditioning or mechanical contractor certified to do business in this state and actively engaged in the profession. The Florida Air Conditioning Contractors Association, the Florida Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Contractors Association, and the Mechanical Contractors Association of Florida are encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(d) One electrical contractor certified to do business in this state and actively engaged in the profession. The Florida Association of Electrical Contractors and the National Electrical Contractors Association, Florida Chapter, are encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(e) One member from fire protection engineering or technology who is actively engaged in the profession. The Florida Chapter of the Society of Fire Protection Engineers and the Florida Fire Marshals and Inspectors Association are encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(f) One general contractor certified to do business in this state and actively engaged in the profession. The Associated Builders and Contractors of Florida, the Florida Associated General Contractors Council, and the Union Contractors Association are encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(g) One plumbing contractor licensed to do business in this state and actively engaged in the profession. The Florida Association of Plumbing, Heating, and Cooling Contractors is encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(h) One roofing or sheet metal contractor certified to do business in this state and actively engaged in the profession. The Florida Roofing, Sheet Metal, and Air Conditioning Contractors Association and the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors’ National Association are encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(i) One residential contractor licensed to do business in this state and actively engaged in the profession. The Florida Home Builders Association is encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(j) Three members who are municipal or district codes enforcement officials, one of whom is also a fire official. The Building Officials Association of Florida and the Florida Fire Marshals and Inspectors Association are encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(k) One member who represents the Department of Financial Services.

(l) One member who is a county codes enforcement official. The Building Officials Association of Florida is encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(m) One member of a Florida-based organization of persons with disabilities or a nationally chartered organization of persons with disabilities with chapters in this state.

(n) One member of the manufactured buildings industry who is licensed to do business in this state and is actively engaged in the industry. The Florida Manufactured Housing Association is encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(o) One mechanical or electrical engineer registered to practice in this state and actively engaged in the profession. The Florida Engineering Society is encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(p) One member who is a representative of a municipality or a charter county. The Florida League of Cities and the Florida Association of Counties are encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(q) One member of the building products manufacturing industry who is authorized to do business in this state and is actively engaged in the industry. The Florida Building Material Association, the Florida Concrete and Product Association, and the Fenestration Manufacturers Association are encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(r) One member who is a representative of the building owners and managers industry who is actively engaged in commercial building ownership or management. The Building Owners and Managers Association is encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(s) One member who is a representative of the insurance industry. The Florida Insurance Council is encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(t) One member who is a representative of public education.

(u) One member who is a swimming pool contractor licensed to do business in this state and actively engaged in the profession. The Florida Swimming Pool Association and the United Pool and Spa Association are encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(v) One member who is a representative of the green building industry and who is a third-party commission agent, a Florida board member of the United States Green Building Council or Green Building Initiative, a professional who is accredited under the International Green Construction Code (IGCC), or a professional who is accredited under Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED).

(w) One member who is a representative of a natural gas distribution system and who is actively engaged in the distribution of natural gas in this state. The Florida Natural Gas Association is encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(x) One member who is a representative of the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ Office of Energy. The Commissioner of Agriculture is encouraged to recommend a list of candidates for consideration.

(y) One member who shall be the chair.

(2) All appointments shall be for terms of 4 years. Each person who is a member of the Board of Building Codes and Standards on the effective date of this act shall serve the remainder of their term as a member of the Florida Building Commission. Any member who shall, during his or her term, cease to meet the qualifications for original appointment, through ceasing to be a practicing member of the profession indicated or otherwise, shall thereby forfeit membership on the commission.

(3) Members of the commission shall serve without compensation, but shall be entitled to reimbursement for per diem and travel expenses as provided by s. 112.061.

(4) Each appointed member is accountable to the Governor for the proper performance of the duties of the office. The Governor shall cause to be investigated any complaint or unfavorable report received concerning an action of the commission or any member and shall take appropriate action thereon. The Governor may remove from office any appointed member for malfeasance, misfeasance, neglect of duty, incompetence, permanent inability to perform official duties, or pleading guilty or nolo contendere to, or being found guilty of, a felony.

(5) Notwithstanding s. 112.313 or any other provision of law, a member of any of the commission’s technical advisory committees or a member of any other advisory committee or workgroup of the commission, does not have an impermissible conflict of interest when representing clients before the commission or one of its committees or workgroups. However, the member, in his or her capacity as member of the committee or workgroup, may not take part in any discussion on or take action on any matter in which he or she has a direct financial interest.

History.—s. 5, ch. 74-167; s. 2, ch. 77-365; s. 4, ch. 78-323; ss. 1, 2, ch. 80-231; ss. 1, 3, 4, ch. 81-7; ss. 1, 4, ch. 82-46; s. 2, ch. 83-265; ss. 3, 5, 6, ch. 91-172; s. 5, ch. 91-429; s. 803, ch. 97-103; s. 41, ch. 98-287; s. 76, ch. 2000-141; s. 63, ch. 2000-154; s. 15, ch. 2002-293; ss. 664, 665, ch. 2003-261; s. 11, ch. 2008-191; s. 33, ch. 2010-176; s. 415, ch. 2011-142; s. 31, ch. 2011-222; s. 15, ch. 2013-193; s. 19, ch. 2014-154.

553.75 Organization of commission; rules and regulations; meetings; staff; fiscal affairs; public comment.—
(1) The commission shall meet on call of the secretary. The commission shall annually elect from its appointive members such officers as it may choose.

(2) The commission shall meet at the call of its chair, at the request of a majority of its membership, at the request of the department, or at such times as may be prescribed by its rules. The members shall be notified in writing of the time and place of a regular or special meeting at least 7 days in advance of the meeting. A majority of members of the commission shall constitute a quorum.

(3) The department shall be responsible for the provision of administrative and staff support services relating to the functions of the commission. With respect to matters within the jurisdiction of the commission, the department shall be responsible for the implementation and faithful discharge of all decisions of the commission made pursuant to its authority under the provisions of this part. The department is specifically authorized to use communications media technology in conducting meetings of the commission or any meetings held in conjunction with meetings of the commission.

(4) Meetings of the commission shall be conducted so as to encourage participation by interested persons in attendance. At a minimum, the commission shall provide one opportunity for interested members of the public in attendance at a meeting to comment on each proposed action of the commission before a final vote is taken on any motion.

History.—s. 6, ch. 74-167; s. 4, ch. 78-323; ss. 2, 3, 4, ch. 81-7; ss. 1, 4, ch. 82-46; s. 2, ch. 83-265; ss. 5, 6, ch. 91-172; s. 5, ch. 91-429; s. 804, ch. 97-103; s. 42, ch. 98-287; s. 12, ch. 2008-191.

553.76 General powers of the commission.—The commission is authorized to:
(1) Adopt rules pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54 to implement the provisions of this part.

(2) Issue memoranda of procedure for its internal management and control. The commission may adopt rules related to its consensus-based decisionmaking process, including, but not limited to, super majority voting requirements for commission actions relating to the adoption of the Florida Building Code or amendments to the code.

(3) Enter into contracts and do such things as may be necessary and incidental to the discharge of its responsibilities under this part.

(4) Adopt rules pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54 to implement the provisions of the Florida Building Code and the provisions of this chapter.

(5) Adopt and promote, in consultation with state and local governments, other boards, advisory councils, and commissions, such recommendations as are deemed appropriate to determine and ensure consistent, effective, and efficient enforcement and compliance with the Florida Building Code, including, but not limited to, voluntary professional standards for the operation of building departments and for personnel development. Recommendations shall include, but not be limited to, provisions for coordination among and between local offices with review responsibilities and their coordination with state or regional offices with special expertise.

History.—s. 7, ch. 74-167; s. 4, ch. 78-323; ss. 3, 4, ch. 81-7; ss. 1, 4, ch. 82-46; s. 2, ch. 83-265; ss. 5, 6, ch. 91-172; s. 5, ch. 91-429; s. 184, ch. 98-200; ss. 43, 44, ch. 98-287; s. 131, ch. 2000-141; s. 35, ch. 2001-186; s. 4, ch. 2001-372; s. 34, ch. 2010-176.

553.77 Specific powers of the commission.—
(1) The commission shall:
(a) Adopt and update the Florida Building Code or amendments thereto, pursuant to ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54.

(b) Make a continual study of the operation of the Florida Building Code and other laws relating to the design, construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, or demolition of public or private buildings, structures, and facilities, including manufactured buildings, and code enforcement, to ascertain their effect upon the cost of building construction and determine the effectiveness of their provisions. Upon updating the Florida Building Code every 3 years, the commission shall review existing provisions of law and make recommendations to the Legislature for the next regular session of the Legislature regarding provisions of law that should be revised or repealed to ensure consistency with the Florida Building Code at the point the update goes into effect. State agencies and local jurisdictions shall provide such information as requested by the commission for evaluation of and recommendations for improving the effectiveness of the system of building code laws for reporting to the Legislature annually. Failure to comply with this or other requirements of this act must be reported to the Legislature for further action. Any proposed legislation providing for the revision or repeal of existing laws and rules relating to technical requirements applicable to building structures or facilities should expressly state that such legislation is not intended to imply any repeal or sunset of existing general or special laws governing any special district that are not specifically identified in the legislation.

(c) Upon written application by any substantially affected person or a local enforcement agency, issue declaratory statements pursuant to s. 120.565 relating to new technologies, techniques, and materials which have been tested where necessary and found to meet the objectives of the Florida Building Code. This paragraph does not apply to the types of products, materials, devices, or methods of construction required to be approved under paragraph (f).

(d) Make recommendations to, and provide assistance upon the request of, the Florida Commission on Human Relations regarding rules relating to accessibility for persons with disabilities.

(e) Participate with the Florida Fire Code Advisory Council created under s. 633.204, to provide assistance and recommendations relating to firesafety code interpretations. The administrative staff of the commission shall attend meetings of the Florida Fire Code Advisory Council and coordinate efforts to provide consistency between the Florida Building Code and the Florida Fire Prevention Code and the Life Safety Code.

(f) Determine the types of products which may be approved by the commission for statewide use and shall provide for the evaluation and approval of such products, materials, devices, and method of construction for statewide use. The commission may prescribe by rule a schedule of reasonable fees to provide for evaluation and approval of products, materials, devices, and methods of construction. Evaluation and approval shall be by action of the commission or delegated pursuant to s. 553.842. This paragraph does not apply to products approved by the State Fire Marshal.

(g) Appoint experts, consultants, technical advisers, and advisory committees for assistance and recommendations relating to the major areas addressed in the Florida Building Code.

(h) Establish and maintain a mutual aid program, organized through the department, to provide an efficient supply of various levels of code enforcement personnel, design professionals, commercial property owners, and construction industry individuals, to assist in the rebuilding effort in an area which has been hit with disaster. The program shall include provisions for:
1. Minimum postdisaster structural, electrical, and plumbing inspections and procedures.

2. Emergency permitting and inspection procedures.

3. Establishing contact with emergency management personnel and other state and federal agencies.

(i) Maintain a list of interested parties for noticing rulemaking workshops and hearings, disseminating information on code adoption, revisions, amendments, and all other such actions which are the responsibility of the commission.

(j) Coordinate with the state and local governments, industry, and other affected stakeholders in the examination of legislative provisions and make recommendations to fulfill the responsibility to develop a consistent, single code.

(k) Provide technical assistance to local building departments in order to implement policies, procedures, and practices which would produce the most cost-effective property insurance ratings.

(l) Develop recommendations for local governments to use when pursuing partial or full privatization of building department functions. The recommendations shall include, but not be limited to, provisions relating to equivalency of service, conflict of interest, requirements for competency, liability, insurance, and long-term accountability.

(m) Develop recommendations that increase residential and commercial recycling and composting and strongly encourage the use of recyclable materials and the recycling of construction and demolition debris.

(2) For educational and public information purposes, the commission shall develop and publish an informational and explanatory document which contains descriptions of the roles and responsibilities of the licensed design professional, residential designer, contractor, and local building and fire code officials. The State Fire Marshal shall be responsible for developing and specifying roles and responsibilities for fire code officials. Such document may also contain descriptions of roles and responsibilities of other participants involved in the building codes system.

(3) The commission may provide by rule for plans review and approval of prototype buildings owned by public and private entities to be replicated throughout the state. The rule must allow for review and approval of plans and changes to approved plans for prototype buildings to be performed by a public or private entity with oversight by the commission. The department may charge reasonable fees to cover the administrative costs of the program. Such approved plans or prototype buildings shall be exempt from further review required by s. 553.79(2), except changes to the prototype design, site plans, and other site-related items. Changes to an approved plan may be approved by the local building department or by the public or private entity that approved the plan. As provided in s. 553.73, prototype buildings are exempt from any locally adopted amendment to any part of the Florida Building Code. Construction or erection of such prototype buildings is subject to local permitting and inspections pursuant to this part.

(4) The commission may produce and distribute a commentary document to accompany the Florida Building Code. The commentary must be limited in effect to providing technical assistance and must not have the effect of binding interpretations of the code document itself.

(5) The commission may implement its recommendations delivered pursuant to s. 48(2), chapter 2007-73, Laws of Florida, by amending the Florida Energy Efficiency Code for Building Construction as provided in s. 553.901.

(6) A member of the Florida Building Commission may abstain from voting in any matter before the commission which would inure to the commissioner’s special private gain or loss, which the commissioner knows would inure to the special private gain or loss of any principal by whom he or she is retained or to the parent organization or subsidiary of a corporate principal by which he or she is retained, or which he or she knows would inure to the special private gain or loss of a relative or business associate of the commissioner. A commissioner shall abstain from voting under the foregoing circumstances if the matter is before the commission under ss. 120.569, 120.60, and 120.80. The commissioner shall, before the vote is taken, publicly state to the assembly the nature of the commissioner’s interest in the matter from which he or she is abstaining from voting and, within 15 days after the vote occurs, disclose the nature of his or her other interest as a public record in a memorandum filed with the person responsible for recording the minutes of the meeting, who shall incorporate the memorandum in the minutes.

(7) Building officials shall recognize and enforce variance orders issued by the Department of Health pursuant to s. 514.0115(5), including any conditions attached to the granting of the variance.

History.—s. 8, ch. 74-167; s. 4, ch. 75-85; s. 4, ch. 75-111; s. 3, ch. 77-365; s. 4, ch. 78-323; ss. 5, 8, ch. 79-152; ss. 3, 4, ch. 81-7; ss. 1, 4, ch. 82-46; s. 9, ch. 83-160; s. 2, ch. 83-265; s. 2, ch. 84-365; s. 1, ch. 86-135; s. 1, ch. 88-81; s. 9, ch. 89-139; s. 11, ch. 89-321; ss. 4, 5, 6, ch. 91-172; s. 5, ch. 91-429; s. 311, ch. 92-279; s. 55, ch. 92-326; s. 28, ch. 93-166; s. 51, ch. 95-196; ss. 45, 46, ch. 98-287; ss. 77, 78, 79, ch. 2000-141; ss. 26, 34, 35, ch. 2001-186; ss. 2, 3, 4, ch. 2001-372; s. 16, ch. 2002-293; s. 8, ch. 2005-147; s. 13, ch. 2008-191; s. 13, ch. 2010-143; s. 43, ch. 2011-4; s. 149, ch. 2013-183; s. 20, ch. 2014-154.

553.775 Interpretations.—
(1) It is the intent of the Legislature that the Florida Building Code and the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction be interpreted by building officials, local enforcement agencies, and the commission in a manner that protects the public safety, health, and welfare at the most reasonable cost to the consumer by ensuring uniform interpretations throughout the state and by providing processes for resolving disputes regarding interpretations of the Florida Building Code and the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction which are just and expeditious.

(2) Local enforcement agencies, local building officials, state agencies, and the commission shall interpret provisions of the Florida Building Code and the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction in a manner that is consistent with declaratory statements and interpretations entered by the commission, except that conflicts between the Florida Fire Prevention Code and the Florida Building Code shall be resolved in accordance with s. 553.73(11)(c) and (d).

(3) The following procedures may be invoked regarding interpretations of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction:
(a) Upon written application by any substantially affected person or state agency or by a local enforcement agency, the commission shall issue declaratory statements pursuant to s. 120.565 relating to the enforcement or administration by local governments of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction.

(b) When requested in writing by any substantially affected person or state agency or by a local enforcement agency, the commission shall issue a declaratory statement pursuant to s. 120.565 relating to this part and ss. 515.25, 515.27, 515.29, and 515.37. Actions of the commission are subject to judicial review under s. 120.68.

(c) The commission shall review decisions of local building officials and local enforcement agencies regarding interpretations of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction after the local board of appeals has considered the decision, if such board exists, and if such appeals process is concluded within 25 business days.
1. The commission shall coordinate with the Building Officials Association of Florida, Inc., to designate panels composed of five members to hear requests to review decisions of local building officials. The members must be licensed as building code administrators under part XII of chapter 468 and must have experience interpreting and enforcing provisions of the Florida Building Code and the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction.

2. Requests to review a decision of a local building official interpreting provisions of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction may be initiated by any substantially affected person, including an owner or builder subject to a decision of a local building official or an association of owners or builders having members who are subject to a decision of a local building official. In order to initiate review, the substantially affected person must file a petition with the commission. The commission shall adopt a form for the petition, which shall be published on the Building Code Information System. The form shall, at a minimum, require the following:
a. The name and address of the county or municipality in which provisions of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction are being interpreted.

b. The name and address of the local building official who has made the interpretation being appealed.

c. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner; the name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s representative, if any; and an explanation of how the petitioner’s substantial interests are being affected by the local interpretation of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction.

d. A statement of the provisions of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction which are being interpreted by the local building official.

e. A statement of the interpretation given to provisions of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction by the local building official and the manner in which the interpretation was rendered.

f. A statement of the interpretation that the petitioner contends should be given to the provisions of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction and a statement supporting the petitioner’s interpretation.

g. Space for the local building official to respond in writing. The space shall, at a minimum, require the local building official to respond by providing a statement admitting or denying the statements contained in the petition and a statement of the interpretation of the provisions of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction which the local jurisdiction or the local building official contends is correct, including the basis for the interpretation.

3. The petitioner shall submit the petition to the local building official, who shall place the date of receipt on the petition. The local building official shall respond to the petition in accordance with the form and shall return the petition along with his or her response to the petitioner within 5 days after receipt, exclusive of Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays. The petitioner may file the petition with the commission at any time after the local building official provides a response. If no response is provided by the local building official, the petitioner may file the petition with the commission 10 days after submission of the petition to the local building official and shall note that the local building official did not respond.

4. Upon receipt of a petition that meets the requirements of subparagraph 2., the commission shall immediately provide copies of the petition to a panel, and the commission shall publish the petition, including any response submitted by the local building official, on the Building Code Information System in a manner that allows interested persons to address the issues by posting comments.

5. The panel shall conduct proceedings as necessary to resolve the issues; shall give due regard to the petitions, the response, and to comments posed on the Building Code Information System; and shall issue an interpretation regarding the provisions of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction within 21 days after the filing of the petition. The panel shall render a determination based upon the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction or, if the code is ambiguous, the intent of the code. The panel’s interpretation shall be provided to the commission, which shall publish the interpretation on the Building Code Information System and in the Florida Administrative Register. The interpretation shall be considered an interpretation entered by the commission, and shall be binding upon the parties and upon all jurisdictions subject to the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction, unless it is superseded by a declaratory statement issued by the Florida Building Commission or by a final order entered after an appeal proceeding conducted in accordance with subparagraph 7.

6. It is the intent of the Legislature that review proceedings be completed within 21 days after the date that a petition seeking review is filed with the commission, and the time periods set forth in this paragraph may be waived only upon consent of all parties.

7. Any substantially affected person may appeal an interpretation rendered by a hearing officer panel by filing a petition with the commission. Such appeals shall be initiated in accordance with chapter 120 and the uniform rules of procedure and must be filed within 30 days after publication of the interpretation on the Building Code Information System or in the Florida Administrative Register. Hearings shall be conducted pursuant to chapter 120 and the uniform rules of procedure. Decisions of the commission are subject to judicial review pursuant to s. 120.68. The final order of the commission is binding upon the parties and upon all jurisdictions subject to the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction.

8. The burden of proof in any proceeding initiated in accordance with subparagraph 7. is on the party who initiated the appeal.

9. In any review proceeding initiated in accordance with this paragraph, including any proceeding initiated in accordance with subparagraph 7., the fact that an owner or builder has proceeded with construction may not be grounds for determining an issue to be moot if the issue is one that is likely to arise in the future.

This paragraph provides the exclusive remedy for addressing requests to review local interpretations of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction and appeals from review proceedings.

(d) Upon written application by any substantially affected person, contractor, or designer, or a group representing a substantially affected person, contractor, or designer, the commission shall issue or cause to be issued a formal interpretation of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction as prescribed by paragraph (c).

(e) Local decisions declaring structures to be unsafe and subject to repair or demolition are not subject to review under this subsection and may not be appealed to the commission if the local governing body finds that there is an immediate danger to the health and safety of the public.

(f) Upon written application by any substantially affected person, the commission shall issue a declaratory statement pursuant to s. 120.565 relating to an agency’s interpretation and enforcement of the specific provisions of the Florida Building Code or the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction which the agency is authorized to enforce. This subsection does not provide any powers, other than advisory, to the commission with respect to any decision of the State Fire Marshal made pursuant to chapter 633.

(g) The commission may designate a commission member who has demonstrated expertise in interpreting building plans to attend each meeting of the advisory council created in s. 553.512. The commission member may vary from meeting to meeting, shall serve on the council in a nonvoting capacity, and shall receive per diem and expenses as provided in s. 553.74(3).

(h) The commission shall by rule establish an informal process of rendering nonbinding interpretations of the Florida Building Code and the Florida Accessibility Code for Building Construction. The commission is specifically authorized to refer interpretive issues to organizations that represent those engaged in the construction industry. The commission shall immediately implement the process before completing formal rulemaking. It is the intent of the Legislature that the commission create a process to refer questions to a small, rotating group of individuals licensed under part XII of chapter 468, to which a party may pose questions regarding the interpretation of code provisions. It is the intent of the Legislature that the process provide for the expeditious resolution of the issues presented and publication of the resulting interpretation on the Building Code Information System. Such interpretations shall be advisory only and nonbinding on the parties and the commission.

(4) In order to administer this section, the commission may adopt by rule and impose a fee for filing requests for declaratory statements and binding and nonbinding interpretations to recoup the cost of the proceedings which may not exceed $125 for each request for a nonbinding interpretation and $250 for each request for a binding review or interpretation. For proceedings conducted by or in coordination with a third party, the rule may provide that payment be made directly to the third party, who shall remit to the department that portion of the fee necessary to cover the costs of the department.

History.—s. 9, ch. 2005-147; s. 5, ch. 2006-65; s. 8, ch. 2007-1; s. 5, ch. 2007-187; s. 14, ch. 2008-191; s. 35, ch. 2010-176; s. 49, ch. 2013-14; s. 21, ch. 2014-154.

553.781 Licensee accountability.—
(1) The Legislature finds that accountability for work performed by design professionals and contractors is the key to strong and consistent compliance with the Florida Building Code and, therefore, protection of the public health, safety, and welfare. The purpose of this section is to provide such accountability.

(2)(a) Upon a determination by a local jurisdiction that a licensee, certificateholder, or registrant licensed under chapter 455, chapter 471, chapter 481, or chapter 489 has committed a material violation of the Florida Building Code and failed to correct the violation within a reasonable time, such local jurisdiction shall impose a fine of no less than $500 and no more than $5,000 per material violation.

(b) If the licensee, certificateholder, or registrant disputes the violation within 30 days following notification by the local jurisdiction, the fine is abated and the local jurisdiction shall report the dispute to the Department of Business and Professional Regulation or the appropriate professional licensing board for disciplinary investigation and final disposition. If an administrative complaint is filed by the department or the professional licensing board against the certificateholder or registrant, the commission may intervene in such proceeding. Any fine imposed by the department or the professional licensing board, pursuant to matters reported by the local jurisdiction to the department or the professional licensing board, shall be divided equally between the board and the local jurisdiction which reported the violation.

(3) The Department of Business and Professional Regulation, as an integral part of the automated information system provided under s. 455.2286, shall establish, and local jurisdictions and state licensing boards shall participate in, a system of reporting violations and disciplinary actions taken against all licensees, certificateholders, and registrants under this section that have been disciplined for a violation of the Florida Building Code. Such information shall be available electronically. Any fines collected by a local jurisdiction pursuant to subsection (2) shall be used initially to help set up the parts of the reporting system for which such local jurisdiction is responsible. Any remaining moneys shall be used solely for enforcing the Florida Building Code, licensing activities relating to the Florida Building Code, or education and training on the Florida Building Code.

(4) Local jurisdictions shall maintain records, readily accessible by the public, regarding material violations and shall report such violations to the Department of Business and Professional Regulation by means of the reporting system provided in s. 455.2286.

For purposes of this section, a material code violation is a violation that exists within a completed building, structure, or facility which may reasonably result, or has resulted, in physical harm to a person or significant damage to the performance of a building or its systems. Except when the fine is abated as provided in subsection (2), failure to pay the fine within 30 days shall result in a suspension of the licensee’s, certificateholder’s, or registrant’s ability to obtain permits within this state until such time as the fine is paid. Such suspension shall be reflected on the automated information system under s. 455.2286.
History.—s. 47, ch. 98-287; ss. 80, 81, ch. 2000-141; ss. 34, 35, ch. 2001-186; ss. 3, 4, ch. 2001-372.

553.79 Permits; applications; issuance; inspections.—
(1) After the effective date of the Florida Building Code adopted as herein provided, it shall be unlawful for any person, firm, corporation, or governmental entity to construct, erect, alter, modify, repair, or demolish any building within this state without first obtaining a permit therefor from the appropriate enforcing agency or from such persons as may, by appropriate resolution or regulation of the authorized state or local enforcing agency, be delegated authority to issue such permits, upon the payment of such reasonable fees adopted by the enforcing agency. The enforcing agency is empowered to revoke any such permit upon a determination by the agency that the construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, or demolition of the building for which the permit was issued is in violation of, or not in conformity with, the provisions of the Florida Building Code. Whenever a permit required under this section is denied or revoked because the plan, or the construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, or demolition of a building, is found by the local enforcing agency to be not in compliance with the Florida Building Code, the local enforcing agency shall identify the specific plan or project features that do not comply with the applicable codes, identify the specific code chapters and sections upon which the finding is based, and provide this information to the permit applicant. Installation, replacement, removal, or metering of any load management control device is exempt from and shall not be subject to the permit process and fees otherwise required by this section.

(2) Except as provided in subsection (6), an enforcing agency may not issue any permit for construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, or demolition of any building or structure until the local building code administrator or inspector has reviewed the plans and specifications required by the Florida Building Code, or local amendment thereto, for such proposal and found the plans to be in compliance with the Florida Building Code. If the local building code administrator or inspector finds that the plans are not in compliance with the Florida Building Code, the local building code administrator or inspector shall identify the specific plan features that do not comply with the applicable codes, identify the specific code chapters and sections upon which the finding is based, and provide this information to the local enforcing agency. The local enforcing agency shall provide this information to the permit applicant. In addition, an enforcing agency may not issue any permit for construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, or demolition of any building until the appropriate firesafety inspector certified pursuant to s. 633.216 has reviewed the plans and specifications required by the Florida Building Code, or local amendment thereto, for such proposal and found that the plans comply with the Florida Fire Prevention Code and the Life Safety Code. Any building or structure which is not subject to a firesafety code shall not be required to have its plans reviewed by the firesafety inspector. Any building or structure that is exempt from the local building permit process may not be required to have its plans reviewed by the local building code administrator. Industrial construction on sites where design, construction, and firesafety are supervised by appropriate design and inspection professionals and which contain adequate in-house fire departments and rescue squads is exempt, subject to local government option, from review of plans and inspections, providing owners certify that applicable codes and standards have been met and supply appropriate approved drawings to local building and firesafety inspectors. The enforcing agency shall issue a permit to construct, erect, alter, modify, repair, or demolish any building or structure when the plans and specifications for such proposal comply with the Florida Building Code and the Florida Fire Prevention Code and the Life Safety Code as determined by the local authority in accordance with this chapter and chapter 633.

(3) Except as provided in this chapter, the Florida Building Code, after the effective date of adoption pursuant to the provisions of this part, shall supersede all other building construction codes or ordinances in the state, whether at the local or state level and whether adopted by administrative regulation or by legislative enactment. However, this subsection does not apply to the construction of manufactured homes as defined by federal law. Nothing contained in this subsection shall be construed as nullifying or divesting appropriate state or local agencies of authority to make inspections or to enforce the codes within their respective areas of jurisdiction.

(4) The Florida Building Code, after the effective date of adoption pursuant to the provisions of this part, may be modified by local governments to require more stringent standards than those specified in the Florida Building Code, provided the conditions of s. 553.73(4) are met.

(5)(a) The enforcing agency shall require a special inspector to perform structural inspections on a threshold building pursuant to a structural inspection plan prepared by the engineer or architect of record. The structural inspection plan must be submitted to and approved by the enforcing agency before the issuance of a building permit for the construction of a threshold building. The purpose of the structural inspection plan is to provide specific inspection procedures and schedules so that the building can be adequately inspected for compliance with the permitted documents. The special inspector may not serve as a surrogate in carrying out the responsibilities of the building official, the architect, or the engineer of record. The contractor’s contractual or statutory obligations are not relieved by any action of the special inspector. The special inspector shall determine that a professional engineer who specializes in shoring design has inspected the shoring and reshoring for conformance with the shoring and reshoring plans submitted to the enforcing agency. A fee simple title owner of a building, which does not meet the minimum size, height, occupancy, occupancy classification, or number-of-stories criteria which would result in classification as a threshold building under s. 553.71(12), may designate such building as a threshold building, subject to more than the minimum number of inspections required by the Florida Building Code.

(b) The fee owner of a threshold building shall select and pay all costs of employing a special inspector, but the special inspector shall be responsible to the enforcement agency. The inspector shall be a person certified, licensed, or registered under chapter 471 as an engineer or under chapter 481 as an architect.

(c) The architect or engineer of record may act as the special inspector provided she or he is on the Board of Professional Engineers’ or the Board of Architecture and Interior Design’s list of persons qualified to be special inspectors. School boards may utilize employees as special inspectors provided such employees are on one of the professional licensing board’s list of persons qualified to be special inspectors.

(d) The licensed architect or registered engineer serving as the special inspector shall be permitted to send her or his duly authorized representative to the job site to perform the necessary inspections provided all required written reports are prepared by and bear the seal of the special inspector and are submitted to the enforcement agency.

(6) A permit may not be issued for any building construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, or addition unless the applicant for such permit complies with the requirements for plan review established by the Florida Building Commission within the Florida Building Code. However, the code shall set standards and criteria to authorize preliminary construction before completion of all building plans review, including, but not limited to, special permits for the foundation only, and such standards shall take effect concurrent with the first effective date of the Florida Building Code.

(7) Each enforcement agency shall require that, on every threshold building:
(a) The special inspector, upon completion of the building and prior to the issuance of a certificate of occupancy, file a signed and sealed statement with the enforcement agency in substantially the following form: To the best of my knowledge and belief, the construction of all structural load-bearing components described in the threshold inspection plan complies with the permitted documents, and the specialty shoring design professional engineer has ascertained that the shoring and reshoring conforms with the shoring and reshoring plans submitted to the enforcement agency.

(b) Any proposal to install an alternate structural product or system to which building codes apply be submitted to the enforcement agency for review for compliance with the codes and made part of the enforcement agency’s recorded set of permit documents.

(c) All shoring and reshoring procedures, plans, and details be submitted to the enforcement agency for recordkeeping. Each shoring and reshoring installation shall be supervised, inspected, and certified to be in compliance with the shoring documents by the contractor.

(d) All plans for the building which are required to be signed and sealed by the architect or engineer of record contain a statement that, to the best of the architect’s or engineer’s knowledge, the plans and specifications comply with the applicable minimum building codes and the applicable firesafety standards as determined by the local authority in accordance with this chapter and chapter 633.

(8) No enforcing agency may issue a building permit for construction of any threshold building except to a licensed general contractor, as defined in s. 489.105(3)(a), or to a licensed building contractor, as defined in s. 489.105(3)(b), within the scope of her or his license. The named contractor to whom the building permit is issued shall have the responsibility for supervision, direction, management, and control of the construction activities on the project for which the building permit was issued.

(9) Any state agency whose enabling legislation authorizes it to enforce provisions of the Florida Building Code may enter into an agreement with any other unit of government to delegate its responsibility to enforce those provisions and may expend public funds for permit and inspection fees, which fees may be no greater than the fees charged others. Inspection services that are not required to be performed by a state agency under a federal delegation of responsibility or by a state agency under the Florida Building Code must be performed under the alternative plans review and inspection process created in s. 553.791 or by a local governmental entity having authority to enforce the Florida Building Code.

(10) An enforcing authority may not issue a building permit for any building construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, or addition unless the permit either includes on its face or there is attached to the permit the following statement: “NOTICE: In addition to the requirements of this permit, there may be additional restrictions applicable to this property that may be found in the public records of this county, and there may be additional permits required from other governmental entities such as water management districts, state agencies, or federal agencies.”

(11) The local enforcing agency may not issue a building permit to construct, develop, or modify a public swimming pool without proof of application, whether complete or incomplete, for an operating permit pursuant to s. 514.031. A certificate of completion or occupancy may not be issued until such operating permit is issued. The local enforcing agency shall conduct its review of the building permit application upon filing and in accordance with this chapter. The local enforcing agency may confer with the Department of Health, if necessary, but may not delay the building permit application review while awaiting comment from the Department of Health.

(12) Nothing in this section shall be construed to alter or supplement the provisions of part I of this chapter relating to manufactured buildings.

(13) One-family and two-family detached residential dwelling units are not subject to plan review by the local fire official as described in this section or inspection by the local fire official as described in s. 633.216, unless expressly made subject to the plan review or inspection by local ordinance.

(14) A building permit for a single-family residential dwelling must be issued within 30 working days of application therefor unless unusual circumstances require a longer time for processing the application or unless the permit application fails to satisfy the Florida Building Code or the enforcing agency’s laws or ordinances.

(15) Certifications by contractors authorized under the provisions of s. 489.115(4)(b) shall be considered equivalent to sealed plans and specifications by a person licensed under chapter 471 or chapter 481 by local enforcement agencies for plans review for permitting purposes relating to compliance with the wind resistance provisions of the code or alternate methodologies approved by the commission for one and two family dwellings. Local enforcement agencies may rely upon such certification by contractors that the plans and specifications submitted conform to the requirements of the code for wind resistance. Upon good cause shown, local government code enforcement agencies may accept or reject plans sealed by persons licensed under chapter 471, chapter 481, or chapter 489. A truss-placement plan is not required to be signed and sealed by an engineer or architect unless prepared by an engineer or architect or specifically required by the Florida Building Code.

(16)(a) The Florida Building Commission shall establish, within the Florida Building Code adopted by rule, standards for permitting residential buildings or structures moved into or within a county or municipality when such structures do not or cannot comply with the code. However, such buildings or structures shall not be required to be brought into compliance with the building code in force at the time the building or structure is moved, provided:
1. The building or structure is structurally sound and in occupiable condition for its intended use;

2. The occupancy use classification for the building or structure is not changed as a result of the move;

3. The building is not substantially remodeled;

4. Current fire code requirements for ingress and egress are met;

5. Electrical, gas, and plumbing systems meet the codes in force at the time of construction and are operational and safe for reconnection; and

6. Foundation plans are sealed by a professional engineer or architect licensed to practice in this state, if required by the building code for all residential buildings or structures of the same occupancy class;

(b) The building official shall apply the same standard to a moved residential building or structure as that applied to the remodeling of any comparable residential building or structure to determine whether the moved structure is substantially remodeled. The cost of moving the building and the cost of the foundation on which the moved building or structure is placed shall not be included in the cost of remodeling for purposes of determining whether a moved building or structure has been substantially remodeled.

(17) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, state agencies responsible for the construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, or demolition of public buildings, or the regulation of public and private buildings, structures, and facilities, shall be subject to enforcement of the Florida Building Code by local jurisdictions. This subsection applies in addition to the jurisdiction and authority of the Department of Financial Services to inspect state-owned buildings. This subsection does not apply to the jurisdiction and authority of the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to inspect amusement rides or the Department of Financial Services to inspect state-owned buildings and boilers.

(18)(a) A local enforcing agency, and any local building code administrator, inspector, or other official or entity, may not require as a condition of issuance of a one- or two-family residential building permit the inspection of any portion of a building, structure, or real property that is not directly impacted by the construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, or demolition of the building, structure, or real property for which the permit is sought.

(b) This subsection does not apply to a building permit sought for:
1. A substantial improvement as defined in s. 161.54 or as defined in the Florida Building Code.

2. A change of occupancy as defined in the Florida Building Code.

3. A conversion from residential to nonresidential or mixed use pursuant to s. 553.507(3) or as defined in the Florida Building Code.

4. A historic building as defined in the Florida Building Code.

(c) This subsection does not prohibit a local enforcing agency, or any local building code administrator, inspector, or other official or entity, from:
1. Citing any violation inadvertently observed in plain view during the ordinary course of an inspection conducted in accordance with the prohibition in paragraph (a).

2. Inspecting a physically nonadjacent portion of a building, structure, or real property that is directly impacted by the construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, or demolition of the building, structure, or real property for which the permit is sought in accordance with the prohibition in paragraph (a).

3. Inspecting any portion of a building, structure, or real property for which the owner or other person having control of the building, structure, or real property has voluntarily consented to the inspection of that portion of the building, structure, or real property in accordance with the prohibition in paragraph (a).

4. Inspecting any portion of a building, structure, or real property pursuant to an inspection warrant issued in accordance with ss. 933.20-933.30.

(d) This subsection is repealed upon receipt by the Secretary of State of the written certification by the chair of the Florida Building Commission that the commission has adopted an amendment to the Florida Building Code which substantially incorporates this subsection, including the prohibition in paragraph (a), as part of the code and such amendment has taken effect.

(19) For the purpose of inspection and record retention, site plans or building permits may be maintained in the original form or in the form of an electronic copy at the worksite. These plans and permits must be open to inspection by the building official or a duly authorized representative, as required by the Florida Building Code.

History.—s. 10, ch. 74-167; s. 4, ch. 77-365; s. 10, ch. 83-160; s. 1, ch. 83-352; s. 2, ch. 84-24; s. 3, ch. 84-365; s. 2, ch. 85-97; s. 2, ch. 86-135; s. 2, ch. 87-287; s. 5, ch. 87-349; s. 2, ch. 88-142; s. 1, ch. 88-378; s. 1, ch. 91-7; s. 4, ch. 93-249; ss. 57, 260, ch. 94-119; s. 7, ch. 94-284; s. 461, ch. 94-356; s. 72, ch. 95-144; s. 2, ch. 95-379; s. 14, ch. 96-298; s. 73, ch. 96-388; s. 1175, ch. 97-103; ss. 48, 49, ch. 98-287; ss. 82, 83, 84, 135, ch. 2000-141; ss. 27, 34, 35, 37, ch. 2001-186; ss. 2, 3, 4, 6, ch. 2001-372; s. 666, ch. 2003-261; s. 10, ch. 2005-147; s. 36, ch. 2010-176; s. 1, ch. 2011-82; s. 73, ch. 2012-5; s. 15, ch. 2012-13; s. 150, ch. 2013-183; s. 16, ch. 2013-193; s. 126, ch. 2014-17; s. 22, ch. 2014-154.

553.791 Alternative plans review and inspection.—
(1) As used in this section, the term:
(a) “Applicable codes” means the Florida Building Code and any local technical amendments to the Florida Building Code but does not include the applicable minimum fire prevention and firesafety codes adopted pursuant to chapter 633.

(b) “Audit” means the process to confirm that the building code inspection services have been performed by the private provider, including ensuring that the required affidavit for the plan review has been properly completed and affixed to the permit documents and that the minimum mandatory inspections required under the building code have been performed and properly recorded. The term does not mean that the local building official is required to replicate the plan review or inspection being performed by the private provider.

(c) “Building” means any construction, erection, alteration, demolition, or improvement of, or addition to, any structure for which permitting by a local enforcement agency is required.

(d) “Building code inspection services” means those services described in s. 468.603(6) and (7) involving the review of building plans to determine compliance with applicable codes and those inspections required by law of each phase of construction for which permitting by a local enforcement agency is required to determine compliance with applicable codes.

(e) “Duly authorized representative” means an agent of the private provider identified in the permit application who reviews plans or performs inspections as provided by this section and who is licensed as an engineer under chapter 471 or as an architect under chapter 481 or who holds a standard certificate under part XII of chapter 468.

(f) “Immediate threat to public safety and welfare” means a building code violation that, if allowed to persist, constitutes an immediate hazard that could result in death, serious bodily injury, or significant property damage. This paragraph does not limit the authority of the local building official to issue a Notice of Corrective Action at any time during the construction of a building project or any portion of such project if the official determines that a condition of the building or portion thereof may constitute a hazard when the building is put into use following completion as long as the condition cited is shown to be in violation of the building code or approved plans.

(g) “Local building official” means the individual within the governing jurisdiction responsible for direct regulatory administration or supervision of plans review, enforcement, and inspection of any construction, erection, alteration, demolition, or substantial improvement of, or addition to, any structure for which permitting is required to indicate compliance with applicable codes and includes any duly authorized designee of such person.

(h) “Permit application” means a properly completed and submitted application for the requested building or construction permit, including:
1. The plans reviewed by the private provider.

2. The affidavit from the private provider required under subsection (6).

3. Any applicable fees.

4. Any documents required by the local building official to determine that the fee owner has secured all other government approvals required by law.

(i) “Private provider” means a person licensed as an engineer under chapter 471 or as an architect under chapter 481. For purposes of performing inspections under this section for additions and alterations that are limited to 1,000 square feet or less to residential buildings, the term “private provider” also includes a person who holds a standard certificate under part XII of chapter 468.

(j) “Request for certificate of occupancy or certificate of completion” means a properly completed and executed application for:
1. A certificate of occupancy or certificate of completion.

2. A certificate of compliance from the private provider required under subsection (11).

3. Any applicable fees.

4. Any documents required by the local building official to determine that the fee owner has secured all other government approvals required by law.

(k) “Stop-work order” means the issuance of any written statement, written directive, or written order which states the reason for the order and the conditions under which the cited work will be permitted to resume.

(2) Notwithstanding any other law or local government ordinance or local policy, the fee owner of a building or structure, or the fee owner’s contractor upon written authorization from the fee owner, may choose to use a private provider to provide building code inspection services with regard to such building or structure and may make payment directly to the private provider for the provision of such services. All such services shall be the subject of a written contract between the private provider, or the private provider’s firm, and the fee owner or the fee owner’s contractor, upon written authorization of the fee owner. The fee owner may elect to use a private provider to provide plans review or required building inspections, or both. However, if the fee owner or the fee owner’s contractor uses a private provider to provide plans review, the local building official, in his or her discretion and pursuant to duly adopted policies of the local enforcement agency, may require the fee owner or the fee owner’s contractor to use a private provider to also provide required building inspections.

(3) A private provider and any duly authorized representative may only perform building code inspection services that are within the disciplines covered by that person’s licensure or certification under chapter 468, chapter 471, or chapter 481. A private provider may not provide building code inspection services pursuant to this section upon any building designed or constructed by the private provider or the private provider’s firm.

(4) A fee owner or the fee owner’s contractor using a private provider to provide building code inspection services shall notify the local building official at the time of permit application, or no less than 7 business days prior to the first scheduled inspection by the local building official or building code enforcement agency for a private provider performing required inspections of construction under this section, on a form to be adopted by the commission. This notice shall include the following information:
(a) The services to be performed by the private provider.

(b) The name, firm, address, telephone number, and facsimile number of each private provider who is performing or will perform such services, his or her professional license or certification number, qualification statements or resumes, and, if required by the local building official, a certificate of insurance demonstrating that professional liability insurance coverage is in place for the private provider’s firm, the private provider, and any duly authorized representative in the amounts required by this section.

(c) An acknowledgment from the fee owner in substantially the following form:I have elected to use one or more private providers to provide building code plans review and/or inspection services on the building or structure that is the subject of the enclosed permit application, as authorized by s. 553.791, Florida Statutes. I understand that the local building official may not review the plans submitted or perform the required building inspections to determine compliance with the applicable codes, except to the extent specified in said law. Instead, plans review and/or required building inspections will be performed by licensed or certified personnel identified in the application. The law requires minimum insurance requirements for such personnel, but I understand that I may require more insurance to protect my interests. By executing this form, I acknowledge that I have made inquiry regarding the competence of the licensed or certified personnel and the level of their insurance and am satisfied that my interests are adequately protected. I agree to indemnify, defend, and hold harmless the local government, the local building official, and their building code enforcement personnel from any and all claims arising from my use of these licensed or certified personnel to perform building code inspection services with respect to the building or structure that is the subject of the enclosed permit application.
If the fee owner or the fee owner’s contractor makes any changes to the listed private providers or the services to be provided by those private providers, the fee owner or the fee owner’s contractor shall, within 1 business day after any change, update the notice to reflect such changes. A change of a duly authorized representative named in the permit application does not require a revision of the permit, and the building code enforcement agency shall not charge a fee for making the change. In addition, the fee owner or the fee owner’s contractor shall post at the project site, prior to the commencement of construction and updated within 1 business day after any change, on a form to be adopted by the commission, the name, firm, address, telephone number, and facsimile number of each private provider who is performing or will perform building code inspection services, the type of service being performed, and similar information for the primary contact of the private provider on the project.

(5) After construction has commenced and if the local building official is unable to provide inspection services in a timely manner, the fee owner or the fee owner’s contractor may elect to use a private provider to provide inspection services by notifying the local building official of the owner’s or contractor’s intention to do so no less than 7 business days prior to the next scheduled inspection using the notice provided for in paragraphs (4)(a)-(c).

(6) A private provider performing plans review under this section shall review construction plans to determine compliance with the applicable codes. Upon determining that the plans reviewed comply with the applicable codes, the private provider shall prepare an affidavit or affidavits on a form adopted by the commission certifying, under oath, that the following is true and correct to the best of the private provider’s knowledge and belief:
(a) The plans were reviewed by the affiant, who is duly authorized to perform plans review pursuant to this section and holds the appropriate license or certificate.

(b) The plans comply with the applicable codes.

(7)(a) No more than 30 business days after receipt of a permit application and the affidavit from the private provider required pursuant to subsection (6), the local building official shall issue the requested permit or provide a written notice to the permit applicant identifying the specific plan features that do not comply with the applicable codes, as well as the specific code chapters and sections. If the local building official does not provide a written notice of the plan deficiencies within the prescribed 30-day period, the permit application shall be deemed approved as a matter of law, and the permit shall be issued by the local building official on the next business day.

(b) If the local building official provides a written notice of plan deficiencies to the permit applicant within the prescribed 30-day period, the 30-day period shall be tolled pending resolution of the matter. To resolve the plan deficiencies, the permit applicant may elect to dispute the deficiencies pursuant to subsection (13) or to submit revisions to correct the deficiencies.

(c) If the permit applicant submits revisions, the local building official has the remainder of the tolled 30-day period plus 5 business days to issue the requested permit or to provide a second written notice to the permit applicant stating which of the previously identified plan features remain in noncompliance with the applicable codes, with specific reference to the relevant code chapters and sections. If the local building official does not provide the second written notice within the prescribed time period, the permit shall be issued by the local building official on the next business day.

(d) If the local building official provides a second written notice of plan deficiencies to the permit applicant within the prescribed time period, the permit applicant may elect to dispute the deficiencies pursuant to subsection (13) or to submit additional revisions to correct the deficiencies. For all revisions submitted after the first revision, the local building official has an additional 5 business days to issue the requested permit or to provide a written notice to the permit applicant stating which of the previously identified plan features remain in noncompliance with the applicable codes, with specific reference to the relevant code chapters and sections.

(8) A private provider performing required inspections under this section shall inspect each phase of construction as required by the applicable codes. The private provider shall be permitted to send a duly authorized representative to the building site to perform the required inspections, provided all required reports are prepared by and bear the signature of the private provider or the private provider’s duly authorized representative. The duly authorized representative must be an employee of the private provider entitled to receive reemployment assistance benefits under chapter 443. The contractor’s contractual or legal obligations are not relieved by any action of the private provider.

(9) A private provider performing required inspections under this section shall provide notice to the local building official of the date and approximate time of any such inspection no later than the prior business day by 2 p.m. local time or by any later time permitted by the local building official in that jurisdiction. The local building official may visit the building site as often as necessary to verify that the private provider is performing all required inspections. A deficiency notice must be posted at the job site by the private provider, the duly authorized representative of the private provider, or the building department whenever a noncomplying item related to the building code or the permitted documents is found. After corrections are made, the item must be reinspected by the private provider or representative before being concealed. Reinspection or reaudit fees shall not be charged by the local jurisdiction as a result of the local jurisdiction’s audit inspection occurring before the performance of the private provider’s inspection or for any other administrative matter not involving the detection of a violation of the building code or a permit requirement.

(10) Upon completing the required inspections at each applicable phase of construction, the private provider shall record such inspections on a form acceptable to the local building official. The form must be signed by the provider or the provider’s duly authorized representative. These inspection records shall reflect those inspections required by the applicable codes of each phase of construction for which permitting by a local enforcement agency is required. The private provider, before leaving the project site, shall post each completed inspection record, indicating pass or fail, at the site and provide the record to the local building official within 2 business days. The local building official may waive the requirement to provide a record of each inspection within 2 business days if the record is posted at the project site and all such inspection records are submitted with the certificate of compliance. Records of all required and completed inspections shall be maintained at the building site at all times and made available for review by the local building official. The private provider shall report to the local enforcement agency any condition that poses an immediate threat to public safety and welfare.

(11) Upon completion of all required inspections, the private provider shall prepare a certificate of compliance, on a form acceptable to the local building official, summarizing the inspections performed and including a written representation, under oath, that the stated inspections have been performed and that, to the best of the private provider’s knowledge and belief, the building construction inspected complies with the approved plans and applicable codes. The statement required of the private provider shall be substantially in the following form and shall be signed and sealed by a private provider as established in subsection (1):To the best of my knowledge and belief, the building components and site improvements outlined herein and inspected under my authority have been completed in conformance with the approved plans and the applicable codes.

(12) No more than 2 business days after receipt of a request for a certificate of occupancy or certificate of completion and the applicant’s presentation of a certificate of compliance and approval of all other government approvals required by law, the local building official shall issue the certificate of occupancy or certificate of completion or provide a notice to the applicant identifying the specific deficiencies, as well as the specific code chapters and sections. If the local building official does not provide notice of the deficiencies within the prescribed 2-day period, the request for a certificate of occupancy or certificate of completion shall be deemed granted and the certificate of occupancy or certificate of completion shall be issued by the local building official on the next business day. To resolve any identified deficiencies, the applicant may elect to dispute the deficiencies pursuant to subsection (13) or to submit a corrected request for a certificate of occupancy or certificate of completion.

(13) If the local building official determines that the building construction or plans do not comply with the applicable codes, the official may deny the permit or request for a certificate of occupancy or certificate of completion, as appropriate, or may issue a stop-work order for the project or any portion thereof as provided by law, if the official determines that the noncompliance poses an immediate threat to public safety and welfare, subject to the following:
(a) The local building official shall be available to meet with the private provider within 2 business days to resolve any dispute after issuing a stop-work order or providing notice to the applicant denying a permit or request for a certificate of occupancy or certificate of completion.

(b) If the local building official and private provider are unable to resolve the dispute, the matter shall be referred to the local enforcement agency’s board of appeals, if one exists, which shall consider the matter at its next scheduled meeting or sooner. Any decisions by the local enforcement agency’s board of appeals, or local building official if there is no board of appeals, may be appealed to the commission as provided by this chapter.

(c) Notwithstanding any provision of this section, any decisions regarding the issuance of a building permit, certificate of occupancy, or certificate of completion may be reviewed by the local enforcement agency’s board of appeals, if one exists. Any decision by the local enforcement agency’s board of appeals, or local building official if there is no board of appeals, may be appealed to the commission as provided by this chapter, which shall consider the matter at the commission’s next scheduled meeting.

(14) For the purposes of this section, any notice to be provided by the local building official shall be deemed to be provided to the person or entity when successfully transmitted to the facsimile number listed for that person or entity in the permit application or revised permit application, or, if no facsimile number is stated, when actually received by that person or entity.

(15)(a) A local enforcement agency, local building official, or local government may not adopt or enforce any laws, rules, procedures, policies, qualifications, or standards more stringent than those prescribed by this section.

(b) A local enforcement agency, local building official, or local government may establish, for private providers and duly authorized representatives working within that jurisdiction, a system of registration to verify compliance with the licensure requirements of paragraph (1)(i) and the insurance requirements of subsection (16).

(c) This section does not limit the authority of the local building official to issue a stop-work order for a building project or any portion of the project, as provided by law, if the official determines that a condition on the building site constitutes an immediate threat to public safety and welfare.

(16) A private provider may perform building code inspection services on a building project under this section only if the private provider maintains insurance for professional liability covering all services performed as a private provider. Such insurance shall have minimum policy limits of $1 million per occurrence and $2 million in the aggregate for any project with a construction cost of $5 million or less and $2 million per occurrence and $4 million in the aggregate for any project with a construction cost of over $5 million. Nothing in this section limits the ability of a fee owner to require additional insurance or higher policy limits. For these purposes, the term “construction cost” means the total cost of building construction as stated in the building permit application. If the private provider chooses to secure claims-made coverage to fulfill this requirement, the private provider must also maintain coverage for a minimum of 5 years subsequent to the performance of building code inspection services. The insurance required under this subsection shall be written only by insurers authorized to do business in this state with a minimum A.M. Best’s rating of A. Before providing building code inspection services within a local building official’s jurisdiction, a private provider must provide to the local building official a certificate of insurance evidencing that the coverages required under this subsection are in force.

(17) When performing building code inspection services, a private provider is subject to the disciplinary guidelines of the applicable professional board with jurisdiction over his or her license or certification under chapter 468, chapter 471, or chapter 481. All private providers shall be subject to the disciplinary guidelines of s. 468.621(1)(c)-(h). Any complaint processing, investigation, and discipline that arise out of a private provider’s performance of building code inspection services shall be conducted by the applicable professional board.

(18) Each local building code enforcement agency may audit the performance of building code inspection services by private providers operating within the local jurisdiction. Work on a building or structure may proceed after inspection and approval by a private provider if the provider has given notice of the inspection pursuant to subsection (9) and, subsequent to such inspection and approval, the work shall not be delayed for completion of an inspection audit by the local building code enforcement agency.

(19) The local government, the local building official, and their building code enforcement personnel shall be immune from liability to any person or party for any action or inaction by a fee owner of a building, or by a private provider or its duly authorized representative, in connection with building code inspection services as authorized in this act.

History.—s. 17, ch. 2002-293; s. 106, ch. 2005-2; s. 11, ch. 2005-147; s. 1, ch. 2005-216; s. 6, ch. 2006-65; s. 6, ch. 2007-187; s. 141, ch. 2008-4; s. 77, ch. 2012-30.

553.792 Building permit application to local government.—
(1) Within 10 days of an applicant submitting an application to the local government, the local government shall advise the applicant what information, if any, is needed to deem the application properly completed in compliance with the filing requirements published by the local government. If the local government does not provide written notice that the applicant has not submitted the properly completed application, the application shall be automatically deemed properly completed and accepted. Within 45 days after receiving a completed application, a local government must notify an applicant if additional information is required for the local government to determine the sufficiency of the application, and shall specify the additional information that is required. The applicant must submit the additional information to the local government or request that the local government act without the additional information. While the applicant responds to the request for additional information, the 120-day period described in this subsection is tolled. Both parties may agree to a reasonable request for an extension of time, particularly in the event of a force major or other extraordinary circumstance. The local government must approve, approve with conditions, or deny the application within 120 days following receipt of a completed application.

(2) The procedures set forth in subsection (1) apply to the following building permit applications: accessory structure; alarm permit; nonresidential buildings less than 25,000 square feet; electric; irrigation permit; landscaping; mechanical; plumbing; residential units other than a single family unit; multifamily residential not exceeding 50 units; roofing; signs; site-plan approvals and subdivision plats not requiring public hearings or public notice; and lot grading and site alteration associated with the permit application set forth in this subsection. The procedures set forth in subsection (1) do not apply to permits for any wireless communications facilities or when a law, agency rule, or local ordinance specify different timeframes for review of local building permit applications.

History.—s. 35, ch. 2005-147; s. 63, ch. 2006-1.

553.793 Streamlined low-voltage alarm system installation permitting.—
(1) As used in this section, the term:
(a) “Contractor” means a person who is qualified to engage in the business of electrical or alarm system contracting pursuant to a certificate or registration issued by the department under part II of chapter 489.

(b) “Low-voltage alarm system project” means a project related to the installation, maintenance, inspection, replacement, or service of a new or existing alarm system, as defined in s. 489.505, that is hardwired and operating at low voltage, as defined in the National Electrical Code Standard 70, Current Edition, and ancillary components or equipment attached to such a system, including, but not limited to, home-automation equipment, thermostats, and video cameras.

(c) “Wireless alarm system” means a burglar alarm system or smoke detector that is not hardwired.

(2) Notwithstanding any provision of law, this section applies to all low-voltage alarm system projects for which a permit is required by a local enforcement agency. However, a permit is not required to install, maintain, inspect, replace, or service a wireless alarm system, including any ancillary components or equipment attached to the system.

(3) This section does not apply to the installation or replacement of a fire alarm if a plan review is required.

(4) A local enforcement agency shall make uniform basic permit labels available for purchase by a contractor to be used for the installation or replacement of a new or existing alarm system at a cost of not more than $40 per label per project per unit. The local enforcement agency may not require the payment of any additional fees, charges, or expenses associated with the installation or replacement of a new or existing alarm system.
(a) A local enforcement agency may not require a contractor, as a condition of purchasing a label, to submit any information other than identification information of the licensee and proof of registration or certification as a contractor.

(b) A label is valid for 1 year after the date of purchase and may only be used within the jurisdiction of the local enforcement agency that issued the label. A contractor may purchase labels in bulk for one or more unspecified current or future projects.

(5) A contractor shall post an unused uniform basic permit label in a conspicuous place on the premises of the low-voltage alarm system project site before commencing work on the project.

(6) A contractor is not required to notify the local enforcement agency before commencing work on a low-voltage alarm system project. However, a contractor must submit a Uniform Notice of a Low-Voltage Alarm System Project as provided under subsection (7) to the local enforcement agency within 14 days after completing the project. A local enforcement agency may take disciplinary action against a contractor who fails to timely submit a Uniform Notice of a Low-Voltage Alarm System Project.

(7) The Uniform Notice of a Low-Voltage Alarm System Project may be submitted electronically or by facsimile if all submissions are signed by the owner, tenant, contractor, or authorized representative of such persons. The Uniform Notice of a Low-Voltage Alarm System Project must contain the following information:UNIFORM NOTICE OF A LOW-VOLTAGE
ALARM SYSTEM PROJECT
Owner’s or Customer’s Name  
Owner’s or Customer’s Address  
City  
State  Zip 
Phone Number  
E-mail Address  
Contractor’s Name  
Contractor’s Address   
City  
State  Zip 
Phone Number 
Contractor’s License Number  
Date Project Completed  
Scope of Work   
Notice is hereby given that a low-voltage alarm system project has been completed at the address specified above. I certify that all of the foregoing information is true and accurate.
  (Signature of Owner, Tenant, Contractor, or Authorized Representative)  

(8) A local enforcement agency may coordinate directly with the owner or customer to inspect a low-voltage alarm system project to ensure compliance with applicable codes and standards. If a low-voltage alarm system project fails an inspection, the contractor must take corrective action as necessary to pass inspection.

(9) A municipality, county, district, or other entity of local government may not adopt or maintain in effect any ordinance or rule regarding a low-voltage alarm system project that is inconsistent with this section.

(10) A uniform basic permit label shall not be required for the subsequent maintenance, inspection, or service of an alarm system that was permitted in accordance with this section.

History.—s. 2, ch. 2013-203; s. 1, ch. 2015-50.

553.794 Local government residential master building permit program.—
(1) MASTER BUILDING PERMIT PROGRAM CREATION.—If a local building code administrator licensed under part XII of chapter 468 receives a written request from a general, building, or residential contractor licensed under chapter 489 requesting the creation of a master building permit program, the applicable local government shall create such program within 6 months after receipt of the written request. The master building permit program is intended for use by builders who expect to construct identical single-family or two-family dwellings or townhomes on a repetitive basis. The master building permit program must be designed to achieve standardization and consistency during the permitting process and to reduce the time spent by local building departments during the site-specific building permit application process.

(2) DEFINITIONS.—For purposes of this section, the term:
(a) “Building orientation” means the placement of a building on a parcel of land with respect to weathering elements such as sun, wind, and rain and environmental factors like topography.

(b) “Elevation” means a construction drawing that is drawn to scale and depicts the external face of the dwelling or townhome to be constructed.

(3) MASTER BUILDING PERMIT APPLICATION.—To obtain a master building permit, a builder must submit the following information to the local building department:
(a) A completed master building permit application.

(b) A general construction plan that complies with subsection (4).

(c) All general construction plan pages, documents, and drawings, including structural calculations if required by the local building department, signed and sealed by the design professional of record, along with a written acknowledgment from the design professional that the plan pages, documents, and drawings contained within the master building permit application will be used for future site-specific building permit applications. The design professional of record must be a licensed engineer or architect.

(d) Truss specifications, signed and sealed by the truss design engineer. The design professional of record must stamp and sign the truss layout sheet as reviewed and approved for each model design.

(e) Energy performance calculations for all building orientations. The calculations must consider worst-case scenarios for the relevant climate zone and must include component and cladding product approvals for all windows, pedestrian doors, garage doors, glazed opening impact protection devices, truss anchors, roof underlayments, and roof coverings. The design professional of record must stamp and sign all product approvals as reviewed and approved for use with each model design.

(4) GENERAL CONSTRUCTION PLAN.—The general construction plan submitted as part of a master building permit application:
(a) May be submitted in electronic or paper format, as required by the local building department. A plan submitted in paper format must be a minimum of 36 inches by 48 inches or must comply with requirements of the local building department.

(b) Shall include left-hand and right-hand building orientations, including floor plans.

(c) Shall include a model design which may include up to four alternate exterior elevations, each containing the same living space footprint. The model design:
1. May not contain more than three alternate garage layouts, with each garage layout limited to accommodating no more than three cars.

2. Must include a foundation plan.

3. Must contain a truss layout sheet for each exterior elevation that is compatible with the roof plan.

(d) Must show typical wall sections from the foundation to the roof.

(e) Must contain a complete set of applicable electrical, plumbing, fuel gas, and mechanical plans.

(f) Must contain window, door, and glazed opening impact protection device schedules, if applicable.

(g) Must meet any other requirements of the local building department.

(5) MASTER BUILDING PERMIT APPLICATION APPROVAL PROCESS.—
(a) A builder may submit to the local building department a master building permit application that contains the information identified in subsection (3). Once a master building permit application is approved as provided in this subsection, the local building department may only require the builder to submit the documents identified in subsection (7) for each site-specific building permit application for a single-family or two-family dwelling or townhome.

(b) The local building department shall review the general construction plan submitted as part of the master building permit application to determine compliance with existing building code requirements. If the general construction plan is approved and all documents provided pursuant to subsections (3) and (4) are verified, the builder shall receive a master building permit and permit number.

(c) The local building department must approve or deny a master building permit application within 120 days after the local building department receives a completed application, unless the applicant agrees to a longer period.

(d) A builder may submit the master building permit number an unlimited number of times, and such number applies to each subsequent dwelling or townhome to be built as long as the builder uses the model design contained in the master building permit and meets the requirement of paragraph (e).

(e) An approved master building permit remains valid until the Florida Building Code is updated as provided in s. 553.73.

(6) REVISIONS TO MASTER BUILDING PERMIT.—Once a master building permit has been approved, a local building department:
(a) May not allow structural revisions to the master building.

(b) May allow limited nonstructural revisions to the master building so long as any revised floor plan is submitted to and approved by the local building department.

(c) May accept limited field revisions, as determined by the local building department.

(7) SITE-SPECIFIC BUILDING PERMIT APPLICATIONS.—Once a master building permit is approved, the builder is only required to submit the following information for each site-specific building permit application for a single-family or two-family dwelling or townhome:
(a) A completed site-specific building permit application that includes the master building permit number and identifies the model design to be built, including elevation and garage style.

(b) Three signed and sealed copies of the lot or parcel survey or site plan, as applicable. The survey or site plan must indicate the Federal Emergency Management Agency flood zone, base flood elevation, and minimum finished floor elevation and must conform to local zoning regulations. Lot or parcel drainage indicators must be shown along with site elevations.

(c) An affidavit by the licensed engineer of record affirming that the master building permit is a true and correct copy of the master building permit on file with the local building department. The affidavit must reference the master building permit number. The licensed engineer of record must affirm that the master building permit will conform to soil conditions on the specific site.

(d) Complete mechanical drawings of the model design, including HVAC heating and cooling load calculations and equipment specifications.

(e) Specific information that was not included in the master building permit application addressing the HVAC system design, including duct design and heating and cooling load calculations.

(8) FEES.—The governing body of the applicable local government shall set fees pursuant to s. 553.80(7).

(9) PENALTIES.—In addition to any other penalty provided by law, a builder or design professional who willfully violates this section shall be fined $10,000 for each dwelling or townhome that is built under the master building permit that does not conform to the master building permit on file with the local building department.

(10) PROGRAM GUIDELINES.—Each local government may adopt procedures to provide master building permit program guidelines and requirements for the submission and approval of materials and applications.

History.—s. 1, ch. 2015-156.

553.80 Enforcement.—
(1) Except as provided in paragraphs (a)-(g), each local government and each legally constituted enforcement district with statutory authority shall regulate building construction and, where authorized in the state agency’s enabling legislation, each state agency shall enforce the Florida Building Code required by this part on all public or private buildings, structures, and facilities, unless such responsibility has been delegated to another unit of government pursuant to s. 553.79(9).
(a) Construction regulations relating to correctional facilities under the jurisdiction of the Department of Corrections and the Department of Juvenile Justice are to be enforced exclusively by those departments.

(b) Construction regulations relating to elevator equipment under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Elevators of the Department of Business and Professional Regulation shall be enforced exclusively by that department.

(c) In addition to the requirements of s. 553.79 and this section, facilities subject to the provisions of chapter 395 and parts II and VIII of chapter 400 shall have facility plans reviewed and construction surveyed by the state agency authorized to do so under the requirements of chapter 395 and parts II and VIII of chapter 400 and the certification requirements of the Federal Government. Facilities subject to the provisions of part IV of chapter 400 may have facility plans reviewed and shall have construction surveyed by the state agency authorized to do so under the requirements of part IV of chapter 400 and the certification requirements of the Federal Government.

(d) Building plans approved under s. 553.77(3) and state-approved manufactured buildings, including buildings manufactured and assembled offsite and not intended for habitation, such as lawn storage buildings and storage sheds, are exempt from local code enforcing agency plan reviews except for provisions of the code relating to erection, assembly, or construction at the site. Erection, assembly, and construction at the site are subject to local permitting and inspections. Lawn storage buildings and storage sheds bearing the insignia of approval of the department are not subject to s. 553.842. Such buildings that do not exceed 400 square feet may be delivered and installed without need of a contractor’s or specialty license.

(e) Construction regulations governing public schools, state universities, and Florida College System institutions shall be enforced as provided in subsection (6).

(f) The Florida Building Code as it pertains to toll collection facilities under the jurisdiction of the turnpike enterprise of the Department of Transportation shall be enforced exclusively by the turnpike enterprise.

(g) Construction regulations relating to secure mental health treatment facilities under the jurisdiction of the Department of Children and Families shall be enforced exclusively by the department in conjunction with the Agency for Health Care Administration’s review authority under paragraph (c).

The governing bodies of local governments may provide a schedule of fees, as authorized by s. 125.56(2) or s. 166.222 and this section, for the enforcement of the provisions of this part. Such fees shall be used solely for carrying out the local government’s responsibilities in enforcing the Florida Building Code. The authority of state enforcing agencies to set fees for enforcement shall be derived from authority existing on July 1, 1998. However, nothing contained in this subsection shall operate to limit such agencies from adjusting their fee schedule in conformance with existing authority.

(2)(a) Any two or more counties or municipalities, or any combination thereof, may, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 163, governing interlocal agreements, form an enforcement district for the purpose of enforcing and administering the provisions of the Florida Building Code. Each district so formed shall be registered with the department on forms to be provided for that purpose. Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to supersede provisions of county charters which preempt municipal authorities respective to building codes.

(b) With respect to evaluation of design professionals’ documents, if a local government finds it necessary, in order to enforce compliance with the Florida Building Code and issue a permit, to reject design documents required by the code three or more times for failure to correct a code violation specifically and continuously noted in each rejection, including, but not limited to, egress, fire protection, structural stability, energy, accessibility, lighting, ventilation, electrical, mechanical, plumbing, and gas systems, or other requirements identified by rule of the Florida Building Commission adopted pursuant to chapter 120, the local government shall impose, each time after the third such review the plans are rejected for that code violation, a fee of four times the amount of the proportion of the permit fee attributed to plans review.

(c) With respect to inspections, if a local government finds it necessary, in order to enforce compliance with the Florida Building Code, to conduct any inspection after an initial inspection and one subsequent reinspection of any project or activity for the same code violation specifically and continuously noted in each rejection, including, but not limited to, egress, fire protection, structural stability, energy, accessibility, lighting, ventilation, electrical, mechanical, plumbing, and gas systems, or other requirements identified by rule of the Florida Building Commission adopted pursuant to chapter 120, the local government shall impose a fee of four times the amount of the fee imposed for the initial inspection or first reinspection, whichever is greater, for each such subsequent reinspection.

(3)(a) Each enforcement district shall be governed by a board, the composition of which shall be determined by the affected localities.

(b)1. At its own option, each enforcement district or local enforcement agency may adopt rules granting to the owner of a single-family residence one or more exemptions from the Florida Building Code relating to:
a. Addition, alteration, or repairs performed by the property owner upon his or her own property, provided any addition or alteration shall not exceed 1,000 square feet or the square footage of the primary structure, whichever is less.

b. Addition, alteration, or repairs by a nonowner within a specific cost limitation set by rule, provided the total cost shall not exceed $5,000 within any 12-month period.

c. Building and inspection fees.

2. However, the exemptions under subparagraph 1. do not apply to single-family residences that are located in mapped flood hazard areas, as defined in the code, unless the enforcement district or local enforcement agency has determined that the work, which is otherwise exempt, does not constitute a substantial improvement, including the repair of substantial damage, of such single-family residences.

3. Each code exemption, as defined in sub-subparagraphs 1.a., b., and c., shall be certified to the local board 10 days prior to implementation and shall only be effective in the territorial jurisdiction of the enforcement district or local enforcement agency implementing it.

(4) When an enforcement district has been formed as provided herein, upon its registration with the department, it shall have the same authority and responsibility with respect to building codes as provided by this part for local governing bodies.

(5) State and regional agencies with special expertise in building code standards and licensing of contractors and design professionals shall provide support to local governments upon request.

(6) Notwithstanding any other law, state universities, Florida College System institutions, and public school districts shall be subject to enforcement of the Florida Building Code under this part.

(a)1. State universities, Florida College System institutions, or public school districts shall conduct plan review and construction inspections to enforce building code compliance for their building projects that are subject to the Florida Building Code. These entities must use personnel or contract providers appropriately certified under part XII of chapter 468 to perform the plan reviews and inspections required by the code. Under these arrangements, the entities are not subject to local government permitting requirements, plans review, and inspection fees. State universities, Florida College System institutions, and public school districts are liable and responsible for all of their buildings, structures, and facilities. This paragraph does not limit the authority of the county, municipality, or code enforcement district to ensure that buildings, structures, and facilities owned by these entities comply with the Florida Building Code or to limit the authority and responsibility of the fire official to conduct firesafety inspections under chapter 633.

2. In order to enforce building code compliance independent of a county or municipality, a state university, Florida College System institution, or public school district may create a board of adjustment and appeal to which a substantially affected party may appeal an interpretation of the Florida Building Code which relates to a specific project. The decisions of this board, or, in its absence, the decision of the building code administrator, may be reviewed under s. 553.775.

(b) If a state university, Florida College System institution, or public school district elects to use a local government’s code enforcement offices:
1. Fees charged by counties and municipalities for enforcement of the Florida Building Code on buildings, structures, and facilities of state universities, state colleges, and public school districts may not be more than the actual labor and administrative costs incurred for plans review and inspections to ensure compliance with the code.

2. Counties and municipalities shall expedite building construction permitting, building plans review, and inspections of projects of state universities, Florida College System institutions, and public schools that are subject to the Florida Building Code according to guidelines established by the Florida Building Commission.

3. A party substantially affected by an interpretation of the Florida Building Code by the local government’s code enforcement offices may appeal the interpretation to the local government’s board of adjustment and appeal or to the commission under s. 553.775 if no local board exists. The decision of a local board is reviewable in accordance with s. 553.775.

(c) The Florida Building Commission and code enforcement jurisdictions shall consider balancing code criteria and enforcement to unique functions, where they occur, of research institutions by application of performance criteria in lieu of prescriptive criteria.

(d) School boards, Florida College System institution boards, and state universities may use annual facility maintenance permits to facilitate routine maintenance, emergency repairs, building refurbishment, and minor renovations of systems or equipment. The amount expended for maintenance projects may not exceed $200,000 per project. A facility maintenance permit is valid for 1 year. A detailed log of alterations and inspections must be maintained and annually submitted to the building official. The building official retains the right to make inspections at the facility site as he or she considers necessary. Code compliance must be provided upon notification by the building official. If a pattern of code violations is found, the building official may withhold the issuance of future annual facility maintenance permits.

This part may not be construed to authorize counties, municipalities, or code enforcement districts to conduct any permitting, plans review, or inspections not covered by the Florida Building Code. Any actions by counties or municipalities not in compliance with this part may be appealed to the Florida Building Commission. The commission, upon a determination that actions not in compliance with this part have delayed permitting or construction, may suspend the authority of a county, municipality, or code enforcement district to enforce the Florida Building Code on the buildings, structures, or facilities of a state university, Florida College System institution, or public school district and provide for code enforcement at the expense of the state university, Florida College System institution, or public school district.

(7) The governing bodies of local governments may provide a schedule of reasonable fees, as authorized by s. 125.56(2) or s. 166.222 and this section, for enforcing this part. These fees, and any fines or investment earnings related to the fees, shall be used solely for carrying out the local government’s responsibilities in enforcing the Florida Building Code. When providing a schedule of reasonable fees, the total estimated annual revenue derived from fees, and the fines and investment earnings related to the fees, may not exceed the total estimated annual costs of allowable activities. Any unexpended balances shall be carried forward to future years for allowable activities or shall be refunded at the discretion of the local government. The basis for a fee structure for allowable activities shall relate to the level of service provided by the local government and shall include consideration for refunding fees due to reduced services based on services provided as prescribed by s. 553.791, but not provided by the local government. Fees charged shall be consistently applied.
(a) As used in this subsection, the phrase “enforcing the Florida Building Code” includes the direct costs and reasonable indirect costs associated with review of building plans, building inspections, reinspections, and building permit processing; building code enforcement; and fire inspections associated with new construction. The phrase may also include training costs associated with the enforcement of the Florida Building Code and enforcement action pertaining to unlicensed contractor activity to the extent not funded by other user fees.

(b) The following activities may not be funded with fees adopted for enforcing the Florida Building Code:
1. Planning and zoning or other general government activities.

2. Inspections of public buildings for a reduced fee or no fee.

3. Public information requests, community functions, boards, and any program not directly related to enforcement of the Florida Building Code.

4. Enforcement and implementation of any other local ordinance, excluding validly adopted local amendments to the Florida Building Code and excluding any local ordinance directly related to enforcing the Florida Building Code as defined in paragraph (a).

(c) A local government shall use recognized management, accounting, and oversight practices to ensure that fees, fines, and investment earnings generated under this subsection are maintained and allocated or used solely for the purposes described in paragraph (a).

(8) The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is not subject to local government permitting requirements, plan review, or inspection fees for agricultural structures, such as equipment storage sheds and pole barns that are not used by the public.

History.—s. 11, ch. 74-167; s. 3, ch. 75-111; s. 5, ch. 77-365; s. 3, ch. 85-97; s. 805, ch. 97-103; ss. 50, 51, ch. 98-287; ss. 85, 86, ch. 2000-141; ss. 34, 35, ch. 2001-186; ss. 3, 4, ch. 2001-372; s. 87, ch. 2002-1; s. 27, ch. 2002-20; s. 12, ch. 2005-147; s. 64, ch. 2006-1; s. 15, ch. 2008-191; s. 37, ch. 2010-176; s. 127, ch. 2014-17; s. 276, ch. 2014-19; s. 23, ch. 2014-154.

553.83 Injunctive relief.—Any local government, legally constituted enforcement district, or state agency authorized to enforce sections of the Florida Building Code under s. 553.80 may seek injunctive relief from any court of competent jurisdiction to enjoin the offering for sale, delivery, use, occupancy, erection, alteration, or installation of any building covered by this part, upon an affidavit of the local government, code enforcement district, or state agency specifying the manner in which the building does not conform to the requirements of the Florida Building Code, or local amendments to the Florida Building Code. Noncompliance with the building code promulgated under this part shall be considered prima facie evidence of irreparable damage in any cause of action brought under authority of this part.
History.—s. 14, ch. 74-167; s. 5, ch. 77-365; s. 87, ch. 2000-141; s. 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372.

553.835 Implied warranties.—
(1) The Legislature finds that the courts have reached different conclusions concerning the scope and extent of the common law doctrine or theory of implied warranty of fitness and merchantability or habitability for improvements immediately supporting the structure of a new home, which creates uncertainty in the state’s fragile real estate and construction industry.

(2) It is the intent of the Legislature to affirm the limitations to the doctrine or theory of implied warranty of fitness and merchantability or habitability associated with the construction and sale of a new home.

(3) As used in this section, the term “offsite improvement” means:
(a) The street, road, driveway, sidewalk, drainage, utilities, or any other improvement or structure that is not located on or under the lot on which a new home is constructed, excluding such improvements that are shared by and part of the overall structure of two or more separately owned homes that are adjoined or attached whereby such improvements affect the fitness and merchantability or habitability of one or more of the other adjoining structures; and

(b) The street, road, driveway, sidewalk, drainage, utilities, or any other improvement or structure that is located on or under the lot but that does not immediately and directly support the fitness and merchantability or habitability of the home itself.

(4) There is no cause of action in law or equity available to a purchaser of a home or to a homeowners’ association based upon the doctrine or theory of implied warranty of fitness and merchantability or habitability for damages to offsite improvements. However, this section does not alter or limit the existing rights of purchasers of homes or homeowners’ associations to pursue any other cause of action arising from defects in offsite improvements based upon contract, tort, or statute, including, but not limited to, ss. 718.203 and 719.203.

History.—s. 1, ch. 2012-161.

553.84 Statutory civil action.—Notwithstanding any other remedies available, any person or party, in an individual capacity or on behalf of a class of persons or parties, damaged as a result of a violation of this part or the Florida Building Code, has a cause of action in any court of competent jurisdiction against the person or party who committed the violation; however, if the person or party obtains the required building permits and any local government or public agency with authority to enforce the Florida Building Code approves the plans, if the construction project passes all required inspections under the code, and if there is no personal injury or damage to property other than the property that is the subject of the permits, plans, and inspections, this section does not apply unless the person or party knew or should have known that the violation existed.
History.—s. 15, ch. 74-167; s. 88, ch. 2000-141; ss. 28, 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372.

553.841 Building code compliance and mitigation program.—
(1) The Legislature finds that knowledge and understanding by persons licensed or employed in the design and construction industries of the importance and need for complying with the Florida Building Code and related laws is vital to the public health, safety, and welfare of this state, especially for protecting consumers and mitigating damage caused by hurricanes to residents and visitors to the state. The Legislature further finds that the Florida Building Code can be effective only if all participants in the design and construction industries maintain a thorough knowledge of the code, code compliance and enforcement, duties related to consumers, and changes that improve construction standards, project completion, and compliance of design and construction to protect against consumer harm, storm damage, and other damage. Consequently, the Legislature finds that there is a need for a program to provide ongoing education and outreach activities concerning compliance with the Florida Building Code, the Florida Fire Prevention Code, construction plan and permitting requirements, construction liens, and hurricane mitigation.

(2) The Department of Business and Professional Regulation shall administer a program, designated as the Florida Building Code Compliance and Mitigation Program, to develop, coordinate, and maintain education and outreach to persons required to comply with the Florida Building Code and related provisions as specified in subsection (1) and ensure consistent education, training, and communication of the code’s requirements, including, but not limited to, methods for design and construction compliance and mitigation of storm-related damage. The program shall also operate a clearinghouse through which design, construction, and building code enforcement licensees, suppliers, and consumers in this state may find others in order to exchange information relating to mitigation and facilitate repairs in the aftermath of a natural disaster.

(3) All services and materials under the Florida Building Code Compliance and Mitigation Program must be provided by a private, nonprofit corporation under contract with the department. The term of the contract shall be for 4 years, with the option of one 4-year renewal at the end of the contract term. The initial contract must be in effect no later than November 1, 2007. The private, nonprofit corporation must be an organization whose membership includes trade and professional organizations whose members consist primarily of persons and entities that are required to comply with the Florida Building Code and that are licensed under part XII of chapter 468, chapter 471, chapter 481, or chapter 489. When selecting the private, nonprofit corporation for the program, the department must give primary consideration to the corporation’s demonstrated experience and the ability to:
(a) Develop and deliver building code-related education, training, and outreach;

(b) Directly access the majority of persons licensed in the occupations of design, construction, and building code enforcement individually and through established statewide trade and professional association networks;

(c) Serve as a clearinghouse to deliver education and outreach throughout the state. The clearinghouse must serve as a focal point at which persons licensed to design, construct, and enforce building codes and suppliers and consumers can find each other in order to exchange information relating to mitigation and facilitate repairs in the aftermath of a natural disaster;

(d) Accept input from the Florida Building Commission, licensing regulatory boards, local building departments, and the design and construction industries in order to improve its education and outreach programs; and

(e) Promote design and construction techniques and materials for mitigating hurricane damage at a Florida-based trade conference that includes participants from the broadest possible range of design and construction trades and professions, including from those private and public sector entities having jurisdiction over building codes and design and construction licensure.

(4) In administering the Florida Building Code Compliance and Mitigation Program, the department shall maintain, update, develop, or cause to be developed advanced modules designed for use by each profession.

(5) Each biennium, upon receipt of funds by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation from the Construction Industry Licensing Board and the Electrical Contractors’ Licensing Board provided under ss. 489.109(3) and 489.509(3), the department shall determine the amount of funds available for the Florida Building Code Compliance and Mitigation Program.

(6) If the projects provided through the Florida Building Code Compliance and Mitigation Program in any state fiscal year do not require the use of all available funds, the unused funds shall be carried forward and allocated for use during the following fiscal year.

(7) The Florida Building Commission shall provide by rule for the accreditation of courses related to the Florida Building Code by accreditors approved by the commission. The commission shall establish qualifications of accreditors and criteria for the accreditation of courses by rule. The commission may revoke the accreditation of a course by an accreditor if the accreditation is demonstrated to violate this part or the rules of the commission.

(8) This section does not prohibit or limit the subject areas or development of continuing education or training on the Florida Building Code by any qualified entity.

History.—s. 52, ch. 98-287; s. 89, ch. 2000-141; s. 59, ch. 2004-357; s. 14, ch. 2005-147; s. 7, ch. 2007-187; s. 38, ch. 2010-176; s. 416, ch. 2011-142; s. 24, ch. 2014-154.

553.842 Product evaluation and approval.—
(1) The commission shall adopt rules under ss. 120.536(1) and 120.54 to develop and implement a product evaluation and approval system that applies statewide to operate in coordination with the Florida Building Code. The commission may enter into contracts to provide for administration of the product evaluation and approval system. The commission’s rules and any applicable contract may provide that the payment of fees related to approvals be made directly to the administrator. Any fee paid by a product manufacturer shall be used only for funding the product evaluation and approval system. The product evaluation and approval system shall provide:
(a) Appropriate promotion of innovation and new technologies.

(b) Processing submittals of products from manufacturers in a timely manner.

(c) Independent, third-party qualified and accredited testing and laboratory facilities, product evaluation entities, quality assurance agencies, certification agencies, and validation entities.

(d) An easily accessible product acceptance list to entities subject to the Florida Building Code.

(e) Development of stringent but reasonable testing criteria based upon existing consensus standards, when available, for products.

(f) Long-term approvals, where feasible. State and local approvals will be valid until the requirements of the code on which the approval is based change, the product changes in a manner affecting its performance as required by the code, or the approval is revoked. However, the commission may authorize by rule editorial revisions to approvals and charge a fee as provided in this section.

(g) Criteria for revocation of a product approval.

(h) Cost-effectiveness.

(2) The product evaluation and approval system shall rely on national and international consensus standards, whenever adopted by the Florida Building Code, for demonstrating compliance with code standards. Other standards which meet or exceed established state requirements shall also be considered.

(3) Products or methods or systems of construction that require approval under s. 553.77, that have standardized testing or comparative or rational analysis methods established by the code, and that are certified by an approved product evaluation entity, testing laboratory, or certification agency as complying with the standards specified by the code shall be approved for statewide use. Products required to be approved for statewide use shall be approved by one of the methods established in subsection (5) without further evaluation.

(4) Products or methods or systems of construction requiring approval under s. 553.77 must be approved by one of the methods established in subsection (5) before their use in construction in this state. Products may be approved by the commission for statewide use. Notwithstanding a local government’s authority to amend the Florida Building Code as provided in this act, statewide approval shall preclude local jurisdictions from requiring further testing, evaluation, or submission of other evidence as a condition of using the product so long as the product is being used consistent with the conditions of its approval.

(5) Statewide approval of products, methods, or systems of construction may be achieved by one of the following methods. One of these methods must be used by the commission to approve the following categories of products: panel walls, exterior doors, roofing, skylights, windows, shutters, impact protective systems, and structural components as established by the commission by rule. A product may not be advertised, sold, offered, provided, distributed, or marketed as hurricane, windstorm, or impact protection from wind-borne debris from a hurricane or windstorm unless it is approved pursuant to this section or s. 553.8425. Any person who advertises, sells, offers, provides, distributes, or markets a product as hurricane, windstorm, or impact protection from wind-borne debris without such approval is subject to the Florida Deceptive and Unfair Trade Practices Act under part II of chapter 501 brought by the enforcing authority as defined in s. 501.203.
(a) Products for which the code establishes standardized testing or comparative or rational analysis methods shall be approved by submittal and validation of one of the following reports or listings indicating that the product or method or system of construction was in compliance with the Florida Building Code and that the product or method or system of construction is, for the purpose intended, at least equivalent to that required by the Florida Building Code:
1. A certification mark or listing of an approved certification agency, which may be used only for products for which the code designates standardized testing;

2. A test report from an approved testing laboratory;

3. A product evaluation report based upon testing or comparative or rational analysis, or a combination thereof, from an approved product evaluation entity; or

4. A product evaluation report based upon testing or comparative or rational analysis, or a combination thereof, developed and signed and sealed by a professional engineer or architect, licensed in this state.

A product evaluation report or a certification mark or listing of an approved certification agency which demonstrates that the product or method or system of construction complies with the Florida Building Code for the purpose intended is equivalent to a test report and test procedure referenced in the Florida Building Code. An application for state approval of a product under subparagraph 1. or subparagraph 3. must be approved by the department after the commission staff or a designee verifies that the application and related documentation are complete. This verification must be completed within 10 business days after receipt of the application. Upon approval by the department, the product shall be immediately added to the list of state-approved products maintained under subsection (13). Approvals by the department shall be reviewed and ratified by the commission’s program oversight committee except for a showing of good cause that a review by the full commission is necessary. The commission shall adopt rules providing means to cure deficiencies identified within submittals for products approved under this paragraph.

(b) Products, methods, or systems of construction for which there are no specific standardized testing or comparative or rational analysis methods established in the code may be approved by submittal and validation of one of the following:
1. A product evaluation report based upon testing or comparative or rational analysis, or a combination thereof, from an approved product evaluation entity indicating that the product or method or system of construction was in compliance with the intent of the Florida Building Code and that the product or method or system of construction is, for the purpose intended, at least equivalent to that required by the Florida Building Code; or

2. A product evaluation report based upon testing or comparative or rational analysis, or a combination thereof, developed and signed and sealed by a professional engineer or architect, licensed in this state, who certifies that the product or method or system of construction is, for the purpose intended, at least equivalent to that required by the Florida Building Code.

(6) The commission shall ensure that product manufacturers that obtain statewide product approval operate quality assurance programs for all approved products. The commission shall adopt by rule criteria for operation of the quality assurance programs.

(7) For state approvals, validation shall be performed by validation entities approved by the commission. The commission shall adopt by rule criteria for approval of validation entities, which shall be third-party entities independent of the product’s manufacturer and which shall certify to the commission the product’s compliance with the code. The commission may adopt by rule a schedule of penalties to be imposed against approved validation entities that validate product applications in violation of this section or rules adopted under this section.

(8) The commission may adopt rules to approve the following types of entities that produce information on which product approvals are based. All of the following entities, including engineers and architects, must comply with a nationally recognized standard demonstrating independence or no conflict of interest:
(a) Evaluation entities approved pursuant to this paragraph. The commission shall specifically approve the National Evaluation Service, the International Association of Plumbing and Mechanical Officials Evaluation Service, the International Code Council Evaluation Services, and the Miami-Dade County Building Code Compliance Office Product Control. Architects and engineers licensed in this state are also approved to conduct product evaluations as provided in subsection (5).

(b) Testing laboratories accredited by national organizations, such as A2LA and the National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program, laboratories accredited by evaluation entities approved under paragraph (a), and laboratories that comply with other guidelines for testing laboratories selected by the commission and adopted by rule.

(c) Quality assurance entities approved by evaluation entities approved under paragraph (a) and by certification agencies approved under paragraph (d) and other quality assurance entities that comply with guidelines selected by the commission and adopted by rule.

(d) Certification agencies accredited by nationally recognized accreditors and other certification agencies that comply with guidelines selected by the commission and adopted by rule.

(e) Validation entities that comply with accreditation standards established by the commission by rule.

(9) A building official may deny the local application of a product or method or system of construction which has received statewide approval, based upon a written report signed by the official that concludes the product application is inconsistent with the statewide approval and that states the reasons the application is inconsistent. Such denial is subject to the provisions of s. 553.77 governing appeal of the building official’s interpretation of the code.

(10) Products, other than manufactured buildings, which are custom fabricated or assembled shall not require separate approval under this section provided the component parts have been approved for the fabricated or assembled product’s use and the components meet the standards and requirements of the Florida Building Code which applies to the product’s intended use.

(11) A building official may appeal the required approval for local use of a product or method or system of construction to the commission. The commission shall conduct a hearing under chapter 120 and the uniform rules of procedure and shall handle such appeals in an expedited manner.

(12) The decisions of local building officials shall be appealable to the local board of appeals, if such board exists, and then to the commission, which shall conduct a hearing under chapter 120 and the uniform rules of procedure. Decisions of the commission regarding statewide product approvals and appeals of local product approval shall be subject to judicial review pursuant to s. 120.68.

(13) The commission shall maintain a list of the state-approved products, product evaluation entities, testing laboratories, quality assurance agencies, certification agencies, and validation entities and make such lists available in the most cost-effective manner. The commission shall establish reasonable timeframes associated with the product approval process and availability of the lists.

(14) The commission shall by rule establish criteria for revocation of product approvals as well as revocation of approvals of product evaluation entities, testing laboratories, quality assurance entities, certification agencies, and validation entities. Revocation is governed by s. 120.60 and the uniform rules of procedure.

(15) The commission may adopt a rule listing the prescriptive, material standards and alternative means by which products subject to those standards may demonstrate compliance with the code.

(16) The commission may adopt a rule that identifies standards that are equivalent to or more stringent than those specifically adopted by the code, thereby allowing the use in this state of the products that comply with the equivalent standard.

History.—s. 54, ch. 98-287; s. 90, ch. 2000-141; s. 30, ch. 2001-186; s. 18, ch. 2002-293; s. 16, ch. 2005-147; s. 65, ch. 2006-1; s. 8, ch. 2007-187; s. 16, ch. 2008-191; s. 39, ch. 2010-176; s. 32, ch. 2011-222; s. 17, ch. 2013-193.

553.8425 Local product approval.—
(1) For local product approval, products or systems of construction shall demonstrate compliance with the structural windload requirements of the Florida Building Code through one of the following methods:
(a) A certification mark, listing, or label from a commission-approved certification agency indicating that the product complies with the code;

(b) A test report from a commission-approved testing laboratory indicating that the product tested complies with the code;

(c) A product-evaluation report based upon testing, comparative or rational analysis, or a combination thereof, from a commission-approved product evaluation entity which indicates that the product evaluated complies with the code;

(d) A product-evaluation report or certification based upon testing or comparative or rational analysis, or a combination thereof, developed and signed and sealed by a Florida professional engineer or Florida registered architect, which indicates that the product complies with the code;

(e) A statewide product approval issued by the Florida Building Commission; or

(f) Designation of compliance with a prescriptive, material standard adopted by the commission by rule under s. 553.842(15).

(2) For product-evaluation reports that indicate compliance with the code based upon a test report from an approved testing laboratory and rational or comparative analysis by a Florida registered architect or Florida professional engineer, the testing laboratory or the evaluating architect or engineer must certify independence from the product manufacturer.

(3) Local building officials may accept modifications to approved products or their installations if sufficient evidence is submitted to the local building official to demonstrate compliance with the code or the intent of the code, including such evidence as certifications from a Florida registered architect or Florida professional engineer.

(4) Products demonstrating compliance shall be manufactured under a quality assurance program audited by an approved quality assurance entity.

(5) Products bearing a certification mark, label, or listing by an approved certification agency require no further documentation to establish compliance with the code.

(6) Upon review of the compliance documentation, and a finding that the product complies with the code, the authority having jurisdiction or a local building official shall deem the product approved for use in accordance with its approval and limitation of use.

(7) Approval shall be valid until such time as the product changes and decreases in performance; the standards of the code change, requiring increased performance; or the approval is otherwise suspended or revoked. Changes to the code do not void the approval of products previously installed in existing buildings if such products met building code requirements at the time the product was installed.

History.—s. 19, ch. 2005-147; s. 66, ch. 2006-1.

553.844 Windstorm loss mitigation; requirements for roofs and opening protection.—
(1) The Legislature finds that:
(a) The effects of recent hurricanes on the state have demonstrated the effectiveness of the Florida Building Code in reducing property damage to buildings constructed in accordance with its requirements, and have also exposed a vulnerability of some construction undertaken prior to implementation of the Florida Building Code.

(b) Hurricanes represent a continuing threat to the health, safety, and welfare of the residents of this state due to the direct destructive effects of hurricanes as well as their effects on windstorm insurance rates.

(c) The mitigation of property damage constitutes a valid and recognized objective of the Florida Building Code.

(d) Cost-effective techniques for integrating proven methods of the Florida Building Code into buildings built prior to its implementation benefit all residents of the state as a whole.

(2) The Florida Building Commission shall:
(a) Analyze the extent to which a proposed Florida Building Code provision will mitigate property damage to buildings and their contents in evaluating that proposal. If the nature of the proposed Florida Building Code provision relates only to mitigation of property damage and not to a lifesafety concern, the proposal shall be reviewed based on its measurable benefits in relation to the costs imposed.

(b) Develop and adopt within the Florida Building Code a means to incorporate recognized mitigation techniques for site-built, single-family residential structures constructed before the implementation of the Florida Building Code, including, but not limited to:
1. Prescriptive techniques for the installation of gable-end bracing;

2. Secondary water barriers for roofs and standards relating to secondary water barriers. The criteria may include, but need not be limited to, roof shape, slope, and composition of all elements of the roof system. The criteria may not be limited to one method or material for a secondary water barrier;

3. Prescriptive techniques for improvement of roof-to-wall connections. The Legislature recognizes that the cost of retrofitting existing buildings to meet the code requirements for new construction in this regard may exceed the practical benefit to be attained. The Legislature intends for the commission to provide for the integration of alternate, lower-cost means that may be employed to retrofit existing buildings that are not otherwise required to comply with the requirements of the Florida Building Code for new construction so that the cost of such improvements does not exceed approximately 15 percent of the cost of reroofing. Roof-to-wall connections shall not be required unless evaluation and installation of connections at gable ends or all corners can be completed for 15 percent of the cost of roof replacement. For houses that have both hip and gable roof ends, the priority shall be to retrofit the gable end roof-to-wall connections unless the width of the hip is more than 1.5 times greater than the width of the gable end. Priority shall be given to connecting the corners of roofs to walls below the locations at which the spans of the roofing members are greatest;

4. Strengthening or correcting roof-decking attachments and fasteners during reroofing; and

5. Adding or strengthening opening protections.

(3) The Legislature finds that the integration of these specifically identified mitigation measures is critical to addressing the serious problem facing the state from damage caused by windstorms and that delay in the adoption and implementation constitutes a threat to the health, safety, and welfare of the state. Accordingly, the Florida Building Commission shall develop and adopt these measures by October 1, 2007, by rule separate from the Florida Building Code, which take immediate effect and shall incorporate such requirements into the next edition of the Florida Building Code. Such rules shall require or otherwise clarify that for site-built, single-family residential structures:
(a) A roof replacement must incorporate the techniques specified in subparagraphs (2)(b)2. and 4.

(b) For a building that is located in the wind-borne debris region as defined in s. 1609.2 of the International Building Code (2006) and that has an insured value of $300,000 or more or, if the building is uninsured or for which documentation of insured value is not presented, has a just valuation for the structure for purposes of ad valorem taxation of $300,000 or more, a roof replacement must incorporate the techniques specified in subparagraph (2)(b)3.

(c) Any activity requiring a building permit that is applied for on or after July 1, 2008, and for which the estimated cost is $50,000 or more, must include provision of opening protections as required within the Florida Building Code for new construction for a building that is located in the wind-borne debris region as defined in s. 1609.2 of the International Building Code (2006) and that has an insured value of $750,000 or more, or, if the building is uninsured or for which documentation of insured value is not presented, has a just valuation for the structure for purposes of ad valorem taxation of $750,000 or more.

(4) Notwithstanding the provisions of this section, exposed mechanical equipment or appliances fastened to a roof or installed on the ground in compliance with the code using rated stands, platforms, curbs, slabs, or other means are deemed to comply with the wind resistance requirements of the 2007 Florida Building Code, as amended. Further support or enclosure of such mechanical equipment or appliances is not required by a state or local official having authority to enforce the Florida Building Code. This subsection expires on the effective date of the 2013 Florida Building Code.

History.—s. 5, ch. 2007-126; s. 17, ch. 2008-191; s. 40, ch. 2010-176; s. 16, ch. 2012-13.

553.85 Liquefied petroleum gases.—The provisions of the Florida Building Code for the design, construction, location, installation, services, and operation of equipment for storing, handling, transporting, and utilization of liquefied petroleum gases shall not be in conflict with chapter 527.
History.—s. 16, ch. 74-167; s. 91, ch. 2000-141; s. 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372.

553.86 Public restrooms; ratio of facilities for men and women; application; incorporation into the Florida Building Code.—The Florida Building Commission shall incorporate into the Florida Building Code, to be adopted by rule pursuant to s. 553.73(1), a ratio of public restroom facilities for men and women which must be provided in all buildings that are newly constructed after September 30, 1992, and that have restrooms open to the public. This section does not apply to establishments licensed under chapter 509 if the establishment does not provide meeting or banquet rooms which accommodate more than 150 persons and the establishment has at least the same number of water closets for women as the combined total of water closets and urinals for men.
History.—s. 1, ch. 92-68; s. 1, ch. 93-45; s. 68, ch. 98-287; ss. 52, 108, ch. 2000-141; s. 58, ch. 2000-154; ss. 34, 39, ch. 2001-186; ss. 3, 8, ch. 2001-372.

Note.—Former s. 553.141.

553.88 Adoption of electrical and alarm standards.—For the purpose of establishing minimum electrical and alarm standards in this state, the current edition of the following standards are adopted:
(1) “National Electrical Code,” NFPA No. 70.

(2) Underwriters’ Laboratories, Inc., “Standards for Safety, Electrical Lighting Fixtures, and Portable Lamps,” UL 57 and UL 153.

(3) Underwriters’ Laboratories, Inc., “Standard for Electric Signs,” UL 48.

(4) The provisions of the following which prescribe minimum electrical and alarm standards:
(a) NFPA No. 56A, “Inhalation Anesthetics.”

(b) NFPA No. 56B, “Respiratory Therapy.”

(c) NFPA No. 56C, “Laboratories in Health-related Institutions.”

(d) NFPA No. 56D, “Hyperbaric Facilities.”

(e) NFPA No. 56F, “Nonflammable Medical Gas Systems.”

(f) NFPA No. 72, “National Fire Alarm Code.”

(g) NFPA No. 76A, “Essential Electrical Systems for Health Care Facilities.”

(5) The rules and regulations of the Department of Health, entitled “Nursing Homes and Related Facilities Licensure.”

(6) The minimum standards for grounding of portable electric equipment, chapter 8C-27 as recommended by the Division of Workers’ Compensation, Department of Financial Services.

The Florida Building Commission shall update and maintain such electrical standards consistent with the procedures established in s. 553.73 and may recommend the National Electrical Installation Standards.
History.—s. 5, ch. 70-332; s. 1, ch. 72-292; s. 1, ch. 73-283; s. 1, ch. 75-55; s. 452, ch. 77-147; s. 1, ch. 77-174; s. 1, ch. 78-62; s. 46, ch. 79-7; s. 79, ch. 79-40; s. 1, ch. 82-15; s. 1, ch. 84-66; s. 1, ch. 84-273; s. 20, ch. 88-149; s. 1, ch. 89-74; s. 32, ch. 90-228; s. 9, ch. 91-119; ss. 35, 68, ch. 98-287; s. 49, ch. 98-419; ss. 92, 108, ch. 2000-141; s. 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372; s. 667, ch. 2003-261.

Note.—Former s. 553.19.

553.883 Smoke alarms in one-family and two-family dwellings and townhomes.—One-family and two-family dwellings and townhomes undergoing a repair, or a level 1 alteration as defined in the Florida Building Code, may use smoke alarms powered by 10-year nonremovable, nonreplaceable batteries in lieu of retrofitting such dwelling with smoke alarms powered by the dwelling’s electrical system. Effective January 1, 2015, a battery-powered smoke alarm that is newly installed or replaces an existing battery-powered smoke alarm must be powered by a nonremovable, nonreplaceable battery that powers the alarm for at least 10 years. The battery requirements of this section do not apply to a fire alarm, smoke detector, smoke alarm, or ancillary component that is electronically connected as a part of a centrally monitored or supervised alarm system.
History.—s. 25, ch. 2014-154.

553.885 Carbon monoxide alarm required.—
(1) Every separate building or addition to an existing building, other than a hospital, an inpatient hospice facility, or a nursing home facility licensed by the Agency for Health Care Administration, constructed on or after July 1, 2008, and having a fossil-fuel-burning heater or appliance, a fireplace, an attached garage, or other feature, fixture, or element that emits carbon monoxide as a byproduct of combustion shall have an approved operational carbon monoxide alarm installed within 10 feet of each room used for sleeping purposes in the new building or addition, or at such other locations as required by the Florida Building Code. The requirements of this subsection may be satisfied with the installation of a hard-wired or battery-powered carbon monoxide alarm or a hard-wired or battery-powered combination carbon monoxide and smoke alarm. For a new hospital, an inpatient hospice facility, a nursing home facility licensed by the Agency for Health Care Administration, or a new state correctional institution, an approved operational carbon monoxide detector shall be installed inside or directly outside of each room or area within the hospital or facility where a fossil-fuel-burning heater, engine, or appliance is located. This detector shall be connected to the fire alarm system of the hospital or facility as a supervisory signal. This subsection does not apply to existing buildings that are undergoing alterations or repairs unless the alteration is an addition as defined in subsection (3).

(2) The Florida Building Commission shall adopt rules to administer this section and shall incorporate such requirements into its next revision of the Florida Building Code.

(3) As used in this section, the term:
(a) “Carbon monoxide alarm” means a device that is meant for the purpose of detecting carbon monoxide, that produces a distinct audible alarm, and that meets the requirements of and is approved by the Florida Building Commission.

(b) “Fossil fuel” means coal, kerosene, oil, fuel gases, or other petroleum or hydrocarbon product that emits carbon monoxide as a by-product of combustion.

(c) “Addition” means an extension or increase in floor area, number of stories, or height of a building or structure.

History.—s. 2, ch. 2007-181; s. 18, ch. 2008-191; s. 65, ch. 2009-21; s. 41, ch. 2010-176.

553.886 Energy efficiency technologies.—The provisions of the Florida Building Code must facilitate and promote the use of cost-effective energy conservation, energy-demand management, and renewable energy technologies in buildings.
History.—s. 19, ch. 2008-191.

553.895 Firesafety.—
(1) Any transient public lodging establishment, as defined in chapter 509 and used primarily for transient occupancy as defined in s. 83.43(10), or any timeshare unit of a timeshare plan as defined in chapters 718 and 721, which is of three stories or more and for which the construction contract has been let after September 30, 1983, with interior corridors which do not have direct access from the guest area to exterior means of egress and on buildings over 75 feet in height that have direct access from the guest area to exterior means of egress and for which the construction contract has been let after September 30, 1983, shall be equipped with an automatic sprinkler system installed in compliance with the provisions prescribed in the National Fire Protection Association publication NFPA No. 13 (1985), “Standards for the Installation of Sprinkler Systems.” Each guest room and each timeshare unit shall be equipped with an approved listed single-station smoke detector meeting the minimum requirements of NFPA 74 (1984) “Standards for the Installation, Maintenance and Use of Household Fire Warning Equipment,” powered from the building electrical service, notwithstanding the number of stories in the structure, if the contract for construction is let after September 30, 1983. Single-station smoke detectors shall not be required when guest rooms or timeshare units contain smoke detectors connected to a central alarm system which also alarms locally.

(2) Except for single-family and two-family dwellings, any building which is of three stories or more and for which the construction contract is let after January 1, 1994, regardless of occupancy classification and including any building which is subject to s. 509.215, shall be equipped with an automatic sprinkler system installed in compliance with the provisions of chapter 633 and the rules and codes adopted pursuant thereto. A stand-alone parking garage constructed with noncombustible materials, the design of which is such that all levels of the garage are uniformly open to the atmosphere on all sides with percentages of openings as prescribed in the applicable building code, and which parking garage is separated from other structures by at least 20 feet, is exempt from the requirements of this subsection. Telecommunications spaces located within telecommunications buildings, if the spaces are equipped to meet an equivalent fire prevention standard approved by both the Florida Building Commission and the State Fire Marshal, are exempt from the requirements of this subsection. In a building less than 75 feet in height which is protected throughout with an approved and maintained fire sprinkler system, a manual wet standpipe, as defined in the National Fire Protection Association Standard 14, Standard for the Installation of Standpipe, Private Hydrant, and Hose Systems, shall be allowed.

History.—s. 2, ch. 83-194; s. 103, ch. 85-81; s. 8, ch. 86-174; s. 1, ch. 93-276; s. 3, ch. 95-379; s. 31, ch. 2001-186.

553.896 Mitigation grant program guideline.—
(1) The Legislature finds that facilities owned by the government and those designated to protect the public should be the first to adopt the best practices, active risk management, and improved security planning. These facilities should be protected to a higher level.

(2) Beginning with grant funds approved after July 1, 2005, the construction of new or retrofitted window or door coverings that is funded by a hazard-mitigation grant program or shelter-retrofit program must conform to design drawings that are signed, sealed, and inspected by a structural engineer who is registered in this state. Before the Division of Emergency Management forwards payment to a recipient of the grant, an inspection report and attestation or a copy of the signed and sealed plans shall be provided to the department.

(3) If the construction is funded by a hazard mitigation grant or shelter retrofit program, the Division of Emergency Management shall advise the county, municipality, or other entity applying for the grant that the cost or price of the project is not the sole criterion for selecting a vendor.

(4) A project funded under mitigation or retrofit grants is subject to inspection by the local building officials in the county in which the project is performed.

History.—s. 20, ch. 2005-147; s. 417, ch. 2011-142.

553.898 Preemption; certain special acts concerning general purpose local government repealed.—Chapter 2000-141, Laws of Florida, does not imply any repeal or sunset of existing general or special laws governing any special district that are not specifically identified by chapter 2000-141. However, chapter 2000-141 is intended as a comprehensive revision of the regulation by counties and municipalities of the design, construction, erection, alteration, modification, repair, and demolition of public and private buildings. Therefore, any sections or provisions of any special act governing those activities by any general purpose local government are hereby repealed.
History.—s. 136, ch. 2000-141.

PART V
THERMAL EFFICIENCY STANDARDS

553.900 Short title.

553.901 Purpose of thermal efficiency code.

553.902 Definitions.

553.903 Applicability.

553.904 Thermal efficiency standards for new nonresidential buildings.

553.905 Thermal efficiency standards for new residential buildings.

553.906 Thermal efficiency standards for renovated buildings.

553.907 Compliance.

553.908 Inspection.

553.9085 Energy performance disclosure for residential buildings.

553.909 Setting requirements for appliances; exceptions.

553.912 Air conditioners.

553.900 Short title.—This part shall be known and may be cited as the “Florida Thermal Efficiency Code.”
History.—s. 1, ch. 77-128.

553.901 Purpose of thermal efficiency code.—The Department of Business and Professional Regulation shall prepare a thermal efficiency code to provide for a statewide uniform standard for energy efficiency in the thermal design and operation of all buildings statewide, consistent with energy conservation goals, and to best provide for public safety, health, and general welfare. The Florida Building Commission shall adopt the Florida Building Code-Energy Conservation, and shall modify, revise, update, and maintain the code to implement the provisions of this thermal efficiency code and amendments thereto, in accordance with the procedures of chapter 120. The department shall, at least triennially, determine the most cost-effective energy-saving equipment and techniques available and report its determinations to the commission, which shall update the code to incorporate such equipment and techniques. The proposed changes shall be made available for public review and comment no later than 6 months before code implementation. The term “cost-effective,” as used in this part, means cost-effective to the consumer.
History.—s. 1, ch. 77-128; s. 2, ch. 80-193; s. 78, ch. 81-167; s. 1, ch. 81-226; s. 1, ch. 82-197; s. 81, ch. 83-55; s. 3, ch. 84-273; s. 1, ch. 88-213; s. 5, ch. 93-249; s. 93, ch. 2000-141; s. 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372; s. 418, ch. 2011-142; s. 18, ch. 2013-193.

553.902 Definitions.—As used in this part, the term:
(1) “Energy performance level” means the indicator of the energy-related performance of a building, including, but not limited to, the levels of insulation, the amount and type of glass, and the HVAC and water heating system efficiencies.

(2) “Exempted building” means:
(a) A building or portion thereof whose peak design rate of energy usage for all purposes is less than 1 watt (3.4 Btu per hour) per square foot of floor area for all purposes.

(b) A building that is neither heated nor cooled by a mechanical system designed to control or modify the indoor temperature and powered by electricity or fossil fuels.

(c) A building for which federal mandatory standards preempt state energy codes.

(d) A historical building as described in s. 267.021(3).

The Florida Building Commission may recommend to the Legislature additional types of buildings which should be exempted from compliance with the Florida Building Code-Energy Conservation.

(3) “Exterior envelope physical characteristics” means the physical nature of those elements of a building which enclose conditioned spaces through which energy may be transferred to or from the exterior.

(4) “HVAC” means a system of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning.

(5) “Local enforcement agency” means the agency of local government which has the authority to make inspections of buildings and to enforce the Florida Building Code. The term includes any agency within the definition of s. 553.71(5).

(6) “Renovated building” means a residential or nonresidential building undergoing alteration that varies or changes insulation, HVAC systems, water heating systems, or exterior envelope conditions, if the estimated cost of renovation exceeds 30 percent of the assessed value of the structure.

History.—s. 1, ch. 77-128; s. 3, ch. 80-193; ss. 2, 5, ch. 81-226; s. 2, ch. 82-197; s. 82, ch. 83-55; s. 2, ch. 88-213; s. 94, ch. 2000-141; ss. 32, 33, ch. 2001-63; s. 34, ch. 2001-186; s. 3, ch. 2001-372; s. 19, ch. 2013-193.

553.903 Applicability.—This part applies to all new and renovated buildings in the state, except exempted buildings, for which building permits are obtained after March 15, 1979, and to the installation or replacement of building systems and components with new products for which thermal efficiency standards are set by the Florida Building Code-Energy Conservation. The provisions of this part shall constitute a statewide uniform code.
History.—s. 1, ch. 77-128; s. 1, ch. 78-625; s. 2, ch. 80-193; s. 6, ch. 93-249; s. 95, ch. 2000-141; s. 20, ch. 2013-193.

553.904 Thermal efficiency standards for new nonresidential buildings.—Thermal designs and operations for new nonresidential buildings for which building permits are obtained after March 15, 1979, must at a minimum take into account exterior envelope physical characteristics, including thermal mass; HVAC, service water heating, energy distribution, lighting, energy managing, and auxiliary systems design and selection; and HVAC, service water heating, energy distribution, lighting, energy managing, and auxiliary equipment performance, and are not required to meet standards more stringent than the provisions of the Florida Building Code-Energy Conservation.
History.—s. 1, ch. 77-128; s. 1, ch. 78-625; s. 1, ch. 79-267; s. 2, ch. 80-193; s. 4, ch. 84-273; s. 3, ch. 88-213; s. 7, ch. 93-249; s. 21, ch. 2013-193.

553.905 Thermal efficiency standards for new residential buildings.—Thermal designs and operations for new residential buildings for which building permits are obtained after March 15, 1979, must at a minimum take into account exterior envelope physical characteristics, HVAC system selection and configuration, HVAC equipment performance, and service water heating design and equipment selection and are not required to meet standards more stringent than the provisions of the Florida Building Code-Energy Conservation. HVAC equipment mounted in an attic or a garage is not required to have supplemental insulation in addition to that installed by the manufacturer. All new residential buildings, except those herein exempted, must have insulation in ceilings rated at R-19 or more, space permitting. Thermal efficiency standards do not apply to a building of less than 1,000 square feet which is not primarily used as a principal residence and which is constructed and owned by a natural person for hunting or similar recreational purposes; however, such person may not build more than one exempt building in any 12-month period.
History.—s. 1, ch. 77-128; s. 1, ch. 78-625; s. 2, ch. 79-267; s. 2, ch. 80-193; s. 3, ch. 81-226; s. 5, ch. 84-273; s. 8, ch. 93-249; s. 55, ch. 98-287; s. 22, ch. 2013-193.

553.906 Thermal efficiency standards for renovated buildings.—Thermal designs and operations for renovated buildings for which building permits are obtained after March 15, 1979, must take into account insulation; windows; infiltration; and HVAC, service water heating, energy distribution, lighting, energy managing, and auxiliary systems design and equipment selection and performance. Such buildings are not required to meet standards more stringent than the provisions of the Florida Building Code-Energy Conservation. These standards apply only to those portions of the structure which are actually renovated.
History.—s. 1, ch. 77-128; s. 1, ch. 78-625; s. 3, ch. 79-267; s. 2, ch. 80-193; s. 6, ch. 84-273; s. 4, ch. 88-213; s. 23, ch. 2013-193.

553.907 Compliance.—Each local enforcement agency shall report to the department any information concerning compliance certifications and amendments at such intervals as the department designates by rule adopted in accordance with chapter 120.
History.—s. 1, ch. 77-128; s. 5, ch. 88-213; s. 807, ch. 97-103; s. 3, ch. 98-145; s. 96, ch. 2000-141.

553.908 Inspection.—Before construction or renovation is completed, the local enforcement agency shall inspect buildings for compliance with the standards of this part.
History.—s. 1, ch. 77-128.

553.9085 Energy performance disclosure for residential buildings.—The energy performance level resulting from compliance with the provisions of this part, for each new residential building, shall be disclosed at the request of the prospective purchaser. In conjunction with the normal responsibilities and duties of this part, the local building official shall require that a complete and accurate energy performance level display card be completed and certified by the builder as accurate and correct before final approval of the building for occupancy. The energy performance level display card shall be included as an addendum to each sales contract. The display card shall be uniform statewide and developed by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation. At a minimum, the display card shall list information indicating the energy performance level of the dwelling unit resulting from compliance with the code, shall be signed by the builder, and shall list general information about the energy performance level and the code.
History.—s. 3, ch. 82-197; s. 83, ch. 83-55; s. 6, ch. 88-213; s. 9, ch. 93-249; s. 97, ch. 2000-141; s. 419, ch. 2011-142.

553.909 Setting requirements for appliances; exceptions.—
(1) The Florida Energy Efficiency Code for Building Construction shall set the minimum requirements for commercial or residential swimming pool pumps, swimming pool water heaters, and water heaters used to heat potable water. The code shall further establish the minimum acceptable standby loss for electric water heaters and the minimum recovery efficiency and standby loss for water heaters fueled by natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas.

(2) Dishwashers sold after March 1, 1981, shall be equipped so that the normal operating cycle does not include automatic switching on of the heating element for the drying portion of the operating cycle. Dishwashers the controls of which permit the user to elect to have the heating element on during the drying portion of the operating cycle meet this requirement.

(3) Commercial or residential swimming pool heaters manufactured and sold on or after December 31, 2011, for installation in this state must comply with the requirements of the Florida Energy Efficiency Code for Building Construction.

(4) Residential swimming pool filtration pumps and pump motors manufactured and sold on or after December 31, 2011, for installation in this state must comply with the requirements of the Florida Energy Efficiency Code for Building Construction.

(5) Portable electric spas manufactured and sold on or after December 31, 2011, for installation in this state must comply with the requirements of the Florida Energy Efficiency Code for Building Construction protocol.

(6) The Florida Energy Efficiency Code for Building Construction may include standards for other appliances and energy-using systems if they are determined by the department to have a significant impact on the energy use of the building and if they are cost-effective to the consumer.

(7) If the provisions of this section are preempted in part by federal standards, those provisions not preempted shall apply.

History.—s. 7, ch. 80-163; s. 7, ch. 84-273; s. 10, ch. 93-249; s. 98, ch. 2000-141; s. 110, ch. 2008-227; s. 43, ch. 2010-176; s. 34, ch. 2011-222.

553.912 Air conditioners.—All air conditioners that are sold or installed in the state must meet the minimum efficiency ratings of the Florida Building Code-Energy Conservation. These efficiency ratings must be minimums and may be updated in the Florida Building Code-Energy Conservation by the department in accordance with s. 553.901, following its determination that more cost-effective energy-saving equipment and techniques are available. It is the intent of the Legislature that all replacement air-conditioning systems in residential applications be installed using energy-saving, quality installation procedures, including, but not limited to, equipment sizing analysis and duct inspection. Notwithstanding this section, existing heating and cooling equipment in residential applications need not meet the minimum equipment efficiencies, including system sizing and duct sealing.
History.—s. 4, ch. 81-226; s. 8, ch. 84-273; s. 42, ch. 91-220; s. 44, ch. 2010-176; s. 24, ch. 2013-193.

PART VI
ENERGY CONSERVATION STANDARDS

553.951 Short title.

553.953 Purpose.

553.954 Adoption of standards.

553.955 Definitions.

553.957 Products covered by this part.

553.959 Applicability.

553.961 Test methods.

553.963 Energy conservation standards.

553.968 Exemptions.

553.969 Revisions of standards.

553.971 Certification statements.

553.973 Enforcement and penalties.

553.975 Report to the Governor and Legislature.

553.951 Short title.—This part may be cited as the “Florida Energy Conservation Standards Act.”
History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271.

553.953 Purpose.—
(1) The purpose of these energy conservation standards is to provide statewide minimum standards for energy efficiency in certain products, consistent with energy conservation goals. The standards shall be based on feasible and attainable efficiencies which will reduce Florida’s energy consumption growth rate and the growth rate of energy demand. Standards adopted pursuant to this part shall be cost-effective to the majority of the users and shall consider the expected life of the covered product. Such standards shall collectively be known and may be cited as “Florida Energy Conservation Standards.”

(2) The Legislature recognizes that energy conservation is an important element of the energy policy of this state. Further, it is the policy of the state and the intent of the Legislature to employ a range of measures to reduce wasteful, uneconomical, and unnecessary uses of energy, thereby reducing the rate of growth of energy consumption and prudently conserving energy resources. The Legislature finds that increased product efficiency can contribute significantly toward energy conservation. It is the intent of the Legislature to bring about increased product efficiency through adoption of energy conservation standards.

History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271.

553.954 Adoption of standards.—The Department of Business and Professional Regulation shall adopt, modify, revise, update, and maintain the Florida Energy Conservation Standards to implement the provisions of this part and amendments thereto in accordance with the procedures of chapter 120.
History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271; s. 420, ch. 2011-142.

553.955 Definitions.—For purposes of this part:
(1) “AV” means the adjusted volume for refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers, as defined in the applicable test procedure.

(2) “Ballast” or “fluorescent lamp ballast” means a device to operate a fluorescent lamp by providing a starting voltage and current and limiting the current during normal operation. It must also be designed to:
(a) Operate at nominal input voltages of 120 or 227 volts.

(b) Operate with an input frequency of 60 hertz.

(3) “Ballast efficiency factor” means the ratio of relative light output, expressed as a percent, to the power input, expressed in watts under test conditions.

(4) “Code” means the Florida Energy Efficiency Code for Building Construction.

(5) “Date of sale” means the day when the product is physically delivered to the buyer.

(6) “Department” means the Department of Business and Professional Regulation.

(7) “Distributor” means any person or business entity which distributes a privately labeled product on a national basis for which the specifications for manufacture, testing, and certification are established and attested to by the distributor, rather than the manufacturer.

(8) “Energy conservation standard” means:
(a) A performance standard which prescribes a minimum level of energy efficiency or a maximum quantity of energy use for a covered product, determined in accordance with applicable test procedures;

(b) A design requirement for the products specified in s. 553.957; or

(c) A testing and rating requirement for the products specified in s. 553.957; and

includes any other requirements which the department may prescribe.

(9) “F40T12 lamp” means a tubular fluorescent lamp which is a nominal 40 watts, with a 48-inch tube, 1.5 inches in diameter. These lamps conform to American National Standards Institute standard C.78.1-1978.

(10) “F96T12 lamp” means a tubular fluorescent lamp which is a nominal 75 watts, with a 96-inch tube, 1.5 inches in diameter. These lamps conform to American National Standards Institute standard C.78.3-1978.

(11) “Luminaire” means a complete lighting unit consisting of a fluorescent lamp or lamps, together with parts designed to distribute the light, to position and protect such lamps, and to connect such lamps to the power supply.

(12) “Manufacturer” means any person or business entity engaged in the original production or assembly of a product.

(13) “New product” means a product that is sold, offered for sale, or installed for the first time and specifically includes floor models and demonstration units.

(14) “Nominal input voltage” means an input voltage within plus 5 percent or minus 5 percent of a specified value.

(15) “Nominal lamp watts” means the wattage at which a fluorescent lamp is designed to operate.

(16) “Occupancy” means an occupied building or part of a building.

(17) “Operation” means the ability to start the lamp at least 8 times out of 10 with a minimum of 1 minute between attempts when tested under test conditions.

(18) “Power input” means the rate of energy consumption in watts of a ballast and fluorescent lamp or lamps.

(19) “Relative light output” means the test ballast light output divided by a reference ballast light output using the same reference lamp and expressing the value as a percent.

(20) With respect to refrigerators, freezers, and refrigerator-freezers:
(a) “Automatic defrost system” means a defrost system in which the defrosting action for all refrigerated surfaces is initiated and terminated automatically.

(b) “Freezer” means a cabinet designed as a unit for the storage of food at temperatures of about 0 °F, having the ability to freeze food, and having a source of refrigeration requiring an energy input.

(c) “Refrigerator” means a cabinet designed for the refrigerated storage of food at temperatures above 32 °F, and having a source of refrigeration requiring an energy input. It may include a compartment for the freezing and storage of food at temperatures below 32 °F, but does not provide a separate low temperature compartment designed for the freezing of and the long-term storage of food at temperatures below 8 °F. It has only one exterior door, but it may have interior doors on compartments.

(d) “Refrigerator-freezer” means a cabinet which consists of two or more compartments with at least one of the compartments designed for the refrigerated storage of foods at temperatures above 32 °F, and with at least one of the compartments designed for the freezing of and the storage of frozen foods at temperatures of 8 °F or below. The source of refrigeration requires energy input.

(21) Definitions used in the code shall also apply to terms used in this part.

History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271; s. 11, ch. 93-249; s. 421, ch. 2011-142.

553.957 Products covered by this part.—
(1) The provisions of this part apply to the testing, certification, and enforcement of energy conservation standards for the following types of new products sold in the state:
(a) Refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, and freezers which can be operated by alternating current electricity, excluding:
1. Any type designed to be used without doors; and

2. Any type which does not include a compressor and condenser unit as an integral part of the cabinet assembly.

(b) Lighting equipment.

(c) Showerheads.

(d) Any other type of consumer product which the department classifies as a covered product as specified in this part.

(2) The provisions of this part do not apply to:
(a) New products manufactured in this state and sold outside the state.

(b) New products manufactured outside this state and sold at wholesale in this state for final retail sale and installation outside the state.

(c) Products designed expressly for installation and use in recreational vehicles or other equipment designed for regular mobile use.

History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271.

553.959 Applicability.—
(1) Subject to the effective dates provided by s. 553.963, no new product covered by this part may be sold, offered for sale, advertised or otherwise displayed for sale, or installed or caused to be installed in buildings or structures in the state unless the efficiency rating of the product meets or exceeds the levels established by this part. For each new product that is sold, offered for sale, advertised or otherwise displayed for sale, or installed or caused to be installed in buildings or structures in this state a separate offense may be found. Further, new products which do not comply with the provisions of this part shall not be imported or delivered after sale or pursuant to a contract for sale for use in or in connection with a building or structure in the state.

(2) The standards adopted in or pursuant to the provisions of this part shall be minimum standards. They shall constitute a statewide, uniform standard for energy conservation. The Florida Energy Conservation Standards shall, by reference, set minimum efficiencies for products also covered by the code.

History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271.

553.961 Test methods.—The manufacturer shall cause the testing of samples of each model of each product covered by this part. Test procedures identified in the code shall be the accepted test procedures for those products addressed by the code. Test procedures for products not addressed in the code shall be determined by the department. The department shall use United States Department of Energy approved test methods or, in the absence of such test methods, other appropriate nationally recognized test methods applicable to the respective products. The department may elect to develop and prescribe other test methods based upon the department’s determination that use of such other test methods is justified due to decreased cost, increased accuracy, or the general use and acceptance of a specific test method by the industry involved.
History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271.

553.963 Energy conservation standards.—
(1) STANDARDS FOR REFRIGERATORS, REFRIGERATOR-FREEZERS, AND FREEZERS.—
(a) The following is the maximum energy use allowed in kilowatt hours per year for the following products, other than those described in paragraph (b), manufactured on or after January 1, 1993:

Energy Standards
Equations

Refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers with manual defrost..........
13.7 AV+267

Refrigerator-freezers—partial automatic defrost..........
17.4 AV+344

Refrigerator-freezers—automatic defrost with:

 Top-mounted freezer without ice..........
16.7 AV+336

 Side-mounted freezer without ice..........
22.4 AV+395

 Bottom-mounted freezer without ice..........
22.4 AV+395

 Top-mounted freezer with through-the-door ice..........
18.5 AV+374

 Side-mounted freezer with through-the-door ice..........
24.8 AV+438

Upright freezers with:

 Manual defrost..........
8.38 AV+324

 Automatic defrost...........
12.3 AV+477

Chest freezers and all other freezers..........
6.3 AV+282

(b) The standards described in paragraph (a) do not apply to refrigerators and refrigerator-freezers with total refrigerated volume exceeding 39 cubic feet or freezers with total refrigerated volume exceeding 30 cubic feet.

(2) STANDARDS FOR LIGHTING EQUIPMENT.—
(a) Except as provided in paragraph (b), no fluorescent lamp ballast or luminaire manufactured on or after January 1, 1989, shall either have a ballast efficiency factor, or contain a ballast with a ballast efficiency factor, less than the following applicable values:

Ballasts Designed
for the Operation of:
Nominal
Input
Voltage
Total Nominal
Lamp Watts
Ballast
Efficiency
Factor

 

One F40T12 lamp
120
277
40
40
1.805
1.805

Two F40T12 lamps
120
277
80
80
1.060
1.050

Two F96T12 lamps
120
277
150
150
0.570
0.570

(b) The standards described in paragraph (a) do not apply to the following types of fluorescent lamp ballasts:
1. Those which have a dimming capability.

2. Those intended for use in ambient temperatures of 0 °F or less.

3. Those with a power factor of less than 0.60.

(3) STANDARDS FOR SHOWERHEADS.—
(a) The initial minimum standards for showerheads manufactured on or after January 1, 1988, shall require the limiting of maximum water discharge to 3.00 gallons per minute when tested according to ANSI A112.18.1M-1979.

(b) Showerheads manufactured for use in safety spray installations shall be exempt.

(4) STANDARDS FOR OTHER COVERED PRODUCTS.—
(a) The department may prescribe an energy conservation standard for any type or class of covered products of a type specified in s. 553.957, except where precluded by federal law, if the department determines that:
1. The average per occupancy energy use within this state resulting from performance of products of such type or class exceeded 80 kilowatt hours or its Btu equivalent for any 12 calendar-month period ending before such determination; and

2. Substantial improvement in the energy efficiency of products of such type or class is technologically feasible.

(b) The department may prescribe an energy conservation testing and rating standard for any type or class of covered products of a type specified in s. 553.957 if the department determines that the certifications to the state and uniform product labeling required by this part will improve the enforceability of the code.

(c) Any new or amended standard for covered products of a type specified in s. 553.957(1)(d) shall not apply to products manufactured within 2 years after the publication of a final rule establishing such standard.

History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271; s. 13, ch. 93-249.

553.968 Exemptions.—The department may grant an exemption from compliance with the standards of this part for any currently produced product model which the manufacturer shows, and the department finds, comprises less than 0.5 percent of that manufacturer’s total sales volume in the state for that product class, and with respect to which the manufacturer shows, and the department finds, that modification of the product model to meet the standards of this part would place an undue burden on the manufacturer. Such determination by the department shall be considered final agency action reviewable pursuant to chapter 120. An exemption so granted shall be for a period of up to but not exceeding 2 years. The department shall grant only one exemption for any particular model, and any new product model initially produced after January 1, 1988, shall not be eligible for such an exemption.
History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271.

553.969 Revisions of standards.—The department shall, no earlier than 2 years after adoption of new or revised standards and no later than 4 years after adoption of new or revised standards, review and if warranted by the department update the standards established by this part. Revisions to the standards established by this part shall be based upon the department’s determination that revised energy conservation levels are cost-effective to the majority of the users and shall include consideration of the expected life of the covered product.
History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271; s. 43, ch. 91-220.

553.971 Certification statements.—
(1) Manufacturers of products covered by this part shall certify to the department that such products are in compliance with the provisions of this part.

(2) Except as provided in subsection (3), the manufacturer shall submit a certification statement to the department for each model, containing the following information:
(a) Name and address of manufacturer.

(b) Type of product.

(c) Brand name.

(d) Model number, as it appears on the product name plate.

(e) Name and address of laboratory where test for efficiency was performed.

(f) Date of test for efficiency.

(g) Results of the test for efficiency, expressed in terms consistent with the applicable test procedure identified in s. 553.961.

(h) Sufficient information about the model number or other identification by which the date of manufacture can be readily ascertained.

(i) A declaration that the product model complies with the standards established by this part.

(j) Every certification statement shall be dated and signed by the manufacturer attesting to its truth and accuracy under penalty of perjury. If the manufacturer is either a corporation or a business association, the certification statement shall be dated, signed, and attested to by an officer thereof.

(k) Within 45 days after receipt of a certification statement, the department shall forward to the manufacturer an acknowledgment that the statement has been received and that it is complete and accurate on its face.

(3) Manufacturers or distributors of covered products that participate in a nationally recognized product certification program are exempt from the requirements of subsection (2), except that sufficient information about the model number or identification by which the date of manufacture can be readily ascertained shall be provided to the department.

(4) The following information shall appear on each product:
(a) The manufacturer’s or distributor’s name or brand name.

(b) The model number as used in certifying compliance with the provisions of this part.

(c) The date of manufacture, which may be coded into the model or serial number for the product.

(5) The department may require, by rule, other information necessary to permit the determination that products covered by this part comply with the standards established herein.

History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271.

553.973 Enforcement and penalties.—
(1) The Department of Business and Professional Regulation shall investigate any complaints received concerning violations of this part and shall report the results of its investigation to the Attorney General or state attorney. The Attorney General or state attorney may institute proceedings to enjoin any person found to be violating the provisions of this part.

(2) The department shall cause periodic inspections to be made of manufacturers, distributors, or retailers of new products in order to determine compliance with this part. The department, by rule, shall adopt procedures for such inspections and verification of products.

(3) Any person who violates any provision of this part is guilty of a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable by fine as provided in s. 775.083.

History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271; s. 422, ch. 2011-142.

553.975 Report to the Governor and Legislature.—The Public Service Commission shall submit a biennial report to the Governor, the President of the Senate, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, concurrent with the report required by s. 366.82(10), beginning in 1990. Such report shall include an evaluation of the effectiveness of these standards on energy conservation in this state.
History.—s. 1, ch. 87-271; s. 66, ch. 2009-21.

PART VII
STANDARDS FOR RADON-RESISTANT
BUILDINGS

553.98 Development of building codes for radon-resistant buildings; funding; rules for radon-resistant passive construction standards; ordinances.

553.98 Development of building codes for radon-resistant buildings; funding; rules for radon-resistant passive construction standards; ordinances.—
(1) The Department of Business and Professional Regulation shall be provided funds for activities incidental to the development and implementation of the building codes for radon-resistant buildings and for such other building code-related activities as directed by the Legislature.

(2) The rules for radon-resistant passive construction standards proposed by the department for residential buildings are hereby approved by the Legislature. The rules for radon-resistant commercial building standards shall be submitted by the department to the Legislature prior to becoming effective.

(3) Local jurisdictions may enact ordinances for radon-resistant building construction only pursuant to this subsection. A county governing authority and the governing bodies of the municipalities representing at least a majority of the county’s municipal population shall enter into an interlocal agreement to adopt by ordinance the department’s radon-resistant passive construction standards as a code for residential radon-resistant building construction. The standards shall apply uniformly to the entire jurisdictions that adopt the standards. No local jurisdiction may adopt any requirement for radon-resistant building construction other than the rules of the department, nor enact any other requirements relating to environmental radiation caused by the radon decay series other than the rules of the department.

History.—s. 2, ch. 88-285; s. 20, ch. 93-120; s. 3, ch. 94-284; s. 3, ch. 95-339; s. 91, ch. 2013-15.

PART VIII
BUILDING ENERGY-EFFICIENCY
RATING SYSTEM

553.990 Short title.

553.991 Purpose.

553.993 Definitions.

553.994 Applicability.

553.995 Energy-efficiency ratings for buildings.

553.996 Energy-efficiency information provided by building energy-efficiency rating systems providers.

553.997 Public buildings.

553.998 Compliance.

553.990 Short title.—This part may be cited as the “Florida Building Energy-Efficiency Rating Act.”
History.—s. 12, ch. 93-249.

553.991 Purpose.—The purpose of this part is to identify systems for rating the energy efficiency of buildings. It is in the interest of the state to encourage the consideration of energy-efficiency rating systems in the market so as to provide market rewards for energy-efficient buildings and to those persons or companies designing, building, or selling energy-efficient buildings.
History.—s. 12, ch. 93-249; s. 41, ch. 98-250; s. 25, ch. 2013-193.

553.993 Definitions.—For purposes of this part:
(1) “Acquisition” means to gain the sole or partial use of a building through a purchase agreement.

(2) “Builder” means the primary contractor who possesses the requisite skill, knowledge, and experience, and has the responsibility, to supervise, direct, manage, and control the contracting activities of the business organization with which she or he is connected and who has the responsibility to supervise, direct, manage, and control the construction work on a job for which she or he has obtained the building permit. Construction work includes, but is not limited to, foundation, framing, wiring, plumbing, and finishing work.

(3) “Building energy-efficiency rating system” means a whole building energy evaluation system that provides a reliable and scientifically based analysis of a building’s energy consumption or energy features and allows a comparison to similar building types in similar climate zones where applicable. Specifically, the rating system shall use standard calculations, formulas, and scoring methods; be applicable nationally; compare a building to a clearly defined and researched baseline or benchmark; require qualified professionals to conduct the rating or assessment; and provide a labeling and recognition program with specific criteria or levels. Residential program benchmarks for new construction must be consistent with national building standards. Residential building program benchmarks for existing construction must be consistent with national home energy rating standards. The building energy-efficiency rating system shall require at least one level of oversight performed by an organized and balanced group of professionals with subject matter expertise in energy efficiency, energy rating, and evaluation methods.

(4) “Designer” means the architect, engineer, landscape architect, builder, interior designer, or other person who performs the actual design work or under whose direct supervision and responsible charge the construction documents are prepared.

(5) “Energy auditor” means a trained and certified professional who conducts energy evaluations of an existing building and uses tools to identify the building’s current energy usage and the condition of the building and equipment.

(6) “Energy-efficiency rating” means an unbiased indication of a building’s relative energy efficiency based on consistent inspection procedures, operating assumptions, climate data, and calculation methods.

(7) “Energy rater” means an individual certified by a building energy-efficiency rating system to perform building energy-efficiency ratings for the building type and in the rating class for which the rater is certified.

(8) “New building” means commercial occupancy buildings permitted for construction after January 1, 1995, and residential occupancy buildings permitted for construction after January 1, 1994.

(9) “Public building” means a building comfort-conditioned for occupancy that is owned or leased by the state, a state agency, or a governmental subdivision, including, but not limited to, a city, county, or school district.

History.—s. 12, ch. 93-249; s. 808, ch. 97-103; s. 27, ch. 2013-193; s. 26, ch. 2014-154.

553.994 Applicability.—Building energy-efficiency rating systems apply to all public, commercial, and residential buildings in the state.
History.—s. 12, ch. 93-249; s. 4, ch. 94-284; s. 42, ch. 98-250; s. 28, ch. 2013-193.

553.995 Energy-efficiency ratings for buildings.—
(1) Building energy-efficiency rating systems must, at a minimum:
(a) Take into account local climate conditions, construction practices, and building use.

(b) Be compatible with standard federal rating systems and state building codes and standards, where applicable, and shall satisfy the requirements of s. 553.9085 with respect to residential buildings and s. 255.256 with respect to state buildings.

(c) Provide a means of analyzing the relative energy efficiency of buildings upon the sale of new or existing residential, public, or commercial buildings.

(2)(a) Ratings may be conducted by a local government or private entity if the appropriate persons have completed the necessary training established by the applicable building energy-efficiency rating system.

(b) The Department of Management Services shall rate state-owned or state-leased buildings if the appropriate persons have completed the necessary training established by the applicable building energy-efficiency rating system.

(c) A state agency that has building construction regulation authority may rate its own buildings and those it is responsible for if the appropriate persons have completed the necessary training established by the applicable building energy-efficiency rating system.

History.—s. 12, ch. 93-249; s. 424, ch. 2011-142; s. 29, ch. 2013-193.

553.996 Energy-efficiency information provided by building energy-efficiency rating systems providers.—A prospective purchaser of real property with a building for occupancy located thereon shall be provided information at the time of or before the purchaser’s execution of the contract for sale and purchase which notifies the purchaser of the option for an energy-efficiency rating on the building. Building energy-efficiency rating system providers identified in this part shall prepare such information and make it available for distribution. Such information relevant to that class of building must include, but need not be limited to:
(1) How to analyze the building’s energy-efficiency rating.

(2) Comparisons to statewide averages for new and existing construction of that class.

(3) Information concerning methods to improve the building’s energy-efficiency rating.

(4) A notice to residential purchasers that the energy-efficiency rating may qualify the purchaser for an energy-efficient mortgage from lending institutions.

History.—s. 12, ch. 93-249; s. 5, ch. 94-284; s. 43, ch. 98-250; s. 30, ch. 2013-193.

553.997 Public buildings.—
(1) Each public building proposed for construction, renovation, or acquisition shall be rated pursuant to the energy-efficiency rating system provided in s. 553.995 prior to contracting for construction, renovation, or acquisition. The public body proposing to contract for construction, renovation, or acquisition of a public building shall consider the energy-efficiency rating when comparing contract alternatives, notwithstanding the provisions of s. 255.254.

(2) State agencies having building construction and maintenance responsibilities shall make available energy-efficiency practices information to be used by individuals involved in the design, construction, retrofitting, and maintenance of buildings for state and local governments.

History.—s. 12, ch. 93-249; s. 31, ch. 2013-193.

553.998 Compliance.—All ratings must be determined using tools and procedures developed by the systems recognized under this part and must be certified by the rater as accurate and correct and in compliance with procedures of the system under which the rater is certified.
History.—s. 12, ch. 93-249; s. 32, ch. 2013-193.
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