Arts and Cultural Affairs - Divisions of History and Public Records - The Amistad Commission - Legislative findings

Subscribe to a Global-Regulation Premium Membership Today!

Key Benefits:

Subscribe Now for only USD$40 per month.
§ 57.51. Legislative findings. The legislature finds and declares
that:

1. During the period beginning late in the fifteenth century through
the nineteenth century, millions of persons of African origin were
enslaved and brought to the Western Hemisphere, including the United
States of America; anywhere from between twenty to fifty percent of
enslaved Africans died during their journey to the Western Hemisphere;
the enslavement of Africans and their descendants was part of a
concerted effort of physical and psychological terrorism that deprived
groups of people of African descent the opportunity to preserve many of
their social, religious, political and other customs; the vestiges of
slavery in this country continued with the legalization of second class
citizenship status for African-Americans through Jim Crow laws,
segregation and other similar practices; the legacy of slavery has
pervaded the fabric of our society; and in spite of these events there
are endless examples of the triumphs of African-Americans and their
significant contributions to the development of this country.

2. All people should know of and remember the human carnage and
dehumanizing atrocities committed during the period of the African slave
trade and slavery in America and of the vestiges of slavery in this
country; and it is in fact vital to educate our citizens on these
events, the legacy of slavery, the sad history of racism in this
country, and on the principles of human rights and dignity in a
civilized society.

3. It is the policy of the state of New York that the history of the
African slave trade, slavery in America, the depth of their impact in
our society, and the triumphs of African-Americans and their significant
contributions to the development of this country is the proper concern
of all people, particularly students enrolled in the schools of the
state of New York.

4. It is therefore desirable to create a state-level commission, which
shall research and survey the extent to which the African slave trade
and slavery in America is included in the curricula of New York state
schools, and make recommendations to the legislature and executive
regarding the implementation of education and awareness programs in New
York concerned with the African slave trade, slavery in America, the
vestiges of slavery in this country, and the contributions of
African-Americans in building our country. Such recommendations may
include, but not be limited to, the development of workshops,
institutes, seminars, and other teacher training activities designed to
educate teachers on this subject matter; the coordination of events on a
regular basis, throughout the state, that provide appropriate
memorialization of the events concerning the enslavement of Africans and
their descendants in America as well as their struggle for freedom and
liberty; and suggestions for revisions to the curricula and textbooks
used to educate the students of New York state to reflect a more
adequate inclusion of issues identified by the commission.