Postal Regulations


Published: 1933

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Postal Regulations


1988 Revised Edition






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POSTAL REGULATIONS

Postal Regulations CAP. 95A Arrangement of Sections




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POSTAL REGULATIONS

Arrangement of Sections
Section
Short title. ........................................................................................................................5
Interpretation. ..................................................................................................................5
Letters. .........................................................................................................................7
Postcards. ........................................................................................................................7
Commercial papers..........................................................................................................8
Mode of packing and addressing.....................................................................................9
Printed papers. ...............................................................................................................11
Articles grouped together. .............................................................................................14
Literature for the bind ...................................................................................................14
Unpaid and insufficiently prepared correspondence. ....................................................14
Examination of certain packets. ....................................................................................15
Registration. ..................................................................................................................15
Delivery of Postal Articles. ...........................................................................................16
Prohibited Articles.........................................................................................................17
Transparent or Panel Envelopes. ...................................................................................18
Late fees. .......................................................................................................................18
Parcels post, Definition. ................................................................................................19
Limit of weight..............................................................................................................19
Limit of size. ................................................................................................................. 19
Times of posting............................................................................................................20
Prepayment and Posting. ...............................................................................................20
Receipts for Parcels. ......................................................................................................20
Parcels to Different Addresses must not be enclosed....................................................20
Methods of Packing.......................................................................................................20
Provision for Safety of Parcels. .....................................................................................22
Redirection. ...................................................................................................................22

Arrangement of Sections CAP. 95A Postal Regulations




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Parcels not to Interfere with Letter Post. .......................................................................23
Disposal of Contents by Controller in Certain Cases. ...................................................23
Compensation. ...............................................................................................................23
Collection of Customs Dues on Parcels. Postmaster to Assess Duty on Parcels...........23
Parcels Subject to Inspection. ........................................................................................24
Parcels to be delivered to addressee. .............................................................................24
Production of Invoice. ...................................................................................................24
Application of Customs Laws. ......................................................................................24
Importation of Tobacco and Spirits by Parcels Post. .....................................................24
Redirection.....................................................................................................................25
Franking of Official Correspondence. ...........................................................................25
Disposal of Undelivered Correspondence. Articles to be sent to the Controller. ..........26
How Deal With ..............................................................................................................27
Declaration.....................................................................................................................28
Addressing Correspondence. .........................................................................................28
Postmasters and the Public. ...........................................................................................28
Private Boxes. ................................................................................................................29
Illegal Detention of Mail Bags. .....................................................................................30
Freight on Mails Beyond The Kingdom. .......................................................................30
British Postal Orders......................................................................................................30
Money Orders - General. ...............................................................................................31
Scope of the Service. .....................................................................................................32
Maximum Amount for Money Orders...........................................................................32
Payments - How to be made. .........................................................................................32
No fractional Part of a Seniti Allowed...........................................................................32
Commission. ..................................................................................................................32
Mode of Application for Money Orders. .......................................................................32
Particulars Required for a Money Order........................................................................32
Form of Money Order....................................................................................................33
Orders not to be Paid unless Advices bear stamp of Exchange Office..........................33
Payment of Orders. ........................................................................................................33
Stoppage of Payment of an Order to be effected in the Country where the

Original Order was Payable. ..........................................................................34
Alteration of Name, etc. and Requests for Repayment..................................................34
Repayment not to be made until Payment has been stopped. ........................................34
Lost Orders - Issue of a Duplicate. ................................................................................34
Void Orders. ..................................................................................................................35
Through Orders..............................................................................................................35
Non-liability of Controller. ............................................................................................35


APPENDIX I 36

Postal Regulations CAP. 95A Section 1




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C
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POSTAL REGULATIONS

Made by the Controller on 5th August, 1933

G. 115/33, 123/34, 29/35, 123/35, 39/36, 17/38, 139/38, 106/39, 127/39,
2/40, 24/40, 171/40, 123/41, 126/47, 127/47, 2/48, 124/49, 129/49,

143/50, 151/50, 37/51, 25/54, 28/55, 3/56, G.S. 101/58, 111/59, 19/60,
21/60, 15/62, 39/66, G. S. 91/67, G. S. 3/68, G. S. 69/77, G. 285/85



Short title.
1. These Regulations may be cited as the Postal Regulations.

Interpretation.
2.

(1) In these Regulations, unless the context otherwise requires—

The term correspondence means and includes letters, postcards, both
single and reply-paid, commercial papers, packets, samples of
merchandise and printed papers of any kind, including articles printed in
relief for the use of the blind;

The term packet means and includes—
(a) banker's packets (in covers open at the end or sides) containing

notes, orders, cheques or pass-books sent by or to any bank or
banker;

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(b) packets (in covers open at the ends or sides) containing process of
or proceedings or pleadings in any Court, briefs, cases and
instructions for counsel and their opinions thereon respectively,
deeds, affidavits, policies of assurance, letters of attorney,
depositions or recognizances;

(c) packets (in covers open at the ends or sides) containing patterns or
samples of merchandise not having a value of their own apart from
their mere use as patterns or samples and either unenclosed or
enclosed in transparent bags or in bags tied round the neck so as to
be easily loosened and refastened;

(d) packets (in covers open at the ends or sides) containing prices
current and catalogues;

(e) packets (in covers open at the ends or sides) containing Acts of
Tonga or official reports and returns or copies of official reports
and returns made by or to any officer in the public service;

(f) packets (in covers open at the ends or sides) containing script
pamphlets, maps, plans, specifications, music, photographs on
paper, magazines, reviews, placards, almanacs, prospectuses,
paintings, engravings, printers' proofs, writing paper, music paper
or periodical publications;

(g) packets (in covers open at the ends or sides) containing printed or
plain books; and

(h) packets containing seeds in bags tied so as to be easily loosened and
refastened.

The term newspaper means a publication consisting wholly or in great
part of political or other news, or of articles relating thereto or to other
current topics, with or without advertisements, and whether printed for
sale or gratuitous distribution. A supplement to a newspaper is deemed to
be part of such newspaper for the purposes of the regulations, and must
consist wholly or in great part of matter like that of a newspaper, printed
on a sheet or sheets of paper, or consisting wholly or in part of engravings,
prints, or lithographs, or any other sort of picture illustrative of articles in
the newspaper. Insets, advertising sheets, posters, or handbills are not
allowed to pass as supplements.

(2) Every newspaper shall be sent without a cover or in a cover open at both
ends and there shall not be in or upon any such newspaper or the cover
thereof any communication, character, figure, letter or number (other than
the words “newspaper only” or a line drawn through any report, article or
paragraph therein, the printed title of such newspaper, the printed names,
occupations and places of business of the printer, publisher and vendor
thereof, the name, occupation and address of the person to whom it is
sent) nor shall anything be enclosed in or with or accompany such

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newspaper or cover; otherwise such newspaper shall not be transmitted or
delivered.

Letters.
3. No letter may exceed 4 lb in weight.

4. The size of letters may not exceed 18 inches in any direction:

Provided always that if posted in the form of a roll, letters may be 30
inches in length if they do not exceed 4 inches in diameter.

5. Letters may not contain any letter, note or document addressed to a person
other than the addressee or a person living with him.

Postcards.
6. Postcards must bear on the face the heading “Carte postale” in French or

the equivalent of this heading in another language. This heading is not
obligatory for single postcards of private manufacture.

7. The size of the cards may not exceed 57/8 inches in length by 41/8 inches in
width, nor be less than 4 inches in length by 23/4 inches in width.
Postcards must be sent unclosed, that is to say, without wrapper or
envelope.

8. Postcards of which the whole or a part of the address side has been
marked off into several divisions intended to receive successive addresses
are prohibited.

9. Postcards must be made of cardboard or of paper stout enough to be easily
handled.

10. The postage stamps should be affixed to the upper right-hand corner of the
address side. The address of the recipient as well as the indications
relating to the postal service (such as “Registered”, “Advice of Delivery”,
etc.) should appear on the address side, of which the right-hand half is
reserved for these indications. The sender may make use of the back of the
left-hand half of the address side subject to the provisions of the following
regulations.

11. There shall not be joined or attached to postcards, samples of
merchandise, or similar articles:

Provided that illustrations, photographs, stamps of any kind, address
labels or slips to fold back for address purposes, labels and cuttings of any
kind may be affixed to them, if these articles are not of such a nature as to
alter the character of the postcards, and if they consist of paper or other
very thin substance and if they adhere completely to the card. With the

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exception of address labels or slips, these articles may only be affixed to
the back or to the left-hand half of the address side of postcards.

12. Reply-paid postcards must bear on the face in French as heading on the
first half, the words “Carte postale avec response payee”; on the second
half “Carte postale-response”. Each of the two halves must comply with
the conditions laid down for single postcards, one-half is doubled over the
other, and they may not be closed in any way.

13. The address on the reply half must be on the inside of the fold. The send
of a reply-paid postcard may indicate his name and address on the face of
the “Reply” half, either in writing, or by affixing a label.

14. The prepayment of the “Reply” half by means of the postage stamp of the
country which has issued the card is valid only if the two halves of the
reply-paid postcard were attached to one another when received from the
country of origin, and if the “Reply” half is despatched from the country
where it has been received by post to the said country of origin. If these
conditions are not complied with it is treated as an unpaid postcard.

15. Postcards which do not comply with the conditions laid down by these
regulations for this class of correspondence are treated as letters.

Commercial papers
16. Packets of commercial papers may not weigh more than 5 lb. if posted for

delivery within the Kingdom. If posted for delivery beyond the Kingdom,
such packets may not weigh more than 4 lb.

17. The size of packets of commercial papers is limited to the same
dimensions as is provided for letters under regulation 4 hereof.

18. The following are considered as commercial papers: all papers and
documents whether writings or drawings, produced wholly or partly by
hand, not having the character of an actual and personal correspondence,
such as open letters and out-of-date postcards which have already fulfilled
their original purpose, legal documents, deeds of all kinds drawn up by
public functionaries, waybills or bills of lading, invoices, certain
documents of insurance companies, copies of, or extracts from deeds
under private seal, written on stamped or unstamped paper, musical scores
or sheets of music in manuscript, the manuscripts of works or of
newspapers forwarded separately, pupils' exercises in original or with
corrections, but without any note which does not relate directly to the
execution of the work.

19. These documents may be accompanied by reference slips or statements
showing the following or similar particulars: list of the papers included in

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the packet, reference to correspondence exchanged between the sender
and the addressee such as:

“Annex to our letter of ..........................to Mr. ...............................

Our reference ....................................... your reference .................”.

20. Commercial papers are subject, so far as regards form and make-up to the
regulations laid down for printed papers:

Provided that envelopes only partly open at the ends or in any way closed
against inspection cannot be admitted at commercial papers rate.

21. The weight of packets containing samples posted for delivery within the
Kingdom is limited to 5 lb. For delivery beyond the Kingdom the weight
is limited to 1 lb.

22. Packets containing samples posted for delivery within the Kingdom shall
not exceed 24 inches in length, and 12 inches in width or depth. If posted
for delivery beyond the Kingdom, they shall not exceed 18 inches in
length, 8 inches in width, and 4 inches in depth, unless they are made up
in the form of a roll for which the limits are 18 inches in length and 6
inches in diameter.

23. With the exceptions specified below, the use of the sample post is
restricted to bona fide trade samples or patterns of merchandise without
saleable value. Transmission at the sample rate is also accorded to
printers' blocks, keys sent singly, fresh cut flowers, articles of natural
history (such as dried or preserved animals or plants and geological
specimens), tubes of serum, pathological objects rendered innocuous by
their mode of preparation and packing, beneficial insect parasites and live
destroyers of noxious insects intended for controlling these insects when
exchanged between officially recognized institutions, and live bees. These
articles, except tubes of serum sent in the public interest by laboratories or
institutions officially recognized and live bees, may not be sent for a
commercial purpose. (Amended, G. 24/40.)

24. No packet containing goods for sale or consigned in execution of an order
(however small the quantity) can be forwarded by the sample post.

Note: It is recommended that every sample should be indelibly marked
“Sample-not for sale”, or otherwise defaced in such a way as to render the
article unsaleable in the ordinary way of trading.

Mode of packing and addressing.
25. Samples must be packed in such a manner as to be easy of examination

and, when practicable, must be sent in removable covers, bags, or boxes.

Section 26 CAP. 95A Postal Regulations




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26. Packing is not obligatory for articles consisting of one piece (such as
pieces of wood or metal) which it is not the custom of the trade to pack,
provided that, in that case, the address and the postage stamps appear on
the label. The address, however, must always be repeated on the article
itself, otherwise packing may be insisted upon.

27. There may be indicated by hand or by a mechanical process outside or
inside the packet, the name, position, profession and address of the sender
and of the addressee, as well as the date of despatch, the sender's
signature, telephone number, telegraphic address and code, postal cheque
or banking account, manufacturer's or trade mark, numbers, prices and
particulars, relating to weight, measurement and size, or to the quantity to
be disposed of, and such as are necessary to determine the origin and the
character of the goods.

28. Articles of glass, packets containing liquids, oils, fatty substances, dry
powders, whether dyes or not, as well as packets of live bees are
transmitted as samples of merchandise, provided that they are packed in
the following manner —
(a) articles of glass must be securely packed in boxes of metal, wood,

or strong corrugated cardboard so as to prevent all danger to
correspondence and to postal officers.

(b) liquids, oils, and substances which easily liquefy must be enclosed
in glass bottles hermetically sealed. Each bottle must be placed in a
special box of metal, wood, or strong corrugated cardboard
containing sawdust, cotton or spongy material in sufficient quantity
to absorb the liquid in the event of the bottle becoming broken. The
box itself, if it is of thin wood, must be enclosed in a second case of
metal or wood with the lid screwed down or of strong corrugated
cardboard, or of stout thick leather;

(c) when a perforated wooden block is used having a thickness of at
least 21/2 millimetres (about 1/8 inch) in the thinnest part and fitted
with a lid, it is not necessary to enclose this block in a second case;

(d) fatty substances which do not easily liquefy (such as ointments, soft
soap, or resin) the transmission of which presents fewer difficulties,
must be enclosed in an inner cover (such as a box, bag of linen, or
parchment) which must itself be placed in a second box of wood,
metal, or stout thick leather;

(e) dyes, such as aniline, are not admitted unless enclosed in stout tin
boxes, placed inside wooden boxes with sawdust between the two
covers; dry non-colouring powders must be placed in boxes of
metal, wood, or cardboard. These boxes should be themselves
enclosed in a bag of linen or parchment;

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(f) samples of liquids and fatty substances and those enclosed in linen
or paper envelopes of little strength must have a label, preferably of
parchment, attached with the address of the addressee, the postage
stamps and the impressions of the date-stamps. The address must be
repeated on the article itself;

(g) live bees, beneficial insects, parasites and live destroyers of noxious
insects must be enclosed in boxes so constructed as to avoid all
danger. (Amended, G. 24/40);

(h) articles of any kind, such as tinned foods, which would be spoilt if
packed in the manner prescribed may be admitted in a cover
hermetically sealed. In that case the sender or the addressee may be
required to assist in the check of the contents either by opening
certain packets or in some other satisfactory manner.

29. Small packets are limited as regards size and mode of packing, as is
provided for sample packets under regulations 22, 25 and 28. The
maximum weight is 2 lb.

30. Small packets may contain all articles admissible for transmission by
letter post including dutiable articles, but may not contain personal
correspondence, coins, bank notes, currency notes, postage stamps,
negotiable instruments payable to bearer, platinum, gold or silver
(manufactured or not), precious stones, jewels and other valuable articles.
In addition to the articles specifically mentioned above all articles which
from their nature are specially valuable are to be considered as precious
articles. (Amended, G. 123/41.)

31. Small packets addressed to places beyond the Kingdom must bear a
special green Customs label obtainable at all Post Offices. The particulars
set out on this label must be filled in by the sender.

32. The name and address of the sender must be indicated on small packets at
the bottom left-hand corner of the address side.

Printed papers.
33. Packets of printed papers are limited as regards size to the same

dimensions as are provided for letters under regulation 4 hereof, and as
regards weight to the same weights as are provided for commercial papers
under regulation 16 hereof. A single volume sent by printed papers post
may, however, weigh up to 61/2 lb.

34. The following are considered as printed papers and allowed to pass as
such —
(a) newspapers and periodicals, books stitched or bound, pamphlets,

sheets of music, excluding perforated sheets intended to be used

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with automatic musical instruments, visiting cards, address cards,
proofs of printing with or without the relative manuscript,
engravings, photographs and albums containing photographs,
pictures, drawings, plans, maps, catalogues, prospectuses,
advertisements, and notices of various kinds, printed, engraved
lithographed or mimeographed, and, in general, all impressions or
copies obtained upon paper, parchment, or cardboard, by means of
printing, engraving, lithography, mimeography, or any other
mechanical process easy to recognize, except the copying press, a
typeset hand-stamp, and the typewriter;

(b) reproductions of a manuscript or typewritten original, when they
are obtained by a manifolding process (such as chromography), are
treated like printed papers:
Provided that to pass at the reduced postage, these reproductions
must be handed over the counter of a post office to the number of at
least twenty packets containing precisely identical copies. The
manuscript additions authorized for printed papers may also be
made in these reproductions;

(c) printed papers which bear any marks whatever capable of
constituting a conventional language, or, save the exceptions
specifically authorized by the present regulation, those of which the
text has been modified after printing, may not be sent at the rates
provided for printed papers;

(d) stamps or forms of prepayment, obliterated or not, as well as all
printed papers representing a monetary value, and articles of
stationery, are excluded from transmission at the reduced rate.

35. Printed papers, authorized annotations —
(a) It is allowed, outside or inside a packet of printed papers —

(i) to indicate by hand or by a mechanical process, the name,
position, the profession, firm, and the address of the sender
and of the addressee, as well as the date of despatch, the
signature, telephone number, telegraphic address and code,
and postal cheque or banking account of the sender;

(ii) to correct errors in printing; to strike out, to underline, or to
enclose by marks, certain words or certain parts of a printed
text, unless this is done with the object of constituting
personal correspondence.

(b) it is also allowed to indicate or to add by hand or by a mechanical
process —
(i) in advices of the departures and arrivals of ships: the dates

and times of departures and arrivals, as well as the names of
the ships and the ports of departure, call, and arrivals;

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(ii) in travellers' advices: the name of the traveller, the date, time,
and place of his intended visit, and the address at which he is
staying;

(iii) in forms of order or subscription for publications, books,
newspapers, engravings, pieces of music; the works required
or offered, as well as the price of these works;

(iv) on pictorial cards and printed visiting cards and also on
Christmas and New Year cards: good wishes,
congratulations, thanks, condolences, or other formulas of
courtesy, expressed in five words or by means of five
conventional initials at most;

(v) in proofs of printing; alterations and additions concerned
with corrections, form, and printing, and also notes such as
“Passed for Press”, “Read–Passed for Press”, or any similar
note concerned with the execution of the work. In case of
want or space these additions may be made on separate
sheets;

(vi) in fashion plates, maps, etc.: colours;
(vii) in price lists, tenders for advertisements, stock and share lists,

market quotations, trade circulars and prospectuses: figures,
and any other notes representing essential elements of the
price;

(viii) on books, pamphlets, newspapers, photographs, engravings,
sheets of music and in general on all literary or artistic
productions, printed, engraved, lithographed or
mimeographed: a dedication consisting simply of an
expression of regard;

(ix) to cuttings from newspapers and periodicals: the title, date,
number, and address of the publication from which the article
is extracted;

(c) it is, moreover, allowed to enclose —
(i) with proofs of printing, whether corrected or not: the “copy”;
(ii) with articles of the categories mentioned under (b) (viii): the

relative invoice.

36. Printed papers must be made up in such a way that they can be easily
examined. They must be either placed in wrappers upon rollers between
boards, in cases open at both sides or at both ends, or in unclosed
envelopes, or secured with a string easy to untie, or be simply folded, but
in such a manner that other articles cannot slip into their folds.

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37. Address cards and all printed matter of the form and substance of a
printed card, either unfolded or folded once, may be forwarded without
wrapper, envelope, fastening, or fold.

38. Cards bearing the heading “Postcards” or the equivalent of this heading in
any language are allowed to pass at the rate for printed matter, provided
that they conform to the general conditions laid down herein for this class
of articles. Those which do not fulfil these conditions are regarded as
postcards or letters and treated accordingly.

Articles grouped together.
39. It is permissible to enclose in one and the same packet samples, printed

matter, and commercial papers, but not printed papers intended for the
blind, subject to the following conditions —
(a) that each article taken singly does not exceed the limits which are

applicable to it as regards weight and size;
(b) that the total weight does not exceed 4 lb. per packet;
(c) that the minimum charge is 3s. if a packet contains commercial

papers, and 1s. if it consists of printed papers and samples.

Literature for the blind.
40. Packets containing printed papers intended for the special use of the blind,

and printed volumes sent singly may weigh up to 61/2 1b., but may not
exceed the dimensions prescribed for other classes of printed papers.

Unpaid and insufficiently prepared correspondence.
41.

(1) Correspondence posted for delivery within the Kingdom which is wholly
unpaid, or insufficiently prepared, will be charged with double the
deficiency on delivery.

(2) Wholly unpaid and insufficiently prepaid letters and postcards, and other
articles which are partly prepaid, posted within the Kingdom to any other
country, will be charged with double the deficiency with a minimum
charge of 1s. and forwarded for delivery. Articles other than letters and
postcards which are wholly unpaid will be returned to the senders through
the Dead Letter Office. (Amended, G. 123/35.)

(3) Reply-paid postcards of which the two halves are not fully prepaid shall
not be forwarded to their destination.

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Examination of certain packets.
42. Officers of the post office may examine the contents of any packet of

commercial or printed papers or samples, for the purpose of ascertaining
whether they are in accordance with these regulations, but such officers
must securely refasten any packet so opened.

Note: This authority does not apply to letters or to bankers' packets
containing notes.

Registration.
43. Any article of correspondence complying with the regulations relating

thereto, and bearing a registration fee in addition to the correct amount of
postage, shall be accepted for registration. No such article addressed in
pencil, except copying-ink pencil or (unless addressed to the care of some
person), to initials, shall be accepted for registration. The reply halves of
reply-paid postcards cannot be registered by the original senders of such
cards.

44. No article shall be accepted for registration unless the cover is in sound
condition. Under no circumstances shall articles be accepted for
registration if selvedged stamp paper or other gummed paper is attached
to the covers thereof, or if the articles bear the appearance of having been
opened and resealed.

45. The address of all articles tendered for registration must be written in
English.

46. Any article intended for registration must be handed to an officer of the
post office, and an official receipt obtained therefor. It should under no
circumstances be dropped in a letter box.

47. The sender of a registered article may obtain acknowledgment of its due
delivery to the addressee by paying in advance, at the time of the
registration, or subsequently, a fee at the prescribed rate when delivered
overseas and of 3s. otherwise, in addition to the postage and registration
fee.

48. Except in cases beyond control, and in case where registration has been
compulsory, compensation not exceeding $7.25 will be paid to the sender
for the loss of any registered article which may occur within the Kingdom,
it having been clearly shown that the loss was not due either wholly or in
part to the fault of the sender, and that it actually occurred when the article
was in the post:

Provided that no such compensation shall be entertained unless made
within one year of the posting of the registered article or in respect of any
registered article for which the owner shall have given a receipt on

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delivery. In cases where registered articles are lost abroad, the final
decision upon the question of payment rests with the Postal
Administration of the country in which the loss takes place. Nothing
herein contained shall render the Government liable for any loss
occasioned by an act of the enemies of His Majesty the King, or the
enemies of Her Majesty the Queen of England, or for any loss which is
the direct or indirect consequence of any war. (Amended, G. 127/39,
143/50, 3/56.)

49. All packets containing bank notes, jewellery, or articles of high value if
not registered by the sender will be compulsorily registered and on
delivery charged with double the ordinary registration fee. Coin and
bullion will be passed at letter rates only and must be registered.

Delivery of Postal Articles.
50. When no direction in writing to the contrary has been received,

correspondence for a husband may be delivered to his wife, and
correspondence for a wife may be delivered to her husband, and
correspondence addressed to members of the same family living in the
same house may be delivered to any responsible member of the family
living in the house (except young children) or to any messenger
authorized to receive it.

51. Except as set forth in regulation 50 above, no postal article shall be
delivered to any person other than —
(a) the addressee in person; or
(b) a person authorized by a written order from the addressee to receive

delivery of postal articles on his behalf; such order to bear the date
on which it is made, the addressee's address, and to be witnessed by
some person other than the person in whose favour it be made, and
must be delivered to the postmaster or other proper officer; or

(c) in the case of business establishments, public institutions, hotels
and lodging houses, the proprietor or manager, or some person
authorized in writing by the proprietor or manager to receive
delivery of the correspondence at such places; or

(d) a person to whose care the postal article is addressed.

52. The department cannot undertake to deliver by letter-carrier bulky articles
that may impede the general distribution of correspondence. The
addressees of books, etc., weighing over 1 lb. must take delivery thereof at
the post office.

53. When a firm is dissolved and any member of the late firm gives notice to
the postmaster not to deliver to any person other than himself any postal
article addressed to the firm, the postmaster or other officer of the post

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office (unless he is satisfied as to who is entitled to delivery) may refuse
to deliver all such articles until an agreement is arrived at between the
persons interested as to their delivery, and, in default of such agreement,
may mark such postal articles “in dispute” and send them to the
Controller, unless they bear requests for their return if not delivered within
a certain time, in which case they shall at the expiration of the time named
on the postal article be returned to the sender. No postal article shall be
sent to the Controller under this regulation until the expiration of one
month from the date of the receipt of the above-mentioned notice.

54. Postal articles addressed to deceased persons may be delivered to the
executors or administrators of such deceased persons on production of the
probate or letters of administration; but until such production the
Controller may cause such postal articles to be delivered to some near
relative of the deceased person.

Provided that registered postal articles addressed to a deceased person,
and in connection with which the sender has paid the fee for an
acknowledgment of receipt, shall be returned to the sender.

Prohibited Articles.
55. There shall not be posted or conveyed or delivered by post any postal

article —
(a) consisting of or containing any indecent or obscene print, painting,

photograph, lithograph, engraving, book or card, or any indecent or
obscene article, whether similar to the above or not; or

(b) having thereon or on the cover thereof any words, marks, or designs
of an indecent, obscene, grossly offensive or of a libellous
character;

(c) containing any article or thing prohibited by the Customs or other
laws of Tonga, or of the country to which the postal article is
addressed;

(d) consisting of or containing —
(i) any explosive or inflammable substance;
(ii) any dangerous substance;
(iii) any filth;
(iv) any noxious or deleterious substance;
(v) any sharp instrument not properly protected;
(vi) except with the special permission of the Controller, any

living creature;
(vii) any liquid unless securely packed in proper cases;

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(viii) any article or thing whatsoever which is likely to injure other
postal articles in course of conveyance, or any receptacle in
which the same are conveyed, or an officer of the post office
or other person who may deal with such postal article;

(d) containing or bearing any fictitious postage stamp; or
(e) purporting to be prepaid with any stamp which has been previously

used to prepay any other postal packet or any other revenue duty or
tax; or

(f) having thereon or on the cover thereof any words, letters or marks
(used without due authority) which signify, or imply, or may
reasonably lead the recipient thereof to believe that the postal
packet is sent on His Majesty's Service;

(g) having thereon or on the cover thereof any words, marks, or designs
of a character likely, in the opinion of the Controller, to embarrass
the officers of the post office in dealing with the packet in the post;

(h) of such a form or so made up for transmission by post as to be
likely, in the opinion of the Controller, to embarrass the officers of
the post office in dealing with the packet in the post.

56. Prohibited articles if tendered for transmission will be refused, or if
detected in transit, detained and dealt with in such a manner as the
Controller may direct.

Transparent or Panel Envelopes.
57. Articles in envelopes entirely transparent or in envelopes with an open

panel are not admitted.

58. The following conditions apply to articles in envelopes with a transparent
panel —
(a) the transparent panel must be parallel to the longest side, so that the

address of the addressee appears in the same direction; it must be
placed so as not to interfere with the application of the date stamp;

(b) the panel must be sufficiently transparent for the address to be
perfectly legible, even in artificial light, and must take writing.

59. Articles forwarded in envelopes with a transparent panel may be
registered only if the panel forms an integral part of the envelope.

Late fees.
60. Letters which bear a special late fee of 2s. in stamps and are either

tendered at the counter of a post office or posted in the ordinary letter box
after the advertised time fixed for the closing of surface or air mails shall

Postal Regulations CAP. 95A Section 61




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be accepted for transmission up to such time thereafter as the Controller
may by public notice exhibited at a post office prescribe. (Substituted, G.
124/49.)

61. Letters posted or tendered for transmission after the advertised time of
closing of mails which do not conform to the requirements of regulation
62 hereof shall not be forwarded until the next succeeding despatch.
(Substituted, G. 124/49.)

62.

(1) The special late fee of 2s. in stamps must be affixed to all letters intended
for transmission under the provisions of regulation 60 hereof in addition
to the normal postage required and such letters must be clearly marked in
the left-hand top corner thereof with the words “LATE FEE”.
(Substituted, G. 124/49.)

(2) Letters which do not bear the special late fee but are posted in the late
letter boxes on vessels carrying mails and providing late fee facilities will
be surcharged on delivery at double the rate of the deficiency. (Added, G.
124/49.)

63. Registered articles tendered for transmission after the advertised time
fixed for the closing of registered mails shall be accepted up to such time
thereafter as the Controller may by public notice exhibited at a post office
prescribe and forwarded on payment of a special late fee of 5s. to be
affixed in stamps to the registered article in addition to the prescribed
postage and registration fee. (Substituted, G. 124/49.)

Parcels post, Definition.
64. In regulations 64 to 83 the expression “parcel” means a postal packet

which is posted as a parcel in accordance with the provisions of these
regulations or any regulations amending the same.

Limit of weight.
65. The weight of a parcel to Great Britain and Northern Ireland or New

Zealand must not exceed 22 lb. and to other countries 11 lb.

Limit of size.
66. Parcels must not exceed 3 feet 6 inches in length, or 6 feet in length and

girth combined.

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Times of posting.
67. Parcels intended to be transmitted by post may be posted at any time when

the post office is open for the transaction of business. All parcels should
reach the post office 24 hours prior to the time given for closing the
ordinary mails.

Prepayment and Posting.
68. The postage on a parcel must be prepaid. A parcel should not be posted in

a letterbox. It should be marked “Parcels Post” and presented at the
counter of a post office, and the sender, who must himself affix the
postage stamps should see that the weight, size, and postage are in order
before leaving. The rates of postage will be as provided in the Postal
Tariff, vide Appendix I.

Receipts for Parcels.
69. The sender of a parcel may obtain a receipt for it at the time of posting by

filling in a form provided by the post office for this purpose, or in a book
provided by himself.

70. The address of a parcel must be clearly written in English, on the parcel,
and also on the label if one is attached.

71. The sender's address should be inserted in the parcel. It may be written on
the cover, but must be kept distinct from the address to which the parcel is
to be sent.

72. No parcel may contain a letter, or any written communication in the
nature of a letter, or having the character of actual or personal
correspondence. A parcel may, however, contain an invoice of the
contents.

Parcels to Different Addresses must not be enclosed.
73. No parcel shall consist of or contain two or more parcels addressed to

different persons at different addresses. If such parcel be discovered each
of its contents will be treated as a separate parcel and be charged for
accordingly.

Methods of Packing.
74. Parcels must be securely and substantially packed as not only to preserve

their contents from loss or damage in the post, but also so as not to injure
other parcels in the mail, or an officer of the post office —

Postal Regulations CAP. 95A Section 74




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(a) hats, millinery, and similar articles must be packed in rigid boxes of
wood or other material, or in stout “leather-board” boxes with lids
extending about two-thirds of the depth of the box, or in strong
cardboard boxes, protected externally by cross bars of wood
consisting of two frames placed at right angles to one another and
fastened together where they cross at the top and bottom;

(b) weighty articles, such as iron castings, must be packed in material
such as straw-roping or hay-roping;

(c) musical instruments must be enclosed in stout cases, with sufficient
soft internal packing to prevent movement and to prevent damage
through jolting;

(d) pictures in frames must be protected on the front and back by stout
wooden boards each larger than the frame. Soft packing must be
placed firmly between the corners of the frame and the boards, but
not so as to press on the glass;

(e) sharp instruments may be transmitted as parcels, but only if the
edges and points are carefully covered;

(f) umbrellas, walking-sticks, fishing-rods, and other similar articles
must be enclosed in stout cases made of wood at least three-eighths
of an inch thick, but the two small ends of such cases may be of
lighter wood such as three-ply. Soft interior packing must be used
in all cases where the handles are made of brittle or fragile
substances;

(g) raw celluloid, and roll and cinematograph films must be packed in a
tin case enclosed in a strong wooden box. Any other article
composed wholly or partly of celluloid must be enclosed in a strong
wooden box. If the lid or bottom or any of the sides of the box is
composed of more than one piece of wood, the pieces must be
jointed together by means of tongues and grooves. A lining of
suitable material must be placed between the upper edges of the box
and the lid, and the lid must be firmly screwed down. A white label
bearing the word “Films” or “Celluloid”, as the case may be, in
plain black letters must be affixed to the parcel;

(h) suit, attaché, dressing, and other similar cases must be protected by
wooden boards covering the sides;

(i) for liquids, and substances which easily liquefy two receptacles
must be used. The outer receptacle must be of strong wood or
metal. Between this and the inner receptacle containing the liquid,
space must be left all round, and this space must be filled with bran,
sawdust, or other absorbent material in sufficient quantity to absorb
all the liquid contents in the event of breakage;

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(j) powders must have an inner covering securely closed, and a strong
outer covering of metal, wood, or leather;

(k) china, crockery, and glass must be firmly packed in rigid metal or
wooden boxes with ample soft packing between the article and the
top, bottom, and sides of the box;

(l) food and other articles attractive to rats must be packed in
receptacles which are rat proof.

75. Parcels irregularly posted will, if fully prepaid at the rate applicable to any
other post and admissible by that post, be forwarded as a letter, a printed
paper, or a newspaper, otherwise they will be returned to the sender at his
expense.

Provision for Safety of Parcels.
76. In any case where any officer of the post office may find it necessary or

expedient for the safety or protection of parcels that any parcel should be
forwarded or delivered by some later despatch or delivery than that for
which the same was posted or despatched, or intended to be posted or
despatched respectively, he may delay the despatch or delivery of such
parcel, or make such other and special arrangements as to the despatch or
delivery thereof, as may be deemed by such officer necessary or expedient
in the circumstances of the case.

Redirection.
77. Any parcel may be redirected from its original address, or any substituted

address, either to another place within the Kingdom, or to any country or
place abroad, and in every case of such redirection there shall be charged
on such parcels in respect of such redirection, a new and distinct rate of
postage according to the rates for the time being payable in respect of the
transmission of a like parcel.

78. The sender of a parcel may request at the time of posting that if the parcel
cannot be delivered as addressed it may be either —
(a) treated as abandoned; or
(b) tendered for delivery at a second address in the country of

destination. No other alternative is admissible. If the sender avails
himself of this facility his request must be written on the parcel and
must be in one of the following forms: “If not deliverable as
addressed, abandon; if not deliverable as addressed, deliver to
...........................” In the absence of a definite request for
abandonment a parcel which is undeliverable at the original address

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or at the alternative address if one is furnished will be returned to
the sender without previous notification and at his expense.

79. Parcels will be treated as undeliverable after having lain at a post office
for a period of 30 days.

Parcels not to Interfere with Letter Post.
80. Where the despatch or delivery from a post office in the Kingdom of

letters would be delayed by the despatch or delivery therefrom at the same
time of parcels, such parcels, or any of them, may be detained in the post
office until the despatch or delivery next following that by which they
would ordinarily be despatched or delivered.

Disposal of Contents by Controller in Certain Cases.
81. The contents of unclaimed or undelivered parcels which have been

returned to Tonga, and cannot be delivered to the sender, will be sold or
destroyed as may be directed by the Controller.

Compensation.
82. Parcels will be received and forwarded at the risk of the owners. As an act

of grace, however, compensation up to the maximum of $2 may be
allowed for total loss of, or damage to, a parcel securely packed and
forwarded in accordance with the foregoing regulations. No compensation
will, however, be paid for damage to any article inadequately or
insecurely packed, or to any of the following articles, viz.: liquids, and
substances which easily liquefy, perishable articles, such as eggs, butter,
flowers, fruit, confectionery, etc., and fragile articles, such as china,
glassware, millinery, gramophone records, etc.

83. In no circumstances will compensation be paid in respect of a parcel
which has been lost or has sustained damage or loss of contents through
any cause beyond control. Each claim for compensation must be
supported by the production of the relative receipt of posting.

Collection of Customs Dues on Parcels. Postmaster to Assess Duty on
Parcels.
84. When a parcel contains anything liable to duty under the laws relating to

Customs, which are now or may hereafter be in force in the Kingdom, the
Postmaster at the port or place at which such parcel is landed shall assess
the duty payable thereon and shall retain possession of it until the

Section 85 CAP. 95A Postal Regulations




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addressee or his authorized agent shall have signed the receipt form and
have paid the duty payable.

Parcels Subject to Inspection.
85. Every parcel shall be subject to inspection, in the presence of the owner

thereof or his authorized agent, and to valuation by the Postmaster or an
officer authorized by him in that behalf.

Parcels to be delivered to addressee.
86. No parcel shall be delivered by the Postmaster except to the addressee

thereof or his authorized agent. Every addressee of a parcel wishing it to
be delivered to another person on his behalf must sign and deliver to the
Postmaster an authority in the form that the Controller may from time to
time prescribe.

Production of Invoice.
87. The addressee of every parcel or his agent shall, when required so to do

by the Postmaster, produce the invoice (if any) of the contents of the
parcel.

Application of Customs Laws.
88. The provisions of the Customs laws relating to the presentation of false

Application documents, false declarations, smuggling, and all other
matters concerning the collection and payment of Customs duties on
goods imported into and exported from the Kingdom shall apply to goods
imported or exported through the medium of the Parcels Post.

Importation of Tobacco and Spirits by Parcels Post.
89. Subject to the regulations now in force or that may hereafter be in force,

relating the collection of Customs dues on parcels, tobacco (including
cigars and cigarettes), and snuff in parcels not weighing more than eleven
pounds, and not packed with other goods, and spirits not exceeding one
pint in quantity being samples and not packed with other goods, may be
imported into the Kingdom by post, notwithstanding the provisions of any
Ordinance or Act relating to the collection and payment of Customs duties
to the contrary effect.

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Redirection.
90. Notices of removal and applications for the redirection of letters,

postcards, commercial papers, printed papers, patterns and samples must
in all cases be signed by the person to whom the articles are addressed.
The printed form of notice, which will be supplied on application at any
post office, should be used wherever practicable.

91. Persons presenting redirection orders are required to add their titles:
“Mr.”, “Mrs.”, or “Miss”.

92. Changes of address are only recorded for 6 months; and if not renewed
before the expiration of that time, correspondence will be sent as
addressed.

93. The Department cannot undertake to intercept and re-address before
delivery, letters addressed to the care of private box holders, hotels,
lodging-houses, and warehouses.

94. The Department will not undertake to intercept postal articles at any office
other than that to which they are addressed. Applications for the
redirection of letters, etc., should be made directly to the Postmaster of the
office to which letters are addressed, and whence they will be redirected.

95. No charge is made for redirection, but articles which are properly prepaid
for their first transmission, and on which the complementary postage
appropriate to the further transmission has not been paid before their
redirection, are charged with a rate equal to the difference between the
amount of postage already prepaid, and that which would have been
charged if the articles had been despatched in the first instance to the new
destination.

96. Articles which have originally circulated free of postage within the
Kingdom, are charged with the rate applicable to prepaid articles of the
same nature addressed directly from the place or origin to that of the new
destination.

97. Correspondence, ordinary or registered, which being wrongly or
insufficiently addressed, is returned to the senders in order that they may
correct or complete the address, when posted with the address completed
or corrected, is considered not as redirected correspondence, but as freshly
posted correspondence on which new and distinct rates of postage must be
paid.

Franking of Official Correspondence.
98. From Public Department, etc. —

Section 99 CAP. 95A Postal Regulations




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(a) the envelope or cover of any official letter or other packet shall be
“franked” under authority of the Prime Minister in either of the
following ways —
(i) by the impression of an approved “official frank stamp”;
(ii) by the signature and official designation of the Head of the

Department, or other duly authorized officer or functionary,
on the lower left-hand corner of the envelope or cover;

(b) the envelope or cover shall be superscribed with the words “On His
Majesty's Service”.

99. General —
(a) no public officer will be permitted to make use of any stamp for

franking letters or to frank letters without the authority of the Prime
Minister;

(b) Heads of Departments and all Postmasters must exercise vigilance
to prevent any abuse of the franking privilege; and any evasion or
attempt to abuse the privilege or any departure from the regulations
must be reported, with full particulars to the Prime Minister or to
the Controller;

(c) the franking of envelopes, etc., either by means of the franking
stamp or by signature, is strictly forbidden, unless the envelopes,
etc., contain at the time of franking the official correspondence or
matter to be transmitted through the post.

100. The privilege of franking does not apply to correspondence which is
intended for transmission beyond the Kingdom.

101.

(1) The following officials shall be entitled to send and receive between each
other official correspondence through the post free of charge —

His Majesty the King.
Ministers and Heads of Departments (including their
representatives in districts outside, Tongatapu).
Police Magistrates.
His Majesty's Secretary.

(2) The official correspondence of the British High Commissioner to Tonga.
(Amended by Act 9 of 1970.)

Disposal of Undelivered Correspondence. Articles to be sent to the
Controller.
102. Every Postmaster or other postal officer shall transmit to the controller —

Postal Regulations CAP. 95A Section 103




1988 Revised Edition
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Page 27



(a) all correspondence in his possession without address or with an
illegible address, or containing, or reasonably suspected to contain,
any enclosure in fraud or violation of the Post Office Act, or any
Act or Ordinance amending the same or any Act relating to
Customs, or of any rules or regulations made under the Post Office
Act or any Act or Ordinance amending the same;

(b) all correspondence originally posted overseas remaining in his
possession undelivered for a period of two calendar months;

(c) all correspondence originally posted within the Kingdom remaining
in his possession undelivered for a period of one calendar month.

How Dealt With.
103. All correspondence remaining undelivered shall be disposed of in the

following manner —
(a) postal articles from places beyond the Kingdom shall be returned,

unopened, to the Dead Letter Office of the country of origin;
(b) correspondence originally posted within the Kingdom shall be

returned to the writer or sender thereof. When necessary all such
postal articles may be opened by the Controller, or a duly
authorized officer of the Department:
Provided that every such officer shall before he enters upon his
duties in this respect make and subscribe before the Controller or a
Magistrate a declaration in the form attached to this regulation;

(c) correspondence remaining undelivered either to the addressee, or to
the writer or sender thereof, may, unless it contains coin, or
valuable or saleable articles, be forthwith destroyed by the
Controller or other duly authorized officer of the Department;

(d) correspondence found to contain coin or any valuable or saleable
article shall be safely kept, and a list thereof, together with a
memorandum of such contents shall be made and preserved for
three months at the end of which time the coin shall be paid to the
Treasurer, and the valuable or saleable articles may be destroyed or
converted into money, as the Controller may with the approval of
the Prime Minister direct, and the proceeds thereof shall be paid to
the Treasurer;

(e) exceptions —
(i) before undeliverable correspondence on which postal charges

may have become due are returned to the senders, such postal
charges must be paid by the senders;

Section 104 CAP. 95A Postal Regulations




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(ii) printed papers of no value shall not be returned to the country
of origin, or to the senders, unless their return has been asked
for by means of a note on the cover.

Declaration
I, A. B. , do declare that I will be true and faithful in the execution of the trust
committed to my charge and that I will not intentionally read the contents of any letter
or packet which I may open under the provisions of any Act now or hereafter to be in
force relating to the post office except so far as it may be necessary for the purpose of
ascertaining the name and address of the writer or sender thereof and I will not divulge
to any person whatsoever except the Controller or other officer in immediate charge of
the post office any of the contents of any such letter or packet.

Declared before me at............................... the............. day of.............................. 19.......



....................................

Controller.

Magistrate.

Addressing Correspondence.
104. The address of every postal article should be full and distinct. In the case

of towns, the name of the street and the number of the house should
always form part of the address. If the addressee is a private-box holder,
the number of the box should always be stated.

Postmasters and the Public.
105. No information shall be given respecting correspondence passing through

a post office except to the persons to whom they are addressed; and in no
other way is official information of a private character allowed to be made
public. A Postmaster may, however, give an address if he has reason to
believe that the person whose address it is would not disapprove of his
doing so.

106. Postal officials may not return any correspondence to the writer or sender,
or to any one else, or delay forwarding it to its destination according to the
address. Persons desiring the return of a postal article posted by them,
must either obtain the consent in writing of the person to whom the same
is addressed, or an order from the Controller. Applications for the return
of correspondence must be accompanied by a fee of 5s.

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107. Postmasters are not bound to weigh letters, books, packets or newspapers
for the public, but they may do so if their duty is not thereby impeded.
This regulation does not apply to parcels, which are tested both as to
weight and size before being accepted.

108. Postmasters are not bound to give change, and when money is paid at a
post office, whether as change or otherwise, no question as to its right
amount, goodness or weight can be entertained after it has been removed
from the counter.

Private Boxes.
109. Locked private boxes may be rented at the General Post Office, Private

Nuku'alofa, and at certain of the other post offices, on payment in advance
of the fees set out in the Appendix.

110. Each private box is opened and closed from without the office by the
holder thereof by means of a door, lock and key, which must be kept in
repair at the holder's expense, fair wear and tear alone excepted.

111. The fees for subscribers renting a box shall be calculated from the first
day of the month in which they commence, to the thirty-first day of
December, and the renewal fee shall fall due on the first day of January
following, and must be paid within 14 days from that date.

112. Notwithstanding the provisions of these regulations for payment of annual
fees, persons who declare that they are temporary residents only, and who
desire to rent a private box for a limited time, may be allowed the use of
such box for a period of not less than 3 months and not more than 6
months. In those cases the fee shall be charged from the first day of the
month in which the box is taken.

113. Every person who desires to rent a private box, shall, in addition to any
other fee payable under these regulations, deposit the sum of $0.50 as a
guarantee for the return, in good order, of the key of the box, which
deposit shall be refunded on the key being so returned within 14 days
from the day on which the tenancy expires; otherwise the deposit shall be
forfeited to provide for the cost of fitting a new lock to enable the box to
be re-let.

114. A private letter box may be transferred to the successor in business of the
original boxholder, upon application being made by both parties, and an
undertaking being furnished by the transferee to accept all liabilities and
obligations devolving upon the original boxholder at the time of transfer.

115. When a private box is transferred, the right to refund of the deposit, as
provided in regulation 113, shall pass to the transferee.

Section 116 CAP. 95A Postal Regulations




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116. The Controller may refuse to let a private box to any person or persons,
and may cancel the tenancy of a private box at any time if he considers the
box is intended to be, or is being used, for objectionable purposes.

Illegal Detention of Mail Bags.
117. Any person who is found to have in his possession or uses unauthorisedly,

any mail bag, mail hamper, or mail receptacle the property of the post
office of Tonga, or of the post office of any other country shall be deemed
guilty of a misdemeanour and shall on conviction thereof be liable to a
fine not exceeding $10.

Freight on Mails Beyond The Kingdom.
118. The following rates shall be paid to every master or person in charge of

any vessel (not being a vessel under contract to carry mails) about to
depart from the Kingdom to or for any place beyond the Kingdom, who
receives on board thereof any mail packet, mail bag, or mail hamper for
the purpose of conveying the same beyond the Kingdom, and according to
the direction thereof —
(a) For every kilogram of letters or postcards, the sum of $1;
(b) For every 50 kilogram of other articles, the sum of $3. (Amended by

G. S. 69/77.)

British Postal Orders.
119. There shall be a regular exchange of British Postal Orders, between such

post offices within the Kingdom as the Prime Minister may from time to
time direct, and between the Kingdom and Great Britain and Northern
Ireland, the Irish Free State, and all British Dominions, Colonies, and
Protectorates participating in the Imperial Postal Order scheme.

Note: For post offices within the Kingdom at which Postal Order business
may be transacted, see official “Lists of Post Offices” published from time
to time.

120. The maximum amount for which a Postal Order may be issued in the
Kingdom shall be $2.10.

121. The amounts and the rates of poundage to be charged on the issue of
Postal Orders shall be as shown in the Postal Tariff vide Appendix I.

122. Postal Orders shall be issued and paid in the Kingdom at the General Post
Office, Nuku'alofa, and at post offices at Ha'apai and Vava'u and such
other places as the Prime Minister may direct.

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Note: See official “List of Post Offices”, published from time to time.

123. The purchaser of a Postal Order may increase its value by an amount not
exceeding 5s. by affixing Tongan postage stamps not exceeding three in
number to the face of the order; but no such addition may include a
fractional part of a seniti.

124. If an order be not paid within 6 calendar months from the last day of the
month of issue, a commission equal to the original poundage will be
charged. The commission thus paid must be affixed in postage stamps to
the back of the order. Postal Orders presented for payment more than 6
months after the month of issue shall not be paid until reference has been
made to London. (Amended, G. 39/36.)

125. The purchaser of a Postal Order shall fill in the name of the person to
whom it is to be paid, and as a precaution in the case of the loss of the
order, he should also fill in the name of the office of payment.

126. The payee shall, before payment can be made, sign the receipt at the foot
of the order and shall also fill in the name of the office of payment, if that
has not been already done.

127. After a Postal Order has once been paid to whomsoever it has been paid,
the Controller will not be liable to any further claim.

128. If a Postal Order be crossed, payment will only be made through a banker;
and, if the name of a banker be added, payment will only be made through
that banker.

129. No Postal Order shall be paid unless the name of the payee be inserted in
the body of the order.

130. If any erasure or alteration be made, or if the order be cut, defaced, or
mutilated, payment may be refused.

131. The rules for Postmasters and Sub-Postmasters governing Postal Order
transactions, as published by the Imperial Post Office, shall be referred to
in all cases which do not come within the scope of the foregoing
regulations.

Money Orders - General.
132. There shall be a regular exchange of Money Orders between such post

offices within the Kingdom as the Prime Minister may from time to time
direct, and between the Kingdom and the following countries, viz.: New
Zealand, Fiji, Australia and such other countries, through the intermediary
of the General Post Office of Australia, as are published in the Post Office
Guide of the Commonwealth.

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Scope of the Service.
Note: For post offices within the Kingdom at which Money Order
business may be transacted, see official: “List of Post Offices” published
from time to time.

Maximum Amount for Money Orders.
133. The maximum amount for which a single Money Order may be drawn in

the Kingdom shall be $80, and the Controller of the Post Office shall have
the power to limit the total amount of such Money Orders that may be
drawn by any one person in any period of one calendar month.

(Amended, G. 126/47.)

Payments - How to be made.
134. All payments for Money Orders, whether by or to the public, shall be

made in currency notes or in gold, or in other legal tender.

No fractional Part of a Seniti Allowed.
135. No Money Order may contain a fractional part of a seniti.

Commission.
136. The rates of commission to be charged on the issue of Money Orders shall

be as shown in Appendix I.

Mode of Application for Money Orders.
137. When applying for Money Orders the public must use the printed

requisition form supplied gratuitously at all Money Order Offices.

Particulars Required for a Money Order.
138.

(1) With the under-mentioned exceptions, the applicant for every Money
Order shall be required to furnish, if possible, the full surname and
Christian or personal name (or at least the initial of one Christian or
personal name) both of the remitter and payee. If, however, a Christian or
personal name or an initial cannot be given, an order may nevertheless be
issued at the remitter's risk. In the case of natives of India, the name, tribe

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or caste, father's name, and full address of both remitter and payee must
be furnished.

(2) If the remitter or payee be a peer or bishop, his ordinary title will be
sufficient, and in the case of a firm, or company, the usual designation of
such firm or company will suffice.

(3) The remitter, on stating that the order is to be paid only through a bank,
shall have the option of giving or withholding the name of the payee. In
such a case the officer drawing the order must cross it in the way
commonly adopted for cheques when they are intended to be paid through
a bank.

Form of Money Order.
139. Every Money Order and advice shall be drawn on the authorized form

only.

Orders not to be Paid unless Advices bear stamp of Exchange Office.
140. No order will be paid unless the corresponding advice has been previously

received and bears the stamp of the Exchange Office of the country of
issue.

Payment of Orders.
141. Money Orders drawn on any Money Order Office, Tonga, shall be

subject, as regards payment, to the following condition —
(a) if, when an order is presented for payment it is properly receipted,

and the name of the remitter, as furnished by the applicant, is in
agreement with the advice, it will be paid unless the Postmaster has
good reason for believing that the applicant is neither the payee nor
his agent. In the case of a Money Order payable to a limited
liability company, corporation, or society the name of the company,
corporation, or society must be stamped or written in the receipt
space, and below it must appear the signature of some responsible
officer, such as secretary, manager, director, treasurer, or
accountant, with a description of his official position;

(b) if payment of an order be refused, in consequence of the remitter's
name not being furnished correctly, or in consequence of the
signature on the order not corresponding with the entry on the
advice, the applicant for payment should communicate with the
remitter, and request him to apply to the issuing Postmaster;

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(c) payment of a Money Order is subject to the possession by the
Postmaster of the paying office of sufficient funds, and delay is
possible, especially in the case of orders for large amounts drawn
on small offices.

142. The orders issued by Tonga on any other country, shall be subject, as
regards payment to the rules which govern the payment of Money Orders
in the country on which they are drawn.

Stoppage of Payment of an Order to be effected in the Country where the
Original Order was Payable.
143. On the receipt of a written request to stop payment of a Money Order

from either the remitter or the payee, or from the administration of the
country of issue, instructions to stop payment shall be given from the
Money Order Office, Nuku'alofa, to the Postmaster at the office where an
order is made payable.

Alteration of Name, etc. and Requests for Repayment.
144. When it is desired that an error in the name of the remitter or of the payee

should be corrected, or that the amount of a Money Order should be
repaid to the remitter, application must be made by the remitter to the
Money Order Office at which the order was issued. A fee of 10 seniti shall
be payable in each case of an alteration in name.

Repayment not to be made until Payment has been stopped.
145. Repayment whether of an original or duplicate order will not be made to

the remitter until it has been ascertained, though the chief office of the
country of payment that the order has not been paid, and until an
authorization for such repayment shall have been obtained from the
country where such order is payable.

Lost Orders - Issue of a Duplicate.
146. Duplicates of lost or destroyed orders may be granted on payment of a fee

of 10 seniti. In the case of orders issued for payment within the Kingdom
an application form containing the necessary particulars and accompanied
by the prescribed fee must be sent to the Money Order Office, Nuku'alofa,
where the duplicate will be issued.

147. Applications for duplicates of lost orders drawn in Tonga for payment in
other countries must be made direct by the payees to the chief office of the
country of payment.

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Void Orders.
148. Money Orders issued in Tonga for payment within the Kingdom, which

are not paid within a period of 6 months after the month in which they are
issued become forfeited, and the proceeds thereof shall be paid to the
Treasurer. When, however, a good and sufficient reason can be furnished
for the delay in presenting such orders, an application for payment will be
considered, subject to the payment of a fee of 10 seniti.

149. Money Orders issued in countries with which Tonga has entered into an
agreement for the exchange of Money Orders shall be valid for a period of
12 months after the month in which they are issued. At the expiry of the
period of validity any such orders unpaid shall be returned to and shall
remain at the disposal of the country of issue.

Through Orders.
150. In cases where Money Orders are drawn in Tonga on countries with which

no agreement has been entered into for the exchange of Money Orders,
such orders shall be transmitted through an intermediate country, and shall
be subject to such additional charges for commission as may be levied by
the intermediate country. The additional commission must be added to the
amount of the orders.

151. If repaid, the additional commission levied on “Through” orders shall not
be refunded.

Non-liability of Controller.
152. After once paying a Money Order, by whomsoever presented, the Non-

liability Controller is not liable to any further claim nor is he liable to pay
compensation for loss or injury arising out of delay in payment of a
Money Order, or out of any other irregularities in connection with an
order.

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APPENDIX I

G. 285/85,G.S. 3/68, G.S. 91/67

POSTAL TARIFF – RATES OF POSTAGES

PART I – WITHIN THE KINGDOM

Division 1 – Surface Mail Charges

Category


Maximum Weight

Letter 5 seniti for every 15 grams or
fraction thereof




Postcard Single: 4 seniti each


Printed papers, 10 seniti for the first 100 grams or
fraction thereof and 7 seniti for
each additional 100 grams or
fraction thereof.

2kgs P/Papers
5kgs books

Small Packet and other
articles

12 seniti for every 100 grams or
fraction thereof

500 grams

Parcels (Articles over 500
grams)

35 seniti for the first 500 grams and
17 seniti for each additional 500
grams or fraction thereof.

10kgs

Division 2 – Air Mail Charges

Category


Maximum Weight

Letter Mail 15 seniti for every 15 grams
or fraction thereof




Postcard, Greeting Cards and
Aerogrammes

10 senti each


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Category


Maximum Weight

Printed papers, newspapers,
small packet and other articles
of mail

50 seniti for the first 500
grams and 35 seniti for each
additional 500 grams or
fraction thereof.




Parcels (Articles over 500
grams)

18 seniti for every 100 grams
or fraction thereof.




Division 3 – Miscellaneous Fees

Category





Domestic Registration $1 for all items other than
parcels

Maximum amount of
compensation $12.00

Parcels Insurance Fee $1 up to $30 and 50c for each
additional $30 or fraction
thereof.

Maximum insurance value of
$500.



APPENDIX I CAP. 95A Postal Regulations




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PART II - BEYOND THE KINGDOM

Division 1 – Surface Mail Charges

Category To all overseas countries Maximum Weight

Letters 30 seniti for the first 25 grams or fraction thereof
and 15 seniti for each additional 25 grams or
fraction thereof.




Postcard 20 seniti each 2kgs P/Papers

Printed papers
and books

20 seniti for the first 50 grams or fraction thereof.


Newspapers 15 seniti for the first 50 grams or fraction thereof
and 9 seniti for each additional 50 grams or fraction
thereof.

1kg

Small Packet
Phonopost

30 seniti for each 50 grams or fraction thereof. 500 grams

To a country included in Zone

Parcels Zone 1. $2.60 for the first kilogram or fraction
thereof and $1.20 for each additional kilogram or
fraction thereof.







Zone 2. $4.20 for the first kilogram or fraction
thereof and $1.80 for each additional kilogram or
fraction thereof.






Literature for the Blind Free to all destinations Maximum Weight 10 kgs

Division 2 – AIR MAILS

Categories


The categories of mail despatched by Air Mail below at the postage rates shown are as follows:

(a) Letters;

(b) Postcards and Greeting Cards;

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(c) Aerogrammes;

(d) Other articles comprising the types of matter, samples, phonopost and small mail;

(e) Newspaper; and

(f) Parcels.


Aerogrammes must not contain an enclosure or have an attachment. Aerogrammes will be
accepted for registration, but if acknowledgement of delivery at place of destination is required
the whole article must be paid at their air-rate appropriate to letter mail.

To a country
included

Letter per 15
grams

Postcards and
Greeting Card
per 15 grams

Other Articles per
grams Maximum
Weight 250 grams

Newspaper/Printed
Matter per 50 grams
Maximum Weight
250 grams

Zone 1.
2.

42 seniti
57 seniti

32 seniti
32 seniti

47 seniti
$1.50

30 seniti
55 seniti


Parcels (articles not less than 250 grams-maximum weight 10 kgs)

To a country included in Zone

ZONE 1. $3.50 for the first 250 grams $1.56 for each additional 250 grams or fraction thereof.

ZONE 2. $4.50 for the first 250 grams and $2.00 for each additional 250 grams or fraction
thereof.

Aerogrammes

32 seniti to all destinations


Literature for the Blind

10 seniti for each 50 grams to all destinations Maximum Weight: 7 kgs


Overseas Registration: (Surface Mail & Air Mail)

$1.20 Maximum amount of compensation T$15.00


Parcels Insurance Fee (Surface Mail and Air Mail)

$2 up to $50 and $1 for each additional $50 or part thereof. Maximum insurance value
$500.

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PART III-MISCELLANEOUS FEES

(a) Overseas Advice of delivery card ....................... 30 seniti

(b) Storage Charge for parcels after 1 week ............... 10 seniti per day

(c) Inquiry Charge (Tongatapu only) ....................... cost of postage

(d) Request for withdrawal from the post of alteration of
address ......................................................

30 seniti

(e) Late fee-Registered Mail Parcels and packets ......... 30 seniti

(f) Rental of mail boxes-Large ...............................

Small .................................

$24.00 per annum
$16.00 per annum

(g) Private Mail Bag .......................................... $12.00 per annum

PACIFIC ISLANDS IN ZONE 1

American Samoa
Australia
Canton Island
Caroline Islands
Chatham Is.
Christmas Is.
Cook Islands
Federated States of Micronesia
Midway Is.
Nauru
New Britain
New Caledonia
New Zealand
Niue
Norfolk Is.
Ocean Is.
Papua New Guinea

Fiji
French Polynesia
Guam
Hawaii
Kiribati
Line Islands
Marianas Islands
Marshall Is.
Pitcairn Is.
Solomon Is.
Tahiti
Tokelau Is.
Tuvalu
Vanuatu
Wake Is.
Wallis & Futuna
Western Samoa


BALANCE OF WORLD POSTAL ADMINISTRATIONS OTHER THAN THOSE LISTED
ABOVE ARE IN ZONE 2.

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PART IV – MONEY ORDERS

SUBSTITUTED BY G.S. 3/68

COMMISSION


The commission (to be paid on issue) is as follows: —

If payable within the Kingdom —

5 seniti for each $10.00 or fraction thereof;

If payable beyond the Kingdom —

5 seniti for each $2.00 or fraction thereof with a minimum charge of10 seniti.

PART V-BRITISH POSTAL ORDERS

SUBSTITUTED BY G.S. 3/68


British Postal Orders are available for transmission of money within Kingdom and to any
country within the sterling area (except Australia)

PART VI

G.S. 91/67

PRIVATE LETTER BOXES


Annual rental

for a small box............................. $4.00

for a large box............................. $6.00

Related Laws