On Approval of the Programme for Increasing Employment for 2014-2020


Published: 0000-00-00

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GOVERNMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF LITHUANIA
 
 
 
RESOLUTION NO 878
 
ON
 
APPROVAL OF THE PROGRAMME FOR INCREASING EMPLOYMENT FOR 2014–2020
 
 
 
25 September 2013
 
Vilnius
 
 
 
For the purpose of implementing paragraph 74 of the Priority Measures Implementing the Programme of the Government of the Republic of Lithuania for 2012-2016, approved by Resolution No 228 of the Government of the Republic of Lithuania of 13 March 2013 (Valstybės žinios (Official Gazette) No 29-1406, 2013), the Government of the Republic of Lithuania has r e s o l v e d:
 
1. To approve the Programme for Increasing Employment for 2014–2020 (hereinafter referred to as “the Programme”).
 
2. To suggest that the municipalities participate in the implementation of the Programme approved by this Resolution.
 
 
 
 
 
Prime Minister                                                                                            Algirdas Butkevičius
 
 
 
Minister of Finance,
 
acting as Minister of Social Security and Labour                                       Rimantas Šadžius
 
 
 
_________________
 
 
 
APPROVED by
 
Resolution No 878 of the Government of the Republic of Lithuania of 25 September 2013
 
 
 
 
 
PROGRAMME FOR INCREASING EMPLOYMENT FOR 2014–2020
 
 
 
I. INTRODUCTION
 
1. The Programme for Increasing Employment for 2014–2020 (hereinafter referred to as “the Programme”) has been drafted with a view to achieving a comprehensive solution to employment problems that now are the most pressing through consolidation of the business, education and labour market sectors as well as involvement of social partners and municipalities in shaping employment policy.
 
2. The Programme is in compliance with the National Progress Strategy “Lithuania’s Progress Strategy ‘Lithuania 2030’” approved by Resolution No XI-2015 of the Seimas of the Republic of Lithuania of 15 May 2012 (Official Gazette, 2012, No 61-3050), and the provisions of the objective 1.1 “To encourage lifelong learning“ of priority 1 “Education of society, science and culture“, priority 2 “Active and solidary society“ and priority 3 “Environment favourable to economic growth“ of the National Progress Programme for 2014–2020 approved by Resolution No 1482 of the Government of the Republic of Lithuania of 28 November 2012 (Official Gazette, 2012, No 144-7430).
 
3. Preparation of the Programme was determined by the following:
 
3.1. The need to reduce unemployment caused by economic decline. The sudden downturn of the economy of the Republic of Lithuania (hereinafter referred to as “Lithuania“) in 2009 when the contraction of the GDP by 14.8 per cent had a negative effect on jobs and caused a mismatch of labour market demand and supply – during the peak of the crisis in 2010, the number of the unemployed increased to 312 100 people. In the period 2009–2011, the number of people who were working under employment contract, working in their own enterprises or were self-employed decreased by 263 500 people and in 2012 accounted for only 84.1 per cent of the 2008 level. As economy recovers, the private sector does not create enough jobs necessary for the reduction of unemployment. As at 1 September 2013, the number of the registered unemployed in the country was 190 100 people, accounting for 10.4 per cent of the country’s working age population.
 
3.2. The need to reduce structural unemployment. The labour force qualification structure does not match the qualification structure of jobs and thus prevent the development of business and creation of jobs. The education and training system is not responding fast enough to the labour market needs by fostering proper skills and competences. A situation is emerging in the labour market where there is a high unemployment rate and intense emigration, but vacant jobs are not occupied due to lack of qualified workforce or due to mismatch between the competence of job seekers and the requirements for the jobs offered.
 
3.3. The need to reduce youth unemployment. Owing to insufficient professional skills and lack of work experience, the youth (aged 15–24 years) is the most vulnerable group facing the problems of labour market integration. Over the recent several years, the youth unemployment rate in Lithuania was one of the highest in the European Union (hereinafter referred to as “the EU“), accounting for 35.1 per cent (in 2010). According to the Eurostat data for July 2013, the youth unemployment has decreased to 23.1 per cent, though the indicator is still rather high (EU average is 23.4 per cent). The number of unskilled young people who have not completed even the primary education has increased. Young people who are not in employment, education or training lack incentives to learn, acquire professional qualification or work. The high youth unemployment rate may have a long-term negative effect – the risk of not having a job in the future and earning lower income increases.
 
3.4. The need to reduce long-term unemployment. Due to slow economic recovery the unemployment rate in 2012 was 6.5 per cent, exceeding the EU average (4.6 per cent). Among the registered unemployed in 2012, nearly half of them were out of employment for more than a year and every fourth – more than two years. People with low education face difficulties in the labour market, in particular, the residents of rural residential areas who can hardly find a job matching their competence in the local labour market. The integration into the labour market of persons suffering from poverty and social exclusion is particularly hard, since they usually have been economically inactive for a long-period of time, have lost their working skills, qualifications or social skills or lack them. As a result of persistently high long-term unemployment rate, the unemployed lose motivation to work and become socially excluded permanent recipients of social benefits. This results in barriers to the use in the labour market the potential of the unemployed and inactive residents who are distanced from the labour market.
 
3.5. The need to regulate the effect of the emigration processes on the labour market. In 2009–2012, 220 400 people emigrated from Lithuania. More than a half of them (55.5 per cent) were between 20 and 34 years old. As a result of high emigration, the country‘s population during the said period decreased by 171 700 people. The main reasons for emigration are high unemployment rate, uneven distribution of jobs and low wages in Lithuania. According to the data provided by the Statistics Lithuania, in 2012, nearly 82 per cent of emigrants were out of employment for a year or longer before leaving the country. Such structure of emigration is dangerous for the Lithuanian labour market and the whole system of social protection, as it reduces the number of working age population and labour force, increases the average age of the labour market participants, speeds up the ageing of population and limits the possibilities to cover social protection expenditure. According to the data provided by the European Migration Network, in 2012, the number of emigrants declined 1, 3 times (by 12 800 people) compared to 2011, while the number of repatriating Lithuanian citizens was growing (by 3 300 people). In order to achieve a balanced labour market, to stop emigration of Lithuanian citizens and to have those who left return, it is necessary to carry out preventive work.
 
4. The Programme consists of 3 sections: “Introduction”, “Objectives and tasks of the Programme”, “Implementation of the Programme” and the Annex “List of Assessment Criteria for the Programme for Increasing Employment for 2014–2020 and their Meanings to be Achieved”.
 
 
 
II. OBJECTIVES AND TASKS OF THE PROGRAMME
 
5. The strategic goal of the Programme is to achieve the highest possible employment rate among population so that every resident can find work matching his qualification and secure an appropriate standard of living.
 
6. The first objective of the Programme is to encourage the creation of jobs and labour demand.
 
Fast economic growth and the development of business is the basis for increasing employment of Lithuanian population. Business creates new enterprises and workplaces, opens new markets and promotes the acquisition of new skills and abilities. Considering the fact that 99.4 per cent of the country‘s enterprises have less than 250 employees, small and medium business is the most important source of new jobs. Over the recent years, employment among Lithuania’s population has been increasing mostly due to the growing number of people employed in the private sector and the self-employed workers (during 2012, the number of the self-employed has increased by 7 per cent (to 124 600 people), the number of hired employees in the private sector during 2012 has increased by 14 900 people). Nevertheless, the recovery of a vast majority of the small and medium enterprises is yet not smooth and they are unable to return to the pre-crisis level, thus, the number of jobs created is insufficient for fast and sustainable integration of available labour resources into the labour market. Addressing the issues of increasing employment among population will be facilitated by encouraging the creation of new enterprises and establishing jobs while supporting the start-ups and increasing access to business services and financial resources for persons starting and developing a business.
 
Lithuania needs more entrepreneurs in order to create jobs and increase employment. The findings of the 2012 Eurobarometer survey show willingness towards entrepreneurship: as many as 58 per cent of the Lithuanian respondents would opt for self-employment (EU average is 37 per cent). However, the present and future entrepreneurs face a not so friendly business environment: the system of consistent entrepreneurship education, which would encourage young people to start business upon completing their education and studies, has not yet been developed, loans are difficult to obtain and access to the market is difficult, administrative regulation procedures are complicated and regulation of labour relations is strict. These reasons account for a relatively small number of enterprises being established.
 
Domestic and foreign investment is an important factor determining the creation of jobs and employment. In 2012, material investments of the country‘s business have increased by 3 per cent (from LTL 14.0 billion to LTL 14.4 billion) as compared to 2011, however, taking into account the 2012 inflation, they are still at the 2011 level. As at 31 December 2012, foreign direct investment in Lithuania accounted for LTL 41.2 billion, increasing by LTL 3.1 billion during 2012, however, the overall level of accumulated foreign direct investment is one of the lowest in the EU. The majority of investment is drawn to the country’s largest cities. Given the limited financial resources at the country‘s disposal, foreign direct investment must contribute to the maximum degree possible to the creation of jobs and enhancement of employment in the regions.
 
The domestic economy lacks jobs for high-skilled specialists. Although the manufacturing industry is the prevailing industry in Lithuania, the structure of the economy is changing, affecting the distribution of workforce by separate type of economic activity, i.e. the labour force shifts from manufacturing and agricultural activity towards a more efficient service sector. In order to encourage the emergence of new jobs, a qualitative rather than quantitative aspect of job creation is important and thus it is essential to create in the country‘s economy as many as possible better quality jobs, generating higher added value, requiring better qualified specialists who are more likely to stay in the labour market for longer. The increasing number of quality jobs would not only allow for creation of a higher added value in the country‘s economy and an increase in labour productivity, but also would contribute to increasing employment of population, ensuring higher income and better quality of life for the working people. Moreover, the creation of new jobs for high-skilled specialists would allow one to expect a positive effect on the emigration processes of the qualified workforce. This problem is planned to be addressed by implementing measures to promote the development of industry, export and innovations as well as measures to encourage tourism and investment which would stimulate the creation of these jobs.
 
Not enough jobs are created in the country‘s regions, especially, in rural areas. A majority of rural residents living in economically underdeveloped regions work in traditional economy sectors, such as agriculture, forestry and fisheries. The sluggish development of non-traditional (alternative) economic activities in rural residential areas does not encourage the creation of new jobs. Due to the gap between regional business development and creation of jobs, unemployment among the working age population in rural residential areas is 1.8 times higher than in the cities.
 
7. The tasks for achieving the first objective of the Programme shall be as follows:
 
7.1. to ensure a favourable business environment. To address this task it is planned to create more favourable conditions for business start-ups, ensure a stable tax environment, reduce the general regulatory burden and increase the flexibility of labour relations;
 
7.2. to encourage investment and creation of jobs that create a higher added value and require higher-skilled specialists. For this task it is planned to continue investment-attracting initiatives by emphasizing the advantages of individual regions, develop the infrastructure necessary for private investment and encourage the development of clusters in the regions;
 
7.3. to foster entrepreneurship among population and support business creation initiatives. For this task it is planned to encourage the creation of new enterprises and self-employment, offer consultation support for business start-ups, increase access to business services and financial resources for persons who are starting or developing a business and incorporate the entrepreneurship into the country‘s education system;
 
7.4. to encourage the creation of jobs in the regions, particularly, in the areas where there is high unemployment rate. For this task it is planned to create possibilities at the local level for the development of partnership between municipalities and social partners in order to create jobs, continue to support young farmers and non-agricultural business in rural areas and to provide support for employers in the areas with high unemployment rate.
 
8. The second objective of the Programme is to increase the alignment between the workforce skills and labour market needs.
 
The skilled workforce that is able to adapt to the market changes is one of the key conditions for increasing employment. The education system plays the most important role in the creation of society which actively participates in the labour market where all the members constantly acquire, update and expand their competencies and, also, apply them productively in the country‘s economy.
 
In order to train a skilled workforce, it is necessary to modernize vocational training, improve the contents and the process of study. Efforts must be made to achieve that the supply of study and training programmes for youth and adults matches the needs of employers and the regional economy. When ensuring the quality of practical training it is important to create as many possibilities as possible for the students to acquire specific practical skills in actual workplaces (including also in the form of organization of apprenticeship and professional training). For this purpose it is necessary for employers to take proactive part in the development and implementation of the programmes of training and study.
 
With a view to increasing the efficiency of the education system, it is necessary to make use of the data on human resources and of the systems of monitoring and forecasting of the labour market. As the system of forecasting of the supply and demand of competencies in the labour market is still fragmentary, neither population nor institutions responsible for the organization of education have sufficient information about the need for competencies in the labour market. The monitoring and forecasting of the labour market and human resources would make it possible to evaluate the labour market and human resources development trends, help to obtain an objective information regarding the structural changes of the economy, quantitative and qualitative changes of jobs in individual economic sectors and the forecasted requirements of the labour force competencies in different economic sectors.
 
It is necessary to improve the system of services of occupational (career) guidance, to address the issues related to its financing so that these services are of good quality and accessible to the students and to those who are not in employment or training as well as the working people. The services of occupational (career) guidance (career development, vocational activation, information and counselling) that are provided to persons at any stage of their life is a very important factor facilitating the improvement of the efficiency of education and the labour market, namely, to reduce the early withdrawal from the education system, choose an occupation, acquire the necessary skill and etc. These services help people to consciously choose education and employment possibilities that are suitable for them, create conditions for acquiring career competencies, and actively develop their career (i. e. a lifelong sequence of training, self-expression and work experiences significant for a person and society).
 
With a view to ensuring sustainable development, it is necessary to develop the variety and accessibility of non-formal education forms in the regions. It should be acknowledged that the system of recognition of competencies acquired through non-formal education, work and self-education is still underdeveloped. It is necessary to further develop the system of non-formal education and thus encourage learning, especially for the youth, under non-formal adult education programmes. It is also very important to encourage the development of flexible forms and methods of learning, which would contribute to strengthening of the learner‘s motivation.
 
Active adult education is a particularly important condition for continuous personal improvement and ability to adapt to the changing labour market, however, the system of non-formal education is not sufficiently adapted to the growing need of provision of lifelong learning services. Lower-skilled persons participate in lifelong learning much more rarely than those who have a higher qualification. Improvement of their qualification and their re-training is the weakest part of the system of non-formal adult education. Higher education schools should be more encouraged to participate in the provision of lifelong learning services in order to train high-skilled specialists.
 
9. The tasks for achieving the second objective of the Programme are shall be as follows:
 
9.1. to improve accessibility and quality of occupational (career) guidance services. For addressing this task it is planned to improve the occupational (career) guidance system, i.e. to support all forms of provision of occupational (career) guidance services in the real and virtual environment, to address its financing issues so that these services are of good quality and accessible to both persons who study and persons who are not in employment or training;
 
9.2. to ensure the acquisition of quality skills in the system of education and training. For this task it is planned to modernize vocational training, improve the content and process of study, improve the quality of practical training, facilitate the acquisition of more practical skills in actual workplaces, optimize the network of vocational training institutions and supply of programmes, taking into account the needs and prospects of the regional economy, also, to plan the admission to vocational and higher education schools based on the forecasts of specialist supply and labour market demand;
 
9.3. to develop the system of assessment and recognition of competencies. For this task it is planned to reform and develop the framework of assessment and recognition of competencies which would ensure the assessment and recognition of competencies acquired through formal, non-formal and self-education so that persons would be able to acquire the desired education in a shorter time (by studying under individual programme modules) or obtain the recognition of the acquired qualification and integrate into the labour market faster;
 
9.4. to develop the system of lifelong learning as a guarantee of staying in the labour market longer. For this task it is planned to create and implement, in co-operation with employers and other social partners, the schemes for the integration of graduates into the labour market (such as trainee’s and etc.) so that they could acquire, while working in enterprises or organizations, specific practical skills wanted by employers, also, to support the initiatives of creation of lifelong learning services and introduce new models for financing of non-formal adult education.
 
10. The third objective of the Programme is to integrate the available labour resources into and keeping them there.
 
This objective is pursued, as it is necessary, taking into account the aging society, shortage of skilled workers and the emigration that reduces the country‘s workforce potential, to mobilize all Lithuanian people of working age, encourage their active participation in economic activity, integration into the labour market and remaining there as long as possible.
 
It is difficult for young people to get a job in Lithuania – the youth unemployment rate in the country is still high. As at 1 September 2013, the registered number of unemployed young people under 25 years old was 24 000. The main reasons for youth unemployment are different case by case – the lack of education, vocational training or work experience, misalignment between acquired vocational knowledge and labour market requirements, the lack of perseverance and job search skills, insufficient support while making first steps into the labour market. Therefore, in order to reduce youth unemployment, attention should be paid to the elimination of reasons rather than consequences and help for jobless young people should be provided taking into account their individual needs. It is necessary to encourage young people to finish school and acquire skills. The development of skills should be inseparable from the improvement of practical working skills. Onsite training, practical training and work placement in enterprises are very important, providing an opportunity for the young people to obtain not only the required skills, but also work experience. It is essential to encourage self-employment among youth and develop an efficient support for youth business creation initiatives. It is necessary to support youth in the transition from school-to-work, i.e. to ensure that all young people under 25 years old, within 4 months from losing a job or completing formal education, would get an appropriate job offer or continue to study, including training offered in the form of apprenticeship, and have the possibility of practical training or work placement.
 
Older people lack skills and motivation to remain in the labour market. The situation of these people in the labour market is unstable, their education or general abilities are often not sufficiently aligned with the labour market needs, they lack confidence and motivation to improve their knowledge and abilities in order to retain professional qualification for as long as possible. It is necessary to encourage the initiative of lifelong learning and the employers‘ tolerance towards older workers. In addition, it should be borne in mind that the work experience acquired by older persons could and should be handed down to the youth.
 
The potential of the long-term unemployed people is not utilized in the labour market. Over the recent years, the share of the unemployed who are unskilled or have lost their skill has been increasing and the number of the long-term unemployed who are not prepared to compete in the labour market has been growing, especially, in rural areas. The lack of qualification and motivation for work is the major obstacle for integration into the labour market. The overall coverage of the active labour market measures and funding allocated for individual measures are too small, the measures are insufficiently adapted to the low-skilled workers and the long-term unemployed, therefore, it is necessary to allocate funds for active labour market policy measures while at the same time increasing their coverage and efficiency.
 
The working conditions and education system are not adapted for the disabled. Currently, in Lithuania there are nearly 170 000 disabled of working age, of which only 28 per cent are in employment. The disabled can work in the workplace adapted to the type of disability, however, the public and work environment that has not been fully adapted to the needs of the disabled limits participation of these persons in the labour market while the education system limits the possibilities to acquire professional qualification. It is necessary to encourage tolerance among the public and employers for the disabled workers. An excellent example is the social integration project “Towards Work“ that has become the winner of the RegioStars Awards 2013 organized by the European Commission.
 
The poor integration of available labour resources into the labour market is also caused by increased emigration. The possibilities to get employment under good conditions and earn a wage sufficient to live a decent life should contribute to the prevention of migration. It is also necessary to encourage active Lithuanian re-emigration policy related to the creation of favourable conditions for returning emigrants and the provision of support for their integration into the labour market.
 
11. The tasks for achieving the third objective of the Programme shall be as follows:
 
11.1. to ensure a swift and sustainable school-to-work transition of young people. For this task it is planned to provide support for young people under 25 years old who, within 4 months from losing a job or completing formal education, would get an appropriate job offer or continue to study, including training offered in the form of apprenticeship, and would have the possibility of practical training or work placement in a specific enterprise and to continue to provide support for employers who create new jobs and recruit young people entering their first job, to improve young people‘s professional skills acquired in an actual workplace by offering training in the form of apprenticeship, practical training or work placement in an enterprise, to encourage self-employment among youth and support youth business creation initiatives;
 
11.2. to encourage older workers to remain in the labour market longer. For this task it is planned to create favourable conditions for working after the retirement age, encourage the learning of older workers by providing flexible adult training schemes, provide the older unemployed persons with opportunities of skill upgrading and re-training, use targeted incentives to employ older workers, support the transfer of experience gained by older workers to the young people using different types of experience transfer;
 
11.3. to create possibilities for the unemployed, especially the long-term and low-skilled ones, to return to the labour market. For this task it is planned to increase the access to the labour market services while taking into account the individual needs, improve the system of evaluation and profiling of the unemployed, implement activation measures for the long-term unemployed that stimulate willingness to work, increase the funding, coverage and effectiveness of the active labour market policy measures, employ flexible models for re-training of the long-term and low-skilled unemployed so as to enable the unemployed to learn a specific occupation within a short period of time as well as to encourage the unemployed to begin self-employment activities, especially, in the rural areas.
 
11.4. to increase the labour market participation of the disabled. For this task it is planned to increase the coverage and efficiency of the systems of social and professional rehabilitation of the disabled, establish the framework of employment mediation and sustaining employment once in work, develop flexible and innovative forms of employment as well as the possibilities of the education system, taking into account the specific disability, to adapt the work environment to the needs of the disabled, improve the legal basis for the operation of social enterprises and the system of support for the employment of the disabled.
 
11.5. to facilitate the labour market integration of returning emigrants. For this task it is planned to provide information and consultation on conditions of employment, vocational training, conditions and possibilities for establishment and development of business in Lithuania, establish an institutional system for development of close relations with Lithuania’s economic migrants living abroad and co-operation with active Lithuanian communities, ensure that the children of the Lithuanian citizens living abroad have possibilities for integration into the Lithuanian general education system and create favourable conditions for entry into Lithuanian higher education schools, provide support for emigrants’ integration into the labour market, facilitate employment under good conditions and earn a wage sufficient to live a decent life.
 
 
 
III. Implementation of the programme
 
12. Implementation of the Programme shall be co-ordinated by the Ministry of Social Security and Labour.
 
13. The Programme is implemented with participation of the Ministry of Social Security and Labour, Ministry of Education and Science, Ministry of Economy, Ministry of Agriculture and the Ministry of the Interior, institutions subordinate to these ministries and other institutions related to employment initiatives, also, other ministries, bodies, enterprises and organizations. It is proposed that the municipalities and social partners should also participate in the implementation of the Programme.
 
14. To implement the objectives and tasks of the Programme, an inter-institutional action plan shall be elaborated to be approved by the Government of the Republic of Lithuania.
 
15. Implementation of the Programme shall be financed from the general appropriations, approved by the Law on Approval of Financial Indicators of the State Budget of the Republic of Lithuania and of Municipal Budgets for relevant year, earmarked for appropriate institutions responsible for the implementation of the Programme‘s actions, the Employment Fund, European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development, EU Structural Funds and other legally obtained funding. Preliminary funding needed for implementation of the Programme is LTL 1 100 million.
 
16. Monitoring of Programme implementation and assessment of the progress achieved shall be carried out by the Ministry of Social Security and Labour. Institutions participating in Programme implementation shall supply information to the Ministry of Social Security and Labour on implementation of measures and results achieved.
 
17. The Ministry of Social Security and Labour shall present the information on implementation of the interinstitutional action plan and changes of indicators to the Office of the Government of the Republic of Lithuania twice a year (for the half year and for the year). The Ministry of Social Security and Labour shall present the information on Programme implementation (including analytical information on the results achieved, the benefit created for the society, emerging problems and other important positive and negative aspects) in the annual activity report.
 
18. In 2017, a mid-term assessment of the progress of Programme implementation shall be carried out. Taking into consideration the conclusions of the assessment, the objectives and tasks of the Programme as well as their assessment criteria may be reviewed and a draft amendment to the Programme may be prepared. This draft amendment shall be presented for public discussion and co-ordination.
 
19. Annual Programme implementation results shall be made available to the public.
 
 
 
_________________
 
 
 
 
 
Annex
 
to the Programme for Increasing Employment for 2014–2020
 
 
 
LIST OF ASSESMENT CRITERIA FOR THE PROGRAMMEFOR INCREASING EMPLOYMENT FOR 2014–2020 AND THEIR MEANINGS TO BE ACHIEVED
 
 
No.
Strategic goal
Objective
Task
Assessment Criterion
Indicators
Institution monitoring the achievement of the assessment criterion
Initial indicator value 2012
2016
2020
1.
To achieve the highest possible employment rate of population so that every resident can find work matching his qualification and secure an appropriate standard of living.
 
 
employment rate of population aged 20– 64 years (in per cent) (Lithuania’s commitment under the Europe 2020 Strategy).
68.7
70.7
72.8
Ministry of Social  Security and Labour
2.
 
1. To encourage creation of jobs and job demand.
 
increase in the number of employed persons (aged 15– 64 years) compared to 2012 (1 247 000 people) (in per cent)

13.4
28.3
Ministry of Social Security and Labour
3.
 
 
1.1.To ensure a favourable business environment
business environment index; survey of the World Bank, ranking
27
22
15
Ministry of Economy
4.
 
 
1.2. Encourage investments and creation of jobs that create a higher added value and require higher-skilled specialists.
foreign direct investment per capita LTL thousand
13.85
17.16
20.86
Ministry of Economy
labour productivity index (per person employed, in per cent)
132.1
145.6
162.0
5.
 
 
1.3. To foster entrepreneurship among population and support business creation initiatives.
number of operating small and medium sized enterprises and natural persons engaged in individual activity under business certificate and self-employment certificate per thousand population
63.9
70
75
Ministry of Economy
6.
 
 
1.4. To encourage the creation of jobs in the regions, particularly, in the areas with high unemployment rate.
employment rate of population (aged 15– 64 years) in rural residential areas (in per cent)
53.5
56.5
60.3
Ministry of Social Security and Labour
7.
 
2. To increase the alignment between the workforce skills and labour market needs
 
share of higher education school graduates registered in the territorial labour exchange offices (a year after graduation) (in per cent)
6.2
5.5
5
Ministry of Education and Science
share of vocational training establishment graduates registered in the territorial labour exchange offices (a year after graduation) (in per cent)
21.4
20
18
8.
 
 
2.1. To improve the accessibility and quality of occupational (career) guidance services
share of young people aged 18– 24 years without a secondary education and not attending school anymore (Eurostat) (in per cent)
6.5
not more than 8.9
not more than 8.9
Ministry of Social Security and Labour
share of young unemployed people without professional qualification compared to the number of the registered young unemployed (in per cent)
52.1
42
30
9.
 
 
2.2. To ensure the acquisition of quality skills in the system of education and training
share of study programmes accredited for 6 years compared to the total of accredited programmes (in per cent)
47
60
80
Ministry of Education and Science
share of modular vocational training programmes compared to the total of formal vocational training programmes (in per cent)
10
20
30
10.
 
 
2.3.To develop the system of assessment and recognition of competencies
share of higher education schools where the model of the system of formalizing of competencies acquired in a non-formal way has been introduced (in per cent)
12
90
100
Ministry of Education and Science
share of the state vocational training institutions where the competencies acquired through non-formal work and self-education have been assessed (in per cent)
5.2
7
10
11.
 
 
2.4. To develop the system of lifelong learning as a guarantee of staying in the labour market longer
level of lifelong learning among population aged 15– 64 years (Eurostat) (in per cent)
5.2
7.6
10
Ministry of Education and Science
12.
 
3. To integrate the available labour resources into and keep them in the labour market
 
level of activity of population workforce aged 15– 64 years (in per cent)
71.9
73.7
75.4
Ministry of Social Security and Labour
13.
 
 
3.1. To ensure a swift and sustainable school-to-work transition of young people
employment level of young people (aged 15– 24 years) (in per cent)
21.6
26.6
32.6
Ministry of Social Security and Labour
share of young people who are not in employment or training or practical training (inactive persons) (aged 15– 24 years) (in per cent)
11.1
8.9
6.6
14.
 
 
3.2. To encourage older workers to remain in the labour market longer
level of employment of older workers (aged 55– 64 years) (in per cent)
50.5
51.5
53.5
Ministry of Social Security and Labour
the average age of withdrawal from the labour market
62.3
63
64
15.
 
 
3.3. To create possibilities for the unemployed, especially the long-term and low-skilled ones, to return to the labour market
level of long-term unemployment (in per cent)
6.5
5.2
3.5
Ministry of Social Security and Labour
share of the unemployed participating in active labour policy market measures compared to the total number of the unemployed at the beginning of the year (in per cent)
28.8
35
50
16.
 
 
3.4. To increase the labour market participation of the disabled
share of the employed disabled of working age compared to the total number of the working age disabled (in per cent)
28
32
38
Ministry of Social Security and Labour
17.
 
 
3.5. To facilitate the labour market integration of returning emigrants
increase in the number of returning migrants compared to 2012 (17 357 people) (in per cent)

22
25
Ministry of Social Security and Labour
 
 
 
_________________