Hull Inspection Regulations

Link to law: http://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/regulations/C.R.C.,_c._1432/FullText.html

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Hull Inspection Regulations

C.R.C., c. 1432CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001
Regulations Respecting the Inspection of Hulls and Equipment of SteamshipsShort Title

1 These Regulations may be cited as the Hull Inspection Regulations.

Interpretation

2 In these Regulations,

Act
Act means the Canada Shipping Act; (Loi)
approved
approved means approved by the Board; (approuvé)
Board
Board means the Board of Steamship Inspection; (Bureau)
Chairman
Chairman means the Chairman of the Board; (président)
Divisional Supervisor
Divisional Supervisor means the officer of the Department of Transport in charge of a Steamship Inspection Division and includes the Regional Superintendent of a Steamship Inspection Division; (surveillant divisionnaire)
equipment
equipment includes lifeboats, life-saving equipment, fire-extinguishing equipment, anchors, cables, apparatus for the detection and extinguishing of fire, compasses, lights, signals, navigating appliances, and all other apparatus designed or required for the safety of a ship or the protection of passengers and crew, but does not include radio equipment other than radio equipment for survival craft; (équipement)
existing ship
existing ship means a ship that is not a new ship; (navire existant)
first inspection
first inspection means inspection of a ship during construction and includes the initial inspection of a ship transferred from registry elsewhere than in Canada to Canadian registry; (première inspection)
hull
hull means the body of a steamship, including the masts and rigging, and all parts of its structure; (coque)
inspector
inspector means a steamship inspector appointed under the Act; (inspecteur)
length

length means,

(a) in the case of a ship that is registered under the Act or required by the Act to be registered,

(i) the distance from the fore part of the uppermost end of the stem to the aft side of the head of the stern post except that, if a stern post is not fitted to the ship, the measurement shall be taken to the foreside of the head of the rudder stock,
(ii) if the ship has no rudder stock or has a rudder stock situated outside of the hull at the stern, the distance from the foreside of the foremost permanent structure to the aft side of the aftermost permanent structure of the ship not including guards or rubbing strakes, or
(iii) if the ship is double-ended, the distance from the aft side of the forward rudder stock to the foreside of the after rudder stock, and

(b) in the case of a ship that is not required by the Act to be registered, the horizontal distance between perpendiculars erected at the extreme ends of the outside of the hull; (longueur)

new ship

new ship means

(a) a Safety Convention ship the keel of which was laid on or after May 26, 1965,
(b) a ship, other than a passenger ship, that is converted to a Safety Convention passenger ship on or after May 26, 1965,
(c) a ship, other than a Safety Convention ship, the keel of which was laid on or after June 10, 1954,
(d) a ship that is converted to a passenger ship other than a Safety Convention passenger ship on or after June 10, 1954, and
(e) a ship that is transferred to registry in Canada after June 10, 1954; (navire neuf)

nuclear ship
nuclear ship means a ship fitted with a nuclear power plant; (navire nucléaire)
steamship
steamship means any ship propelled by machinery, not being a sailing ship as defined in the Act; (navire à vapeur)
strength deck
strength deck means the uppermost continuous deck, except in way of an effective superstructure, when the superstructure deck shall be considered the strength deck. (pont de résistance)

SOR/93-251, s. 2.

Application

3 (1) Subject to subsection (3), these Regulations apply to

(a) ships not over five tons, gross tonnage, that carry more than 12 passengers;
(b) passenger ships over five tons, gross tonnage;
(c) non-passenger ships over 15 tons, gross tonnage, that are self-propelled, including lighters, dredges, barges, hoppers and like vessels; and
(d) ships, as defined in Part XV of the Act, that are dredges, rock drills, floating elevators, floating pile drivers and like vessels and are not self-propelled.

(2) [Revoked, SOR/93-251, s. 2]
(3) These Regulations do not apply to fishing vessels except as provided in the Large Fishing Vessel Inspection Regulations.

SOR/93-251, s. 2;
SOR/96-437, s. 4.

Exemption

4 [Revoked, SOR/93-251, s. 2]

First Inspection

5 (1) Subject to section 16, new steamships shall be constructed in accordance with plans that have been approved by the Board or a Divisional Supervisor as set forth in Schedule VI.
(2) Subject to subsection (3), detailed plans, in triplicate, as set forth in Schedule VI, shall be submitted by the builder of a ship for approval before construction is commenced and if the construction of the ship is commenced before that approval is obtained, the builder may be required to make such alterations as are necessary to comply with the conditions of approval.
(3) Where a ship is to be constructed beyond the limits of the area inspected by a Divisional Supervisor, the plans specified in Schedule VI shall be submitted in quadruplicate.
(4) [Revoked, SOR/93-251, s. 2]
(5) One copy of every plan approved by a Divisional Supervisor shall be forwarded to the Chairman.
(6) Steamships shall be inspected at suitable intervals during construction to ensure that the construction is in accordance with the approved plans and that the material and workmanship are satisfactory and where defects in either material or workmanship are found, alterations or replacements shall be made to rectify the deficiency.

(7) Where a ship built outside Canada is brought under Canadian registry and is

(a) in class with a classification society approved by the Minister, or
(b) certified by or under the authority of the government of the country to which the ship belongs,

the Board shall determine the extent to which the ship shall be inspected before an inspection certificate may be issued in respect of it.

SOR/93-251, s. 2.

6 (1) Subject to these Regulations, the Board may accept as standards of construction the standards set out in the current edition of the construction rules published by Lloyd’s Register of Shipping, Bureau Veritas, American Bureau of Shipping, Det Norske Veritas, Germanischer Lloyd, Registro Italiano or Nippon Kaiji Kyokai.
(2) Where the Board has accepted the standards of one of the rules described in subsection (1) in relation to a ship, any deviation from such rules shall be submitted to the Board for its approval.

7 (1) Before a new ship is launched, the compartments within the main hull shall be subjected to hose or pressure tests as follows:

(a) double bottoms that are not to be used for the carriage of oil: a head of water which shall be equal to the maximum head that can be experienced in service;
(b) deep tanks and peak tanks used for the carriage of water, and deep tanks and double bottom tanks arranged for the carriage of oil fuel: a head of water equal to the maximum head to which the tanks can be subjected in service but not less than 2.44 m above the crown of the tanks where the moulded depth to the strength deck exceeds 4.88 m, and 0.91 m where the moulded depth does not exceed 3.05 m; intermediate heads may be obtained by interpolation between 4.88 m and 3.05 m;
(c) peak bulkheads, which do not form the boundaries of tanks, shall be tested by filling the peaks with water to the level of the load waterline;
(d) watertight bulkheads, including recesses and watertight flats, watertight tunnels, weather decks and waterways, shall be hose tested; the pressure of water in the hose shall be not less than 207 kPa;

(e) cargo tanks in tankers shall be filled with water to a head of 2.44 m above the highest point of the tanks, excluding the hatchways;

NOTE — 
This test may be conducted before the ship is launched, or afterward in dry dock. If special conditions exist, which will not permit of either of these arrangements, an alternative arrangement may be made to the satisfaction of the inspector.

(f) cofferdams in tankers shall be filled with water to the top of the hatchways.

(2) Where tanks are to be cemented, the tests shall be carried out before the cementing is commenced.

SOR/93-251, s. 2(F).

8 Inspection of the underwater portion of a ship for the issue of a Load Line Convention Certificate, or for the issue of a Safety Convention Certificate, shall be completed and the draught marks verified before the ship is floated.
SOR/93-251, s. 2.

9 All sea connections and discharge openings in the hull shall be carefully inspected, and those in the underwater portion shall be inspected before the ship is floated.

10 The means for closing openings in the hull, decks and superstructures shall be inspected before the ship goes into service, and where such openings are required to close watertight, they shall be hose-tested; the pressure of the water in the hose shall be not less than 207 kPa.

11 Fire-resisting bulkheads and fire-resisting doors shall be inspected and self-closing arrangements for fire-resisting doors shall be tested.

12 All watertight doors within the hull shall be inspected, tried under working conditions and hose tested; the pressure of the water in the hose shall be not less than 207 kPa.

13 The means for pumping shall be tested before the inspection is completed.

14 The steering arrangements shall be inspected during construction and tried under working conditions; where rod and chain steering gear leads are fitted the following spare gear shall be provided, and shall be inspected:
One complete spring buffer and one extra spring, two tested chains each equal to the longest length in the gear, two turnbuckles, four shackles, four connecting links and four rod pins; provided that in ocean-going steamships, the speed of which is 12 knots or more, one buffer spring, one turnbuckle, and one length of chain may be dispensed with, and that in steamships engaged on home-trade voyages, Class III, having either a main gear, which is hand-operated, or an auxiliary gear, independent of the rods and chains, that can be effectively operated, the spare gear may be confined to sufficient shackles or split links to enable repair of the gear to be readily effected in the event of a breakdown; and provided, further, that in all other steamships engaged on home-trade voyages, Class III, the spare gear shall be as required for ships the speed of which is 12 knots or more.

15 The masts and rigging shall be inspected during construction, and tests of the cargo gear shall be made in the presence of a competent person, as prescribed in the Tackle Regulations.

16 Steamships transferred from registry elsewhere than in Canada to Canadian registry are deemed to be new ships and are subject to inspection as follows:

(a) they shall be completely inspected in dry dock and checked against plans showing the ship’s construction; provided that, where plans are not obtainable, the matter shall be referred to the Board. In all cases full particulars of the ship’s stability, including a copy of the hydrostatic curves, shall be submitted, but, if this information is not available, an inclining experiment shall be conducted in the presence of and to the satisfaction of the inspector, and the owners shall also provide a set of hydrostatic curves. The inspector shall forward to the Chairman a report of the inclining experiment and a copy of the hydrostatic curves;
(b) after checking the ship against the plans, the inspector shall forward to the Chairman a report, with a copy of the plans, stating whether or not the ship is constructed in accordance with the plans; if any difference exists between the ship and the plans the inspector shall make a detailed report accordingly; the condition of the ship and any defects that may be discovered shall be noted. Where considered necessary by the inspector, a section of the deck covering shall be removed to determine the thickness of the deck plating below;
(c) in the case of a ship more than 12 years old, the hull shall be drilled in accordance with the requirements of subsection 27(3) and a report regarding the thicknesses found shall be forwarded to the Chairman, but in the case of a classed ship this requirement may be waived if the inspector is satisfied that no serious reduction in thickness exists;
(d) the suitability of the ship for the proposed service shall also be considered by the inspector, who will state his views thereon in his report;
(e) after examination of the plans and the report the Board shall determine the suitability of the ship for the proposed service and shall issue instructions regarding any alterations or renewals it may consider necessary before the ship is accepted;
(f) after approval of the plans, the inspection shall proceed in the same manner as for a new ship and a complete inspection of the hull shall be made as prescribed in sections 5 to 15; and
(g) for the inspection required by paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e) and (f), the hull shall be cleaned inside and outside, all compartments being opened for access, and facilities provided by the owner so that complete inspection may be made; the ship shall not be floated until inspection of all underwater portions has been completed.

SOR/93-251, s. 2.

17 [Revoked, SOR/93-251, s. 2]

Periodical Inspections — Annual, Quadrennial and Quinquennial

18 (1) Subject to subsection (2), the following ships shall be inspected annually in accordance with section 23, and quadrennially in accordance with sections 24 to 27:

(a) passenger ships over five tons, gross tonnage;
(b) non-passenger steamships over 150 tons, gross tonnage; and
(c) towed barges, dredges and like vessels over 150 tons, gross tonnage, making voyages more than 15 nautical miles from land and carrying a crew.

(2) Where a ship described in paragraph (1)(a), (b) or (c) is

(a) not over 40 years old,
(b) constructed of steel,
(c) making voyages on inland waters, and
(d) in fresh water for a period of at least three consecutive months annually,

it shall be inspected annually in accordance with section 23 and quinquennially in accordance with sections 24 to 27.

(3) The following ships shall be inspected quadrennially in accordance with sections 24 to 27:

(a) non-passenger steamships over 15 tons, gross tonnage, and not over 150 tons, gross tonnage; and
(b) towed barges, dredges and like vessels over 15 tons, gross tonnage, and not over 150 tons, gross tonnage, making voyages more than 15 nautical miles from land and carrying a crew.

(4) [Revoked, SOR/93-251, s. 2]

SOR/93-251, s. 2.

19 (1) Where it is inconvenient for an owner to fulfil all the requirements of a periodical inspection referred to in section 23 or in sections 24 to 27 at the due date, the Board may allow postponement of certain parts of the inspection of the ship if it is satisfied that it can do so with propriety.

(2) Where postponement is allowed under subsection (1),

(a) the periodical inspection shall be completed within a time determined by the Board in accordance with the requirements of the appropriate section, as if the ship had been inspected on the original due date; and
(b) in the case of ships subject to quinquennial inspection, the succeeding periodical inspection shall become due within the prescribed period from the original due date.

20 (1) An owner may submit a proposal to the Board for a system of continuous inspection and testing of the hull of the ship whereby all compartments of the hull are opened for inspection and testing in regular rotation within a five-year period.
(2) Where a system of continuous inspection is approved by the Board, the owner of the ship for which it is approved shall furnish a chart for recording inspections and tests.

Underwater Inspections

21 (1) Steamships and non-self-propelled ships shall be inspected in dry dock or on a slipway as prescribed in Schedule I, except that where an owner cannot comply with the requirements of Schedule I the Board may allow postponement of underwater inspection if it is satisfied that it can do so with propriety and, where postponement is allowed in the case of ships subject to quinquennial inspection, the succeeding underwater inspection shall become due within the inspection interval prescribed in Schedule I from the original due date.
(2) At the underwater inspection, the ship shall be placed on blocks of sufficient height, and suitable stages shall be erected around the ship to facilitate proper inspection of the outside of the hull and its appendages.
(3) In the case of small non-passenger ships, underwater inspection other than in a drydock or on a slipway may be permitted provided the inspector is satified that with such inspection he can properly determine the condition of the outside of the hull and its appendages.

Issue and Extension of Short Term Certificates

22 (1) Notwithstanding sections 18, 19 and 21, where an inspector is satisfied from such inspection as is possible while a ship is afloat, and without opening all compartments, that the hull and equipment are in a seaworthy condition, the inspector may,

(a) in the case of a passenger ship that is not a Safety Convention ship, issue or extend a short term inspection certificate for a period not exceeding one month beyond the due date of periodic inspection; and

(b) in the case of a non-passenger ship, issue or extend a short term inspection certificate for a period not exceeding

(i) two months beyond the due date of periodic inspection, or
(ii) five months beyond the due date of periodic inspection if authorized to do so by the Divisional Supervisor.

(2) A short term inspection certificate issued or extended up to the maximum period allowed under this section shall not be renewed or further extended unless

(a) the periodic inspection is completed; or
(b) permission is granted by the Board.

1987, c. 7, s. 84(F).

Annual Inspections

23 The annual inspection referred to in subsection 18(1) shall be carried out as follows:

(a) the ship shall be inspected externally and internally as far as may be possible without extensive opening up, and tests, if found necessary, shall be conducted to the inspector’s satisfaction to ensure that conditions are satisfactory. Where a definite standard of subdivision has been approved, inspection shall be made to ensure that the watertight compartments and all arrangements and details connected with the subdivision are in order and that no changes affecting them have been made;
(b) alterations in approved subdivision arrangements and details, including watertight and non-watertight longitudinal bulkheads if fitted, appropriation of space below the bulkhead deck, and other alterations that have been made since the previous inspection shall be reported in detail; special attention shall be given to parts in the structure that are particularly subject to excessive deterioration from such causes as chafing, lying on the ground, or the handling of cargo;
(c) all side scuttles shall be examined, and where they are required to have special locking arrangements, the locking arrangements shall be tested and the inspector shall take such steps as are necessary to ensure that proper instructions with regard to these arrangements are posted in the chart room;

(d) in the case of a passenger ship,

(i) scupper and sanitary discharge valves and other appliances intended to prevent the accidental admission of water into the hull, except valves and cocks connected with the machinery, shall be inspected,

(ii) where the ship has a large number of scupper and sanitary discharge valves and cocks and examination of at least 25 per cent of those valves and cocks annually shows that they are generally in good condition, the opening up of the remainder is not necessary, but every valve and cock shall be opened for inspection

(A) at least once every four years, where the interval between underwater inspections is four years or less, or
(B) at least once every five years, where the interval between underwater inspections is five years, and

(iii) a record of the opening up and examination of such valves and cocks shall be kept on board the ship;

(e) in the case of non-passenger ships, scupper and sanitary discharge valves and any other appliances intended to prevent accidental admission of water into the hull shall be examined in place and shall be opened up for inspection

(i) at least once every four years where the interval between underwater inspection is not more than four years, or
(ii) at least once every five years where the interval between underwater inspection is five years;

(f) where rod and chain steering gear leads are fitted, the spares specified in section 14 shall be inspected;
(g) all watertight doors and other means for closing openings in the watertight subdivision shall be inspected and their condition and efficiency ascertained; the doors shall be tried by hand, and also by power, if operated by power;
(h) warning signals, hand gear indicators showing when doors are closed, and indicators at central closing stations shall be inspected and tested;
(i) hinged watertight doors shall be inspected and operated to ensure that lever-operated clips are in good order and that all joints are watertight;
(j) when a watertight door is removed for repairs it shall be hose-tested upon replacement, and, if practicable, shall be subjected to a hydraulic test;
(k) fire-resisting bulkheads and fire-resisting doors shall be inspected, and self-closing arrangements for fire-resisting doors shall be tested;
(l) hatchways with their closing and securing appliances, ventilators and other deck openings, casings and superstructure bulkheads with their closing appliances, windlass and anchor equipment, cargo and coaling doors, ash chutes and other openings in the shell plating, rudder, main and auxiliary steering gear shall be inspected;
(m) all parts of rod and chain steering gear shall be inspected; the chain in the vicinity of the blocks shall be cleaned to allow proper inspection, and where any chain is so worn that the diameter at any part is reduced to the size shown in Schedule IV, that part shall be renewed and the requirements of paragraph 24(x) complied with;
(n) the means for auxiliary steering shall be assembled, connected and tested;
(o) where cement is removed from the bottom, the condition of the bottom plating shall be determined by the inspector before new cement is laid;
(p) masts, spars and rigging shall be to the satisfaction of the inspector;
(q) annual renewal surveys for freeboard shall, whenever possible, be made at the time of the annual inspection; and
(r) in the case of wooden ships, parts of the ceiling shall be removed at the discretion of the inspector in order that the condition of the hull, timbers, floors, etc., particularly in the engine room, boiler room and coal bunkers, may be ascertained.

SOR/93-251, s. 2(F).

Quadrennial or Quinquennial Inspection of a Ship Not over Five Years Old

24 (1) At a quadrennial or quinquennial inspection of a ship not over five years old, the following requirements shall apply:

(a) all holds and peaks shall be cleared;
(b) in ships with a single bottom, limber boards and ceiling equal to not less than two strakes fore and aft on each side shall be removed, and one such strake shall be taken from the bilges; where the ceiling is fitted in hatches, the whole of the hatches and one strake of ceiling at the bilges shall be removed;
(c) in ships with a double bottom, a sufficient amount of ceiling shall be removed to enable the condition of the tank top to be ascertained and, if it is found that the plating is free from dirt and rust, the removal of the remainder of the ceiling may be dispensed with; all bilges and limbers fore and aft shall be cleaned;
(d) coal bunkers shall be cleared and ceiling removed as in the holds; in the case of Great Lakes ships, however, cleaning and ceiling removal shall be at the discretion of the inspector;
(e) all steel work shall be exposed and cleaned to the extent required by the inspector for a proper examination; special attention shall be given to ash chutes and shell plating in way of openings;
(f) in the case of a wooden ship, parts of the ceiling shall be removed at the discretion of the inspector in order that the condition of the hull, timbers, floors, etc., particularly in the engine room, boiler room and coal bunkers, may be ascertained;
(g) all scupper and sanitary discharge valves, excluding those connected to the machinery, not recorded as having been inspected since the first inspection, shall be opened up. All side scuttles shall be examined and, where required to have special locking arrangements, those locking arrangements shall be tested and the inspector shall take such steps as are necessary to ensure that proper instructions with regard to these arrangements are posted in the chart room;
(h) where signs of wastage are evident in any part of a ship’s structure, drilling may be required, and if any part is found to be defective, or if material is reduced in thickness, the defect shall be replaced by material equal in scantling and quality to that of the original construction;
(i) where the inner surface of the bottom plating is covered with cement or asphalt, the removal of the covering may be dispensed with when it is found, by heating or chipping, to be sound and adhering satisfactorily to the steel;
(j) double bottom tanks that are not used for the carriage of oil fuel shall be tested by a head of water to the light water line, but in no case less than 2.44 m above the inner bottom; in the case of Great Lakes cargo ships, the testing of tank tops may be waived at the discretion of the inspector, having regard to the voyages the ship makes;
(k) double bottom compartments used for the carriage of oil fuel shall be tested by a head of water or oil extending to the load water line, or by a head sufficient to give the maximum pressure that they may be required to bear at any time, whichever is the greater;
(l) where peak tanks or deep tanks for carrying water ballast are fitted, their watertightness shall be tested as prescribed in paragraph 7(1)(b);
(m) in the case of Great Lakes cargo ships, the testing of peak tanks or deep tanks may be waived if considered unnecessary by the inspector after inspection of the structure;
(n) all water ballast tanks shall be cleaned in order that their interior may be adequately inspected; special attention shall be given to tanks under boiler spaces;
(o) deep tanks constructed for carrying oil or oil and fresh water, but not used solely for that purpose, and peak tanks used for carrying oil fuel, shall be inspected and tested by a head of water or oil sufficient to give the maximum pressure that can be experienced in service, or 2.44 m, whichever is the greater;
(p) double bottom and deep tanks used exclusively for oil fuel or for oil fuel and fresh water, and oil fuel bunkers, need not be examined internally if after a general inspection and testing as required by paragraphs (k) or (o) their condition is found to be satisfactory;
(q) all watertight bulkheads, decks, tunnels and other subdivision arrangements shall be inspected to ascertain their condition, and if their watertightness has been impaired, any part found deficient shall be restored to its original condition;
(r) where a definite standard of subdivision has been approved, the watertight compartments and all arrangements and details connected with the subdivision shall be checked;
(s) all masts, spars and rigging shall be to the satisfaction of the inspector;
(t) anchors and other equipment shall be inspected; chain cables shall be ranged and inspected; where any length of chain cable is found to be reduced in diameter at any part to the extent indicated in Schedule IV, it shall be renewed; where renewal of anchors or cables is required, a certificate shall be produced to show that the replacement has been tested as prescribed by Schedule II, III or V; the interior of the chain locker shall be cleared and cleaned and the compartment inspected;
(u) hatch covers and supports, tarpaulins, cleats, battens, and other means of securing all hatches, shall be inspected;
(v) ventilator coamings and covers shall be inspected;
(w) the rudder, its means of support, and the pintles and gudgeons, shall be inspected, and, if considered necessary by the inspector for proper examination, the rudder shall be lifted;

(x) all steering gear leads shall be dismantled to permit of a detailed examination of all parts; where any length of chain is so worn that the diameter at any part is reduced to the size shown in Schedule IV, that part shall be renewed; all replacements of steering gear chain, or chain that has been repaired, shall be subjected to the proof and breaking tests specified in Schedule II or III; these tests shall be carried out by an authority approved by the Board and certificates of tests shall be furnished;

NOTE — 
A testing authority approved by a classification society will be acceptable to the Board. In a case where testing by such an authority is not possible full particulars shall be submitted to the Chairman.

(y) where rod and chain steering gear leads are fitted, the spares specified in section 14 shall be inspected;
(z) the main steering gear shall be tested;
(aa) the means for auxiliary steering shall be assembled, connected and tested;
(bb) sluice valves and protective casings around air and sounding pipes shall be opened to permit of inspection;
(cc) all watertight doors and other means for closing openings in watertight subdivisions shall be inspected and their condition and efficiency ascertained, the doors shall be tried by hand, and also by power, if operated by power;
(dd) warning signals, hand gear indicators showing when doors are closed, and indicators at central closing stations, shall be inspected and tested;
(ee) hinged watertight doors shall be inspected and operated to ensure that lever-operated clips are in good order and that all joints are watertight;
(ff) when a watertight door is removed for repairs it shall be hose-tested upon replacement, and if practicable, shall be subjected to a hydraulic test;
(gg) fire-resisting bulkheads and fire-resisting doors shall be inspected and self-closing arrangements for fire-resisting doors shall be tested;
(hh) striking plates under sounding pipes shall be examined, and renewed when necessary; and
(ii) where holds are insulated for the purpose of carrying refrigerated cargoes and the hull in way of the insulation was inspected when the insulation was fitted, it shall be sufficient to remove the limbers and hatches to expose the plating in way of these parts.

(2) Oil tankers are subject to the following additional requirements:

(a) the cargo tanks shall be cleaned and thoroughly cleared of gas;
(b) the strums of the cargo suction pipes shall be removed to facilitate inspection of the shell plating and bulkheads in their vicinity;
(c) each oil compartment and cofferdam, except in a case where the cofferdam between the engine room and the cargo tanks is used as a pump room, shall be tested by being filled with water to the top of the hatchway in the expansion trunk or cofferdam; provided that the tanks may be filled to the light water line when the ship is in dry dock and the remainder of the test carried out afloat; the centre line bulkhead need not be tested independently. Where a pump room forms the cofferdam between cargo tanks and the machinery space, the inspector shall be satisfied that the integrity of the engine room bulkhead is being maintained; and
(d) where extensive repairs have been made to the shell plating, the tanks shall be tested by being filled when the ship is in dry dock; where this is not practicable, particulars of any method proposed to be used in testing the tanks shall be submitted for the approval of the Board.

1987, c. 7, s. 84(F);
SOR/93-251, s. 2(F).



Quadrennial or Quinquennial Inspection of a Ship over Five Years Old but Not over 10 Years Old

25 At a quadrennial or quinquennial inspection of a ship over five years old but not over 10 years old, in addition to the requirements of section 24, the following requirements shall apply:

(a) additional ceiling in holds and coal bunkers shall be removed to enable the condition of the inner bottom plating, pillar feet and the bottom plating of bulkheads and tunnel sides to be examined; if considered necessary by the inspector, all of the ceiling shall be removed; removal of additional ceiling and of fastenings, at the discretion of the inspector, shall apply also in the case of wooden ships;
(b) in ships with a single bottom, one additional strake of the limber boards and ceiling all the way fore and aft on each side shall be removed;

(c) all tanks that are used exclusively for oil fuel or oil fuel and fresh water, and all cofferdams adjacent to such tanks, shall be thoroughly cleaned, gas-freed and examined internally, except that

(i) in the case of double bottom tanks used exclusively for oil fuel or oil fuel and fresh water, where the foremost such tank has been thoroughly cleaned, gas-freed, inspected internally and found satisfactory to the inspector, the cleaning, gas-freeing and internal examination of the other double bottom tanks used for such purpose shall not be necessary where, upon a general external examination, the inspector finds their condition to be satisfactory, and
(ii) in the case of tanks used exclusively for oil fuel or oil fuel and fresh water, other than double bottom and peak tanks, the cleaning, gas-freeing and internal examination of those tanks shall not be necessary where, upon external examination, the inspector finds their condition to be satisfactory;

(d) lubricating oil tanks need not be examined internally where, upon external examination, the inspector finds their condition to be satisfactory;
(e) plating in way of the side scuttles shall be exposed for examination.

SOR/93-251, s. 2.

Quadrennial or Quinquennial Inspection of a Ship over 10 Years Old but Not over 24 Years Old

26 At a quadrennial or quinquennial inspection of a ship over 10 years old but not over 24 years old, in addition to the requirements of sections 24 and 25, the following requirements shall apply:

(a) all steel work shall be cleaned and the rust removed, to the extent required by the inspector for a proper examination;
(b) casings of pipes, spar ceiling and lining in way of the side scuttles shall be removed as required by the inspector;
(c) all the ceiling in the bunkers shall be removed for examination of the steel work; portions of the ceiling in the holds shall be removed to establish the condition of the steel work, and unless found free from rust and in good condition all of the ceiling shall be removed;
(d) a thorough examination shall be made of the structure inside coal bunkers, beneath ship’s side discharges, in way of boilers, steam pumps, watertight doors in machinery spaces, and in any locality where there is leakage from pipes and machinery or where continuous condensation occurs;

(e) subject to paragraph (f), all tanks that are used exclusively for oil fuel, oil fuel and fresh water or lubricating oil, and all cofferdams adjacent to such tanks, shall be thoroughly cleaned, gas-freed and examined internally, except that

(i) in the case of a ship not more than 15 years old, its tanks, other than peak tanks, that are used exclusively for oil fuel, oil fuel and fresh water or lubricating oil need not all be examined internally if, after a general inspection and testing and after an internal examination of one double bottom tank forward, one double bottom tank aft and one deep tank, the inspector finds their condition to be satisfactory, and
(ii) in the case of a ship more than 15 but not more than 20 years old, only one oil fuel double bottom tank amidships, one forward and one aft, and one deep tank need be examined internally, and such tanks should be selected so that as many different tanks as possible are examined internally before the ship is 20 years old;

(f) in the case of a ship referred to in subsection 18(2) where the interval between periodical inspections is five years, oil fuel bunkers shall be gas-freed, thoroughly cleaned and examined internally when the ship is 15 years old, except that where, upon external examination, an inspector finds the condition of the bunkers to be satisfactory, the gas-freeing, cleaning and internal examination is not necessary;
(g) in the case of a ship 20 years old and over making foreign voyages, home-trade voyages, Class I, home-trade voyages, Class II or home-trade voyages, Class III, other than an inland non-passenger steamship making extended home-trade voyages within the Gulf of St. Lawrence, all tanks shall be examined internally at each quadrennial inspection;
(h) in the case of wooden ships, the requirements for boring, fastening and removal of ceiling, as specified for previous quadrennial inspection, shall be augmented to the extent considered necessary by the inspector; hull sheathing shall be removed as considered necessary to facilitate complete examination of the hull;
(i) portions of the cement chocks at the ship’s sides shall be removed to permit examination of adjacent steel work;
(j) where the holds are insulated for the purpose of carrying refrigerated cargo and the hull in way of the insulation was inspected when the insulation was fitted, enough insulation shall be removed from each of the chambers, and the framing and plating exposed so that their condition may be ascertained; and
(k) all mast and bowsprit wedging shall be removed; where the plating is doubled in way of the wedging, the wedging only need be removed.

Quadrennial or Quinquennial Inspection of a Ship over 24 Years Old

27 (1) Where the interval between periodical inspections of a ship is four years, it shall be inspected

(a) in accordance with the requirements of sections 24, 25 and 26, at each quadrennial inspection; and

(b) in accordance with the requirements of subsection (3),

(i) at the first quadrennial inspection after the ship is 24 years old, and
(ii) every 12 years after the inspection referred to in subparagraph (i).

(2) Where the interval between periodical inspections of a ship referred to in subsection 18(2) is five years,

(a) it shall be inspected

(i) in accordance with the requirements of sections 24, 25 and 26 at each quinquennial inspection until the ship is 40 years old, and at every quadrennial inspection thereafter, and

(ii) in accordance with the requirements of subsection (3),

(A) at the first quinquennial inspection after the ship is 24 years old,
(B) at the first quadrennial or quinquennial inspection 15 years after the inspection referred to in clause (A), and
(C) every 12 years after the inspection referred to in clause (B); and

(b) the oil fuel bunkers shall be gas-freed, thoroughly cleaned and examined internally at the first quinquennial inspection after the ship is 24 years old, after the next 10 years, after the next nine years, and every eight years thereafter, except that where, upon external examination, the inspector finds the condition of the bunkers to be satisfactory, the gas-freeing, cleaning and internal examination is not necessary.

(3) At the inspection referred to in paragraph (1)(b) and subparagraph (2)(a)(ii), the following requirements apply:

(a) subject to paragraph (b), the shell plating of a ship shall be drilled at such parts as may be considered necessary to ascertain its thickness and for this purpose the following requirements apply:

(i) the number of holes drilled on each side of the ship shall in no case be less than three in each strake of plating not covered with cement,
(ii) the holes shall be drilled about amidships and in the vicinity of the peak bulkheads,
(iii) all paint and rust shall be removed from the area of the plating surrounding the holes before the thickness of the plating is gauged,
(iv) the thickness of the plating at all holes drilled shall be recorded by the inspector, and
(v) the plating covered with cement in the bottom of a ship need not be drilled if, in the opinion of the inspector, the cement is adhering to the plating and it is unnecessary to drill at that place;

(b) in the case of a Great Lakes ship, the inspector shall satisfy himself that the condition of the shell plating is satisfactory and in so doing he shall

(i) give special attention to those parts of the ship that are subject to damage in canals and locks and to all parts of the ship that are particularly subject to excessive corrosion or wear and tear, and
(ii) ascertain the thickness of the shell plating by drilling holes in such places as he deems necessary;

(c) where the holds of a ship are insulated for the purpose of carrying refrigerated cargo, and the hull covered by insulation was inspected when the insulation was fitted, insulation additional to that removed pursuant to paragraph 26(j) shall be removed in each of the chambers in order to allow the condition of the framing and plating to be ascertained and the shell plating drilled as prescribed in paragraph (a); and
(d) all mast and bowsprit wedging of a ship shall be removed whether the plating in way is doubled or not.

SOR/93-251, s. 2.

Inspection of Equipment

28 Inspection of the statutory equipment required to be carried in a ship shall be as follows:

(1) Lifeboats:

(a) all lifeboats shall be swung out and lowered into the water at every inspection except that in exceptional circumstances lowering of the lifeboats may be waived at the discretion of the inspector who shall, however, satisfy himself regarding the length and condition of all lifeboats, falls and lifelines;
(b) lifeboats shall be inspected with all moveable equipment removed;
(c) all lifeboat equipment shall be inspected, checked and properly re-stored;
(d) all lifeboat markings shall be checked;
(e) new lifeboat installations shall be tested with the full equipment and distributed weights representing the complement required to be on board at the time of launching, plus 10 per cent of the complement weight (the weight of an adult shall be taken as 75 kg); and
(f) all air cases, or approved portable substitutes therefor, shall be removed from lifeboats for complete inspection and testing at intervals not exceeding four years; where the approved substitute for air cases forms an integral part of the lifeboat, the inspector shall take drillings as he considers necessary to determine the condition of the substitute material.

(2) Life rafts:

(a) life rafts, their equipment and stowage arrangements shall be inspected and the means provided for placing them in the water shall be tested;
(b) all life raft markings shall be checked; and
(c) all air cases, or approved portable substitutes therefor, shall be removed for complete inspection and testing at intervals not exceeding four years; where the approved substitute for air cases forms an integral part of the life raft the inspector shall take drillings as he considers necessary to determine the condition of the substitute material.

(3) Buoyant apparatus:

(a) buoyant apparatus shall be inspected;
(b) all buoyant apparatus markings shall be checked; and
(c) all air cases, or approved substitutes therefor, shall be removed for complete inspection and testing at intervals not exceeding four years; where the approved substitute for air cases forms an integral part of the buoyancy unit, the inspector shall take drillings as he considers necessary to determine the condition of the substitute material.

(4) Where repairs to a lifeboat, life raft or buoyant apparatus are necessary, they shall be made before a certificate is issued.
(5) Lifejackets, lifebuoys with their lights and lines, and line-throwing appliances shall be inspected; the means provided for stowage shall be satisfactory to the inspector.

(6) Fire-fighting equipment:

(a) all fire extinguishers shall be inspected, and the spare charges checked;
(b) fire-detecting and sprinkler systems shall be inspected and tested; and
(c) fire hose, fire buckets, fire axes and safety appliances shall be inspected.

(7) Smoke helmets, breathing apparatus and safety lamps shall be inspected; the harness shall be examined and the hose and lifelines stretched; the apparatus and safety lamps shall be tested.
(8) General alarm bells and klaxons shall be inspected and tested.
(9) Navigation instruments, boat’s distress signals, and all equipment essential to the safe navigation of the ship shall be checked and inspected.
(10) [Revoked, SOR/93-251, s. 2]

1987, c. 7, s. 84(F);
SOR/93-251, s. 2.

SCHEDULE I(s. 21)Intervals Between Underwater Inspections

1 (1) Subject to subsections (3) to (6), the interval between the underwater inspections of the hull and appendages of a ship shall,

(a) in the case of a passenger steamship

(i) engaged in voyages of a class set out in Column I of an item of Table I,
(ii) having a gross tonnage and carrying a number of passengers set out in Column II of that item, and
(iii) spending an annual period in fresh water set out in Column III of that item,

be that set out in Column IV of that item; and

(b) in the case of a steamship that is not carrying passengers and

(i) that is engaged in voyages of a class and is of an age set out in Column I of an item of Table II,
(ii) that has a gross tonnage set out in Column II of that item, and
(iii) that spends an annual period in fresh water set out in Column III of that item,

be that set out in Column IV of that item.

(2) For the purpose of this Schedule, the St. Lawrence River, west of the eastern end of the Ile d’Orleans, is deemed to be fresh water.

(3) The interval between underwater inspections of a passenger steamship that operates in heavy ice conditions shall be

(a) two years for such a ship making minor waters voyages, Class II on inland waters; or
(b) one year for such a ship making voyages other than voyages described in paragraph (a).

(4) In the case of barge, scow or like vessel carrying passengers that is towed or operated on a cable, the interval between underwater inspections of the hull and appendages shall be four years, except that where such a ship operates in heavy ice conditions the interval between underwater inspections shall be two years.

(5) The interval between underwater inspections of the hull and appendages of an inland non-passenger steamship not over 40 years old that is over 150 tons gross tonnage, constructed of steel and

(a) certificated for inland voyages, where the inspection certificate is endorsed for extended voyages within the Gulf of St. Lawrence, or
(b) certificated for home-trade voyages, Class II, that are Safety Convention voyages between Canadian and United States ports within the limits of inland waters and ports within the Gulf of St. Lawrence outside the limits of inland waters,

shall be five years where such steamship is in fresh water for a period of at least three consecutive months annually.

(6) In the case of a Safety Convention ship carrying more than 12 passengers or a nuclear ship, the interval between underwater inspections shall not be more than one year.
TABLE I
Passenger Steamships

Column I
Column II
Column III
Column IV

Item
Class of Voyage
Gross Tonnage and Number of Passengers
Annual Period in Fresh Water
Inspection Interval

1
Foreign and home-trade Class I
Over 5 tons, 1 or more passengers

2 years

2
Home-trade Class II and home-trade Class III
Over 5 tons, 1 or more passengers
(a) less than 3 consecutive months
(a) 2 years

(b) 3 consecutive months or more
(b) 4 years

3
Inland, minor waters and home-trade Class IV
Over 5 tons, 1 or more passengers
(a) less than 3 consecutive months
(a) 4 years

(b) 3 consecutive months or more
(b) 5 years

4
All Classes
Not over 5 tons, more than 12 passengers
(a) less than 3 consecutive months
(a) 4 years

(b) 3 consecutive months or more
(b) 5 years

TABLE II
Steamships Not Carrying Passengers

Column I
Column II
Column III
Column IV

Item
Class of Voyage and Age of Ship
Gross Tonnage
Annual Period in Fresh Water
Inspection Interval

1
Foreign and home-trade Class I, any age
Over 150 tons

2 years

2
Home-trade Class II and home-trade Class III, any age
Over 150 tons
(a) less than 3 consecutive months
(a) 2 years

(b) 3 consecutive months or more
(b) 4 years

3
Inland, minor waters and home-trade Class IV, under 40 years old
Over 150 tons
(a) less than 3 consecutive months
(a) 4 years

(b) 3 consecutive months or more
(b) 5 years

4
Inland, minor and home-trade Class IV, over 40 years old
Over 150 tons

4 years

5
All Classes
Over 15 tons but not over 150 tons

4 years

TABLE III
Towed Barges Carrying a Crew and Making Voyages More Than 15 Nautical Miles from Land

Column I
Column II
Column III
Column IV

Class of Voyage
Gross Tonnage
Minimum Annual Period in Fresh Water
Inspection Interval

1
Foreign and home-trade Class I
(a) Over 150 tons
(a) No minimum
(a) 2 years

(b) Over 15 tons, but not over 150 tons
(b) No minimum
(b) 4 years

2
Home-trade Class II and home-trade Class III
(a) Over 150 tons
(a) (i) No minimum
(a) (i) 2 years

(ii) 3 consecutive months
(ii) 4 years

(b) Over 15 tons, but not over 150 tons
(b) No minimum
(b) 4 years

3
Inland and minor waters
Over 15 tons
No minimum
5 years

TABLE IV
Towed Dredges Carrying a Crew and Making Voyages More Than 15 Nautical Miles from Land

Column I
Column II
Column III
Column IV

Class of Voyage
Gross Tonnage
Minimum Annual Period in Fresh Water
Inspection Interval

1
Foreign and home-trade Class I
Over 150 tons
No minimum
2 years

2
Home-trade Class II and home-trade Class III
Over 150 tons
(a) No minimum
(a) 2 years

(b) 3 consecutive months
(b) 4 years

3
Inland and minor waters
Over 150 tons
(a) No minimum
(a) 4 years

(b) 3 consecutive months
(b) 5 years

4
All Classes
Over 15 tons, but not over 150 tons
No minimum
4 years

1987, c. 7, s. 84(F);
SOR/93-251, s. 2.

SCHEDULE II(s. 24)Chain Cables, Stream Chains and Steering Chains

WROUGHT IRON SHORT LINK CHAIN CABLES

Minimum size
Proof test
Breaking test
Minimum weight per metre

millimetres
kilonewtons
kilonewtons
kilograms

11
22.5
45
3.7

13
30
60
4.6

14
37
74
5.6

16
46
92
6.5

17
56
112
7.4

19
67
135
8.8

21
79
157
10.2

22
91
182
11.8

24
105
209
13.4

25
120
239
15.3

27
135
269
17.1

29
151
301
19.2

30
168
337
21.5

32
187
374
23.8

33
206
411
26.2

35
226
450
28.7

37
247
493
31.5

38
269
538
34.0

40
292
583
36.8

41
315
630
39.8

43
340
680
42.8

44
366
732
46.3

46
393
785
49.8

48
420
840
53.5

49
448
897
57.2

51
478
957
61.1

SCHEDULE III(s. 24)Chain Cables, Stream Chains and Steering Chains

STUD LINK CHAIN CABLES

Minimum size
Cables of wrought iron
Cables of special steel
Minimum weight per metre

Proof test
Breaking test
Proof test
Breaking test

millimetres
kilonewtons
kilonewtons
kilonewtons
kilonewtons
kilograms

11
34
51
48
71
3.2

13
45
67
63
95
3.9

14
56
84
79
118
4.9

16
70
105
98
147
6.0

17
85
127
119
178
6.7

19
101
151
142
211
8.1

21
119
177
165
248
9.5

22
137
206
192
288
10.9

24
157
236
220
331
12.5

25
179
269
251
377
14.1

27
202
303
283
425
16.0

29
227
340
318
476
18.0

30
253
379
358
530
20.1

32
281
420
393
588
22.2

33
309
463
432
649
24.5

35
339
508
474
711
26.9

37
370
555
518
776
29.4

38
404
585
565
819
32.0

40
437
612
612
857
34.7

41
473
663
663
928
37.0

43
511
715
715
1001
39.8

44
550
769
769
1076
42.8

46
589
825
825
1155
46.1

48
630
882
882
1235
49.3

49
673
942
942
1318
52.6

51
717
1004
1004
1406
55.6

52
762
1067
1067
1494
59.0

54
810
1133
1133
1587
62.5

56
858
1201
1201
1681
66.4

57
908
1270
1270
1779
70.1

59
959
1343
1343
1881
74.1

60
1011
1416
1416
1982
78.3

62
1065
1491
1491
2088
82.4

64
1121
1569
1569
2197
87.0

65
1163
1628
1628
2279
91.7

67
1205
1686
1686
2362
96.3

68
1247
1745
1745
2443
100.9

70
1288
1804
1804
2525
105.8

71
1329
1861
1861
2606
110.9

73
1371
1920
1920
2687
116.0

75
1412
1977
1977
2767
121.3

76
1453
2034
2034
2847
126.6

78
1493
2090
2090
2925
132.0

79
1532
2145
2145
3003
137.5

81
1571
2200
2200
3080
143.3

83
1610
2254
2254
3156
148.9

84
1648
2307
2307
3229
154.9

86
1685
2359
2359
3303
160.9

87
1721
2409
2409
3373
166.9

89
1758
2460
2460
3445
173.2

90
1793
2509
2509
3512
179.2

92
1826
2556
2556
3577
185.2

94
1858
2602
2602
3642
191.5

95
1891
2647
2647
3707
197.5

97
1922
2690
2690
3766
203.5

98
1952
2733
2733
3826
209.7

SCHEDULE IV(ss. 23 and 24)Renewal of Steering Chains and Chain Cables when Worn

When any length of a chain is so worn that the mean diameter at its most worn part is reduced to the size given in the following Table it is to be renewed

Original Diameter
Mean Diameter requiring renewal

millimetres
millimetres

10
9

11
10

13
11.5

14
12.5

16
14.5

17
15.5

19
16.5

21
18.5

22
19.5

24
21.5

25
23

27
24

29
25.5

30
27

32
29

33
30

35
31

37
33

38
34

40
36

41
37

43
38

44
39

46
41

48
43

49
44

51
45

52
47

54
48

56
50

57
51

59
53

60
54

62
56

64
57

65
58

67
60

68
61

70
63

71
64

73
65

75
67

76
68

78
70

79
71

81
73

83
75

84
75

86
77

87
78

89
80

90
81

92
83

94
84

95
85

97
87

98
88

SCHEDULE V(s. 24)

PROOF TESTS FOR ANCHORS

Weight
Test

kilograms
kilonewtons

50
33.5

100
44

150
54

200
63

250
72.5

300
81

350
91

400
99.5

450
109.5

500
118

550
126.5

600
136.5

650
144.5

700
153.5

750
162

800
170.5

850
179

900
186.5

950
195

1000
203.5

1050
212.5

1100
220

1150
227

1200
234.5

1250
243

1300
251.5

1350
259

1400
266.5

1450
273.5

1500
281

1550
288.5

1600
296

1650
303

1700
310.5

1750
318

1800
325

1850
331

1900
338.5

1950
344.5

2000
350.5

2050
358

2100
364.5

2150
371.5

2200
379

2250
385

2300
391.5

2350
397

2400
403.5

2450
409.5

2500
416

2550
421

2600
428

2650
434

2700
439

2750
445

2800
451

2850
457.5

2900
463.5

2950
468.5

3000
474.5

3050
479.5

3100
485.5

3150
490.5

3200
495.5

3250
500

3300
505

3350
511.5

3400
516.5

3450
522

3500
527

3550
532

3600
537

3650
542

3700
546.5

3750
551.5

3800
556.5

3850
561.5

3900
565.5

3950
570.5

4000
573.5

4050
578.5

4100
583.5

4150
588.5

4200
593.5

4250
598

4300
603

4350
607

4400
610.5

4450
615.5

4500
620.5

4550
624

4600
627.5

4650
632.5

4700
637.5

4750
641.5

4800
645

4850
648.5

4900
652

4950
656

5000
659.5

5050
663.5

5100
667

5150
671

5200
674

5250
678

5300
681.5

5350
685.5

5400
689

5450
693

5500
696.5

5550
700

5600
703.5

5650
707.5

5700
711

5750
715

5800
718.5

5850
722.5

5900
725.5

5950
729.5

6000
733

6050
736.5

6100
739.5

6150
742.5

6200
745.5

6250
749

6300
751.5

6350
754.5

6400
757.5

6450
761

6500
764

7000
794.5

7500
825.5

8000
851

8500
875.5

9000
890

9500
924.5

10000
949

The weight given in the above table is either for stockless anchors or for stocked anchors without the stock.
For intermediate weights the test may be obtained by interpolation.

SCHEDULE VI(s. 5)Submission of Plans

1 In the case of ships 18.3 m in length and over that are to be certificated to carry more than 12 passengers

(a) the following plans shall be submitted to the Board:

(i) general arrangement,
(ii) midship section,
(iii) longitudinal section and deck plans,
(iv) subdivision details and data,
(v) W.T. and O.T. bulkheads,
(vi) sea chests,
(vii) boat arrangement,
(viii) natural and mechanical ventilation,
(ix) sprinkler system,
(x) fire-resisting bulkheads,
(xi) lifeboats, life rafts and buoyant apparatus,
(xii) scuppers and discharges, and
(xiii) aluminum superstructures; and

(b) the following plans shall be submitted to the Divisional Supervisor, who may approve them for the Board or forward them to the Board for approval:

(i) rudder,
(ii) stem, sternpost or sternframe,
(iii) pillars and girders,
(iv) shell expansion,
(v) engine and boiler seatings,
(vi) shaft brackets and bossing,
(vii) schemes of riveting and welding,
(viii) list of fastenings in the case of wooden ships, and
(ix) fresh and salt water systems.

2 In the case of

(a) ships 30.5 m in length and over that are to be certificated to carry not more than 12 passengers; and

(b) ships 30.5 m in length and over that will not be certificated to carry passengers,

(i) the following plans shall be submitted to the Board:

(A) general arrangement,
(B) midship section,
(C) longitudinal section and deck plans,
(D) subdivision details and data (if required by owner),
(E) sprinkler system, if required by owner,
(F) fire-resisting bulkheads, if required by owner,
(G) lifeboats, life rafts and buoyant apparatus, and
(H) aluminum superstructures, and

(ii) the following plans shall be submitted to the Divisional Supervisor, who may approve them for the Board or forward them to the Board for approval:

(A) rudder,
(B) stem, sternpost or sternframe,
(C) pillars and girders,
(D) shell expansion,
(E) W.T. and O.T. bulkheads,
(F) engine and boiler seatings,
(G) shaft brackets and bossing,
(H) schemes of riveting and welding,
(I) list of fastenings in the case of wooden ships,
(J) sea chests,
(K) boat arrangement,
(L) natural and mechanical ventilation,
(M) fresh and salt water systems, and
(N) scuppers and discharges.

3 In the case of

(a) ships under 18.3 m in length that are to be certificated to carry more than 12 passengers,
(b) ships under 30.5 m in length that are to be certificated to carry not more than 12 passengers, and
(c) ships under 30.5 m in length that will not be certificated to carry passengers,

the following plans shall be submitted to the Divisional Supervisor, who may approve them for the Board or forward them to the Board for approval:

(d) general arrangement;
(e) midship section;
(f) longitudinal section and deck plan;
(g) rudder; and
(h) such other plans as the Divisional Supervisor considers necessary.